National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for weapons complex quality

  1. Quality by design in the nuclear weapons complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikle, D.N.

    1988-04-01

    Modern statistical quality control has evolved beyond the point at which control charts and sampling plans are sufficient to maintain a competitive position. The work of Genichi Taguchi in the early 1970's has inspired a renewed interest in the application of statistical methods of experimental design at the beginning of the manufacturing cycle. While there has been considerable debate over the merits of some of Taguchi's statistical methods, there is increasing agreement that his emphasis on cost and variance reduction is sound. The key point is that manufacturing processes can be optimized in development before they get to production by identifying a region in the process parameter space in which the variance of the process is minimized. Therefore, for performance characteristics having a convex loss function, total product cost is minimized without substantially increasing the cost of production. Numerous examples of the use of this approach in the United States and elsewhere are available in the literature. At the Rocky Flats Plant, where there are severe constraints on the resources available for development, a systematic development strategy has been developed to make efficient use of those resources to statistically characterize critical production processes before they are introduced into production. This strategy includes the sequential application of fractional factorial and response surface designs to model the features of critical processes as functions of both process parameters and production conditions. This strategy forms the basis for a comprehensive quality improvement program that emphasizes prevention of defects throughout the product cycle. It is currently being implemented on weapons programs in development at Rocky Flats and is in the process of being applied at other production facilities in the DOE weapons complex. 63 refs.

  2. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  3. Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-06-08

    The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Supersedes DOE O 5600.1.

  4. DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives "DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship" FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY...

  5. FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  6. Physical protection technologies for the reconfigured weapons complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, C.D.

    1994-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was a memtier of the Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Safeguards and Security (S&S) team providing assistance to the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Weapons Complex Reconfigaration. New and improved S&S concepts, approaches and technologies were needed to support both new and upgraded facilities. Physical protection technologies used in these facilities were to use proven state-of-the-art systems in such areas as image processing, alarm communications and display, entry control, contraband detection, intrusion detection and video assessment, access delay, automation and robotics, and various insider protection systems. Factors considered in the selection of these technologies were protection against the design basis threat, reducing S&S life-cycle costs, automation of S&S functions to minimize operational costs, access to critical assets and exposure of people to hazardous environments, increasing the amount of delay to an outsider adversary and having reliable and maintainable systems. This paper will discuss the S&S issues, requirements, technology opportunities and needs. Physical protection technologies and systems considered in the design effort of the Weapons Complex Reconfiguration facilities will be reviewed.

  7. Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan. Remediating the nuclear weapons complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    With the end of the cold war, the US has a reduced need for nuclear weapons production. In response, the Department of Energy has redirected resources from weapons production to weapons dismantlement and environmental remediation. To this end, in November 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (renamed the Office of Environmental Management in 1994). It was created to bring under a central authority the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes at DOE sites and inactive or shut down facilities. The Environmental Restoration Program, a major component of DOE`s Environmental Management Program, is responsible for the remediation and management of contaminated environmental media (e.g., soil, groundwater, sediments) and the decommissioning of facilities and structures at 130 sites in over 30 states and territories.

  8. FAQS Reference Guide - Weapon Quality Assurance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order 13514ConstructionWeaponTraining FAQS Reference

  9. Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons - December Commission meeting

  10. The Need for a Strong Science and Technology Program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garaizar, X

    2010-01-06

    In this paper I argue for the need for a strong Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex as the basis for maintaining a credible deterrence capability. The current Nuclear Posture Review establishes a New Triad as the basis for the United States deterrence strategy in a changing security environment. A predictive science capability is at the core of a credible National Nuclear Weapons program in the 21st Century. In absence of nuclear testing, the certification of our current Nuclear Weapons relies on predictive simulations and quantification of the associated simulation uncertainties. In addition, a robust nuclear infrastructure needs an active research and development program that considers all the required nuclear scenarios, including new configurations for which there is no nuclear test data. This paper also considers alternative positions to the need for a Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons complex.

  11. The meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance and quality assurance programs at a former nuclear weapons facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    The purposes of the meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance, and quality assurance programs at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), are to (1) support Emergency Preparedness (EP) programs at the Site in assessing the transport, dispersion, and deposition of effluents actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by Site operations; and (2) provide information for onsite and offsite projects concerned with the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, and remediation activities. The risk from the Site includes chemical and radioactive emissions historically related to nuclear weapons component production activities that are currently associated with storage of large quantities of radionuclides (plutonium) and radioactive waste forms. The meteorological monitoring program provides information for site-specific weather forecasting, which supports Site operations, employee safety, and Emergency Preparedness operations.

  12. Applying Agile MethodstoWeapon/Weapon-Related Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D; Armendariz, M; Blackledge, M; Campbell, F; Cloninger, M; Cox, L; Davis, J; Elliott, M; Granger, K; Hans, S; Kuhn, C; Lackner, M; Loo, P; Matthews, S; Morrell, K; Owens, C; Peercy, D; Pope, G; Quirk, R; Schilling, D; Stewart, A; Tran, A; Ward, R; Williamson, M

    2007-05-02

    This white paper provides information and guidance to the Department of Energy (DOE) sites on Agile software development methods and the impact of their application on weapon/weapon-related software development. The purpose of this white paper is to provide an overview of Agile methods, examine the accepted interpretations/uses/practices of these methodologies, and discuss the applicability of Agile methods with respect to Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) Technical Business Practices (TBPs). It also provides recommendations on the application of Agile methods to the development of weapon/weapon-related software.

  13. Quality at Y-12, part 3 -- Or: Quality goes beyond nuclear weapons (title as it appeared in The Oak Ridger)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProteinTotal naturalQPXDirectives,QualityQualityQualityat

  14. Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition NNSS Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Arnold

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked the WDD working group to disposition the large inventory of legacy classified weapon components scattered across the complex.

  15. LANSCE Weapons Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 LANSCE Weapons Physics Fortune 500 companies and weapons designers alike rely on our internationally recognized nuclear physics and materials science expertise as well as our...

  16. Quality assurance and reliability sub-committee W88-0/Mk5 weapon assessment NSA lab test results (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Earl M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-29

    The purpose of this report is to gather appropriate level of relevant stockpile surveillance data to assess trends in the NEP quality, reliability, performance, and safety over the life of the system. The objectives are to gather relevant stockpile data to assess NEP quality and trends and to develop metrics to assess the suitability of the surveillance sampling regime to meet assessment process requirements.

  17. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  18. Quality at Y-12, part 2Or: Looking at Y-12 weapons quality (title as it appeared in The Oak Ridger)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProteinTotal naturalQPXDirectives,QualityQualityQuality

  19. NNSA Administrator Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  20. Weapons Quality Assurance Qualification Standard

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE. regulators consumerWaste1 Conference,We Want It

  1. Identification of nuclear weapons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.

    1987-04-10

    A method and apparatus for non-invasively indentifying different types of nuclear weapons is disclosed. A neutron generator is placed against the weapon to generate a stream of neutrons causing fissioning within the weapon. A first detects the generation of the neutrons and produces a signal indicative thereof. A second particle detector located on the opposite side of the weapon detects the fission particles and produces signals indicative thereof. The signals are converted into a detected pattern and a computer compares the detected pattern with known patterns of weapons and indicates which known weapon has a substantially similar pattern. Either a time distribution pattern or noise analysis pattern, or both, is used. Gamma-neutron discrimination and a third particle detector for fission particles adjacent the second particle detector are preferably used. The neutrons are generated by either a decay neutron source or a pulled neutron particle accelerator.

  2. Reconversion of nuclear weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapitza, Sergei P

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

  3. Paradigms of Development and Employment of Weapon Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Daniel M.

    2008-10-23

    Weapons procurement decisions are extremely complex, with an unmanageable quantity of variables to take into account. The human brain, unable to process such a complex problem in a strictly rational way, seeks mechanisms ...

  4. Virtual nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

  5. Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poling, J.

    2012-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

  6. Neutrino Counter Nuclear Weapon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Radiations produced by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation at the Z0 pole can be used to heat up the primary stage of a thermonuclear warhead and can in principle detonate the device remotely. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can also be used as a tactical assault weapon to target hideouts that are unreachable by conventional means.

  7. Neutrino Counter Nuclear Weapon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfred Tang

    2013-06-25

    Radiations produced by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation at the Z0 pole can be used to heat up the primary stage of a thermonuclear warhead and can in principle detonate the device remotely. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can also be used as a tactical assault weapon to target hideouts that are unreachable by conventional means.

  8. US weapons secrets revealed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, R.S.; Arkin, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    Extraordinary details have only recently been revealed about the struggle over the control of early U.S. nuclear weapons and their initial deployments abroad. The information comes from a newly declassified top secret report, part of a larger study, The History of the Strategic Arms Competition, 1945-1972, commissioned by Defense Secretary James R. Schlisinger in summer 1974.

  9. Nuclear weapon detection categorization analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This statement of work is for the Proof of Concept for nuclear weapon categories utility in Arms control. The focus of the project will be to collect, analyze and correlate Intrinsic Radiation (INRAD) calculation results for the purpose of defining measurable signatures that differentiate categories of nuclear weapons. The project will support START III negotiations by identifying categories of nuclear weapons. The categories could be used to clarify sub-limits on the total number of nuclear weapons.

  10. System theoretic approach for determining causal factors of quality loss in complex system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goerges, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the factors that could lead to the loss of quality is difficult for large, complex systems. Traditional design methods such as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), and Robust ...

  11. Nuclear Weapons Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNewsusceptometer under pressureNavy TurnsNuclear Weapons Journal

  12. Sandia's Nuclear Weapons Mission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque AlbuquerqueCybernetics:DefenseNuclear Weapons Mission Ensuring

  13. The US nuclear weapon infrastructure and a stable global nuclear weapon regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Immele, John D; Wagner, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    US nuclear weapons capabilities -- extant force structure and nuclear weapons infrastructure as well as declared policy -- influence other nations' nuclear weapons postures, at least to some extent. This influence can be desirable or undesirable, and is, of course, a mixture of both. How strong the influence is, and its nature, are complicated, controversial, and -- in our view -- not well understood but often overstated. Divergent views about this influence and how it might shape the future global nuclear weapons regime seem to us to be the most serious impediment to reaching a national consensus on US weapons policy, force structure and supporting infrastructure. We believe that a paradigm shift to capability-based deterrence and dissuasion is not only consistent with the realities of the world and how it has changed, but also a desirable way for nuclear weapon postures and infrastructures to evolve. The US and other nuclear states could not get to zero nor even reduce nuclear arms and the nuclear profile much further without learning to manage latent capability. This paper has defined three principles for designing NW infrastructure both at the 'next plateau' and 'near zero.' The US can be a leader in reducing weapons and infrastructure and in creating an international regime in which capability gradually substitutes for weapons in being and is transparent. The current 'strategy' of not having policy or a Congressionally-approved plan for transforming the weapons complex is not leadership. If we can conform the US infrastructure to the next plateau and architect it in such a way that it is aligned with further arms reductions, it will have these benefits: The extant stockpile can be reduced in size, while the smaller stockpile still deters attack on the US and Allies. The capabilities of the infrastructure will dissuade emergence of new challenges/threats; if they emerge, nevertheless, the US will be able to deal with them in time. We will begin to transform the way other major powers view their nuclear capability. Finally, and though of less cosmic importance, it will save money in the long run.

  14. Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons National Security Science Latest Issue:December 2014 All Issues submit Debunking six big myths about nuclear weapons Are nuclear...

  15. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C

    2012-08-14

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  16. Weapons production | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page

  17. Measures to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanzman, E.; Kellman, B.

    1999-11-05

    This seminar is another excellent opportunity for those involved in preventing chemical weapons production and use to learn from each other about how the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) can become a foundation of arms control in Africa and around the world. The author is grateful to the staff of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) for inviting him to address this distinguished seminar. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors alone, and do not represent the position of the government of the US nor or of any other institution. In 1993, as the process of CWC ratification was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the treaty with national law would cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States Parties in how the Convention would be carried out. As a result the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention was prepared and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Manual was reviewed by the Committee of Legal Experts on National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Mica. In February 1998, the second edition of the Manual was published in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The second edition 1998 clarified the national implementation options to reflect post-entry-into-force thinking, added extensive references to national implementing measures that had been enacted by various States Parties, and included a prototype national implementing statute developed by the authors to provide a starting point for those whose national implementing measures were still under development. Last month, the Web Edition of the Manual was completed. It's internet address, or URL, is http://www.cwc.anl.gov/.

  18. Deproliferation Dynamics : : Why States Give Up Nuclear Weapons Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Rupal Naresh

    2014-01-01

    M. 1996. Atomic Bombast: Nuclear Weapon Decision Making in2007. “The Spread of Nuclear Weapons and InternationalDeterrent Value of Nuclear Weapons. ” Journal of Conflict

  19. Uncrackable code for nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Mark

    2014-11-20

    Mark Hart, a scientist and engineer in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Defense Technologies Division, has developed a new approach for ensuring nuclear weapons and their components can't fall prey to unauthorized use. The beauty of his approach: Let the weapon protect itself. "Using the random process of nuclear radioactive decay is the gold standard of random number generators," said Mark Hart. "You’d have a better chance of winning both Mega Millions and Powerball on the same day than getting control of IUC-protected components."

  20. Control of Nuclear Weapon Data

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21

    The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted to individuals with appropriate clearances, approved authorization and valid need-to-know in keeping with the Atomic Energy Act (as amended) stipulation of ensuring common defense and security. Supersedes DOE O 5610.2.

  1. President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  2. The gas centrifuge and nuclear weapons proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Houston G.; Glaser, Alexander; Kemp, R. Scott

    2014-05-09

    Uranium enrichment by centrifugation is the basis for the quick and efficient production of nuclear fuel-or nuclear weapons.

  3. Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability of the energy from a nuclear weapon is generated while in the high energy density (HED) state. High thermonuclear ignition to the national nuclear weapons program was one of the earliest motivations of the ICF

  4. WEAPONS ON CAMPUS Authority: Chief of Police

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharf, Fred

    05.501 WEAPONS ON CAMPUS Authority: Chief of Police History: Established September 14, 2006 Source of weapons on UNCW property. II. Policy A. The University of North Carolina system of campuses is classified be unlawful for any person to possess the following weapons on UNCW property: 1. Dynamite cartridge, bomb

  5. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    a safe and reliable US nuclear weapons deterrent. The complex also retrieves and stores nuclear materials/enhanced surveillance of the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile; · safe and secure storage of nuclear materials" is NNSA's vision for a smaller, safer, more secure, and less expensive nuclear weapons complex

  6. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    a safe and reliable US nuclear weapons deterrent. The complex also retrieves and stores nuclear materials/enhanced surveillance of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile; · safe and secure storage of nuclear materials secure, and less expensive nuclear weapons complex that leverages the scientific and technical

  7. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    a safe and reliable U.S. nuclear weapons deterrent. The Complex also retrieves and stores nuclear of the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile; · safe and secure storage of nuclear materials; · dismantlement secure, and less expensive nuclear weapons complex that leverages the scientific and technical

  8. Disposition of excess weapons plutonium from dismantled weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War and the implementation of various nuclear arms reduction agreements, US and Russia have been actively dismantling tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. As a result,large quantities of fissile materials, including more than 100 (tonnes?) of weapons-grade Pu, have become excess to both countries` military needs. To meet nonproliferation goals and to ensure the irreversibility of nuclear arms reductions, this excess weapons Pu must be placed in secure storage and then, in timely manner, either used in nuclear reactors as fuel or discarded in geologic repositories as solid waste. This disposition in US and Russia must be accomplished in a safe, secure manner and as quickly as practical. Storage of this Pu is a prerequisite to any disposition process, but the length of storage time is unknown. Whether by use as fuel or discard as solid waste, disposition of that amount of Pu will require decades--and perhaps longer, if disposition operations encounter delays. Neither US nor Russia believes that long-term secure storage is a substitute for timely disposition of excess Pu, but long-term, safe, secure storage is a critical element of all excess Pu disposition activities.

  9. weapons

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers andMEDA Station3/%2A ¡BLM3/%2A

  10. Weapons Program Associate Directors named

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page 1WaterWaterComingWeapons

  11. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-08-05

    The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  12. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  13. A Methodology for Establishing Information Quality Baselines for Complex, Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    to occur in the future. Key Words: Data Quality, Information Quality, Baselines, Alert Management System, investigating, and ameliorating the information quality of event based data. Here is a motivating example and information quality problems. 3. Each party that processes the data usually employs several different systems

  14. Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. Science-based weapons under extreme conditions that approach the high energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear in HED science and support broader national science goals. Virtually all of the energy from a nuclear

  15. What do we do with Nuclear Weapons Now?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Michael M

    2005-01-01

    1990 What Do We Do with Nuclear Weapons Now? by Michael M.for the Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy MICHAEL M. MAYan electoral majority in nuclear weapons states. Unlike

  16. Philippine Bases and U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schirmer, Daniel Boone

    1983-01-01

    BASES AN-fJ U.S. NUCLEAR WEAPONS POLICY In 1947, when Unitedcould bring as many nuclear weapons as It wanted onto theinclude opposition to U.S. nuclear weapons and bases In the

  17. Policy Paper 15: Peace, Stability, and Nuclear Weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltz, Kenneth N.

    1995-01-01

    Much About North Korean Nuclear Weapons,” unpublished paper,the South and use nuclear weapons in doing so. How concernedout how to use nuclear weapons except for deterrence. Is a

  18. Iraq's secret nuclear weapons program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Kay, D.A. (Uranium Institute, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-07-01

    UN inspectors discovered an electromagnetic isotope separation factory that put Iraq just 18-30 months away from having enough material for a bomb. They also found European centrifuge technology and plans for an implosion device. The inspections of Iraq mandated by the United Nations as a cease-fire condition at the end of the Gulf War in February 1991 have revealed a clandestine nuclear materials production and weapons design program of unexpected size and sophistication. The total value of that program, in terms of equipment and personnel deployed between 1981 and 1991, may be on the order of $5-10 billion. The program employed an estimated 7000 scientist and 20,000 workers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons...

  20. National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers October 28, 2013 -...

  1. Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

  2. EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

  3. Joint Venture Established Between Russian Weapons Plant And the...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Weapons Plant And the Largest Dialysis Provider in the U.S. Press Release Sep 20, 2001 Joint Venture Established Between Russian Weapons Plant And the Largest Dialysis...

  4. Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production Processes to Their Environmental Consequences Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons...

  5. Toward a nuclear weapons free world?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maaranen, S.A.

    1996-09-01

    Doubts about the wisdom of relying on nuclear weapons are as old as nuclear weapons themselves. But despite this questioning, nuclear weapons came to be seen as the indispensable element of American (indeed Western) security during the Cold War. By the 1970s and 1980s, however, discontent was growing about the intense US-Soviet nuclear arms competition, as it failed to provide any enduring improvement in security; rather, it was seen as creating ever greater risks and dangers. Arms control negotiations and limitations, adopted as a means to regulate the technical competition, may also have relieved some of the political pressures and dangers. But the balance of terror, and the fears of it, continued. The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) under President Reagan was a very different approach to escaping from the precarious protection of nuclear weapons, in that it sought a way to continue to defend the US and the West, but without the catastrophic risks of mutual deterrence. As such, SDI connoted unhappiness with the precarious nuclear balance and, for many, with nuclear weapons in general. The disappearance of the Warsaw Pact, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the sudden end of the Cold War seemed to offer a unique opportunity to fashion a new, more peaceful world order that might allow for fading away of nuclear weapons. Scholars have foreseen two different paths to a nuclear free world. The first is a fundamental improvement in the relationships between states such that nuclear weapons are no longer needed. The second path is through technological development, e.g., missile defenses which could provide effective protection against nuclear attacks. The paper discusses nuclear weapon policy in the US, views of other nuclear states, the future of nuclear weapons, and issues in a less-nuclear world.

  6. Matrices: A Secret Weapon Algebra 5/Trig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    Matrices: A Secret Weapon Algebra 5/Trig May 4, 2010 In this worksheet we will learn how to use zero standing for a blank space. This is displayed at the top of page 784. This can be made more

  7. The role of the DOE weapons laboratories in a changing national security environment: CNSS papers No. 8, April 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecker, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    The contributions of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons laboratories to the nation's security are reviewed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Procurement and Military Nuclear Systems of the House Armed Services Committee. Also presented are contributions that technology will make in maintaining the strategic balance through deterrence, treaty verification, and a sound nuclear weapons complex as the nation prepares for significant arms control initiatives. The DOE nuclear weapons laboratories can contribute to the broader context of national security, one that recognizes that military strength can be maintained over the long term only if it is built upon the foundations of economic strength and energy security. 9 refs.

  8. System Theoretic Approach for Determining Causal Factors of Quality Loss in Complex System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Traditional design methods such as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA to identify more causal factors for quality losses than FMEA or FTA, including component interactions

  9. General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Quality Assurance Engineer)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will perform oversight and evaluate the M&O; contractors performance in the following functional areas: nuclear facility and weapon quality assurance,...

  10. Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackledge, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself. The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

  11. Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackledge, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

  12. Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackledge, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself. The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

  13. New details on nuclear weapons program bared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hileman, B.

    1994-07-11

    In a continuing effort to be more candid about Department of Energy nuclear weapons programs, Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary recently declassified a substantial amount of information. On June 27, she revealed details about total US weapons-grade uranium production, testing of a bomb made of reactor-grade plutonium, radiation experiments conducted on humans since the 1920s, and underground and atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. O'Leary explains the new revelations by saying thousands of people in meetings across the country this year have told her that openness in government is very important. DOE is responding today in a manner that both satisfies the strong public interest and respects critical national security requirements.

  14. China’s Nuclear Weapons Program and the Chinese Research, Development, and Acquisition System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHASE, Michael S.; LIEGGI, Stephanie; ERICKSON, Andrew S.; LAFFERTY, Brian

    2014-01-01

    January 2014 China’s Nuclear Weapons Program and the Chineseand processes within the nuclear weapons program may beare possible. Studying the nuclear weapons program is thus

  15. Igniting the Light Elements: The Los Alamos Thermonuclear Weapon Project, 1942-1952

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne C. Fitzpatrick

    1999-07-01

    The American system of nuclear weapons research and development was conceived and developed not as a result of technological determinism, but by a number of individual architects who promoted the growth of this large technologically-based complex. While some of the technological artifacts of this system, such as the fission weapons used in World War II, have been the subject of many historical studies, their technical successors--fusion (or hydrogen) devices--are representative of the largely unstudied highly secret realms of nuclear weapons science and engineering. In the postwar period a small number of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's staff and affiliates were responsible for theoretical work on fusion weapons, yet the program was subject to both the provisions and constraints of the US Atomic Energy Commission, of which Los Alamos was a part. The Commission leadership's struggle to establish a mission for its network of laboratories, least of all to keep them operating, affected Los Alamos's leaders' decisions as to the course of weapons design and development projects. Adapting Thomas P. Hughes's ''large technological systems'' thesis, I focus on the technical, social, political, and human problems that nuclear weapons scientists faced while pursuing the thermonuclear project, demonstrating why the early American thermonuclear bomb project was an immensely complicated scientific and technological undertaking. I concentrate mainly on Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Theoretical, or T, Division, and its members' attempts to complete an accurate mathematical treatment of the ''Super''--the most difficult problem in physics in the postwar period--and other fusion weapon theories. Although tackling a theoretical problem, theoreticians had to address technical and engineering issues as well. I demonstrate the relative value and importance of H-bomb research over time in the postwar era to scientific, politician, and military participants in this project. I analyze how and when participants in the H-bomb project recognized both blatant and subtle problems facing the project, how scientists solved them, and the relationship this process had to official nuclear weapons policies. Consequently, I show how the practice of nuclear weapons science in the postwar period became an extremely complex, technologically-based endeavor.

  16. Radiocesium Discharges and Subsequent Environmental Transport at the Major U.S. Weapons Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten, Jr. C.T.; Hamby, D.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1999-11-14

    Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production related atomic projects in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950's account for a large fraction of the historical releases from U.S. weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early ,years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major U.S. Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early -years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for r37Cs at the three facilities that were part of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex.

  17. Seaborne Delivery Interdiction of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glauser, H

    2011-03-03

    Over the next 10-20 years, the probability of a terrorist attack using a weapon of mass destruction (WMD) on the United States is projected to increase. At some point over the next few decades, it may be inevitable that a terrorist group will have access to a WMD. The economic and social impact of an attack using a WMD anywhere in the world would be catastrophic. For weapons developed overseas, the routes of entry are air and sea with the maritime vector as the most porous. Providing a system to track, perform a risk assessment and inspect all inbound marine traffic before it reaches US coastal cities thereby mitigating the threat has long been a goal for our government. The challenge is to do so effectively without crippling the US economy. The Portunus Project addresses only the maritime threat and builds on a robust maritime domain awareness capability. It is a process to develop the technologies, policies and practices that will enable the US to establish a waypoint for the inspection of international marine traffic, screen 100% of containerized and bulk cargo prior to entry into the US if deemed necessary, provide a palatable economic model for transshipping, grow the US economy, and improve US environmental quality. The implementation strategy is based on security risk, and the political and economic constraints of implementation. This article is meant to provide a basic understanding of how and why this may be accomplished.

  18. Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program WHEN: Jan 13, 2015 7:30 PM - 8:00 PM WHERE: Fuller Lodge Central...

  19. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-05-14

    This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the Department of Defense. Supersedes DOE O 452.6.

  20. Pantex Takes a Green Approach to Cleaning Weapons Parts | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Takes a Green Approach to Cleaning Weapons Parts At NNSA's Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, a new green approach to cleaning weapons parts was brought online recently at the...

  1. The monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garwin, Richard L., E-mail: RLG2@us.ibm.com [IBM Fellow Emeritus, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    This paper partially reviews and updates the potential for monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons, including verification of their destruction. Cooperative monitoring with templates of the gamma-ray spectrum are an important tool, dependent on the use of information barriers.

  2. The history of nuclear weapon safety devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, D.W.; Greenwood, W.H.

    1998-06-01

    The paper presents the history of safety devices used in nuclear weapons from the early days of separables to the latest advancements in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Although the paper focuses on devices, the principles of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety implementation will also be presented.

  3. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Supersedes DOE O 452.1D.

  4. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and...

  5. GeoffBrumfiel,Washington Nuclear watchdogs and former weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeoffBrumfiel,Washington Nuclear watchdogs and former weapons scientists are taking issue is supposed to help scientists assess the nation's ageing nuclear stockpile without testing the weapons to optimize designs for low-yield nuclear weapons,he says.A 1995 Livermore panel on which he sat warned

  6. Just war and nuclear weapons : just war theory and its application to the Korean nuclear weapons issue in Korean Christianity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Changwan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is primarily an application of the Christian tradition of Just War to the problems arising from the basing of US nuclear weapons in South Korea and the development of nuclear weapons by the regime in the ...

  7. Gordon Assesses Security At Nuclear Weapons Complex News.....

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    impacts of heightened security levels. In response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C., Gordon immediately ordered all NNSA sites and facilities to...

  8. Materiel availability modeling and analysis for a complex army weapon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy ofArticle)SciTechNorrisAlphasub-NeptunesSciTechReport)system.

  9. Gordon Assesses Security At Nuclear Weapons Complex News...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUsefulJorgeAtl anta, Georgia, March 19-23,

  10. NNSA Administrator Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof Energy Moving Basic NERSCKey StaffNEWT NEWT NEWT2,NNMCAB|

  11. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Weapons Quality Assurance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order 13514Construction Management FAQSRadiationSecurity

  12. The IAEA: Neutralizing Iraq's nuclear weapons potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zifferero, M.

    1993-04-01

    With support from UNSCOM and staff members from several countries, the IAEA has succeeded in identifying and destroying most of Iraq's nuclear weapons potential. IAEA activities in Iraq have also established a sound basis for long-term monitoring of Iraq. This will involve several procedures and techniques, including the periodic monitoring of Iraq's main bodies of water and unannounced visits of resident inspectors to plants, factories, and research centers.

  13. The Chemical Weapons Convention -- Legal issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) offers a unique challenge to the US system of constitutional law. Its promise of eliminating what is the most purely genocidal type of weapon from the world`s arsenals as well as of destroying the facilities for producing these weapons, brings with it a set of novel legal issues. The reservations about the CWC expressed by US business people are rooted in concern about safeguarding confidential business information and protecting the constitutional right to privacy. The chief worry is that international verification inspectors will misuse their power to enter commercial property and that trade secrets or other private information will be compromised as a result. It has been charged that the Convention is probably unconstitutional. The author categorically disagrees with that view and is aware of no scholarly writing that supports it. The purpose of this presentation is to show that CWC verification activities can be implemented in the US consistently with the traditional constitutional regard for commercial and individual privacy. First, he very briefly reviews the types of verification inspections that the CWC permits, as well as some of its specific privacy protections. Second, he explains how the Fourth Amendment right to privacy works in the context of CWC verification inspections. Finally, he reviews how verification inspections can be integrated into these constitutional requirements in the SU through a federal implementing statute.

  14. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-10-19

    The Order prescribes how the Department of Energy participates with the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure the surety (safety, security and control) of military nuclear weapon systems deployed around the world. The Order establishes National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the DoD. Cancels DOE O 5610.13. Canceled by DOE O 452.6A.

  15. Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  16. Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  17. Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant - NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant - NNSA Is Helping Make It Happen | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

  18. Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

    1992-10-01

    In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

  19. EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for...

  20. Russia`s nuke complex: A case for downsizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukharin, O.

    1995-07-01

    Nuclear weapons stored in former Soviet republics, uncontrolled export of bomb-grade nuclear materials, and recruitment of ex-Soviet nuclear physicists by Third-World nations remain today`s top proliferation risks, reports Oleg Bukharin, a visiting researcher at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environment Studies. To address these risks, Russia {open_quotes}must shift its weapons production and development to weapons dismantlement, management of weapons materials, and maintenance of a much smaller...arsenal,{close_quotes} Bukharin writes. The goal of such conversion, he says, {open_quotes}is a nuclear complex that is environmentally safe...and compatible with nonproliferation objectives.{close_quotes} Reconfiguration of Russia`s weapons complex also must provide for redeployment of the hundreds of thousands of scientists, engineers, and technicians who have supported the federation`s nuclear weapons program, Bukharin insists. {open_quotes}A truly durable strategy to prevent the dispersion of Russian weapons expertise must [involve] these weapons experts in non-weapons research,{close_quotes} says Bukharin. Furthermore, Bukharin writes, the Russian conversion program must prevent nuclear materials from falling into the wrong hands. {open_quotes}Widespread corruption, crime, and emerging black markets increase the risk of diversion of weapons-grade uranium or plutonium,{close_quotes} he says.

  1. ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

  2. TRACKING SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FROM WEAPONS TO DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Beams, J.; Sanders, K.; Myers, L.

    2013-07-16

    Supporting nuclear nonproliferation and global security principles, beginning in 1994 the United States has withdrawn more than 50 metric tons (MT) of government-controlled plutonium from potential use in nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, established protocols for the tracking of this "excess" and "surplus" plutonium, and for reconciling the current storage and utilization of the plutonium to show that its management is consistent with the withdrawal policies. Programs are underway to ensure the safe and secure disposition of the materials that formed a major part of the weapons stockpile during the Cold War, and growing quantities have been disposed as waste, after which they are not included in traditional nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) data systems. A combination of resources is used to perform the reconciliations that form the basis for annual reporting to DOE, to U.S. Department of State, and to international partners including the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  3. J. David Janiec Director for the Weapons and Energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    support, evaluation; in-service engineering for weapons, and to maintain and operate required facilities for Experimentation, Tactics and Joint Test and Evaluation Development in the Network Centric Warfare Office as the Director for Weapons Systems from 1996-1999, the Head of the Fuze and Proximity Sensors Division from 1994

  4. January 5, 2015 Policy on Firearms, Other Lethal Weapons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 5, 2015 Policy on Firearms, Other Lethal Weapons, Fireworks and Dangerous Objects the possession, use or storage of firearms, other lethal weapons, fireworks, and other dangerous objects. Definitions Firearm means any device, regardless of its name, that is designed to expel a projectile

  5. Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The technology was first used on a W76 Retrofit Evaluation System Test unit on May 3, 2012. Significant Cost Savings The cost savings are realized because the technology is nondestructive, allowing weapon components New weapons assessment technology engineered: nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive

  6. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex The Y-12 Complex-of-a-kind manufacturing facility that plays an important role in US national security. The roles of the Y-12 Complex/enhanced surveillance of the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile; · safe and secure storage of nuclear materials

  7. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND MISCELLANEOUSMATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; EVALUATION; NATIONAL SECURITY; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; US DOD; WEAPONS Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview...

  8. Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A

    2005-01-01

    The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

  9. Introduction to Pits and Weapons Systems (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kautz, D.

    2012-07-02

    A Nuclear Explosive Package includes the Primary, Secondary, Radiation Case and related components. This is the part of the weapon that produces nuclear yield and it converts mechanical energy into nuclear energy. The pit is composed of materials that allow mechanical energy to be converted to electromagnetic energy. Fabrication processes used are typical of any metal fabrication facility: casting, forming, machining and welding. Some of the materials used in pits include: Plutonium, Uranium, Stainless Steel, Beryllium, Titanium, and Aluminum. Gloveboxes are used for three reasons: (1) Protect workers and public from easily transported, finely divided plutonium oxides - (a) Plutonium is very reactive and produces very fine particulate oxides, (b) While not the 'Most dangerous material in the world' of Manhattan Project lore, plutonium is hazardous to health of workers if not properly controlled; (2) Protect plutonium from reactive materials - (a) Plutonium is extremely reactive at ambient conditions with several components found in air: oxygen, water, hydrogen, (b) As with most reactive metals, reactions with these materials may be violent and difficult to control, (c) As with most fabricated metal products, corrosion may significantly affect the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the product; and (3) Provide shielding from radioactive decay products: {alpha}, {gamma}, and {eta} are commonly associated with plutonium decay, as well as highly radioactive materials such as {sup 241}Am and {sup 238}Pu.

  10. An assessment of North Korea's nuclear weapons capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivels, Ciara (Ciara Brooke)

    2013-01-01

    In February of 2013, North Korea conducted its third nuclear weapons test. Speculations are that this test was conducted to further develop a warhead small enough to fit on an intercontinental ballistic missile. This test ...

  11. A thousand suns : political motivations for nuclear weapons testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raas, Whitney

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear weapon testing is the final step in the nuclear development process, an announcement of ability and strength. The consequences of a nuclear test are far from easy to bear, however: economic sanctions can be crippling ...

  12. DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a...

  13. Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to science-based weapons design and certification. The ACRR is a pool-type research reactor (Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility) that has been in operation since the 1970s...

  14. Arms Control: US and International efforts to ban biological weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons Convention, the treaty that bans the development, production, and stockpiling and acquisition of biological weapons was opened for signature in 1972 and came into force in 1975 after being ratified by 22 governments, including the depository nations of the USA, the United Kingdom, and the former Soviet Union. In support of the Convention, the USA later established export controls on items used to make biological weapons. Further, in accordance with the 1990 President`s Enhanced Proliferation Control Initiative, actions were taken to redefine and expand US export controls, as well as to encourage multilateral controls through the Australia Group. Thus far, the Convention has not been effective in stopping the development of biological weapons. The principal findings as to the reasons of the failures of the Convention are found to be: the Convention lacks universality, compliance measures are effective, advantage of verification may outweigh disadvantages. Recommendations for mitigating these failures are outlined in this report.

  15. Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-17

    This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

  16. EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

  17. Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administrat...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) serves as the nation's only source of enriched uranium nuclear weapons components and provides enriched uranium for the U.S. Navy. Y-12 is a...

  18. Environmental Engineers are the technical professionals who identify, analyze and design solutions to improve the quality of the natural and the built environments. They address issues that are complex, multifaceted and that must be workable within the co

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    to improve the quality of the natural and the built environments. They address issues that are complex of residential planning on greenhouse gas emissions. STUDENTS SAY I like the interdisciplinary nature of the BSEE, industry, or governmental agencies to restore environmental quality for ecological and human well

  19. ITERATIVELY REWEIGHTED DESIGN OF OVERSAMPLING COMPLEX-MODULATED FILTER-BANKS FOR HIGH OUTPUT-SIGNAL QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göckler, Heinz G.

    of the frequency-dependent signal-to- disturbance ratio. Next, in section 3, we discuss the basic idea of the of the signal-to-disturbance ratio of the output-signal of an oversampling, complex-modulated subband-coder filter-bank pair with extensive subband-signal am- plification. The undesired non-linear disturbance

  20. Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

  1. DOE weapons laboratories' contributions to the nation's defense technology base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecker, S.S.

    1988-04-01

    The question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories can contribute to a stronger defense technology base is addressed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Defense Industry and Technology of the Senate Armed Services Committee. The importance of the defense technology base is described, the DOE technology base is also described, and some technology base management and institutional issues are discussed. Suggestions are given for promoting a more stable, long-term relationship between the DOE weapons laboratories and the Department of Defense. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  2. The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britton, Julie

    2010-01-01

    and Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant. Rad Res 1989;120:19-Evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility MASTERAT T H E HANFORD NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITY JULIE BRITTON

  3. An analysis of technical and policy drivers in Current U.S. nuclear weapons force structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Amanda, S. B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    U.S. nuclear weapons force structure accounts for the number and types of strategic and nonstrategic weapon systems in various locations that comprise the nuclear arsenal. While exact numbers, locations, and detailed designs ...

  4. Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY...

  5. CRAD, Configuration Management- Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Configuration Management program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Weapons Facility.

  6. Proceedings of the Tungsten Workshop for Hard Target Weapons Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Hayden, H.W.; Davis, R.M.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to review and exchange information and provide technical input for improving technologies relevant to the Hard Target Weapons Program. This workshop was attended by representatives from 17 organizations, including 4 Department of Defense (DoD) agencies, 8 industrial companies, and 5 laboratories within DOE. Hard targets are defined as reinforced underground structures that house enemy forces, weapon systems, and support equipment. DOE-ORO and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) have been involved in advanced materials research and development (R&D) for several DOE and DoD programs. These programs are conducted in close collaboration with Eglin AFB, Department of the Army`s Picatinny Arsenal, and other DoD agencies. As part of this ongoing collaboration, Eglin AFB and Oak Ridge National Laboratory planned and conducted this workshop to support the Hard Target Weapons Program. The objectives of this workshop were to (1) review and identify the technology base that exists (primarily due to anti-armor applications) and assess the applicability of this technology to the Hard Target Weapons Program requirements; (2) determine future directions to establish the W materials, processing, and manufacturing technologies suitable for use in fixed, hard target penetrators; and (3) identify and prioritize the potential areas for technical collaboration among the participants.

  7. Disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Westinghouse reactors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsaed, Abdelhalim Ali

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. We have designed three transition cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. We found that four...

  8. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-01-22

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A. Canceled by DOE O 452.4C.

  9. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-11-19

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

  10. The role of nuclear weapons in the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This publication presents the proceedings for the workshop, The Role of Nuclear Weapons in the Year 2000, held on October 22--24, 1990. The workshop participants considered the changing nature of deterrence and of our strategic relationship with the Soviet Union, the impact of nuclear proliferation on regional conflicts, and ways that the nuclear forces might be restructured to reflect new political circumstances.

  11. Navy's Superlaser Is More Than a Weapon (Wired.com) | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wired.comdangerroom201011navys-super-laser-wont-just-be-a-weapon Submitted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010...

  12. Excess Plutonium: Weapons Legacy or National Asset?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klipa, G.; Boeke, S.; Hottel, R.

    2002-02-27

    The Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative was established in January, 2000, to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of nuclear materials. As part of that initiative, the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM), has established Nuclear Material Management Groups for the management of excess nuclear materials. As one of these groups, the Plutonium Material Management Group (PMMG) has been chartered to serve as DOE's complex wide resource and point of contact for technical coordination and program planning support in the safe and efficient disposition of the nations excess Plutonium 239. This paper will explain the mission, goals, and objectives of the PMMG. In addition, the paper will provide a broad overview of the status of the plutonium inventories throughout the DOE complex. The DOE currently manages approximately 99.5 MT of plutonium isotopes. Details of the various categories of plutonium, from material designated for national security needs through material that has been declared excess, will be explained. For the plutonium that has been declared excess, the various pathways to disposition (including reuse, recycling, sale, transfer, treatment, consumption, and disposal) will be discussed. At this time 52.5 MT of plutonium has been declared excess and the method of disposition for that material is the subject of study and evaluation within DOE. The role of the PMMG in those evaluations will be outlined.

  13. The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britton, Julie

    2010-01-01

    National Laboratory, and Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant.Laboratory (ORNL), and Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (ORNL through 1977, and Rocky Flats through 1979. The SMRs

  14. From the lab to the battlefield? Nanotechnology and fourth generation nuclear weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A

    2002-01-01

    The paper addresses some major implications of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) engineering and nanotechnology for the improvement of existing types of nuclear weapons, and the development of more robust versions of these weapons, as well as for the development of fourth generations nuclear weapons in which nanotechnology will play an essential role.

  15. Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    1 Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2] The end of the Cold of terrorism and the risks of nuclear proliferation, call for a reassessment of the role of nuclear weapons the goal of the complete elimination of nuclear weapons as a practical means of mobilizing more resolute

  16. Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, N.

    1993-11-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

  17. Managing Quality Requirements Using Activity-Based Quality Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    the complexity of software quality. A novel kind of quality mod- els uses the activities performed on and with the software as an explicit dimension. These quality models are a well- suited basis for managing qualityManaging Quality Requirements Using Activity-Based Quality Models Stefan Wagner, Florian

  18. Towards a tactical nuclear weapons treaty? Is There a Role of IAEA Tools of Safeguards?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, Emily C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowberry, Ariana N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-12

    In recent years, there is growing interest in formal negotiations on non-strategic or tactical nuclear weapons. With the negotiations of New START, there has been much speculation that a tactical nuclear weapons treaty should be included in the follow on to New START. This paper examines the current policy environment related to tactical weapons and some of the issues surrounding the definition of tactical nuclear weapons. We then map out the steps that would need to be taken in order to begin discussions on a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. These steps will review the potential role of the IAEA in verification of a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. Specifically, does IAEA involvement in various arms control treaties serve as a useful roadmap on how to overcome some of the issues pertaining to a tactical nuclear weapons treaty?

  19. Crystalline ceramics: Waste forms for the disposal of weapons plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (i) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (ii) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass ``logs``; (iii) deep borehole disposal (National Academy of Sciences Report, 1994). The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  20. A simple method for rapidly processing HEU from weapons returns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    A method based on the use of a high temperature fluidized bed for rapidly oxidizing, homogenizing and down-blending Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from dismantled nuclear weapons is presented. This technology directly addresses many of the most important issues that inhibit progress in international commerce in HEU; viz., transaction verification, materials accountability, transportation and environmental safety. The equipment used to carry out the oxidation and blending is simple, inexpensive and highly portable. Mobile facilities to be used for point-of-sale blending and analysis of the product material are presented along with a phased implementation plan that addresses the conversion of HEU derived from domestic weapons and related waste streams as well as material from possible foreign sources such as South Africa or the former Soviet Union.

  1. Nuclear energy in a nuclear weapon free world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The prospect of a nuclear renaissance has revived a decades old debate over the proliferation and terrorism risks of the use of nuclear power. This debate in the last few years has taken on an added dimension with renewed attention to disarmament. Increasingly, concerns that proliferation risks may reduce the prospects for realizing the vision of a nuclear-weapon-free world are being voiced.

  2. Comments on implementation: Contingency options for chemical weapons demilitarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aroesty, J.

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses the need to formulate contingency options for complying with U.S./U.S.S.R. chemical weapon (C.W.) demilitarization timetables that start in 1992. These timetables could be overly optimistic in the face of emerging environmental concerns and potential political, technical, and operational difficulties. A similar approach may also be relevant to the situation in Iraq, where several years are likely to pass before a suitable C.W. destruction system is available for use.

  3. Stopping the emergence of nuclear weapon states in the Third World: An examination of the Iraq weapons inspection program. Study project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, D.A.

    1993-01-31

    The end of the Gulf War and the implementation of United Nation (UN) resolutions uncovered an Iraqi multi-billion dollar nuclear weapons program. Iraq's ability to pursue this clandestine program for more than a decade, despite periodic inspections, suggest that the myriad of treaties and agreements designed to curb proliferation may be inadequate. Clearly more must be done to deter and counter the spread of these deadly weapon. The UN weapons inspections in Iraq provide insight into possible solutions to the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology in the developing world. This study examines the policy and operational aspects associated with an intrusive United Nations inspection program. In its final analysis, this paper suggests that an effective challenge inspection program is a necessary element in countering the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Further, it suggests that the UN, as the only internationally accepted enforcement organization, be fully engaged in nonproliferation issues and support the challenge inspection program.

  4. EIS-0225: Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environemental impact of a proposal to continue operation of the Pantex Plant and associated storage of nuclear weapon components. Alternatives considered include: ...

  5. Network-centric Warfare and the Globalization of Technology: Transforming simple tools into dangerous weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Ann

    2009-01-01

    simple tools into dangerous weapons New applications ofprogressive, but also dangerous when applied to warfare. Theabove, also a powerful and dangerous tool for terrorists to

  6. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    to meet future missions and to do so in a safe, secure, environmentally, energy efficient, and sustainable, as part of the National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Complex, and with more than 60 critical elements of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) missions that ensure

  7. Western Michigan University is a weapon free school. By order of the Board of Trustees: "No person shall possess on university property any firearms or other dangerous weapons with the exception of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    person shall possess on university property any firearms or other dangerous weapons with the exception considered a dangerous weapon. Stun gun or taser, or any device that produces electrical current intended

  8. Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dombey, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

  9. Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman Dombey

    2011-12-10

    Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

  10. Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745­page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001 §745.1 ADVANCE NOTIFICATION AND ANNUAL REPORT OF ALL EXPORTS OF SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) not less than 30 days in advance of every export

  11. Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department`s first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department`s legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle.

  12. Improving the Quality of Software Quality Determination Processes \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Improving the Quality of Software Quality Determination Processes \\Lambda Leon J. Osterweil a systematic, orderly, process­based approach to stating software quality objec­ tives and knowing if and when they have been achieved. We suggest that quality in software is a complex, multifaceted array

  13. Improving the Quality of Software Quality Determination Leon J. Osterweil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Improving the Quality of Software Quality Determination Processes Leon J. Osterweil Department a systematic, orderly, process-based approach to stating software quality objec- tives and knowing if and when they have been achieved. We suggest that quality in software is a complex, multifaceted array

  14. To state the policy of LSU regarding the possession of firearms and dangerous weapons within its facilities and premises and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    PURPOSE To state the policy of LSU regarding the possession of firearms and dangerous weapons other firearm from which a shot or shots are discharged by an explosive. Dangerous Weapons. Any gas, LSU prohibits the possession of firearms or other dangerous weapons within the campus residences

  15. Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOfficeImplementation and

  16. DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory | DepartmentDOEDepartmentWildlife Refuge |Department of

  17. Reactor options for disposition of excess weapon plutonium: Selection criteria and decision process for assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunds, T.; Buonpane, L.; Sicherman, A.; Sutcliffe, W.; Walter, C.; Holman, G.

    1994-01-01

    DOE is currently considering a wide range of alternatives for disposition of excess weapon plutonium, including using plutonium in mixed oxide fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been tasked to assist DOE in its efforts to develop a decision process and criteria for evaluating the technologies and reactor designs that have been proposed for the fission disposition alternative. This report outlines an approach for establishing such a decision process and selection criteria. The approach includes the capability to address multiple, sometimes conflicting, objectives, and to incorporate the impact of uncertainty. The approach has a firm theoretical foundation and similar approaches have been used successfully by private industry, DOE, and other government agencies to support and document complex, high impact technology choice decisions. Because of their similarity and relatively simple technology, this report focuses on three light water reactors studied in Phase 1 of the DOE Plutonium Disposition Study. The decision process can be extended to allow evaluation of other reactor technologies and disposition options such as direct disposal and retrievable storage.

  18. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT OFFICE OF PRIMARY INTEREST (OPI): AVAILABLE ON-LINE AT: Weapon Quality Division

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReporteeo | National Nucleara

  19. Opportunities for Russian Nuclear Weapons Institute developing computer-aided design programs for pharmaceutical drug discovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-23

    The goal of this study is to determine whether physicists at the Russian Nuclear Weapons Institute can profitably service the need for computer aided drug design (CADD) programs. The Russian physicists` primary competitive advantage is their ability to write particularly efficient code able to work with limited computing power; a history of working with very large, complex modeling systems; an extensive knowledge of physics and mathematics, and price competitiveness. Their primary competitive disadvantage is their lack of biology, and cultural and geographic issues. The first phase of the study focused on defining the competitive landscape, primarily through interviews with and literature searches on the key providers of CADD software. The second phase focused on users of CADD technology to determine deficiencies in the current product offerings, to understand what product they most desired, and to define the potential demand for such a product.

  20. Bioforensics: Characterization of biological weapons agents by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P K; Ghosal, S; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Hutcheon, I D

    2007-02-26

    The anthrax attacks of Fall 2001 highlight the need to develop forensic methods based on multiple identifiers to determine the origin of biological weapons agents. Genetic typing methods (i.e., DNA and RNA-based) provide one attribution technology, but genetic information alone is not usually sufficient to determine the provenance of the material. Non-genetic identifiers, including elemental and isotopic signatures, provide complementary information that can be used to identify the means, geographic location and date of production. Under LDRD funding, we have successfully developed the techniques necessary to perform bioforensic characterization with the NanoSIMS at the individual spore level. We have developed methods for elemental and isotopic characterization at the single spore scale. We have developed methods for analyzing spore sections to map elemental abundance within spores. We have developed rapid focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning techniques for spores to preserve elemental and structural integrity. And we have developed a high-resolution depth profiling method to characterize the elemental distribution in individual spores without sectioning. We used these newly developed methods to study the controls on elemental abundances in spores, characterize the elemental distribution of in spores, and to study elemental uptake by spores. Our work under this LDRD project attracted FBI and DHS funding for applied purposes.

  1. COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MGB Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Dr. Bruce G. Blair Princeton...

  2. Proceedings: 17th Asilomar conference on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickman, R.G.; Meier, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the 1983 conference was to provide for the technical exchange of ideas relating to the science and technology of the immediate effects of nuclear weapon explosions. Separate abstracts were prepared for 39 of the papers.

  3. Largest Federally Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Largest Federally Owned ... Largest Federally Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility Posted: August 13, 2013 - 12:01pm WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's...

  4. A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

    2002-01-01

    A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

  5. US weapons-useable plutonium disposition policy: implementation of the MOX fuel option 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Vanessa L

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of U.S. weapons-grade plutonium which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option...

  6. Auratic Weapons, World War II, and Cultural Hegemony in The Lord of the Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverstein, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    When Merry and Pippin are abducted by the Orc army, oneof the Orcs, Uglúk, takes their knives away from them. Merrywith the weapons causes the orc to cast them away. Once

  7. Imaging the ionization track of alpha recoils for the directional detection of weapons grade plutonium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, William Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Since the dawn of the nuclear weapons era, political, military, and scientific leaders around the world have been working to contain the proliferation of Special Nuclear Material and explosively fissile material. This paper ...

  8. A system for the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo cotainerships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Shawn P., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo containerships is proposed. The ship-based approach removes the constraints of current thinking by addressing the threat of ...

  9. IMPROVISED NUCLEAR DEVICE An Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a type of nuclear weapon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPROVISED NUCLEAR DEVICE An Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a type of nuclear weapon. When of an Improvised Nuclear Device? An IND would cause great destruction, death, and injury and have a wide area

  10. Iraqi nuclear weapons development program. Final report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    This is an abstract of the final report focusing on the collection, collation, analysis, and recording of information pertaining to Iraqi nuclear weapons development and on the long term monitoring of Iraq.

  11. Environmental behavior of hafnium : the impact on the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerefice, Gary Steven

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies were performed to examine the environmental behavior of hafnium and its utility as a neutron poison for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Yucca Mountain. The hydrolysis of ...

  12. Mission emphasis and the determination of needs for new weapon systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Daniel Mark

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to understand the determination of needs of new weapon systems must take into account inputs and actions beyond the formally documented requirements generation process. This study analyzes three recent historical ...

  13. A {open_quotes}New{close_quotes} regime for nuclear weapons and materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-02-15

    In this paper, I discuss the principal ideas that I covered in my presentation on December 8, 1993, at the Future of Foreign Nuclear Materials Symposium held by the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. I was asked to discuss issues related to military inventories of plutonium, and I took this opportunity to describe a possible declaratory regime that could encompass military as well as civilian inventories of plutonium. The {open_quote}new{close_quotes} in the title does not imply that the regime discussed here is an original idea. Rather, the regime will be {open_quotes}new,{close_quotes} when it is adopted. The regime proposed here and in other works is one in which all stocks of nuclear weapons and materials are declared. Originally, declarations were proposed as a traditional arms control measure. Here, declarations are proposed to support the prevention of misuse of nuclear weapons and materials, including support for the nonproliferation regime. In the following, I discuss: (1) Worldwide inventories of nuclear weapons and materials, including the fact that military plutonium must be viewed as part of that worldwide inventory. (2) Life cycles of nuclear weapons and materials, including the various stages from the creation of nuclear materials for weapons through deployment and retirement of weapons to the final disposition of the materials. (3) Mechanisms for making declarations. (4) Risks and benefits to be derived from declarations. (5) Possibilities for supporting evidence or verification.

  14. Legislative Reform of the Kaesong Industrial Complex in North Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Jeehye

    2011-01-01

    non- proliferation of nuclear weapons and trade issues. Onlyproliferation of nuclear weapons and transfer of technologynon- proliferation of nuclear weapons, the international

  15. EIS-0236-S4: Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (SPEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives to continue transformation of the nuclear weapons complex to be smaller, and more responsive, efficient, and secure in order to meet national security requirements.

  16. Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Larry Young

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

  17. Closing the circle on the splitting of the atom: The environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production in the United States and what the Department of Energy is doing about it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    In the grand scheme of things we are a little more than halfway through the cycle of splitting the atom for weapons purposes. If we visualize this historic cycle as the full sweep of a clockface, at zero hour we would find the first nuclear chain reaction by Enrico Fermi, followed immediately by the Manhattan Project and the explosion of the first atomic bombs. From two o`clock until five, the United States built and ran a massive industrial complex that produced tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. At half past, the Cold War ended, and the United States shut down most of its nuclear weapons factories. The second half of this cycle involves dealing with the waste and contamination from nuclear weapons production - a task that had, for the most part, been postponed into the indefinite future. That future is now upon us. Dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War is in many ways as big a challenge for us today as the building of the atomic bomb was for the Manhattan Project pioneers in the 1940s. Our challenges are political and social as well as technical, and we are meeting those challenges. We are reducing risks, treating wastes, developing new technologies, and building democratic institutions for a constructive debate on our future course.

  18. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  19. DOE (Department of Energy) nuclear weapon R and T (research, development, and testing): Objectives, roles, and responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otey, G.R.

    1989-07-01

    An overview of the DOE nuclear weapons research, development, and testing program is given along with a description of the program objectives and the roles and responsibilities of the various involved organizations. The relationship between the DoD and DOE is described and the division of responsibilities for weapon development as well as the coordinated planning and acquisition activities are reviewed. Execution of the RD T program at the nuclear weapons laboratories is outlined. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  20. A review of "European Weapons and Armour From the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution" by Ewart Oakeshott 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furgol, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    stream_source_info Oaskeshott European Weapons & Armour rev Furgol.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7120 Content-Encoding windows-1252 stream_name Oaskeshott European Weapons & Armour rev Furgol.pdf.txt Content... three of many topical arrangements of subject matter. Ewart Oakeshott. European Weapons and Armour From the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution. Rochester, NY: ?e Boydell Press, 2012. Xviii + 288 pp. + c. illus. $28.45. Review...

  1. Investigation of processes for converting weapons plutonium into MOX fuel at the TOMOX facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polyakov, A.S.; Rovnyi, S.; Skiba, O.V.; Lloubtsev, R.I. [Minotom, Moxcow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    On November 12, 1992, the governments of France and Russia signed a cooperation agreement on civil uses of nuclear materials from Russian weapons. This agreement includes the AIDA/mixed-oxide (MOX) program for converting dismantled Russian weapons plutonium into MOX fuel to supply existing and future Russian VVER and BN reactors. AIDA/MOX covers six areas: strategic approaches, the neutronic aspects of loading reactors with military plutonium, the chemistry of alloyed plutonium and conversion into sinterable oxide, MOX fuel fabrication, possible reprocessing of MOX fuel, and incineration of weapons plutonium in new reactors. The short-term use of existing reactors requires a facility for converting weapons plutonium to MOX fuel; the TOMOX-1300 facility should be capable of processing 1300 kg of weapons plutonium annually to fabricate 26.5 tonnes of MOX fuel (1.5 t for the BN-600 reactor and 25 t for four VVER-1000 reactors). Research and development (R&D) undertaken from 1992 to 1996 by several Russian institutes under Minatom and by various Commissariat A l`Energie Atomique (CEA) divisions to select the processes to be implemented in the TOMOX plant is presented and analyzed in this paper.

  2. The origin of Iraq's nuclear weapons program: Technical reality and Western hypocrisy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erkman, S; Hurni, J P; Klement, S; Erkman, Suren; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Klement, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    This report is based on a series of papers written between 1980 and 2005 on the origin of Iraq's nuclear weapons program, which was known to one of the authors in the late 1970s already, as well as to a number of other physicists, who independently tried without success to inform their governments and the public. It is concluded that at no point did the Western governments effectively try to stop Iraq's nuclear weapons program, which suggests that its existence was useful as a foreign policy tool, as is confirmed by its use as a major justification to wage two wars on Iraq.

  3. Exploring the Possible Use of Information Barriers for future Biological Weapons Verification Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, S J

    2011-12-20

    This report describes a path forward for implementing information barriers in a future generic biological arms-control verification regime. Information barriers have become a staple of discussion in the area of arms control verification approaches for nuclear weapons and components. Information barriers when used with a measurement system allow for the determination that an item has sensitive characteristics without releasing any of the sensitive information. Over the last 15 years the United States (with the Russian Federation) has led on the development of information barriers in the area of the verification of nuclear weapons and nuclear components. The work of the US and the Russian Federation has prompted other states (e.g., UK and Norway) to consider the merits of information barriers for possible verification regimes. In the context of a biological weapons control verification regime, the dual-use nature of the biotechnology will require protection of sensitive information while allowing for the verification of treaty commitments. A major question that has arisen is whether - in a biological weapons verification regime - the presence or absence of a weapon pathogen can be determined without revealing any information about possible sensitive or proprietary information contained in the genetic materials being declared under a verification regime. This study indicates that a verification regime could be constructed using a small number of pathogens that spans the range of known biological weapons agents. Since the number of possible pathogens is small it is possible and prudent to treat these pathogens as analogies to attributes in a nuclear verification regime. This study has determined that there may be some information that needs to be protected in a biological weapons control verification regime. To protect this information, the study concludes that the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array may be a suitable technology for the detection of the genetic information associated with the various pathogens. In addition, it has been determined that a suitable information barrier could be applied to this technology when the verification regime has been defined. Finally, the report posits a path forward for additional development of information barriers in a biological weapons verification regime. This path forward has shown that a new analysis approach coined as Information Loss Analysis might need to be pursued so that a numerical understanding of how information can be lost in specific measurement systems can be achieved.

  4. Disposition of excess weapon plutonium in deep boreholes - site selection handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Woldegabriel, G.; Morley, R.; Plannerer, H.; Rowley, J.

    1996-09-01

    One of the options for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology needed to begin designing this means of disposition already exists, and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous United States. There are even more potential sites for this option within Russia. The successful design of a borehole system must address two criteria: (1) how to dispose of 50 metric tons of weapons plutonium while making it inaccessible for unauthorized retrieval, and (2) how to prevent contamination of the accessible biosphere, defined here as the Earth`s surface and usable groundwaters.

  5. Opportunities exist for the diversion of weapons-usable material at the front end of the fuel cycle, during which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    of proliferation: The more places in which this work is done, the harder it is to monitor. Weapons have been, and the technology seems to be not that hard to master or acquire. BURTON RICHTER Reducing Proliferation Risk if it comes without a great increase in the risk of the proliferation of nuclear weapons. FALL 2008 45 T he

  6. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  7. Since leading America's successful effort to develop nuclear weapons in World War II, the U.S. Department of Energy's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the risk of terrorists or rogue nations acquiring nuclear weapons, the National Labs are spearheading warheads to commercial-grade fuel for nuclear power plants as part of a program that successfully destroyedSince leading America's successful effort to develop nuclear weapons in World War II, the U

  8. Y-12 employees receive awards recognizing excellence in nuclear weapons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named Mineralogical Society ofSiteComplex help

  9. A Methodology for Weapon System Availability Assessment, incorporating Failure, Damage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Methodology for Weapon System Availability Assessment, incorporating Failure, Damage systems can become unavailable due to system failures or damage to the system; in both cases, system the more specific availability studies take battlefield damage into account. This paper aims to define

  10. COURSE SYLLABUS Microbial pathogens versus plants: molecular weapons, defenses, and rules of engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    COURSE SYLLABUS Microbial pathogens versus plants: molecular weapons, defenses, and rules-evolutionary molecular battle between microbial pathogens and plants has game-like properties whose rules are emerging pieces and collective behaviors of pathogen virulence and plant immune systems, similarities between

  11. Weapons and commercial plutonium ultimate disposition choices: Destroy ``completely`` or store forever

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1994-07-01

    All of the options under consideration for weapons and commercial plutonium disposition ultimately boil down to the choices of either ``complete`` destruction or storage ``forever.`` None of the reactor-based plutonium burning systems demonstrated over the past 50 years of reactor development consume this material completely. Ultimately considerable unburned plutonium must be stored ``forever`` from those systems. Plutonium is considered to be dangerous both as a weapons material and as a health hazard. While properly stored plutonium might never make its way back by natural phenomena into the environment as a health hazard, stored plutonium is always accessible to recovery for malevolent purposes. It must be guarded wherever in the world it is stored for as long as it continues to exist. Complete destruction of the plutonium eliminates this material as a concern of future generations. Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerator-driven technology promises to allow safe and complete destruction of this material. Furthermore it appears that in the process of destruction the neutron rich features of the weapons plutonium provides benefits to society that place a value on weapons plutonium exceeding that of highly enriched uranium. A realistic time scale for development and deployment of burial technology either with or without partial burning in reactors is expected to be comparable with or to exceed the time for development and deployment of the accelerator-driven destruction method under study at Los Alamos.

  12. NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  13. CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Assessing Indicators of Patent Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Assessing Indicators of Patent Quality: Complex vs. Discrete-00488275,version1-1Jun2010 #12;2 Assessing Indicators of Patent Quality: Complex vs. Discrete Technologies indicators of patent quality in complex and discrete technologies using factor analysis and econometric

  14. Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Indoor air quality problems are diverse and often complex. Adverse indoor air quality problems can exist which create symptomatic conditions for building occupants. Often, the exact cause, or causes, of the substandard indoor air quality are unknown...

  15. Overview of contamination from US and Russian nuclear complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    This paper briefly compares the United States and Russian weapons complexes and provides a perspective on the releases of radioactivity to the environment in both countries. Fortunately, the technologies, data, models, and scientific experience that have been gained over the last 50 years are being shared between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (MINATOM) which constitutes a new environmental partnership between the two countries.

  16. 96 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN JUNE 2005 ew scientific challenges are more complex than

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of energy for environment, safety and health from 1998 to 2001, I was the chief safety officer to the production of nuclear warheads because it increases the yield of the explosions; throughout the cold war, the U.S. nuclear weapons complex was the nation's largest consumer of the substance. Beryllium and its

  17. Total quality management implementation guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

  18. Why is weapons grade plutonium more hazardous to work with than highly enriched uranium?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Costigan, Stephen A.; Schake, Bradley S.

    2015-08-01

    Highly Enriched Uranium and Weapons grade plutonium have assumed positions of dominant importance among the actinide elements because of their successful uses as explosive ingredients in nuclear weapons and the place they hold as key materials in the development of industrial use of nuclear power. While most chemists are familiar with the practical interest concerning HEU and WG Pu, fewer know the subtleties among their hazards. In this study, a primer is provided regarding the hazards associated with working with HEU and WG Pu metals and oxides. The care that must be taken to safely handle these materials is emphasized and the extent of the hazards is described. The controls needed to work with HEU and WG Pu metals and oxides are differentiated. Given the choice, one would rather work with HEU metal and oxides than WG Pu metal and oxides.

  19. Why is weapons grade plutonium more hazardous to work with than highly enriched uranium?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Costigan, Stephen A.; Schake, Bradley S.

    2015-08-01

    Highly Enriched Uranium and Weapons grade plutonium have assumed positions of dominant importance among the actinide elements because of their successful uses as explosive ingredients in nuclear weapons and the place they hold as key materials in the development of industrial use of nuclear power. While most chemists are familiar with the practical interest concerning HEU and WG Pu, fewer know the subtleties among their hazards. In this study, a primer is provided regarding the hazards associated with working with HEU and WG Pu metals and oxides. The care that must be taken to safely handle these materials is emphasizedmore »and the extent of the hazards is described. The controls needed to work with HEU and WG Pu metals and oxides are differentiated. Given the choice, one would rather work with HEU metal and oxides than WG Pu metal and oxides.« less

  20. Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, L J; Borisov, G B

    2004-07-21

    A fifth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held February 16-18, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 46 Russian attendees from 14 different Russian organizations and six non-Russian attendees, four from the US and two from France. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C.

  1. Towards a mutually reinforcing future : opportunities to integrate nuclear weapons stewardship and arms control objectives.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, Lani Miyoshi; DeLand, Sharon Marie; Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2010-07-01

    2010 NPR and President Obama's 2009 Prague Speech highlighted two key objectives with an inherent underlying tension: (1) Moving towards a world free of nuclear weapons; and (2) Sustaining a safe, secure, and effective nuclear arsenal. Objective 1 depends, inter alia, upon reductions in stockpiles at home and abroad and maintaining stability. Objective 2 depends upon needed investments in modernization and life extension. Objectives being pursued predominantly in parallel by largely separate communities.

  2. Literature survey of blast and fire effects of nuclear weapons on urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitter, T.A.; McCallen, D.B.; Kang, S.W.

    1982-06-01

    The American literature of the past 30 years on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons on urban areas has been surveyed. The relevant work is briefly sketched and areas where information is apparently lacking are noted. This report is intended to provide the basis for suggesting research priorities in the fire and blast effects area for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. It is also intended to provide entry into the literature for researchers. over 850 references are given.

  3. EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Weapons Component Testing Facility from Building 450 to Building 207, both within Technical Area 16, at the U.S....

  4. Assessing State Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: Using Bayesian Network Analysis of Social Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Olson, Jarrod; Whitney, Paul D.

    2010-04-16

    A Bayesian network (BN) model of social factors can support proliferation assessments by estimating the likelihood that a state will pursue a nuclear weapon. Social factors including political, economic, nuclear capability, security, and national identity and psychology factors may play as important a role in whether a State pursues nuclear weapons as more physical factors. This paper will show how using Bayesian reasoning on a generic case of a would-be proliferator State can be used to combine evidence that supports proliferation assessment. Theories and analysis by political scientists can be leveraged in a quantitative and transparent way to indicate proliferation risk. BN models facilitate diagnosis and inference in a probabilistic environment by using a network of nodes and acyclic directed arcs between the nodes whose connections, or absence of, indicate probabilistic relevance, or independence. We propose a BN model that would use information from both traditional safeguards and the strengthened safeguards associated with the Additional Protocol to indicate countries with a high risk of proliferating nuclear weapons. This model could be used in a variety of applications such a prioritization tool and as a component of state safeguards evaluations. This paper will discuss the benefits of BN reasoning, the development of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) BN state proliferation model and how it could be employed as an analytical tool.

  5. Approaches to integrating nuclear weapons stockpile management and arms control objectives.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, Lani Miyoshi; DeLand, Sharon Marie; Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2010-06-01

    Historically, U.S. arms control policy and the U.S. nuclear weapons enterprise have been reactive to each other, rather than interdependent and mutually reinforcing. One element of the divergence has been the long timescale necessary to plan and create substantive changes in the infrastructure vs. the inherent unpredictability of arms control outcomes. We explore several examples that illustrate this tension, some of the costs and implications associated with this reactive paradigm, and illustrate that, while the nuclear weapons enterprise has long considered the implications of arms control in sizing capacity of its missions, it has not substantively considered arms control in construction requirement for capabilities and products. Since previous arms control agreements have limited numbers and types of deployed systems, with delivery systems as the object of verification, this disconnect has not been forefront. However, as future agreements unfold, the warhead itself may become the treaty limited item and the object of verification. Such a scenario might offer both the need and the opportunity to integrate nuclear weapons and arms control requirements in unprecedented ways. This paper seeks to inspire new thinking on how such integration could be fostered and the extent to which it can facilitate significant reduction in nuclear stockpiles.

  6. Progress toward mutual reciprocal inspections of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gosnell, T.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    In March 1994, the United States and the Russian Federation announced their intention to conduct mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) to confirm inventories of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons. Subsequent interactions between the two countries have established the basis for an MRI regime, covering instrumentation, candidate sites for MRI, and protection of information deemed sensitive by the countries. This paper discusses progress made toward MRI, stressing measurement technologies and observables, as well as prospects for MRI implementation. An analysis is presented of observables that might be exploited to provide assurance that the material being measured could have come from a dismantled weapon rather than other sources. Instrumentation to exploit these observables will also be discussed, as will joint US/Russian efforts to demonstrate such instrumentation. Progress toward a so-called ``program of cooperation`` between the two countries in protecting each other`s sensitive information will be reviewed. All of these steps are essential components of an eventual comprehensive regime for controlling fissile materials from weapons.

  7. Modeling of the performance of weapons MOX fuel in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvis, J.; Bellanger, P.; Medvedev, P.G.; Peddicord, K.L.; Gellene, G.I.

    1999-05-01

    Both the Russian Federation and the US are pursing mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel in light water reactors (LWRs) for the disposition of excess plutonium from disassembled nuclear warheads. Fuel performance models are used which describe the behavior of MOX fuel during irradiation under typical power reactor conditions. The objective of this project is to perform the analysis of the thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of weapons MOX fuel pins under LWR conditions. If fuel performance analysis indicates potential questions, it then becomes imperative to assess the fuel pin design and the proposed operating strategies to reduce the probability of clad failure and the associated release of radioactive fission products into the primary coolant system. Applying the updated code to anticipated fuel and reactor designs, which would be used for weapons MOX fuel in the US, and analyzing the performance of the WWER-100 fuel for Russian weapons plutonium disposition are addressed in this report. The COMETHE code was found to do an excellent job in predicting fuel central temperatures. Also, despite minor predicted differences in thermo-mechanical behavior of MOX and UO{sub 2} fuels, the preliminary estimate indicated that, during normal reactor operations, these deviations remained within limits foreseen by fuel pin design.

  8. North Korea's nuclear weapons program:verification priorities and new challenges.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Duk-ho

    2003-12-01

    A comprehensive settlement of the North Korean nuclear issue may involve military, economic, political, and diplomatic components, many of which will require verification to ensure reciprocal implementation. This paper sets out potential verification methodologies that might address a wide range of objectives. The inspection requirements set by the International Atomic Energy Agency form the foundation, first as defined at the time of the Agreed Framework in 1994, and now as modified by the events since revelation of the North Korean uranium enrichment program in October 2002. In addition, refreezing the reprocessing facility and 5 MWe reactor, taking possession of possible weapons components and destroying weaponization capabilities add many new verification tasks. The paper also considers several measures for the short-term freezing of the North's nuclear weapon program during the process of negotiations, should that process be protracted. New inspection technologies and monitoring tools are applicable to North Korean facilities and may offer improved approaches over those envisioned just a few years ago. These are noted, and potential bilateral and regional verification regimes are examined.

  9. History of the US weapons-usable plutonium disposition program leading to DOE`s record of decision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, D.J.; Thomas, J.F.; Bugos, R.G.

    1997-04-01

    This report highlights important events and studies concerning surplus weapons-usable plutonium disposition in the United States. Included are major events that led to the creation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition in 1994 and to that DOE office issuing the January 1997 Record of Decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Useable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Emphasis has been given to reactor-based plutonium disposition alternatives.

  10. Optical bullet-tracking algorithms for weapon localization in urban environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R S; Breitfeller, E F

    2006-03-31

    Localization of the sources of small-arms fire, mortars, and rocket propelled grenades is an important problem in urban combat. Weapons of this type produce characteristic signatures, such as muzzle flashes, that are visible in the infrared. Indeed, several systems have been developed that exploit the infrared signature of muzzle flash to locate the positions of shooters. However, systems based on muzzle flash alone can have difficulty localizing weapons if the muzzle flash is obscured or suppressed. Moreover, optical clutter can be problematic to systems that rely on muzzle flash alone. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a projectile tracking system that detects and localizes sources of small-arms fire, mortars and similar weapons using the thermal signature of the projectile rather than a muzzle flash. The thermal signature of a projectile, caused by friction as the projectile travels along its trajectory, cannot be concealed and is easily discriminated from optical clutter. The LLNL system was recently demonstrated at the MOUT facility of the Aberdeen Test Center [1]. In the live-fire demonstration, shooters armed with a variety of small-arms, including M-16s, AK-47s, handguns, mortars and rockets, were arranged at several positions in around the facility. Experiments ranged from a single-weapon firing a single-shot to simultaneous fire of all weapons on full automatic. The LLNL projectile tracking system was demonstrated to localize multiple shooters at ranges up to 400m, far greater than previous demonstrations. Furthermore, the system was shown to be immune to optical clutter that is typical in urban combat. This paper describes the image processing and localization algorithms designed to exploit the thermal signature of projectiles for shooter localization. The paper begins with a description of the image processing that extracts projectile information from a sequence of infrared images. Key to the processing is an adaptive spatio-temporal filter developed to suppress scene clutter. The filtered image sequence is further processed to produce a set of parameterized regions, which are classified using several discriminate functions. Regions that are classified as projectiles are passed to a data association algorithm that matches features from these regions with existing tracks, or initializes new tracks as needed. A Kalman filter is used to smooth and extrapolate existing tracks. Shooter locations are determined by solving a combinatorial least-squares solution for all bullet tracks. It also provides an error ellipse for each shooter, quantifying the uncertainty of shooter location. The paper concludes with examples from the live-fire exercise at the Aberdeen Test Center.

  11. Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Department's Excess Weapons Inventories and Selected Sensitive Equipment used by Protective Forces"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy has, on several occasions, revised its security posture based on identified threats and adversaries. These revisions in security posture have driven Departmental sites to upgrade their defensive and tactical equipment. Subsequent changes in the perceived threats have, in some cases, led to a reduction in the need for certain types of weapons, thus creating a pool of surplus equipment. These surplus weapons could potentially be used by other Department sites and Federal law enforcement agencies. Recent Office of Inspector General reports have raised concerns with the adequacy of controls related to defensive and tactical equipment. For example, our report on Management Controls Over Defense Related High Risk Property (OAS-M-08-06, April 2008) found that administrative controls over certain defense related high risk property were not sufficient for providing accountability over these items. Because of prior reported weaknesses in controls over defensive and tactical equipment, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors were properly managing excess weapons inventories and selected sensitive equipment used by protective forces. Our review disclosed that the Department was not always properly managing its inventories of excess weapons and selected sensitive equipment. We identified issues with the retention of unneeded weapons at many locations and with the identification and tracking of sensitive items. More specifically: Sites maintained large inventories of weapons that were no longer needed but had not been made available for use by either other Departmental sites or other Federal law enforcement agencies. For instance, at six of the locations included in our review we identified a total of 2,635 unneeded weapons with a total acquisition value of over $2.8 million that had not been officially declared as excess - an action that would have made them available for others to use. In addition; Sites were not always identifying, tracking and properly disposing of potentially high risk and sensitive equipment. In particular, we identified control weaknesses in this area related to weapons sights and scopes. These issues occurred because the Department did not have processes in place to properly manage excess inventories of weapons. In particular, the Department does not have requirements for ensuring timely declaration of excess weapons. Additionally, certain sites indicated that they were unwilling to give up excess weapons because of the possibility that they may be needed in the future. However, other sites had a need for some of these weapons and could have avoided purchasing them had they been made available through the excess screening process. Also, we found that the Department lacks clear guidance on the identification of high risk/sensitive equipment. Except for immaterial differences, we were able to locate and verify accountability over the items of defensive and tactical equipment we selected for review. Specifically, we took statistical samples of weapons, ammunition, and other related equipment and were able to verify their existence. While these accountability measures were noteworthy, additional action is necessary to strengthen controls over weapon and sensitive equipment management. Untimely declaration of excess weapons may result in an inefficient use of scarce Government resources. Similarly, if selected high risk/sensitive equipment is not properly categorized and tracked, accountability issues may occur. To address these issues, we made recommendations aimed at improving the management of these categories of defensive and tactical equipment.

  12. nuclear weapons

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afedkcp8/%2A en0/%2A8/%2A en

  13. Advancing Methods for Determining the Source of HEU Used in Terrorist Nuclear Weapon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFleur, Adrienne; Charlton, William

    2007-09-17

    stream_source_info 2007 LaFleur Thesis.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 58569 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name 2007 LaFleur Thesis.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by ADRIENNE MARIE LAFLEUR iii ABSTRACT Advancing Methods for Determining the Source of HEU Used in Terrorist Nuclear Weapon (April 2007) Adrienne M. LaFleur Department of Nuclear Engineering Texas A...

  14. Security implications of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction in the Middle East. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajjar, S.G.

    1998-12-17

    The author argues that the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Iran-Iraq rivalry, and the lack of progress in the peace process are strong incentives for nations in the region to acquire weapons of mass destruction (WMD). He documents Israeli, Iranian, and Arab WMD programs and capabilities, referencing use of WMD in the region. He discusses the reasons why the major regional powers seek WMD capabilities and examines the nature of the proliferation dynamic as well as nonproliferation and counterproliferation approaches applicable to the region. The author offers several recommendations designed to strengthen these efforts and deal more effectively with causes of proliferation.

  15. Legislative Reform of the Kaesong Industrial Complex in North Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Jeehye

    2011-01-01

    program and promote nuclear proliferation worldwide. Evensignificance in non- proliferation of nuclear weapons andattention to its proliferation of nuclear weapons and

  16. Technology diffusion of a different nature: Applications of nuclear safeguards technology to the chemical weapons verification regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadner, S.P. [Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reisman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Turpen, E. [Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The following discussion focuses on the issue of arms control implementation from the standpoint of technology and technical assistance. Not only are the procedures and techniques for safeguarding nuclear materials undergoing substantial changes, but the implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) will give rise to technical difficulties unprecedented in the implementation of arms control verification. Although these regimes present new challenges, an analysis of the similarities between the nuclear and chemical weapons non-proliferation verification regimes illustrates the overlap in technological solutions. Just as cost-effective and efficient technologies can solve the problems faced by the nuclear safeguards community, these same technologies offer solutions for the CWC safeguards regime. With this in mind, experts at the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), who are responsible for verification implementation, need to devise a CWC verification protocol that considers the technology already available. The functional similarity of IAEA and the OPCW, in conjunction with the technical necessities of both verification regimes, should receive attention with respect to the establishment of a technical assistance program. Lastly, the advanced status of the nuclear and chemical regime vis-a-vis the biological non-proliferation regime can inform our approach to implementation of confidence building measures for biological weapons.

  17. Evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, J.S.; Butler, J.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Edmunds, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-04

    The Department of Energy Record of Decision (ROD) selected alternatives for disposition of surplus, weapons grade plutonium. A major objective of this decision was to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Other concerns addressed included economic, technical, institutional, schedule, environmental, and health and safety issues. The analysis reported here was conducted in parallel with technical, environmental, and nonproliferation analyses; it uses multiattribute utility theory to combine these considerations in order to facilitate an integrated evaluation of alternatives. This analysis is intended to provide additional insight regarding alternative evaluation and to assist in understanding the rationale for the choice of alternatives recommended in the ROD. Value functions were developed for objectives of disposition, and used to rank alternatives. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the ranking of alternatives for the base case was relatively insensitive to changes in assumptions over reasonable ranges. The analyses support the recommendation of the ROD to pursue parallel development of the vitrification immobilization alternative and the use of existing light water reactors alternative. 27 refs., 109 figs., 20 tabs.

  18. Report to Congress on stockpile reliability, weapon remanufacture, and the role of nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.H.; Brown, P.S.; Alonso, C.T.

    1987-10-01

    This report analyzes two issues: (1) ''whether past warhead reliability problems demonstrate that nuclear explosive testing is needed to identify or to correct stockpile reliability,'' or (2) ''whether a program of stockpile inspection, nonnuclear testing, and remanufacture would be sufficient to deal with stockpile reliability problems.'' Chapter 1 examines the reasons for nuclear testing. Although the thrust of the request from Congressman Aspin et al., has to do with the need for nuclear testing as it relates to stockpile reliability and remanufacture, there are other very important reasons for nuclear testing. Since there has been increasing interest in the US Congress for more restrictive nuclear test limits, we have addressed the overall need for nuclear testing and the potential impact of further nuclear test limitations. Chapter 1 also summarizes the major conclusions of a recent study conducted by the Scientific and Academic Advisory Committee (SAAC) for the President of the University of California; the SAAC report is entitled, ''Nuclear Weapon Tests: The Role of the University of California-Department of Energy Laboratories.'' Chapter 2 presents a brief history of stockpile problems that involved post-deployment nuclear testing for their resolution. Chapter 3 addresses the problems involved in remanufacturing nuclear weapons, and Chapter 4 discusses measures that should be taken to prepare for possible future restrictive test limits.

  19. Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-12-15

    This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

  20. Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

  1. The B61-based "Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator:" Clever retrofit or headway towards fourth-generation nuclear weapons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A

    2005-01-01

    It is scientifically and technically possible to build an earth penetrating device that could bury a B61-7 warhead 30 meters into concrete, or 150 meters into earth, before detonating it. The device (based on knowledge and technology that is available since 50 years) would however by large and cumbersome. Better penetrator materials, components able to withstand larger stresses, higher impact velocities, and/or high-explosive driven penetration aids, can only marginally improve the device. It is conclude that the robust nuclear earth penetrator (RNEP) program may be as much motivated by the development of new technology directly applicable to next generation nuclear weapons, and by the political necessity to periodically reasses the role and utility of nuclear weapons, then by the perceived military need of a weapon able to destroy deeply buried targets.

  2. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-29

    To establish an effective management system [i.e., quality assurance programs (QAPs)] using the performance requirements of this Order, coupled with technical standards where appropriate. Cancels DOE O 414.1.

  3. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-06-17

    This Order ensures that the quality of DOE/NNSA products and services meets or exceeds the customers' expectations. Cancels DOE O 414.1B and DOE N 411.1. Canceled by DOE O 414.1D.

  4. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-29

    This Order ensures that the quality of DOE/NNSA products and services meets or exceeds the customer's expectations. This Order cancels DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance, dated 9-29-99, and Attachment 1, paragraph 8, and Attachment 2, paragraph 22, of DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, dated 3-27-98. Cancels: DOE O 414.1A and DOE O 440.1A, parts as noted.

  5. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 3: A new reactor concept without uranium or thorium for burning weapons-grade plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Schnitzler, B.G.; Fletcher, C.D. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) requested that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) examine concepts that focus only on the destruction of 50,000 kg of weapons-grade plutonium. A concept has been developed by the INEL for a low-temperature, low-pressure, low-power density, low-coolant-flow-rate light water reactor that destroys plutonium quickly without using uranium or thorium. This concept is very safe and could be designed, constructed, and operated in a reasonable time frame. This concept does not produce electricity. Not considering other missions frees the design from the paradigms and constraints used by proponents of other dispositioning concepts. The plutonium destruction design goal is most easily achievable with a large, moderate power reactor that operates at a significantly lower thermal power density than is appropriate for reactors with multiple design goals. This volume presents the assumptions and requirements, a reactor concept overview, and a list of recommendations. The appendices contain detailed discussions on plutonium dispositioning, self-protection, fuel types, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, off-site radiation releases, and economics.

  6. High-value use of weapons-plutonium by burning in molten salt accelerator-driven subcritical systems or reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, C.D.; Venneri, F.

    1993-11-01

    The application of thermal-spectrum molten-salt reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems to the destruction of weapons-return plutonium is considered from the perspective of deriving the maximum societal benefit. The enhancement of electric power production from burning the fertile fuel {sup 232}Th with the plutonium is evaluated. Also the enhancement of destruction of the accumulated waste from commercial nuclear reactors is considered using the neutron-rich weapons plutonium. Most cases examined include the concurrent transmutation of the long-lived actinide and fission product waste ({sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 126}Sn and {sup 79}Se).

  7. Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, V. ); Schultz, S.C. ); Robison, W.L. )

    1991-05-01

    A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. This document is the bibliography.

  8. Introduction Quality & Information Asymmetry Quality & Product Differentiation Quality & Outsourcing Quality & Supplier Quality Competition in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    & Outsourcing Quality & Supplier Quality Competition in Supply Chain Networks with Applications to Information Asymmetry, Product Differentiation, Outsourcing, and Supplier Selection Dong "Michelle" Li Doctoral & Supplier 1 Introduction 2 Quality & Information Asymmetry A Supply Chain Network Model with Information

  9. 784 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART C: APPLICATIONS AND REVIEWS, VOL. 36, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2006 Improving Weapon Detection in Single Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    focus on objects of metallic composition (knives and guns), while unconventional weapons could easily go, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2006 Improving Weapon Detection in Single Energy X-Ray Images Through Pseudocoloring Abstract--This paper describes a series of linear and nonlinear pseudocoloring maps designed and applied

  10. 10/10/2009 15:02This Week in Evolution: Are antibiotics a weapon or a signal? Page 1 of 7http://blog.lib.umn.edu/denis036/thisweekinevolution/2009/08/are_antibiotics_a_weapon_or_a.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Andy

    10/10/2009 15:02This Week in Evolution: Are antibiotics a weapon or a signal? Page 1 of 7http://blog scheme? | Main | Peacock comment » Are antibiotics a weapon or a signal? (Guest blog by my PhD student a weapon or a signal? Page 2 of 7http://blog.lib.umn.edu/denis036/thisweekinevolution/2009/08/are

  11. Nuclear Weapons in Regional Contexts: The Cases of Argentina and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junior, Olival Freire; Moreira, Ildeu C; Barros, Fernando de Souza

    2015-01-01

    South America is a region which is free from nuclear weapons. However, this was not an inevitable development from the relationships among its countries. Indeed, regional rivalries between Brazil and Argentina, with military implications for both countries, lasted a long time. After WWII these countries took part in the race to obtain nuclear technologies and nuclear ambitions were part of the game. In the mid 1980s, the end of military dictatorships and the successful establishing of democratic institutions put an end to the race. Thus regional and national interests in addition to the establishment of democracies in Latin America have been responsible for the building of trust between the two countries. Meaningful international initiatives are once again needed in the framework of worldwide cooperation. This cooperation is better developed when democratic regimes are in place.

  12. Development of a fresh MOX fuel transport package for disposition of weapons plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, S.B.; Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Michelhaugh, R.D.; Chae, S.M.

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy announced its Record of Decision on January 14, 1997, to embark on a dual-track approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium using immobilization in glass or ceramics and burning plutonium as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in reactors. In support of the MOX fuel alternative, Oak Ridge National Laboratory initiated development of conceptual designs for a new package for transporting fresh (unirradiated) MOX fuel assemblies between the MOX fabrication facility and existing commercial light-water reactors in the US. This paper summarizes progress made in development of new MOX transport package conceptual designs. The development effort has included documentation of programmatic and technical requirements for the new package and development and analysis of conceptual designs that satisfy these requirements.

  13. Cooperative Studies in the Utilization and Storage of Excess Weapons-Grade Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolyatko, V. V.

    1998-01-29

    This technical report is a tangible and verifiable deliverable associated with the Nuclear Group subproject “Cooperative Studies in the Utilization and Storage of Excess Weapons-grade Plutonium.” This report is an assessment ofthe work performed by the Russian party from 1 October 1995 through 30 September 1996 regarding milestones defined in the contract between the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES). In these interactions, TEES serves as agent of the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium (ANRCP) in the capacity oflead institution for the Nuclear Group of the ANRCP. The official Statement ofWork dated 8 April 1996 enumerates specific milestones and deliverables. In its present form, this report is an edited version ofthe translation submitted to TEES by MEPhI on 7 October 1996. The principal investigators for this subproject are Dr. Paul Nelson of TEES and Dr. Victor Bolyatko of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute.

  14. A Passive Tamper Indicating Enclosure For Use Within A Nuclear Weapons Monitoring Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Helen; Tanner, Jennifer E.; Allen, Keir; Benz, Jacob M.; McOmish, Sarah; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2012-10-01

    AWE and PNNL are engaged in a technical collaboration investigating techniques to enhance continuity of knowledge over Treaty Accountable Items, with emphasis on a verified nuclear weapons dismantlement process. Tamper Indicating Enclosures (TIE) will likely be deployed as part of a chain of custody regime to indicate an unauthorised attempt to access a Treaty Accountable Item, or secure authenticated monitoring equipment. In 2011, the collaboration presented a paper at the INMM annual conference held in Palm Desert, CA titled “Passive Tamper Indicating Enclosures Incorporating Embedded Optical Fibre”, which discussed the concept of integrating optical fibres into TIEs for use as a passive tamper indicating mechanism. This paper provides an update on the Fibre Optic based TIE and introduces a second passive TIE concept based on the use of Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate) (PMMA). Concepts relating to deployment, tamper indication, and unique identification will be discussed.

  15. U.S. weapons-usable plutonium disposition policy: Implementation of the MOX fuel option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, A.L. [ed.] [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Gonzalez, V.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Political Science

    1998-10-01

    A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of US weapons-grade plutonium, which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to US plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

  16. Hanford struggles with transition. [Forum on future of DOE weapons site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, H.; Rubin, D.K.

    1993-09-27

    Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary kicked off a precedent-setting forum on the future of the US Energy Dept's largest and most environmentally troubled weapon plant site by announcing sweeping management changes and a Clinton administration commitment to new projects there. O'Leary announced changes in traditional contractor and management relationships at Hanford. She claimed these have created massive red tape that has already delayed the estimated $57-billion cleanup of hazardous and radioactive waste stored at the site over the last 50 years. The secretary also announced that starting Oct. 1, all Hanford subcontractors will report to Westinghouse Hanford Co., the overall management and operations contractor. She also outlined new safety initiatives for site wastes stored in 177 underground tanks, many of them badly deteriorated.

  17. Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

    2010-01-11

    To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

  18. Physical and Mathematical Description of Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattingly, J.K.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Valentine, T.E.

    1997-09-26

    This report describes all time and frequency analysis parameters measured with the new Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) processor with three input channels: (1) the 252Cf source ionization chamber (2) a detection channel; and (3) a second detection channel for active measurements. An intuitive and physical description of the various functions is given as well as a brief mathematical description and a brief description of how the data are acquired. If the fill five channel capability is used, the number of functions increases in number but not in type. The parameters provided by this new NWIS processor can be divided into two general classes: time analysis signatures including multiplicities and frequency analysis signatures. Data from measurements with an 18.75 kg highly enriched uranium (93.2 wt 0/0, 235U) metai casting for storage are presented to illustrate the various time and frequency analysis parameters.

  19. Summary of irradiation tests of mixed oxide fuel prepared with weapons-derived plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) test capsules prepared with weapons-derived plutonium were irradiated to a burnup of 50 GWd/MT. The MOX fuel was fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory by a master-mix process and irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Previous withdrawals of the same fuel have occurred at 9, 21, 30, and 40 GWd/MT. Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed this test series for the Department of Energy s Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). This paper describes the preparation of the MOX fuel, the equipment design, and the irradiation history of the test capsules and discussesthe significance of the more important observations of the post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). Fuel performance has been excellent and consistent with code predictions and with existing U.S. and European experience.

  20. Summary of Irradiation Tests of Mixed-Oxide Fuel Prepared with Weapons-Derived Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) test capsules prepared with weapons-derived plutonium have been irradiated to a burnup of 50 GWd/MT. The MOX fuel was fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory by a master-mix process and irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Previous withdrawals of the same fuel have occurred at 9, 21, 30, and 50 GWd/MT. Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed this test series for the Department of Energy's Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). This paper describes the preparation of the MOX fuel, the equipment desig, and the irradiation history of the test capsules and discusses the significance of the more important observations of the post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). Fuel performance has been excellent and consistent with code predictions and with existing U.S. and Europen experience.

  1. Dose reduction through robotics and automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, David Andrew

    1996-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War and subsequent break up of the Soviet Union, the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile now greatly exceeds any foreseeable future need (Quirck et al., 1993). To compensate for this excess, an estimated 20...

  2. Cooperative measures to support the Indo-Pak Agreement Reducing Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Sitakanta; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2014-04-01

    In 2012, India and Pakistan reaffirmed the Agreement on Reducing the Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons. Despite a history of mutual animosity and persistent conflict between the two countries, this agreement derives strength from a few successful nuclear confidence building measures that have stood the test of time. It also rests on the hope that the region would be spared a nuclear holocaust from an accidental nuclear weapon detonation that might be misconstrued as a deliberate use of a weapon by the other side. This study brings together two emerging strategic analysts from South Asia to explore measures to support the Agreement and further develop cooperation around this critical issue. This study briefly dwells upon the strategic landscape of nuclear South Asia with the respective nuclear force management structures, doctrines, and postures of India and Pakistan. It outlines the measures in place for the physical protection and safety of nuclear warheads, nuclear materials, and command and control mechanisms in the two countries, and it goes on to identify the prominent, emerging challenges posed by the introduction of new weapon technologies and modernization of the respective strategic forces. This is followed by an analysis of the agreement itself leading up to a proposed framework for cooperative measures that might enhance the spirit and implementation of the agreement.

  3. DRAFT - DOE O 452.2C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

  4. Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel Burnup Characteristics in Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Chang

    2006-07-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) test capsules prepared with weapons-derived plutonium have been irradiated to a burnup of 50 GWd/t. The MOX fuel was fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by a master-mix process and has been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Previous withdrawals of the same fuel have occurred at 9, 21, 30, 40, and 50 GWd/t. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) manages this test series for the Department of Energy’s Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). A UNIX BASH (Bourne Again SHell) script CMO has been written and validated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2 (CMO). The new Monte Carlo burnup analysis methodology in this paper consists of MCNP coupling through CMO with ORIGEN-2(MCWO). MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN-2. The fuel burnup analyses presented in this study were performed using MCWO. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations for the ATR small I-irradiation test position. The purpose of this report is to validate both the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxide (WG-MOX) test assembly model and the new fuel burnup analysis methodology by comparing the computed results against the neutron monitor measurements and the irradiated WG-MOX post irradiation examination (PIE) data.

  5. Environmental Radiation Dose Reconstruction for U.S. and Russian Weapons Production Facilities: Hanford and Mayak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansbaugh, Lynn R.; Degteva, M. O.; Kozheurov, V. P.; Napier, Bruce A.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.

    2003-05-01

    Another way to look at Cold War legacies is to examine the major environmental releases that resulted from past operation of Cold War-related facilities for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. Examining these historical releases and the resultant radiation dose to individuals living near these facilities is called environmental dose reconstruction. Dose reconstructions have been performed or are underway at most large Cold War installations in the United States, such as the Hanford facility; several are also underway in other countries, such as at the Mayak facility in Russia. The efforts in the United States are mostly based on historical operating records and current conditions, which are used to estimate environmental releases, transport, and human exposure. The Russian efforts are largely based on environmental measurements and measurements of human subjects; environmental transport modelling, when conducted, is used to organize and validate the measurements. Past operation of Cold War-related facilities for the manufacture of nuclear weapons has resulted in major releases of radionuclides into the environment. Reconstruction of the historical releases and the resultant radiation dose to individuals in the public living near these facilities is called environmental dose reconstruction. Dose reconstructions have been performed or are underway at most large Cold War installations in the United States; several are also underway in other countries. The types of activity performed, the operating histories, and the radionuclide releases vary widely across the different facilities. The U.S. Hanford Site and the Russian Mayak Production Association are used here to illustrate the nature of the assessed problems and the range of approaches developed to solve them.

  6. Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janeen Denise Robertson

    1999-02-01

    In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

  7. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1981-07-21

    To provide Department of Energy (DOE) policy, set forth principles, and assign responsibilities for establishing, implementing, and maintaining programs of plans and actions to assure quality achievement in DOE programs. Cancels DOE O 5700.6, dated 1-16-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.6B, dated 9-23-1986.

  8. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1981-01-16

    To provide Department of Energy (DOE) policy, set forth principles, and assign responsibilities for establishing, implementing, and maintaining programs of plans and actions to assure quality achievement in DOE programs. Canceled by DOE O 5700.6A, dated 7-21-1981.

  9. Steam Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, W.

    1989-01-01

    "STEAM QUALITY has been generally defined as the amount of moisture/vapor (or lack thereof) contained within steam produced from some form of boiler. It has long been used as the standard term for the measurement of ""wet or dry"" steam and as a...

  10. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-07-12

    To establish an effective management system [i.e., quality assurance programs(QAPs)] using the performance requirements of this Order, coupled with technical standards where appropriate. Change 1, dated 7/12/01, facilitates the Department's organizational transition necessitated by establishment of the NNSA. (Attachment 2 of this Order is canceled by DOE O 470.2B.) Cancels: DOE O 414.1

  11. Design Quality Criteria Design Quality Criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Sinderen, Marten

    Design Quality Criteria 19 Chapter 2 Design Quality Criteria This chapter discusses what qualities are desirable of an application protocol design, and what quality criteria can be used when evaluating methodology. The quality criteria presented are not peculiar to application protocol design

  12. Data Driven Quality Assurance and Quality Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Data Driven Quality Assurance & Quality Control," Patrick Roche, Conservation Services Group. Provides an overview of data QA/QC system design.

  13. A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

  14. Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, C.T.; Chapman, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by oilfield operations on and adjacent to each base. Results of the study are presented here for the US Department of the Navy to use in its program to reduce its reliance on petrolem by the development of different sources of energy. The study was accomplished under a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy's San Francisco Operations Office and the Department of the Navy's Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California, for joint research and development of geothermal energy at military installations.

  15. Rocky Flats Plant: Test bed for transitioning from weapons production mission to environmental restoration, waste management, and economic development missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, A.; Murthy, K.S.; Krenzer, R.W.; Williams, R.E.; Detamore, J.A.; Brown, C.M.; Francis, G.E.; Lucerna, J.J.

    1993-01-07

    Redirection of Rocky Flats Plant`s (RF) mission is an inevitable result of changes in the worldwide social, political, and environmental factors. These changes were exemplified in the cancellation of the W-88 Warhead in January 1992, by the President of the United States. These unprecedented changes have altered the RF`s traditional nuclear weapons production mission to the transition mission, i.e., cleanup, preparation for deactivation and decontamination, decommissioning, dismantlement and demolition, and when appropriate, economic development, of the facilities. The purpose of this paper is to describe the essentials of the technical approach and management actions advanced by EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc., to organize, staff, direct, and control the activities necessary to transition the RF from its historical weapons production mission to the transition mission.

  16. Rocky Flats Plant: Test bed for transitioning from weapons production mission to environmental restoration, waste management, and economic development missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, A.; Murthy, K.S.; Krenzer, R.W.; Williams, R.E.; Detamore, J.A.; Brown, C.M.; Francis, G.E.; Lucerna, J.J.

    1993-01-07

    Redirection of Rocky Flats Plant's (RF) mission is an inevitable result of changes in the worldwide social, political, and environmental factors. These changes were exemplified in the cancellation of the W-88 Warhead in January 1992, by the President of the United States. These unprecedented changes have altered the RF's traditional nuclear weapons production mission to the transition mission, i.e., cleanup, preparation for deactivation and decontamination, decommissioning, dismantlement and demolition, and when appropriate, economic development, of the facilities. The purpose of this paper is to describe the essentials of the technical approach and management actions advanced by EG G Rocky Flats, Inc., to organize, staff, direct, and control the activities necessary to transition the RF from its historical weapons production mission to the transition mission.

  17. Supporting Technology for Chain of Custody of Nuclear Weapons and Materials throughout the Dismantlement and Disposition Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunch, Kyle J. [United States Department of State, Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, Office of Verification and Transparency Technologies, Washington, DC (United States); Jones, Anthony M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Benz, Jacob M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Denlinger, Laura Schmidt [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-05-04

    The ratification and ongoing implementation of the New START Treaty have been widely regarded as noteworthy global security achievements for both the Obama Administration and the Putin (formerly Medvedev) regime. But deeper cuts that move beyond the United States and Russia to engage the P-5 and other nuclear weapons possessor states are envisioned under future arms control regimes, and are indeed required for the P-5 in accordance with their Article VI disarmament obligations in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Future verification needs will include monitoring the cessation of production of new fissile material for weapons, monitoring storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondary stages, and other materials. A fundamental challenge to implementing a nuclear disarmament regime is the ability to thwart unauthorized material diversion throughout the dismantlement and disposition process through strong chain of custody implementation. Verifying the declared presence, or absence, of nuclear materials and weapons components throughout the dismantlement and disposition lifecycle is a critical aspect of the disarmament process. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under these future arms control regimes will require new solutions. Since any acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes to prevent the release of classified or other proliferation-sensitive information, non-nuclear non-sensitive modalities may provide significant new verification tools which do not require the use of additional information barriers. Alternative verification technologies based upon electromagnetic and acoustics could potentially play an important role in fulfilling the challenging requirements of future verification regimes. For example, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to rapidly confirm the presence of specific components on a yes/no basis without revealing classified information. PNNL researchers have also used ultrasonic measurements to obtain images of material microstructures which may be used as templates or unique identifiers of treaty-limited items. Such alternative technologies are suitable for application in various stages of weapons dismantlement and often include the advantage of an inherent information barrier due to the inability to extract classified weapon design information from the collected data. As a result, these types of technologies complement radiation-based verification methods for arms control. This article presents an overview of several alternative verification technologies that are suitable for supporting a future, broader and more intrusive arms control regime that spans the nuclear weapons disarmament lifecycle. The general capabilities and limitations of each verification modality are discussed and example technologies are presented. Potential applications are defined in the context of the nuclear material and weapons lifecycle. Example applications range from authentication (e.g., tracking and signatures within the chain of custody from downloading through weapons storage, unclassified templates and unique identification) to verification of absence and final material disposition.

  18. A suggested approach to applying IAEA safeguards to plutonium in weapons components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, M.S.; Allentuck, J.

    1998-08-01

    It is the announced policy of the United States to make fissile material removed from its nuclear weapons stockpile subject to the US-IAEA voluntary safeguards agreement. Much of this material is plutonium in the form of pits. The application of traditional IAEA safeguards would reveal Restricted Data to unauthorized persons which is prohibited by US law and international treaties. Prior to the availability of a facility for the conversion of the plutonium in the pits to a non-sensitive form this obvious long-term solution to the problem is foreclosed. An alternative near-term approach to applying IAEA safeguards while preserving the necessary degree of confidentiality is required. This paper identifies such an approach. It presents in detail the form of the US declaration; the safeguards objectives which are met; inspection techniques which are utilized and the conclusion which the IAEA could reach concerning the contents of each item and the aggregate of all items. The approach would reveal the number of containers and the aggregate mass of plutonium in a set of n containers presented to the IAEA for verification while protecting data of the isotopic composition and plutonium mass of individual components. The suggested approach provides for traceability from the time the containers are sealed until the conversion of the plutonium to a non-sensitive form.

  19. Safeguards and security requirements for weapons plutonium disposition in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.L.; Strait, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Fission Energy and Systems Safety Program

    1994-10-01

    This paper explores the issues surrounding the safeguarding of the plutonium disposition process in support of the United States nuclear weapons dismantlement program. It focuses on the disposition of the plutonium by burning mixed oxide fuel in light water reactors (LWR) and addresses physical protection, material control and accountability, personnel security and international safeguards. The S and S system needs to meet the requirements of the DOE Orders, NRC Regulations and international safeguards agreements. Experience has shown that incorporating S and S measures into early facility designs and integrating them into operations provides S and S that is more effective, more economical, and less intrusive. The plutonium disposition safeguards requirements with which the US has the least experience are the implementation of international safeguards on plutonium metal; the large scale commercialization of the mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and the transportation to and loading in the LWRs of fresh mixed oxide fuel. It is in these areas where the effort needs to be concentrated if the US is to develop safeguards and security systems that are effective and efficient.

  20. Recovery from a chemical weapons accident or incident: A concept paper on planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzenberg, C.L.; Haffenden, R.; Lerner, K.; Meleski, S.A.; Tanzman, E.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Lewis, L.M. [US Dept. of Agriculture (United States); Hemphill, R.C. [Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (United States); Adams, J.D. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Emergency planning for an unintended release of chemical agent from the nation`s chemical weapons stockpile should include preparation for. the period following implementation of immediate emergency response. That period -- the recovery, reentry, and restoration stage -- is the subject of this report. The report provides an overview of the role of recovery, reentry, and restoration planning in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), describes the transition from immediate emergency response to restoration, and analyzes the legal framework that would govern restoration activities. Social, economic, and administrative issues, as well as technical ones, need to be considered in the planning effort. Because of possible jurisdictional conflicts, appropriate federal, state, and local agencies need to be included in a coordinated planning process. Advance consideration should be given to the pertinent federal and state statutes and regulations. On the federal level, the principal statutes and regulations to be considered are those associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; and the National Environmental Policy Act. This report recommends that extensive preaccident planning be undertaken for the recovery, reentry, and restoration stage and outlines several key issues that should be considered in that planning. The need for interagency cooperation and coordination at all levels of the planning process is emphasized.

  1. Supercritical-fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) cleaning of nuclear weapon components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Rubin, J.B.

    1998-05-01

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been evaluated as a cleaning solvent for the cleaning of plutonium (Pu) metal parts. The results of the evaluation show that SCCO{sub 2} is an effective alternative to halogenated solvents that are conventionally used for removing organic and inorganic contaminants from the surface of these parts. The cleaning process was demonstrated at the laboratory scale for steel and uranium substrates and has been found to be compatible with Pu. The efficacy of this cleaning method is found to be dependent on process conditions of pressure, temperature, fluid-flow rate, as well as cleaning time. Process parameters of P > 2,500 psi, T > 40 C, and moderate fluid flow rates, produced good cleaning results in less than 10 minutes using a simple flow-through process configuration. Within the parameter range studied, cleaning efficiency generally improved with increasing process pressure and flow rate. SCCO{sub 2} cleaning is suitable for a variety of component cleaning tasks and is adaptable to precision cleaning requirements. The SCCO{sub 2} cleaning process is currently being developed for deployment for weapons production at LANL.

  2. American perspectives on security : energy, environment, nuclear weapons, and terrorism : 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herron, Kerry Gale; Jenkins-Smith, Hank C.; Silva, Carol L.

    2011-03-01

    We report findings from an Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone among the American public in mid-2010 on US energy and environmental security. Key areas of investigation include public perceptions shaping the context for debate about a comprehensive national energy policy, and what levels of importance are assigned to various prospective energy technologies. Additionally, we investigate how public views on global climate change are evolving, how the public assesses the risks and benefits of nuclear energy, preferences for managing used nuclear fuel, and public trust in sources of scientific and technical information. We also report findings from a national Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone in mid-2010 on public views of the relevance of US nuclear weapons today, support for strategic arms control, and assessments of the potential for nuclear abolition. Additionally, we analyze evolving public views of the threat of terrorism, assessments of progress in the struggle against terrorism, and tolerance for intrusive antiterror policies. Where possible, findings from each survey are compared with previous surveys in this series for analyses of trends.

  3. The distribution and history of nuclear weapons related contamination in sediments from the Ob River, Siberia as determined by isotopic ratios of Plutonium, Neptunium, and Cesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenna, Timothy C

    2002-01-01

    This thesis addresses the sources and transport of nuclear weapons related contamination in the Ob River region, Siberia. In addition to being one of the largest rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean, the bulk of the former ...

  4. EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium...

  5. Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellanger, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    similar conventional UO? fuel. Weapons-grade MOX behavior. However, MOX fuel rods feature higher fuel centerline temperatures due to a lower thermal conductivity. Moreover, higher diffusion in MOX fuel results in a slightly higher fission gas release...

  6. Nuclear Safety Design Principles & the Concept of Independence: Insights from Nuclear Weapon Safety for Other High-Consequence Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, Jeffrey D.

    2014-05-01

    Insights developed within the U.S. nuclear weapon system safety community may benefit system safety design, assessment, and management activities in other high consequence domains. The approach of assured nuclear weapon safety has been developed that uses the Nuclear Safety Design Principles (NSDPs) of incompatibility, isolation, and inoperability to design safety features, organized into subsystems such that each subsystem contributes to safe system responses in independent and predictable ways given a wide range of environmental contexts. The central aim of the approach is to provide a robust technical basis for asserting that a system can meet quantitative safety requirements in the widest context of possible adverse or accident environments, while using the most concise arrangement of safety design features and the fewest number of specific adverse or accident environment assumptions. Rigor in understanding and applying the concept of independence is crucial for the success of the approach. This paper provides a basic description of the assured nuclear weapon safety approach, in a manner that illustrates potential application to other domains. There is also a strong emphasis on describing the process for developing a defensible technical basis for the independence assertions between integrated safety subsystems.

  7. Genetic Analysis of Bread Making Quality Stability in Wheat using a Halberd X Len Recombinant Inbred Line Population 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poudel, Ashima

    2012-07-16

    Wheat grain quality has a complex genetic architecture heavily influenced by the growing environment. Consistency in wheat quality not only affects the efficiency of milling and baking but also the quality of end-use ...

  8. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

  9. Trace Fission Product Ratios for Nuclear Forensics Attribution of Weapons-Grade Plutonium from Fast Breeder Reactor Blankets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Jeremy

    2014-08-13

    for the 500-MWe Indian PFBR was obtained from Chirayath et al.22 and essential parameters are listed in Table II. There is an active core, one meter in height, which consists of an inner core and outer core of MOX “driver” fuel. The MOX fuel of the active...-Particle MOX – Mixed Oxide MWd/kg – Megawatt-day per kilogram of heavy metal MWe – Megawatt electric NPT – Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons ORNL – Oak Ridge National Laboratory PFBR – Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor PHWR...

  10. Quality Assurance Program Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The achievement of quality in LM activities and products requires implementation of a formal Quality Assurance (QA) Program. This program establishes principles, requirements, practices, and...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Prepared for Environmental Conservation policy of Environment Canada. #12;COASTWRITERS RESEARCH & COMMUNICATION · iii ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ..................................................................................................44 Environmental commitments

  12. On the public perception of the risks from nuclear weapons: Would oralloy be more acceptable than plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunsman, D.M.

    1993-03-01

    We technologists generally only address risk magnitudes in our analyses, although other studies have found nineteen additional dimensions for the way the public perceives risk. These include controllability, voluntariness, catastrophic potential, and trust in the institution putting forth the risk. We and the geneml public use two different languages, and to understand what their concerns are, we need to realize that the culture surrounding nuclear weapons is completely alien to the general public. Ultimately, the acceptability of a risk is a values question, not a technical question. For most of the risk dimensions, the public would perceive no significant difference between using oralloy and plutonium. This does not mean that the suggested design change should not be proposed, only that the case for, or against, it be made comprehensively using the best information available today. The world has changed: the ending of the cold war has decreased the benefit of nuclear weapons in the minds of the public and the specter of Chernobyl has increased the perceived risks of processes that use radioactive materials. Our analyses need to incorporate the lessons pertinent to this newer world.

  13. On the public perception of the risks from nuclear weapons: Would oralloy be more acceptable than plutonium?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunsman, D.M.

    1993-03-01

    We technologists generally only address risk magnitudes in our analyses, although other studies have found nineteen additional dimensions for the way the public perceives risk. These include controllability, voluntariness, catastrophic potential, and trust in the institution putting forth the risk. We and the geneml public use two different languages, and to understand what their concerns are, we need to realize that the culture surrounding nuclear weapons is completely alien to the general public. Ultimately, the acceptability of a risk is a values question, not a technical question. For most of the risk dimensions, the public would perceive no significant difference between using oralloy and plutonium. This does not mean that the suggested design change should not be proposed, only that the case for, or against, it be made comprehensively using the best information available today. The world has changed: the ending of the cold war has decreased the benefit of nuclear weapons in the minds of the public and the specter of Chernobyl has increased the perceived risks of processes that use radioactive materials. Our analyses need to incorporate the lessons pertinent to this newer world.

  14. A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

  15. Distributed GIS for Monitoring and Modeling Urban Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

    The progress of technology has made the measurement of air quality and the simulation of complex air pollution models both feasible and cost-effective. However, there is a long way to go in terms of facilitating widespread ...

  16. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceRisk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane, Senior

  17. Quality Counts Certificate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilek, Kevin

    2007-01-31

    This certificate accompanies the Quality Counts program. 1 page. It comes in packages of 25 certificates....

  18. Track 9: Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 9: Quality Assurance

  19. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension impurities can be corrected if they are a nuisance. Before beginning any treatment plan, have water tested select the most effective and economical treatment method. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications

  20. Y-12 hosts visit from directors of weapons labs | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named MineralogicalComplex hosts visit from ... Y-12

  1. Summary report of the screening process to determine reasonable alternatives for long-term storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-29

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials (primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium) have become surplus to national defense needs both in the US and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety and health consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. As announced in the Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Department of Energy is currently conducting an evaluation process for disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials determined surplus to National Security needs, and long-term storage of national security and programmatic inventories, and surplus weapons-usable fissile materials that are not able to go directly from interim storage to disposition. An extensive set of long-term storage and disposition options was compiled. Five broad long-term storage options were identified; thirty-seven options were considered for plutonium disposition; nine options were considered for HEU disposition; and eight options were identified for Uranium-233 disposition. Section 2 discusses the criteria used in the screening process. Section 3 describes the options considered, and Section 4 provides a detailed summary discussions of the screening results.

  2. HANDBOOK FOR CONDUCTING ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEWS RELATED TO TRIBAL AND INDIAN PARTICIPATION IN THE CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND CLEANUP OF THE NUCLEAR WEAPONS COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cristann Gibson; Mervyn L. Tano; Albert Wing

    1999-08-31

    There were three major projects undertaken at the outset of the DOE/EM 22 Cooperative Agreement back in September 1995. There was a project relating to Tribal oral histories. Another project of the Cooperative Agreement related to technology and Tribal values and needs. This project by analogy could apply to issues of technology, environmental cleanup and other indigenous peoples internationally. How can Indian Tribes participate in defining the need for technology development rather than merely learning to adapt themselves and their situations and values to technology developed by others with differing needs, values and economic resources? And the third project was the placement of a Tribal intern in EM-22.

  3. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including unenriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to diver

  4. IT Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality, error-free work holds down costs. Avoiding mistakes and rework saves valuable time, effort, and materials. Quality assurance provides the mechanisms for paying close attention to details...

  5. Quality Assurance | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality Assurance Is A Key Focus At Jefferson Lab Quality assurance is a critical function at Jefferson Lab, protecting workers, lab facilities, the environment and the public. A D...

  6. Quality Research Administration Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    Quality Research Administration Meeting November, 2014 #12;Agenda Sponsored Projects Administration Update Contract and Grant Accounting Update Uniform Guidance Update External Audit Coordination Nancy Lewis Quality Research Administration MeetingNovember, 2014 #12;Sponsored Projects Administration

  7. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Muir, James F. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., J. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

  8. Leveraging U.S. nuclear weapons policy to advance U.S. nonproliferation goals : implications of major theories of international relations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Andrew

    2009-06-01

    National policymakers are currently considering a dilemma of critical importance to the continued security of the United States: how can U.S. nuclear weapons policies be leveraged to benefit U.S. nuclear nonproliferation goals in the near-term, without sacrificing U.S. national security? In its role supporting U.S. nuclear weapons policy, Sandia National Laboratories has a responsibility to provide objective technical advice to support policy deliberations on this question. However, to best fulfill this duty Sandia must have a broader understanding of the context of the problem. To help develop this understanding, this paper analyzes the two predominant analytical perspectives of international relations theory to explore their prescriptions for how nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policies interact. As lenses with which to view and make sense of the world, theories of international relations must play a crucial role in framing the trade-offs at the intersection of the nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policy domains. An analysis of what these theories suggest as courses of action to leverage nuclear weapons policies to benefit nonproliferation goals is then offered, with particular emphasis on where the policy prescriptions resulting from the respective theories align to offer near-term policy changes with broad theoretical support. These policy prescriptions are then compared to the 2001 Nuclear Posture Review to understand what the theories indicate policymakers may have gotten right in their dealing with the nuclear dilemma, and where they may have gone wrong. Finally, a brief international relations research agenda is proposed to help address the dilemma between nuclear deterrence and nuclear nonproliferation policies, with particular emphasis on how such an agenda can best support the needs of the policy community and a potential 'all things nuclear' policy deliberation and decision-support framework.

  9. Surface Water Quality Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Standards Team. This advisory group, with representation from water asso- ciations, the agricultural industry, engineering firms, environmental organizations, consumer groups and government entities, is working with TCEQ staff to review and possibly...SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards...

  10. Software Quality, Software Process,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Richard

    Software Quality, Software Process, and Software Testing Dick Hamlet Portland State University Department of Computer Science Center for Software Quality Research PO Box 751 Portland, OR 97207 Internet. However, unless testing goals are clearly related to true measurements of software quality, the testing

  11. Quality Assurance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services Nuclear Safety Quality Assurance Quality Assurance QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY When properly implemented, the principles and requirements form a...

  12. WEAPONS ON CAMPUS REGULATION WEAPONS ON CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    clearly indicates otherwise: "Law enforcement official" means law-enforcement officials appointed pursuant-1 et seq.) of Title 52 of the Code of Virginia and sworn federal law-enforcement officers. "University in § 18.2-308(A) of the Code of Virginia. Statutory Authority § 23-44 of the Code of Virginia. #12; 8VAC

  13. Complexity eory Michael Strevens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strevens, Michael

    Complexity eory Michael Strevens For the Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Science, edited, is entirely determined by the exact state of the parts and the fundamental laws of nature, there is little of their parts. You might therefore wonder whether sciences of complex systems are possible. Complexity theory

  14. Software Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryn, Witold

    Software Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering Marc-Alexis Côté M. Ing (marc Quality Engineering, Software Quality Models, ISO/IEC 9126. Abstract Software Quality Engineering is an emerging discipline that is concerned with improving the approach to software quality. It is important

  15. Operation greenhouse, scientific director`s report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951, annex 9.2, Sandia Corporation Proving Ground Group. Part 3. Fuzing and firing activities, December 1951 (sanitized version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-29

    This report covers the activities of the Fuzing and Firing Team of Task Unit 3.1.4, the Weapons Assembly Organization. The Fuzing and Firing Team was directly responsible for the assembly and testing of the various fuzing and firing systems necessary to detonate the experimental weapons under test. Other responsibilities of this group included the supplying of fiducial signals from the firing sets for the transit-time experiments being conducted by other groups and a partial responsibility for the final arming of the weapons fired on the towers.

  16. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Muir, J.F.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1985-06-19

    The present invention relates to an empirical electrical method for remote sensing of steam quality utilizing flow-through grids which allow measurement of the electrical properties of a flowing two-phase mixture. The measurement of steam quality in the oil field is important to the efficient application of steam assisted recovery of oil. Because of the increased energy content in higher quality steam it is important to maintain the highest possible steam quality at the injection sandface. The effectiveness of a steaming operation without a measure of steam quality downhole close to the point of injection would be difficult to determine. Therefore, a need exists for the remote sensing of steam quality.

  17. Indoor Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Focus For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health-from cognitive ability to personal comfort...

  18. Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity March 25, 2015 Cross-cutting Sustainability Platform Review Principle Investigator: Dr. Henriette I. Jager Organization: Oak Ridge National...

  19. TRASH TO TREASURE: CONVERTING COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE INTO WEAPONS AGAINST CANCER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholas, R.G.; Lacy, N.H.; Butz, T.R.; Brandon, N.E.

    2004-10-06

    As part of its commitment to clean up Cold War legacy sites, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated an exciting and unique project to dispose of its inventory of uranium-233 (233U) stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and extract isotopes that show great promise in the treatment of deadly cancers. In addition to increasing the supply of potentially useful medical isotopes, the project will rid DOE of a nuclear concern and cut surveillance and security costs. For more than 30 years, DOE's ORNL has stored over 1,200 containers of fissile 233U, originally produced for several defense-related projects, including a pilot study that looked at using 233U as a commercial reactor fuel. This uranium, designated as special nuclear material, requires expensive security, safety, and environmental controls. It has been stored at an ORNL facility, Building 3019A, that dates back to the Manhattan Project. Down-blending the material to a safer form, rather than continuing to store it, will eliminate a $15 million a year financial liability for the DOE and increase the supply of medical isotopes by 5,700 percent. During the down-blending process, thorium-229 (229Th) will be extracted. The thorium will then be used to extract actinium-225 (225Ac), which will ultimately supply its progeny, bismuth-213 (213Bi), for on-going cancer research. The research includes Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia at Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center in New York, as well as other serious cancers of the lungs, pancreas, and kidneys using a technique known as alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy. Alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy is based on the emission of alpha particles by radionuclides. 213Bi is attached to a monoclonal antibody that targets specific cells. The bismuth then delivers a high-powered but short-range radiation dose, effectively killing the cancerous cells but sparing the surrounding tissue. Production of the actinium and bismuth would be a private venture at no cost to the government. Isotek Systems, LLC, was commissioned by the DOE to execute the project, known as the 233U Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown Project. Isotek is a partnership between Duratek Federal Services, Burns and Roe Enterprises, and Nuclear Fuel Services. By pooling their pioneering experiences in nuclear engineering and design, nuclear recycling, and waste management, the partnership has developed a novel process to meet this clean-up milestone. The project is not only important for its cancer treatment potential, but also for setting the stage for reducing global threats through the down-blending of materials.

  20. Electromagnetic Signature Technique as a Promising Tool to Verify Nuclear Weapons Storage and Dismantlement under a Nuclear Arms Control Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunch, Kyle J.; Williams, Laura S.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2012-08-01

    The 2010 ratification of the New START Treaty has been widely regarded as a noteworthy national security achievement for both the Obama administration and the Medvedev-Putin regime, but deeper cuts are envisioned under future arms control regimes. Future verification needs will include monitoring the storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondaries, and other materials. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under future arms control regimes will pose new challenges. Since acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes, non-nuclear non-sensitive signatures may provide a significant verification tool without the use of additional information barriers. The use of electromagnetic signatures to monitor nuclear material storage containers is a promising technology with the potential to fulfill these challenging requirements. Research performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to confirm the presence of specific components on a “yes/no” basis without revealing classified information. Arms control inspectors might use this technique to verify the presence or absence of monitored items, including both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Although additional research is needed to study signature aspects such as uniqueness and investigate container-specific scenarios, the technique potentially offers a rapid and cost-effective tool to verify reduction and dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons.

  1. Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-08-01

    Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

  2. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 3. High-energy spectrum (time-of-flight method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the experiments performed to measure the energy spectrum of neutrons released in certain atomic-weapons tests in Operation Greenhouse. The measurements were made of two types: (1) the time-of-flight measurements designed to establish the fission neutron spectrum down to about 3 MeV energy, and (2) the so-called Tenex (Temperature-Neutron Experiment) measurements designed to obtain the velocity distribution of neutrons produced by the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions.

  3. Monitoring under the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement : the prospects of antineutrino detection as an IAEA verification metric for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copeland, Christopher Michael, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    After the end of World War II, the world entered an even more turbulent period as it faced the beginnings of the Cold War, during which the prospect of mutually assured destruction between the world's largest nuclear weapon ...

  4. Landscape Design & Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    drainage lines to allow water to filter into surrounding soils. Install gravel sumps or other percolationLandscape Design & Water Quality Landscape Design & Water Quality Create a landscape design that reduces pesticide and fertilizer runoff and conserves water. Good plant choices, proper site preparation

  5. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  6. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  7. WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE STATE OF OHIO COMPONENT OF THE OHIO RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING PROGRAM #12;Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Program #12;2 Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water

  8. Analysis and section of processes for the disposition of excess fissile material from nuclear weapon dismantlement in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, B.R.; Armantrout, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Erickson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The end of the cold war and the acceleration of nuclear disarmament efforts by the United States (US) and Russia are generating large quantities of surplus fissile nuclear materials that are no longer needed for military purposes. The safe and secure disposition of this surplus material to prevent theft or reuse in weapons has become a high priority for the US Department of Energy (USDOE). Many options exist for storage and disposition (use or disposal) of these surplus materials. The criteria, which have been developed from the basis for a preliminary ``screening`` of options, to eliminate from further consideration those options that do not meet minimal requirements. Factors, or attributes, contained in the screening and selection criteria include: (1) resistance to theft and diversion by unauthorized parties, (2) resistance to retrieval, extraction, and reuse by the host nation, (3) technical viability, (4) environmental, safety, and health impacts, (5) cost effectiveness, (6) timeliness, (7) fostering of progress and cooperation with Russia and others, (8) public and institutional acceptance, and (9) additional benefits. The evaluation of environmental impacts, in accordance with the US National Environmental Policy Ac (NEPA) process, is an integral part of the overall evaluation process. Because of the variety of physical and chemical forms of the nuclear material inventory, and because of the large number of possible disposition technologies and final forms, several hundred possible pathways to disposition have been defined and have undergone a systematic selection process. Also, because nuclear material disposition will have far ranging impacts, extensive public, in the form of public and stakeholder, input was integral to the selection process.

  9. Characterization of U/Pu Particles Originating From the Nuclear Weapon Accidents at Palomares, Spain, 1966 And Thule, Greenland, 1968

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.; Janssens, K.; Proost, K.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2007-07-10

    Following the USAF B-52 bomber accidents at Palomares, Spain in 1966 and at Thule, Greenland in 1968, radioactive particles containing uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were dispersed into the environment. To improve long-term environmental impact assessments for the contaminated ecosystems, particles from the two sites have been isolated and characterized with respect to properties influencing particle weathering rates. Low [239]Pu/[235]U (0.62-0.78) and [240]Pu/[239]Pu (0.055-0.061) atom ratios in individual particles from both sites obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) show that the particles contain highly enriched U and weapon-grade Pu. Furthermore, results from electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based micrometer-scale X-ray fluorescence ({micro}-XRF) 2D mapping demonstrated that U and Pu coexist throughout the 1-50 {micro}m sized particles, while surface heterogeneities were observed in EDX line scans. SR-based micrometer-scale X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy ({micro}-XANES) showed that the particles consisted of an oxide mixture of U (predominately UO[2] with the presence ofU[3][8]) and Pu ((III)/(IV), (V)/(V) or (III), (IV) and (V)). Neither metallic U or Pu nor uranyl or Pu(VI) could be observed. Characteristics such as elemental distributions, morphology and oxidation states are remarkably similar for the Palomares and Thule particles, reflecting that they originate from similar source and release scenarios. Thus, these particle characteristics are more dependent on the original material from which the particles are derived (source) and the formation of particles (release scenario) than the environmental conditions to which the particles have been exposed since the late 1960s.

  10. Improving Stormwater Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    stream_source_info Improving Stormwater Quality.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5574 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Improving Stormwater Quality.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 Stormwater QualityStory by Raul L. Garcia tx H2O | pg. 18 The City of Houston, Harris County, theHarris County Flood Control District and the Texas Department of Transportation have teamed up through a Joint Task Force (JTF) to address Houston...

  11. Water Quality Criteria Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    APPENDIX G Water Quality Criteria CONTENTS Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798 EPA's Water Quality Criteria and Standards Plan -- Priorities for the Future............................798 Compilation of Recommended Water Quality Criteria and EPA's Process for Deriving New

  12. Studies in Power Quality Success 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laan, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    The California Energy Commission is actively supporting research and development to improve power quality. Poor power quality can result in productivity losses and compromise safety. Dealing with power quality problems when they arise can solve...

  13. Quality Assurance Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM), Office of Standards and Quality Assurance. The EM mission is to achieve safe and compliant...

  14. Power Quality Implications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilson, D.

    1989-01-01

    Electric utilities in the United States spend in excess of one billion dollars annually to maintain or improve the quality of electric power supplied to their customers. Yet, an increasing and alarming number of complaints are being voiced...

  15. School quality and wages 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speakman, Robert B., Jr.

    2007-04-25

    This dissertation examines the literature that attempts to measure the relationship between school quality and earnings. I begin by developing a simple economic model that predicts that, everything else being equal and with comparisons being made...

  16. Quality Assurance Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-16

    This Guide provides information on principles, requirements, and practices used to establish and implement an effective Quality Assurance Program. Admin Chg 2, dated 5-8-13, Admin Chg 1.

  17. Software Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-02

    To define requirements and responsibilities for software quality assurance (SQA) within the Department of Energy (DOE). DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

  18. Software Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-02

    DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01. To define requirements and responsibilities for software quality assurance (SQA) within the Department of Energy (DOE). Does not cancel other directives.

  19. Complex System Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Christopher

    2004-07-24

    The use of terms such as “Engineering Systems”, “System of systems” and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

  20. Observability of complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang-Yu

    A quantitative description of a complex system is inherently limited by our ability to estimate the system’s internal state from experimentally accessible outputs. Although the simultaneous measurement of all internal ...

  1. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  2. Nebraska Air Quality Regulations (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to ambient air quality standards, pollution source operating permits, emissions reporting,...

  3. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    LBNL/PUB-5352, Revision 6 Waste Management QualityAssurance Plan Waste Management Group Environment, HealthRev. 6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

  4. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  5. Algebraic cycle complexes Marc Levine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Marc

    Algebraic cycle complexes Marc Levine June 2, 2008 Marc Levine Cycle complexes #12;Outline's cycle complexes Marc Levine Cycle complexes #12;Algebraic cycles and algebraic K-theory Marc Levine on X. zq(X) := the group of dimenison q algebraic cycles on X. Marc Levine Cycle complexes #12

  6. Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen Fuel Quality Results Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen Fuel Quality Results...

  7. Proceedings of Student/Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 5th Software Engineering and Quality Assurance Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tappert, Charles

    University, New York University and Southern California University. Keywords Software Engineering, Quality is to provide a framework for building higher quality software. The challenge of software engineers is to build Assurance Software Quality is a characteristic or attribute of software such as cyclomatic complexity

  8. Unit 10: Software Quality To introduce software quality management and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    1 Unit 10: Software Quality Objective Ð To introduce software quality management and assurance for, and commitment to, quality. The supplier should ensure that this policy is understood or services #12;6 Management Review ¥ The quality management system will need to be reviewed at regular

  9. Nuclear Weapons Latency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeney, David J

    2014-07-25

    in certain cases. However, use of MAUA for adversary modeling also significantly increased the number of assumptions necessary. A Latency investigation of South Korean nuclear fuel cycle facility development, a current nonproliferation policy concern...

  10. National Laboratory's Weapons Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic Solar PhotovoltaicBWXT Y-12 is

  11. National Security, Weapons Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxide capture CSNational

  12. Weapons Program Associate Directors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN AProject AssessmentWe the Geeks: Women Role

  13. LANSCE Weapons Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job Event InLANLRecovery Act0Venture7 LANSCE

  14. Chemistry and Materials Science Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory-Directed Research and Development. Second half progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are surface research, uranium research, physics and processing of metals, energetic materials. Group study areas included strength of Al and Al-Mg/alumina bonds, advanced synchrotron radiation study of materials, and theory, modeling, and computation. Individual projects were life prediction for composites and thermoelectric materials with exceptional figures of merit. The laboratory-directed R and D include director`s initiatives (aerogel-based electronic devices, molecular levels of energetic materials), individual projects, and transactinium institute studies. An author index is provided.

  15. Developing a methodology to link printed circuit board assembly yield targets to commodity group quality goals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauthen, Jason Wessing

    2009-01-01

    The increasing complexity of high-end routing products, a highly diverse product mix, and continually demanding quality requirements have intensified the challenges faced by Cisco. Primary among these is managing the broad ...

  16. Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Clifton Farrell

    1995-01-01

    The prediction Of postmine ground-water quality is encumbered with many complications resulting from the complex hydrologic system found in mine spoils. Current analytical methods such as acid/base accounting have only had limited success...

  17. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  18. Complex matrix model duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Brown

    2011-10-10

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 non-critical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of half-BPS operators in N=4 super-Yang-Mills. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich-Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces.

  19. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  20. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N. (Berkeley, CA); Corneillie, Todd M. (Campbell, CA); Xu, Jide (Berkeley, CA)

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  1. Irrigation Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Lemon, Robert G.; Stichler, Charles

    2002-04-11

    Irrigation water quality is determined by the total amounts of salts and the types of salts the water contains. In this publication you'll learn why well water can be salty, what problems salty water can cause, what tests should be done...

  2. Quality Assurance Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-16

    This Guide provides information on principles, requirements, and practices used to establish and implement an effective Quality Assurance Program. Cancels DOE G 414.1-2A, DOE G 414.1-3 and DOE G 414.1-5. Admin Chg 1, dated 9-27-11. Admin Chg 2, dated 5-8-13.

  3. Quality Assurance Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-16

    The directive provides guidance for DOE elements and contractors in developing and implementing an effective Quality Assurance Program. Cancels DOE G 414.1-2A, DOE G 414.1-3 and DOE G 414.1-5. Superseded by Admin Chg 1, 9-27-11.

  4. GROUNDWATER QUALITY PROTECTION PRACTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;GROUNDWATER QUALITY PROTECTION PRACTICES Submitted to: Environment Canada 224 West Esplanade.............................................................................................1 2.0 GROUNDWATER RESOURCES WITHIN THE FRASER BASIN.................3 2.1 Lower Fraser Region..............................................................................5 3.0 COMMON SOURCES OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION ...............6 3.1 Category 1 - Sources Designed

  5. Office of Quality Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Quality Management develops and interprets Government-wide policies and procedures and conducts training to ensure the accurate identification of information and documents that must be classified or controlled under statute or Executive order to protect the national security and controlled unclassified Official Use Only information for the effective operation of the Government.

  6. Quality Counts Exhibitor Card 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilek, Kevin; Gregory, Elizabeth

    2004-01-27

    This exhibitor card identifies young livestock exhibitors as participants in the Quality Counts! program. The card is printed with a leather-style background on heavy card stock. It features the 4-H clover and the FFA logo, as well as the logo...

  7. Clothing Quality Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-01

    stream_source_info pdf_2298.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 20810 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_2298.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Clothing Quality Standards E-403...

  8. Algorithmic folding complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinal, Jean

    2009-01-01

    How do we most quickly fold a paper strip (modeled as a line) to obtain a desired mountain-valley pattern of equidistant creases (viewed as a binary string)? Define the folding complexity of a mountain-valley string as the ...

  9. Optimizing Datacenter Power with Memory System Levers for Guaranteed Quality-of-Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramonian, Rajeev

    Optimizing Datacenter Power with Memory System Levers for Guaranteed Quality-of-Service Kshitij scenario in datacenters. Co- location, while maintaining Quality-of-Service (QoS) for each application is a complex problem that is fast gaining rele- vance for these datacenters. The problem is exacerbated

  10. Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Completing the world’s largest nuclear cleanup safely and correctly is EM’s priority. In support of that central mission, EM recently made changes that strengthen its corporate quality assurance program, marking the first revisions to the quality program since EM established it in 2008. The program provides the foundation for achieving quality through a consistent approach to all mission-related work across the EM complex.

  11. Hydrogen Fuel Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockward, Tommy

    2012-07-16

    For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

  12. Laboratory QualityLaboratory Quality ControlControl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory QualityLaboratory Quality ControlControl Nabil A. NIMER Dept . Biotechnology & Genetic thatQA is defined as the overall program that ensures that the final results reported by the laboratory areensures that the final results reported by the laboratory are correct.correct. ""The aim of quality

  13. Defining Forage Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muir, James; Lambert, Barry; Newman, Yoana

    2007-01-18

    value of the forage to be grazed, or the hay to be purchased or marketed. Knowing what affects forage quality will also help making appropriate selection of forages and supplements that will match animal requirements and result in economically... develops as well as deposition of fibrous components at the plant cell level. With advancing maturity, one of the main chemi- cals deposited internally in the plant cell walls is lig- nin. Lignin is a component of fiber that is essentially indigestible...

  14. Developing a quality plan within an R&D organization using a graded approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younger, A.F.; Ellis, E.W.

    1994-04-01

    Rocky Flats is a Department of Energy facility that is managed by EG&G, Inc. The facility, located in Golden, Colorado, employs approximately 7,500 employees. Rocky Flats began operation in 1953 producing components for nuclear weapons, but in 1992, due to changing world conditions, the facility`s mission was changed. The new mission is to decontaminate and decommission the plant and make it ready for economic development for possible new business opportunities. The facility`s mission today is geared toward environmental cleanup from the wastes that were generated during the past 40 years. With these changes came a change in management philosophy that has encouraged more open communications, employee involvement, additional training for employees, and an emphasis on providing quality products and services applying Total Quality Management principles. The changing mission of the plant along with the change in management philosophy required a great deal of adjustment by employees. During this time, the Department of Energy and EG&G management was striving to incorporate these changes as quickly as possible. As part of this change, the Department of Energy required a quality program be implemented in Technology Development, which is the organization responsible for researching and developing new technologies for the environmental cleanup of the plant.

  15. Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Air Quality Act (AQA) delegates the power to maintain air quality in the State to the Department of Environment and Conservation. Under the Department of the Environment and...

  16. Signed Quality Assurance Hub Memo

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SECCTRITY PROGRAM ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Performance Assessment, Commitment, and Corrective Action Management...

  17. 2010 Quality Council Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUALITY COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT For Calendar Year 2010 Office of Health Safety and Security

  18. Estimate product quality with ANNs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambilla, A. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy); Trivella, F. [Adicon Advanced Distillation Control SrL, Pisa (Italy)

    1996-09-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied to predict catalytic reformer octane number (ON) and gasoline splitter product qualities. Results show that ANNs are a valuable tool to derive fast and accurate product quality measurements, and offer a low-cost alternative to online analyzers or rigorous mathematical models. The paper describes product quality measurements, artificial neural networks, ANN structure, estimating gasoline octane numbers, and estimating naphtha splitter product qualities.

  19. Irrigation Water Quality Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and industrial waste water can impact water quality. In most irrigation situations, the primary water qual- ity

  20. IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE Irrigation Water Background In the past, there were minor of irrigation water in Georgia. This is because only a small amount of acreage under irrigated agriculture utilized potable (suitable for drinking) quality water. Thus, quality of irrigation water was not closely

  1. Unit 100 - Data Quality Measurement and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100, CC in GIScience; Veregin, Howard; Hunter, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Page 18 Unit 100 - Data Quality Measurement and AssessmentPage 19 Unit 100 - Data Quality Measurement and AssessmentData Quality Measurement and Assessment Unit 100 - Data

  2. DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recommended Quality Management Provisions DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions. qm6-14-13.pdf...

  3. Complexity Science for Simpletons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig Alan Feinstein

    2012-06-25

    In this article, we shall describe some of the most interesting topics in the subject of Complexity Science for a general audience. Anyone with a solid foundation in high school mathematics (with some calculus) and an elementary understanding of computer programming will be able to follow this article. First, we shall explain the significance of the P versus NP problem and solve it. Next, we shall describe two other famous mathematics problems, the Collatz 3n+1 Conjecture and the Riemann Hypothesis, and show how both Chaitin's incompleteness theorem and Wolfram's notion of "computational irreducibility" are important for understanding why no one has, as of yet, solved these two problems.

  4. Complex Compound Chemical Heat Pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockenfeller, U.; Langeliers, J.; Horn, G.

    1987-01-01

    Complex-compound solid-vapor fluid pairs can be used in heat of reaction heat pumps for temperature amplifier (TA) as well as heat amplifier (HA) cycle configurations. This report describes the conceptual hardware design for complex compound...

  5. A Response to Simplifying Complexity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsma, Femke

    2003-01-01

    In a recent issue of Geoforum, Steven Manson (2001)presented a timely review of Complexity Theory in order to orient the unversed reader in a framework of Complexity Theory’s key concepts. Manson begins with an overview ...

  6. Military and diplomatic roles and options for managing and responding to the proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction. Final report: Program on Stability and the Offense/Defense Relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallenbeck, R.A.; Gill, J.M.; Murray, B.L.

    1993-05-26

    The March seminar, ``Military and Diplomatic Roles and Options`` for managing and responding to proliferation, featured three presentations: the military and diplomatic implications of preemptive force as a counterproliferation option; an in-depth assessment of the threat posed by biological weapons; and, a new proposed US counterproliferation policy.

  7. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was initiated in 1974 to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites throughout the United States that were part of the Nation's early atomic weapons and energy programs during the 1940

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    performed by the Manhattan Engineer District or under the Atomic Energy Commission. Both were predecessors atomic weapons and energy programs during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. Activities at the sites were of the Department of Energy. Management of the program was transferred to the US Army Corps of Engineers from the U

  8. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  9. Underlying Quality Principles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These principles are consistent with Integrated Safety Management Policy, P 450.4A and support ISM implementation. 1. Define Policies and Objectives--Ensure they are Understood and Accepted. Management must set expectations for the organization as a whole before employees can do their jobs, satisfy their customers, and strive to improve the quality of their work. This is accomplished by developing and implementing specific policies and objectives that reflect the operating philosophy of the facility's management. Once these policies and objectives have been established, all managers must take the necessary actions to ensure that each employee shares their vision of the organization's purpose.

  10. Section 22: Quality Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistanceand Governmentm D m r e D m . 2.4Figure9Quality

  11. ARM - Data Quality Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonforsupernovae2Gathering and Delivery Data Gathering andQuality

  12. Renewables and air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooley, D.R.

    2000-08-01

    The US heavy reliance on fossil fuels is a central obstacle to improving air quality and preventing catastrophic climate change. To solve this problem will require a combination of financial incentives and market rules that strongly encourage development of renewable energy resources to meet electric power demand. One promising policy option is to allow renewable energy resources to directly participate in air pollution emission trading mechanisms. Currently, the clean air benefits of renewable energy generally go unrecognized by regulators, under-appreciated by consumers and uncompensated by markets. Renewable energy is a key clean air alternative to conventional electricity generation, and the development of renewables could be stimulated by changes to the Clean Air Act's emissions trading programs. As Congress revisits clean air issues over the next several years, renewable energy representatives could push for statutory changes that reward the renewable energy industry for the air quality benefits it provides. By also becoming involved in key US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state rule-making cases, the renewables industry could influence the structure of emissions trading programs and strengthen one of the most persuasive arguments for wind, solar and biomass energy development.

  13. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) for assessment of microbial water quality: current progress, challenges, and future opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, BoonFei

    Water quality is an emergent property of a complex system comprised of interacting microbial populations and introduced microbial and chemical contaminants. Studies leveraging next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies ...

  14. Quality Research Administration MeetingQuality Research Administration Meeting Sandra Stevens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    Quality Research Administration MeetingQuality Research Administration Meeting SPA Update Sandra, 2015 #12;Quality Research Administration Meeting SPA Realignment · Review of current organizational-Federal Team ­ Clinical Trials Team #12;Quality Research Administration Meeting #12;Quality Research

  15. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  16. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management...

  17. DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recommended Quality Management Provisions RECOMMENDED QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROVISIONS QM Provision Builder Documentation & Verification Requirements RaterVerifier Requirements QM...

  18. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PROGRAM SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM System Maintenance Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM More Documents & Publications Preacceptance...

  19. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    requirements management activities SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements Management Checklist More Documents & Publications SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS...

  20. Construction quality assurance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-09-08

    This report provides a summary of the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and test results, including: The results of the geosynthetic and soil materials conformance testing. The observation and testing results associates with the installation of the soil liners. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the HDPE geomembrane liner systems. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the leachate collection and removal systems. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the working surfaces. The observation and testing results associated with in-plant manufacturing process. Summary of submittal reviews by Golder Construction Services, Inc. The submittal and certification of the piping material specifications. The observation and verification associated of the Acceptance Test Procedure results of the operational equipment functions. Summary of the ECNs which are incorporated into the project.

  1. Indoor air quality: Selected references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    This document was compiled in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality, including sick-building syndrome. Included in the publication are the NIOSH Congressional testimony presented before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications; two articles describing the results of NIOSH research and findings on indoor air-quality problems; NIOSH guidance on conducting indoor-air-quality investigations; and a description of the NIOSH health-hazard evaluation program, which can provide NIOSH assistance in evaluating indoor-air-quality problems.

  2. Current Quality Culture Mini Paper Six Sigma Quality Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    Current Quality Culture Mini Paper Six Sigma Quality Control By: Shawn Higbee Steve Soseman Kaya, they want zero." - John Bertrand, President, A.O. Smith Electrical Products Company What is Six Sigma? SixSig_pg140-2.html Is Six Sigma good for every company? The benefits of implementing a 6 include increased

  3. Nonisostructural complex oxide heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Franklin J. Ramanathan, Shriram

    2014-07-01

    The authors present an overview of the fundamentals and representative examples of the growth of epitaxial complex oxide thin films on structurally dissimilar substrates. The authors will delineate how the details of particular crystal structures and symmetry of different oxide surfaces can be employed for a rational approach to the synthesis of nonisostructural epitaxial heterostructures. The concept of oxygen eutaxy can be widely applied. Materials combinations will be split into three categories, and in all cases the films and substrates occur in different crystal structures: (1) common translational and rotational symmetry between the film and substrate planes; (2) translational symmetry mismatch between the substrates and films that is distinct from a simple mismatch in lattice parameters; and (3) rotational symmetry mismatch. In case (1), in principle single-crystalline thin films can be attained despite the films and substrates possessing different crystal structures. In case (2), antiphase boundaries will be prevalent in the thin films. In case (3), thin-film rotational variants that are joined by tilt boundaries will be present. Diffraction techniques to determine crystallographic alignment and epitaxial variants are discussed, and transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate extended defects in the thin films will also be reviewed. The authors end with open problems in this field regarding the structure of oxide interfaces that can be topics for future research.

  4. NAVIGATING A QUALITY ROUTE TO A NATIONAL SAFETY AWARD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREVETTE SS

    2009-05-26

    Deming quality methodologies applied to safety are recognized with the National Safety Council's annual Robert W. Campbell Award. Over the last ten years, the implementation of Statistical Process Control and quality methodologies at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site have contributed to improved safety. Improvements attributed to Statistical Process Control are evidenced in Occupational Safety and Health records and documented through several articles in Quality Progress and the American Society of Safety Engineers publication, Professional Safety. Statistical trending of safety, quality, and occurrence data continues to playa key role in improving safety and quality at what has been called the world's largest environmental cleanup project. DOE's Hanford Site played a pivotal role in the nation's defense beginning in the 1940s, when it was established as part of the Manhattan Project. After more than 50 years of producing material for nuclear weapons, Hanford, which covers 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state, is now focused on three outcomes: (1) Restoring the Columbia River corridor for multiple uses; (2) Transitioning the central plateau to support long-term waste management; and (3) Putting DOE assets to work for the future. The current environmental cleanup mission faces challenges of overlapping technical, political, regulatory, environmental, and cultural interests. From Oct. 1, 1996 through Sept. 30, 2008, Fluor Hanford was a prime contractor to the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. In this role, Fluor Hanford managed several major cleanup activities that included dismantling former nuclear-processing facilities, cleaning up the Site's contaminated groundwater, retrieving and processing transuranic waste for shipment and disposal off-site, maintaining the Site's infrastructure, providing security and fire protection, and operating the Volpentest HAMMER Training and Education Center. On October 1,2008, a transition occurred that changed Fluor's role at Hanford. Fluor's work at Hanford was split in two with the technical scope being assumed by the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) CHPRC is now spearheading much of the cleanup work associated with former nuclear-processing facilities, contaminated groundwater, and transuranic waste. Fluor is an integrated subcontractor to CH PRC in this effort. In addition, at the time of this writing, while the final outcome is being determined for the new Mission Support Contract, Fluor Hanford has had its contract extended to provide site-wide services that include security, fire protection, infrastructure, and operating the HAMMER facility. The emphasis has to be on doing work safely, delivering quality work, controlling costs, and meeting deadlines. Statistical support is provided by Fluor to the PRC, within Fluor Hanford, and to a third contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, which is tasked with cleaning up approximately 210 square miles designated as the Columbia River corridor along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The closing months of Fluor Hanford's 12 year contract were busy, characterized by special events that capped its work as a prime cleanup contractor, transitions of work scope and personnel, and the completion numerous activities. At this time, Fluor's work and approach to safety were featured in state and national forums. A 'Blockbuster' presentation at the Washington State Governor's Industrial Safety Conference in September 2008 featured Fluor Hanford's Chief Operating Officer, a company Safety Representative, and me. Simultaneously, an award ceremony in Anaheim, Calif. recognized Fluor Hanford as the winner of the 2008 Robert W. Campbell Award. The Robert W. Campbell Award is co-sponsored by Exxon Mobil Corporation and the National Safety Council. Named after a pioneer of industrial safety, the Campbell Award recognizes organizations that demonstrate how integration of environmental, health and safety (EHS) management into business operations is a cornerstone of their corporate success. Fluor Hanford rec

  5. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Oversight and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to testify on matters relating to the Department of Energy's oversight of the nuclear weapons complex. DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and...

  6. Optical computing and computational complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Optical computing and computational complexity Damien Woods Boole Centre for Research­vector algebra [9, 24]. There have been much resources devoted to designs, implementations and algorithms

  7. Optical computing and computational complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Optical computing and computational complexity Damien Woods Boole Centre for Research-vector algebra [9, 24]. There have been much resources devoted to designs, implementations and algorithms

  8. Circuit Complexity and Multiplicative Complexity of Boolean Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    no example of an explicit function requiring super linear circuit size. Moreover, only a few proofs of linear (usually by a long case analysis) that for any circuit computing this function setting some variablesCircuit Complexity and Multiplicative Complexity of Boolean Functions Arist Kojevnikov1

  9. Quality Management Why bother Certificating?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    1 Quality Management #12;2 Why bother Certificating? External view from trained auditors helps Is Quality? Degree to which a set of inherent characteristics fulfils requirements ISO 9000:2000 #12) (Prevention) (Direction) BS 5750 1979-1987 ISO 9001/2/3 1987-2000 ISO 9001 2000, amended 2008 #12;5 What

  10. Reformulated gasoline quality issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, R.G.; Felch, D.E.; Edgar, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    One year ago, a panel of industry experts were interviewed in the November/December 1994 issue of Fuel Reformulation (Vol. 4, No. 6). With the focus then and now on refinery investments, the panelists were asked to forecast which refining processes would grow in importance. It is apparent from their response, and from other articles and discussions throughout the year, that hydroprocessing and catalytic conversion processes are synergistic in the overall refinery design, with flexibility and process objectives varying on a unit-by-unit case. To an extent, future refinery investments in downstream petrochemicals, such as for paraxylene production, are based on available catalytic reforming feedstock. Just a importantly, hydroprocessing units (hydrotreating, hydrocracking) needed for clean fuel production (gasoline, diesel, aviation fuel), are heavily dependent on hydrogen production from the catalytic reformer. Catalytic reforming`s significant influence in the refinery hydrogen balance, as well as its status as a significant naphtha conversion route to higher-quality fuels, make this unit a high-priority issue for engineers and planners striving for flexibility.

  11. Holographic Complexity And Cosmological Singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbon, Jose L F

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of holographic complexity in various AdS/CFT models containing cosmological crunch singularities. We find that a notion of complexity measured by extremal bulk volumes tends to decrease as the singularity is approached in CFT time, suggesting that the corresponding quantum states have simpler entanglement structure at the singularity.

  12. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  13. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  14. 302:20130613.1452 Quality Assurance Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    and software development from the preliminary design phase through launch. Our quality assurance expertise and software. LASP's quality management philosophy includes the belief that quality and safety302:20130613.1452 Quality Assurance Group LASP Quality Assurance Group is involved in hardware

  15. 9 QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL 9.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that a facility's current Quality Assurance Program can be used. Standard ANSI/ASQC E4-1994 (ASQC 1995) provides and the collection and evaluation of environmental data. Annex B of ANSI/ASQC E4-1994 1 Numerous quality assurance (ASME 1989), and ISO 9000/ASQC Q9000 series (ISO 1987). ANSI/ASQC E4- 1994 (ASQC 1995) is a consensus

  16. Three essays on product quality and pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nistor, Cristina (Cristina Daniela)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays on product quality and pricing. Essay 1: Pricing and Quality Provision in a Channel: A Model of Efficient Relational Contracts The first essay analyzes how quality concerns affect ...

  17. A systems view of quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utley, Tana L. (Tana Leigh)

    2007-01-01

    Caterpillar, a leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines and industrial gas turbines, is committed to continually improving the quality of their products. Caterpillar currently ...

  18. Guidelines for Quality Clothing Construction. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culp, Becky

    1979-01-01

    that form on right side of fabric. Durability of bonding or laminating. Examine cut edge and avoid those which separate easily. Quality quilting. Examine for durable and strong quilting threads and a durable backing fabric. Quilting threads should... or processes such as: ? Durable or permanent press for easy care ? Colorfastness (fading) ? Shrinkage control ? Soil release ? Wrinkle or crease resistance ? Flame resistance for safety Quality trims should be compatible with the fabrics chosen. Look...

  19. Oregon Water Quality Permit Program (Stormwater - Industrial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Water Quality Permit Program (Stormwater - Industrial Activities) Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Water Quality...

  20. Quality New Mexico recognizes Community Programs Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CPO receives Pion recognition Quality New Mexico recognizes Community Programs Office LANL has received 14 Pion and Roadrunner recognitions from Quality New Mexico since 1997....

  1. Vermont Water Quality Certification Application for Hydroelectric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vermont Water Quality Certification Application for Hydroelectric Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Vermont Water Quality...

  2. Supplying High-Quality, Raw Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supplying High-Quality, Raw Biomass The building blocks to supply high-quality raw biomass start with harvesting and collection practices, product storage and recommendations of...

  3. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design Checklist This checklist is intended to...

  4. Architecting complex systems for robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slagle, Jason C

    2007-01-01

    Robust design methodologies are frequently utilized by organizations to develop robust and reliable complex systems. The intent of robust design is to create systems that are insensitive to variations from production, the ...

  5. Invariant Subspaces and Complex Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-10-08

    Oct 8, 2015 ... connecting the operator to complex analysis!! Defining the Hardy space on the unit disk, D, by. H. 2. (D) = {f analytic on D : f(z) = ?. ? n=0 anz.

  6. Spin Systems and Computational Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Gottesman

    2009-11-30

    I give a very brief non-technical introduction to the intersection of the fields of spin systems and computational complexity. The focus is on spin glasses and their relationship to NP-complete problems.

  7. Project Dynamics and Emergent Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlick, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    The present paper presents theoretical and empirical analyses of project dynamics and emergent complexity in new product development (NPD) projects. A model-driven approach was taken and a vector autoregression (VAR) model of cooperative task processing was formulated. The model is explained and validated based on an empirical study carried out in a industrial company. Furthermore, concepts and measures of complex systems science were reviewed and applied to project management. To evaluate emergent complexity in NPD projects, an information-theory quantity -termed "effective measure complexity" (EMC)- was selected, because it can be derived from first principles and therefore has high construct validity. Furthermore, EMC can be calculated efficiently from generative models of task processing or purely from historical data, without intervening models. EMC measures the mutual information between the infinite past and future histories of a stochastic process. According to this principle, it is particularly inter...

  8. Control Principles of Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    A reflection of our ultimate understanding of a complex system is our ability to control its behavior. Typically, control has multiple prerequisites: It requires an accurate map of the network that governs the interactions between the system's components, a quantitative description of the dynamical laws that govern the temporal behavior of each component, and an ability to influence the state and temporal behavior of a selected subset of the components. With deep roots in nonlinear dynamics and control theory, notions of control and controllability have taken a new life recently in the study of complex networks, inspiring several fundamental questions: What are the control principles of complex systems? How do networks organize themselves to balance control with functionality? To address these here we review recent advances on the controllability and the control of complex networks, exploring the intricate interplay between a system's structure, captured by its network topology, and the dynamical laws that go...

  9. Better Buildings Workforce Peer Exchange Quality Assurance Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality Assurance Strategies Better Buildings Workforce Peer Exchange Quality Assurance Strategies Better Buildings Workforce Peer Exchange Quality Assurance Strategies, call...

  10. Neutronic evaluation of a non-fertile fuel for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in a boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterbentz, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    A new non-fertile, weapons-grade plutonium oxide fuel concept is developed and evaluated for deep burn applications in a boiling water reactor environment using the General Electric 8x8 Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) fuel assembly dimensions and pitch. Detailed infinite lattice fuel burnup results and neutronic performance characteristics are given and although preliminary in nature, clearly demonstrate the fuel`s potential as an effective means to expedite the disposition of plutonium in existing light water reactors. The new non-fertile fuel concept is an all oxide composition containing plutonia, zirconia, calcia, and erbia having the following design weight percentages: 8.3; 80.4; 9.7; and 1.6. This fuel composition in an infinite fuel lattice operating at linear heat generation rates of 6.0 or 12.0 kW/ft per rod can remain critical for up to 1,200 and 600 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD), respectively, and achieve a burnup of 7.45 {times} 10{sup 20} f/cc. These burnups correspond to a 71--73% total plutonium isotope destruction and a 91--94% destruction of the {sup 239}Pu isotope for the 0--40% moderator steam void condition. Total plutonium destruction greater than 73% is possible with a fuel management scheme that allows subcritical fuel assemblies to be driven by adjacent high reactivity assemblies. The fuel exhibits very favorable neutron characteristics from beginning-of-life (BOL) to end-of-life (EOL). Prompt fuel Doppler coefficient of reactivity are negative, with values ranging between {minus}0.4 to {minus}2.0 pcm/K over the temperature range of 900 to 2,200 K. The ABWR fuel lattice remains in an undermoderated condition for both hot operational and cold startup conditions over the entire fuel burnup lifetime.

  11. Quality Management and Job Quality: How the ISO 9001 Standard forQuality Management Systems Affects Employees and Employers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, David I.; Toffel, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    Quality Management, and financial performance: An empirical investigation. Journal of Operations Management

  12. Approximation and inversion of a complex meteorological system via local linear filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    been the site of some of the nation's most severe air pollution (Lu et al., 1997b). In order to model to a complex mul- tivariate dynamic model for Southern California air quality is given and the method is shown, simulate, and predict levels of ozone and other pollutants, a multivariate dynamic modeling system called

  13. The competition for graphene formation on Re(0001): A complex interplay between carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfè, Dario

    The competition for graphene formation on Re(0001): A complex interplay between carbon segregation) structure. In the range 500­700 K, the formation of a high-quality single-layer of graphene is strongly conditions, the formation of a long-range ordered graphene layer on Re(0001) without carbon bulk saturation

  14. Complexity reduction in automotive design and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Ronald J., 1965-

    2005-01-01

    Automobiles are complex products. High product complexity drives high levels of design and process complexity and complicatedness. This thesis attempts to reduce complicatedness in the automotive vehicle design and development ...

  15. Quality engineering as a discipline of study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, Rachel R.; Hoover, Marcey L.

    2012-12-01

    The current framework for quality scholarship in the United States ranges from the training and education of future quality engineers, managers, and professionals to focused and sustained research initiatives that, through academic institutions and other organizations, aim to improve the knowledge and application of quality across a variety of sectors. Numerous quality journals also provide a forum for professional dissemination of information.

  16. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality Branch Environmental Protection Dept. BC Environment Victoria, B.C. and Fraser Pollution Abatement Office ..................................................... WATER QUALITY OF UNDISTURBED AREAS ....................... LAND USE EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY

  17. Laboratory Policy Methods of Analysis & Quality Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Laboratory Policy Methods of Analysis & Quality Assurance The Cereal Quality Lab (CQL) uses quality data. The laboratory participates in collaborative studies organized by AACC, Wheat Quality by the laboratory is treated confidentially and will not be revealed to third parties without prior consent

  18. Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum - ScienceBrendan M. White About

  19. Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of complex cellulase-hemicellulase mixtures Efficient deconstruction of cellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars for fuel and chemical production is accomplished by a complex...

  20. North American Electricity Infrastructure: System Security, Quality, Reliability, Availability, and Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    1 North American Electricity Infrastructure: System Security, Quality, Reliability, Availability for reliable and disturbance-free electricity. The massive power outages in the United States, Canada, UK and Italy in 2003 underscored electricity infrastructure's vulnerabilities [1-11]. This vital yet complex

  1. Quality Assurance 8-1 8. Quality Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of the five Lockheed Martin facilities, DOE, ER, Central Waste Management, and the Analytical Services program, from sample collection to data manage- ment, must address and meet applicable quality standards- tion, ESD, the ORNL Industrial Hygiene Depart- ment, and the ETTP Technical Division. 8.2 FIELD

  2. Quality Assurance 9-1 9. Quality Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    control processes and standard operating procedures for sample collection and analysis; use of chain, and use statistics to evaluate and continuously im- prove performance. 9.3.1 Internal Quality Assurance, and maintenance of control charts to indicate ana- lytical deficiencies. These activities are sup- ported

  3. Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project Y-12 National Security Complex Site Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This report has been prepared to summarize the findings of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) Mass Balance Project and to support preparation of associated U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) site reports. The project was conducted in support of DOE efforts to assess the potential for health and environmental issues resulting from the presence of transuranic (TRU) elements and fission products in recycled uranium (RU) processed by DOE and its predecessor agencies. The United States government used uranium in fission reactors to produce plutonium and tritium for nuclear weapons production. Because uranium was considered scarce relative to demand when these operations began almost 50 years ago, the spent fuel from U.S. fission reactors was processed to recover uranium for recycling. The estimated mass balance for highly enriched RU, which is of most concern for worker exposure and is the primary focus of this project, is summarized in a table. A discrepancy in the mass balance between receipts and shipments (plus inventory and waste) reflects an inability to precisely distinguish between RU and non-RU shipments and receipts involving the Y-12 Complex and Savannah River. Shipments of fresh fuel (non-RU) and sweetener (also non-RU) were made from the Y-12 Complex to Savannah River along with RU shipments. The only way to distinguish between these RU and non-RU streams using available records is by enrichment level. Shipments of {le}90% enrichment were assumed to be RU. Shipments of >90% enrichment were assumed to be non-RU fresh fuel or sweetener. This methodology using enrichment level to distinguish between RU and non-RU results in good estimates of RU flows that are reasonably consistent with Savannah River estimates. Although this is the best available means of distinguishing RU streams, this method does leave a difference of approximately 17.3 MTU between receipts and shipments. Slightly depleted RU streams received by the Y-12 Complex from ORGDP and PGDP are believed to have been returned to the shipping site or disposed of as waste on the Oak Ridge Reservation. No evidence of Y-12 Complex processing of this material was identified in the historical records reviewed by the Project Team.

  4. The Augmented Complex Kernel LMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouboulis, Pantelis; Mavroforakis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a unified framework for adaptive kernel based signal processing of complex data was presented by the authors, which, besides offering techniques to map the input data to complex Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces, developed a suitable Wirtinger-like Calculus for general Hilbert Spaces. In this short paper, the extended Wirtinger's calculus is adopted to derive complex kernel-based widely-linear estimation filters. Furthermore, we illuminate several important characteristics of the widely linear filters. We show that, although in many cases the gains from adopting widely linear estimation filters, as alternatives to ordinary linear ones, are rudimentary, for the case of kernel based widely linear filters significant performance improvements can be obtained.

  5. S/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 1 Software Quality Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    Management Nov. 30, 2002 Prof. Jeff Tian, SMU #12;S/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 2 Software Quality: Why: customer view of quality Probability: statistical modeling Time/input/environment: OP · OP: OperationalS/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 1 Software Quality Assurance -- Meeting New Challenges Jeff Tian

  6. QualityGate SourceAudit: A Tool for Assessing the Technical Quality of Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferenc, Rudolf

    QualityGate SourceAudit: A Tool for Assessing the Technical Quality of Software Tibor Bakota Front the internal quality of the system over time. This phenomena is called software erosion, which results assessment of software quality. By monitoring the high-level technical quality of systems it is possible

  7. AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' ,

  8. weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2Anational lab8/%2A en6/%2A enw80|

  9. Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport forRetirementAdministrationWayne Jones | National|

  10. Principal Associate Director - Weapons Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in

  11. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  12. Army Regulation 2001 Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 200­1 Environmental Quality Environmental Protection and Enhancement Headquarters Environmental Protection and Enhancement *Army Regulation 200­1 Effective 27 December 2007 History in the summary of change. Summary. This regulation covers envi- ronmental protection and enhancement and provides

  13. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  14. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Qiang, E-mail: qiangweibeihua@163.com [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Xie, Cheng-jun [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Liu, Hong-jun [School of Information Engineering, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China); Li, Yan-hui [The Library, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China)

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ;

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  16. Probability and complex quantum trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, Moncy V. [Department of Physics, St. Thomas College, Kozhencherry, Pathanamthitta, Kerala 689 641 (India)], E-mail: moneyjohn@yahoo.co.uk

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that in the complex trajectory representation of quantum mechanics, the Born's {psi}*{psi} probability density can be obtained from the imaginary part of the velocity field of particles on the real axis. Extending this probability axiom to the complex plane, we first attempt to find a probability density by solving an appropriate conservation equation. The characteristic curves of this conservation equation are found to be the same as the complex paths of particles in the new representation. The boundary condition in this case is that the extended probability density should agree with the quantum probability rule along the real line. For the simple, time-independent, one-dimensional problems worked out here, we find that a conserved probability density can be derived from the velocity field of particles, except in regions where the trajectories were previously suspected to be nonviable. An alternative method to find this probability density in terms of a trajectory integral, which is easier to implement on a computer and useful for single particle solutions, is also presented. Most importantly, we show, by using the complex extension of Schrodinger equation, that the desired conservation equation can be derived from this definition of probability density.

  17. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 232}Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of {sup 235}U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving {sup 233}U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  18. Terahertz Sensor for Non-Contact Thickness and Quality Measurement of Automobile Paints of Varying Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Ke; Shen, Yao-Chun; Zeitler, J. Axel

    2014-06-06

    in the remainder of the paper. The substrate upon which the paint layers are deposited can either be metallic (e.g., aluminum or steel) or non-metallic (e.g. carbon fiber, plastic, etc.). For each paint layer the refractive index, extinction coef- ficient... substrate. (c) Four-layer automobile paint on carbon fiber substrate. (d) Four step paint sample on both metallic and carbon fiber substrate (A1: one-layer paint, A2: two-layer paint, A3: three-layer paint and A4: four-layer paint). layers above and also...

  19. Quality control of complex polymer materials using hyperspectral imaging associated with multivariate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with multivariate statistical analysis Thèse Massoud Ghasemzadeh-Barvarz Doctorat en génie chimique Philosophiae Squares (PLS), Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) and Multivariate Image Analysis/Multivariate Image and Multivariate Image Analysis (MIA). The potential and effectiveness of the proposed method for detecting defects

  20. CSP 587: Software Quality Management S. Kan, Software Quality engineering, Addison-Wesley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    CSP 587: Software Quality Management Texts S. Kan, Software Quality engineering, Addison hours · Quality Appraisal Programs 5 hours SEI's Capability Maturity Model ISO 9000 Total 45 hours CSP

  1. Library Computing and Study Complex - 8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2009-01-01

    Techniques and devices used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to provide and maintain a quality power distribution system are discussed. Quality power is essential to support the array...

  2. Wave propagation in complex coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horsley, S A R; Philbin, T G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the analytic continuation of wave equations into the complex position plane. For the particular case of electromagnetic waves we provide a physical meaning for such an analytic continuation in terms of a family of closely related inhomogeneous media. For bounded permittivity profiles we find the phenomenon of reflection can be related to branch cuts in the wave that originate from poles of the permittivity at complex positions. Demanding that these branch cuts disappear, we derive a large family of inhomogeneous media that are reflectionless for a single angle of incidence. Extending this property to all angles of incidence leads us to a generalized form of the Poschl Teller potentials. We conclude by analyzing our findings within the phase integral (WKB) method.

  3. Rocky Flats Overview Aurora History Museum October 16, 2013

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 Nuclear Weapons Complex Nuclear Weapons Production Processes Step Process Major Sites 1 Uranium Mining, Milling, and Refining Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action Project sites,...

  4. Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) Waste Management Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VOLKMAN, D.D.

    1999-10-27

    This document is the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH), that implements the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC), HNF-MP-599, Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) document, and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement with Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), Sections 6.5 and 7.8. WHM is responsible for the treatment, storage, and disposal of liquid and solid wastes generated at the Hanford Site as well as those wastes received from other US Department of Energy (DOE) and non-DOE sites. WMH operations include the Low-Level Burial Grounds, Central Waste Complex (a mixed-waste storage complex), a nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility, the Transuranic Storage Facility, T Plant, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facility, 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, the 242-A Evaporator, 300 Area Treatment Effluent Disposal Facility, the 340 Facility (a radioactive liquid waste handling facility), 222-S Laboratory, the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility, and the Hanford TRU Waste Program.

  5. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. Gate complexity using Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivas Sridharan; Mile Gu; Matthew R. James

    2008-07-03

    The relationship between efficient quantum gate synthesis and control theory has been a topic of interest in the quantum control literature. Motivated by this work, we describe in the present article how the dynamic programming technique from optimal control may be used for the optimal synthesis of quantum circuits. We demonstrate simulation results on an example system on SU(2), to obtain plots related to the gate complexity and sample paths for different logic gates.

  7. Chaos in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheridan, T.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio Northern University, Ada, Ohio 45810 (United States)

    2005-08-15

    Chaotic dynamics is observed experimentally in a complex (dusty) plasma of three particles. A low-frequency sinusoidal modulation of the plasma density excites both the center-of-mass and breathing modes. Low-dimensional chaos is seen for a 1:2 resonance between these modes. A strange attractor with a dimension of 2.48{+-}0.05 is observed. The largest Lyapunov exponent is positive.

  8. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  10. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  11. Automated Data Quality Analysis Research and Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeney, J., Jr.; Haberl, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    The Automated Data Quality process development is an effort to automate the analysis and monitoring of the Energy Systems Lab's (ESL) polling and energy data process. Polling status refers to basic telecommunication line states, quality of data...

  12. OG&E's Power Quality Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, M.

    1989-01-01

    Our commitment to reliable electric power does not stop at the meter, but extends all the way to the equipment that it operates. Through the Power Quality Program, we provide professional power consultants to assure that the customer has quality...

  13. Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Air Quality Control Act (AQCA) is a set of environmental regulations, permitting requirements, and air quality standards that control the amount of pollutants emitted and who emits them...

  14. Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

  15. Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Department...

  16. Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise K Final Report Melissa M://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NISTIR.8032 NISTIR 8032 #12;NISTIR 8032 Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance

  17. Quality Assurance Guide for Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-27

    This Guide provides acceptable approaches for implementing the Quality Assurance requirements and criteria of DOE O 413.3A related to the development and implementation of a Quality Assurance Program for the project. No cancellations.

  18. Modeling Quality Information within Business Process Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paech, Barbara

    Modeling Quality Information within Business Process Models Robert Heinrich, Alexander Kappe. Business process models are a useful means to document information about structure and behavior literature and tool survey on modeling quality information within business process models. Keywords: Business

  19. TEAMS: Indoor Air Quality (IAR) Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, V.

    2008-01-01

    The Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District (“CFBISD”) found the need to reduce air quality concerns and complaints, and find an effective and efficient method to reduce the rising cost of utilities. An Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) program...

  20. INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES P. Cianchi*, S. Marsili such a computing architecture can be implemented using current internet technologies. Based on the "intelligent a normal web browser. KEYWORDS River water quality, Environmental management, Internet computing, Systems

  1. Quality of work – concept and measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlm, Svenn-Åge; Nesheim, Torstein; Olsen, Karen M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review some of the most essential literature on the concept and measurement of quality of work. We show that different academic fields have conceptualized quality of work in distinct ways however there has ...

  2. Slag pit practices to improve slag quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertdogan, A. [Metal Enterprises, Research and Technology, Inc., Homewood, IL (United States); Gambol, F.C.; Spaeth, J.R.; Zbos, J.; Batka, R. [Acme Steel Co., Chicago, IL (United States); Tolliver, D. [Heckett MultiServ, Whiting, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Slag quality had deteriorated recently. Without the explicit approval for slag quality by the Illinois Department of Transportation, the slag would not be saleable. Disposal of slag to landfills was going to be an expensive solution and rife with environmental concerns. A slag quality control program embarked on in mid-1994 restored slag quality to desired specifications. This paper describes the changes in slag pit practice adopted following extensive tests performed on cooling slag under controlled conditions.

  3. Quality Control Inspector: Different Programs, Different Responsibilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document explains the role of the Quality Control Inspector (QCI) in regards to the Home Energy Professional Certification Exam.

  4. Quality Assurance for Residential Retrofit Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covered quality assurance and how to assure that your investment achieves a desired result of saving energy.

  5. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  6. Quality Estimation and Segmentation of Pig Backs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality Estimation and Segmentation of Pig Backs Mads Fogtmann Hansen Kongens Lyngby 2005 Master the quality of the pig product "18cm back". It presents the necessary tools for deriving the measures, which are needed to perform a quality estimation. This includes finding the ribs, extracting the 18cm back from

  7. MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING MODELS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Harvey J.

    ~ngenvironmental quality. The scope includes air, water, and land quality, stemming from the first works in the 1960s, and the mathematical program is designed to pre- scribe decisions for operations and planning to minimize cost subject. Sections 2-4 sum- marize the literature on mathematical programming models for air, land, and water quality

  8. 6 September 2006 Genetic Quality Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    6 September 2006 Genetic Quality Control Genetic Quality Monitoring by Biochemical Marker monitoring program to ensure the genetic quality of mice strains. This monitoring program is useful treatment, RBCs are lysed in a fourfold volume of iodoacetic acid solution instead of water. Plasma

  9. WATER QUALITY PLAN MONITORING DATA REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;WATER QUALITY PLAN MONITORING DATA REPORT January to March 1993 TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES FREMP WQWM 93-02 DOE FR4P 1993-31 Prepared for FREMP Water QualityAVaste Management Committee by Don Morse PACIFIC REGION #12;Canadian Cataloging in Publication Data Main entry under title Water quality plan

  10. Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise J Final Report Melissa M.6028/NIST.IR.7997 NISTIR 7997 #12;Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise F Final Report Melissa M. Phillips Catherine A. Rimmer NISTIR 7997 Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality

  11. Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise H Final Report Melissa M://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.7903 NISTIR 7903 #12;ii Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise H Final Report Melissa M. Phillips Catherine A

  12. Relating Clusterization Measures and Software Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beszedes, Árpád

    Relating Clusterization Measures and Software Quality Béla Csaba, Lajos Schrettner, Árpád Beszédes clusters and software quality. Such attempts are hindered by a number of difficulties: there are problems in assessing the quality of software, measuring the degree of clusterization of software and finding the means

  13. Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-30

    This quality assurance plan identifies the data necessary, and techniques designed to attain the required quality, to meet the specific data quality objectives associated with the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report specifies sampling, waste testing, and analytical methods for transuranic wastes.

  14. Linearization of Moffat's Symmetric Complex Metric Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Munkhammar

    2009-09-19

    In this paper we investigate a complex symmetric generalization of general relativity and in particular we investigate its linearized field equations. We begin by reviewing some basic definitions and structures in Moffat's symmetric complex metric field theory of gravity. We then move on to derive the linearized retarded complex field equations. In addition to this we also derive a linearization of Moffat's field equations based on the more rigorous Fermi coordinate approach. In conclusion it is shown that the linearized symmetric complex field equations leads to a complex form of gravitomagnetism. We also briefly review the gravitational wave equation from the source less linearized symmetric complex field equations and discuss some open problems.

  15. Successful Characterization Strategies for the Active High Risk Y-12 National Security Complex 9201-5 (Alpha-5) Facility, Oak Ridge, TN - 12164

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birchfield, Joseph W. III [Link Technologies (United States); Albrecht, Linda [Alliant Corporation (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Building 9201-5 (Alpha 5) was completed in May 1944 and served as a production facility for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 Weapons Plant. During the Manhattan Project, it functioned as a uranium enrichment facility. The facility was renovated and altered over the years, converting the calutrons to support other missions. Alpha 5 consists of 4 floors and a basement measuring approximately 600,000 square feet. The facility contains various pieces of equipment remaining from legacy operations. A significant amount (approximately 200,000 kgs) of mercury (Hg) has been spilled in the facility over the operational history of the building. To further complicate matters, beryllium (Be) contamination in 9201-5 is found throughout approximately sixty percent of the facility. Concentrations varying from very low (< 0.2 micrograms (?g)/100 cm{sup 2}) to areas where concentrations are relatively high, approximately 600 ?g/100 cm{sup 2}, in regulated beryllium areas. The primary site related contaminants (SRCs) for the waste in this facility are enriched uranium, depleted uranium, beryllium and mercury. This facility represents the highest environmental risk for DOE-ORO EM and NNSA at Y-12 and must be quickly addressed to minimize impacts to future Y-12 missions, as well as human health and the environment. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), approximately 700,000 cubic feet of legacy material was removed in 2010 and 2011. In addition, characterization of the 9201-5 facility was scheduled in the winter and spring of 2011. This activity was initiated in January 2011 and was completed in July 2011. Heavy schedule pressure was further complicated by the fact that this building has active utility, security and process systems. Given these complex variables, a unique, out of the box characterization strategy was forged in an effort to bound radiological and chemical contaminants, as well as providing the appropriate level of quality to ensure that this data could be used to develop waste profiles when deactivation, decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities are authorized at a future date. The characterization strategy involved a hybrid model of statistically-based and biased sampling events. To achieve the desired results, traditional intrusive sampling and laboratory analysis, as well as a number of field-based characterization methodologies (e.g., X-ray Fluorescence [XRF], Lumex and Non-Destructive Assay [NDA]) were utilized. Results were captured and synthesized into meaningful, usable conclusions in a facility characterization report that will more accurately aid D and D cost estimates for future remedial actions. This massive characterization campaign involved over 1,200 separate sample locations using 4 separate characterization methods and was successfully completed to meet a performance-based milestone within 8 months of initiation. (authors)

  16. Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Quality and Energy Education In addition toAPPENDIX A1: Tenant Indoor Environmental Quality and Energyimproving indoor air quality (IAQ), energy efficiency and

  17. Quality Management System Guidelines - Building America Top Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Quality Management System Guidelines - Building America Top Innovation Quality Management System Guidelines - Building America Top Innovation Effec guid-quality-mgnt.png The...

  18. Policy Paper 37: Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

    1998-01-01

    the accumulation of stockpiles of plutonium. Japan, based ons increasing stockpile of separated plutonium. Korea, theplutonium in deployed weapons, in weapons marked for dismantling, in scrap at the nuclear weapons production complexes, and in stockpiles

  19. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    www.energy.govEM 9 The Nuclear Weapons Complex Produced Both Nuclear Weapons and Contamination on a Large Scale Over 1,000 metric tons of weapons- grade uranium Over 100 metric...

  20. Shear Banding of Complex Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibaut Divoux; Marc A. Fardin; Sébastien Manneville; Sandra Lerouge

    2015-03-13

    Even in simple geometries many complex fluids display non-trivial flow fields, with regions where shear is concentrated. The possibility for such shear banding has been known since several decades, but the recent years have seen an upsurge of studies offering an ever more precise understanding of the phenomenon. The development of new techniques to probe the flow on multiple scales and with increasing spatial and temporal resolution has opened the possibility for a synthesis of the many phenomena that could only have been thought of separately before. In this review, we bring together recent research on shear banding in polymeric and on soft glassy materials, and highlight their similarities and disparities.

  1. Complex motion of precipitation bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagzi, I; Rácz, Z; Lagzi, Istvan; Papai, Peter; Racz, Zoltan

    2006-01-01

    Formation and dynamics of an Al(OH)_3 precipitation ring is studied by diffusing NaOH into a gel containing AlCl_3. Limited feeding of the outer electrolyte (NaOH) is found to yield an intricate ring-dynamics which involves stopping and reversal of the direction of motion of the precipitation ring, and evolution into stationary multi-ring structures. A model of the ring-dynamics is developed by combining a phase separation scenario for the precipitation with the redissolution (complex formation) of the precipitate in the excess of the outer electrolyte.

  2. The Complex Gaussian Kernel LMS algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouboulis, Pantelis

    2010-01-01

    Although the real reproducing kernels are used in an increasing number of machine learning problems, complex kernels have not, yet, been used, in spite of their potential interest in applications such as communications. In this work, we focus our attention on the complex gaussian kernel and its possible application in the complex Kernel LMS algorithm. In order to derive the gradients needed to develop the complex kernel LMS (CKLMS), we employ the powerful tool of Wirtinger's Calculus, which has recently attracted much attention in the signal processing community. Writinger's calculus simplifies computations and offers an elegant tool for treating complex signals. To this end, the notion of Writinger's calculus is extended to include complex RKHSs. Experiments verify that the CKLMS offers significant performance improvements over the traditional complex LMS or Widely Linear complex LMS (WL-LMS) algorithms, when dealing with nonlinearities.

  3. Partitioning Complexity in Air Traffic Management Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive complexity is a term that appears frequently in air traffic control (ATC) research literature, yet there is little principled investigation of the potential sources of cognitive complexity. Three distinctly ...

  4. Modeling Multimodal Communication as a Complex System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thórisson, Kristinn Rúnar

    Modeling Multimodal Communication as a Complex System Kristinn R. Thórisson Center for Analysis of their interactions. Embodied natural communication belongs to this class of systems, encompassing many cognitive. Keywords: Multimodal realtime communication, computational model, complex natural system, heterogeneous

  5. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Moraga, CA); Yu, Choongho (College Station, TX); Scullin, Matthew L. (Berkeley, CA); Huijben, Mark (Enschede, NL)

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  6. Air Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy ResourcesAir Quality Jump to: navigation, search

  7. Analyzing the effects of component reliability on naval Integrated Power System quality of service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawbaker, Benjamin F. (Benjamin Forrest)

    2008-01-01

    The Integrated Power System (IPS) is a key enabling technology for future naval vessels and their advanced weapon systems. While conventional warship designs utilize separate power systems for propulsion and shipboard ...

  8. Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This page intentionally blank i Complex-Wide Review of DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Summary Report TABLE OF CONTENTS Acronyms ......

  9. The Complexity of Nash Equilibria Constantinos Daskalakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    The Complexity of Nash Equilibria by Constantinos Daskalakis Diploma (National Technical University is approved: Chair Date Date Date Date University of California, Berkeley Fall 2008 #12;The Complexity of Nash Equilibria Copyright 2008 by Constantinos Daskalakis #12;Abstract The Complexity of Nash Equilibria

  10. The Great American Education-Industrial Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    The Great American Education-Industrial Complex Ideology, Technology, and Profit Anthony G. Picciano & Joel Spring The Great American Education-Industrial Complex examines the structure and nature in a powerful common entity, and detail how the educational-industrial complex has grown and strengthened its

  11. MAIN THEOREM OF COMPLEX MULTIPLICATION BRIAN CONRAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Brian

    MAIN THEOREM OF COMPLEX MULTIPLICATION BRIAN CONRAD In [S, Ch. IV, §18] the Main Theorem of complex and abelian varieties. The aim of the Main Theorem is as follows. Let (A, i) be an abelian variety over Q Galois automorphisms. In these notes, we give a complete proof of the Main Theorem of complex

  12. Evolution of biological complexity Christoph Adami*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofria, Charles A.

    Evolution of biological complexity Christoph Adami* , Charles Ofria§ , and Travis C. Collier, Pasadena, CA 91125; and ¶Division of Organismic Biology, Ecology, and Evolution, University of California in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined

  13. On the Communication Complexity of Secure Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    On the Communication Complexity of Secure Computation Deepesh Data1 , Manoj M. Prabhakaran2 the communication complexity of this primitive. In this work, we develop powerful information theoretic tools to prove lower bounds on the communication complexity of MPC. We restrict our- selves to a concrete setting

  14. Quality Assurance: Patient Chart Reviews

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oginni, B. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Odero, D. O. [Raleigh Regional Cancer Center, Beckley, West Virginia 25801 (United States)

    2009-07-06

    Recent developments in radiation therapy have immensely impacted the way the radiation dose is delivered to patients undergoing radiation treatments. However, the fundamental quality assurance (QA) issues underlying the radiation therapy still remain the accuracy of the radiation dose and the radiation safety. One of the major duties of clinical medical physicists in the radiation therapy departments still revolves around ensuring the accuracy of dose delivery to the planning target volume (PTV), the reduction of unintended radiation to normal organs and minimization of the radiation exposure to the medical personnel based on ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. Many of the errors in radiation therapy can be minimized through a comprehensive program of periodic checks. One of the QA procedures on the patient comes in the form of chart reviews which could be in either electronic or paper-based format. We present the quality assurance procedures that have to be performed on the patient records from the beginning and periodically to the end of the treatment, based on the guidelines from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and American College of Physicians (ACP)

  15. National Coal Quality Inventory (NACQI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Finkelman

    2005-09-30

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted the National Coal Quality Inventory (NaCQI) between 1999 and 2005 to address a need for quality information on coals that will be mined during the next 20-30 years. Collaboration between the USGS, State geological surveys, universities, coal burning utilities, and the coal mining industry plus funding support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) permitted collection and submittal of coal samples for analysis. The chemical data (proximate and ultimate analyses; major, minor and trace element concentrations) for 729 samples of raw or prepared coal, coal associated shale, and coal combustion products (fly ash, hopper ash, bottom ash and gypsum) from nine coal producing States are included. In addition, the project identified a new coal reference analytical standard, to be designated CWE-1 (West Elk Mine, Gunnison County, Colorado) that is a high-volatile-B or high-volatile-A bituminous coal with low contents of ash yield and sulfur, and very low, but detectable contents of chlorine, mercury and other trace elements.

  16. Quality Control by Artificial Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Edmond Y. [University of Hong Kong, The; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Niel, Kurt S. [Upper Austria University of Applied Science, Engineering and Environmental Studies

    2010-01-01

    Computational technology has fundamentally changed many aspects of our lives. One clear evidence is the development of artificial-vision systems, which have effectively automated many manual tasks ranging from quality inspection to quantitative assessment. In many cases, these machine-vision systems are even preferred over manual ones due to their repeatability and high precision. Such advantages come from significant research efforts in advancing sensor technology, illumination, computational hardware, and image-processing algorithms. Similar to the Special Section on Quality Control by Artificial Vision published two years ago in Volume 17, Issue 3 of the Journal of Electronic Imaging, the present one invited papers relevant to fundamental technology improvements to foster quality control by artificial vision, and fine-tuned the technology for specific applications. We aim to balance both theoretical and applied work pertinent to this special section theme. Consequently, we have seven high-quality papers resulting from the stringent peer-reviewing process in place at the Journal of Electronic Imaging. Some of the papers contain extended treatment of the authors work presented at the SPIE Image Processing: Machine Vision Applications conference and the International Conference on Quality Control by Artificial Vision. On the broad application side, Liu et al. propose an unsupervised texture image segmentation scheme. Using a multilayer data condensation spectral clustering algorithm together with wavelet transform, they demonstrate the effectiveness of their approach on both texture and synthetic aperture radar images. A problem related to image segmentation is image extraction. For this, O'Leary et al. investigate the theory of polynomial moments and show how these moments can be compared to classical filters. They also show how to use the discrete polynomial-basis functions for the extraction of 3-D embossed digits, demonstrating superiority over Fourier-basis functions for this task. Image registration is another important task for machine vision. Bingham and Arrowood investigate the implementation and results in applying Fourier phase matching for projection registration, with a particular focus on nondestructive testing using computed tomography. Readers interested in enriching their arsenal of image-processing algorithms for machine-vision tasks should find these papers enriching. Meanwhile, we have four papers dealing with more specific machine-vision tasks. The first one, Yahiaoui et al., is quantitative in nature, using machine vision for real-time passenger counting. Occulsion is a common problem in counting objects and people, and they circumvent this issue with a dense stereovision system, achieving 97 to 99% accuracy in their tests. On the other hand, the second paper by Oswald-Tranta et al. focuses on thermographic crack detection. An infrared camera is used to detect inhomogeneities, which may indicate surface cracks. They describe the various steps in developing fully automated testing equipment aimed at a high throughput. Another paper describing an inspection system is Molleda et al., which handles flatness inspection of rolled products. They employ optical-laser triangulation and 3-D surface reconstruction for this task, showing how these can be achieved in real time. Last but not least, Presles et al. propose a way to monitor the particle-size distribution of batch crystallization processes. This is achieved through a new in situ imaging probe and image-analysis methods. While it is unlikely any reader may be working on these four specific problems at the same time, we are confident that readers will find these papers inspiring and potentially helpful to their own machine-vision system developments.

  17. FAPRI-UMC Report #01-07 Estimating Water Quality,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon and Carbon Sequestration...................................10 CRP EffectsFAPRI-UMC Report #01-07 Estimating Water Quality, Air Quality, and Soil Carbon Benefits Quality, Air Quality, and Soil Carbon Benefits of the Conservation Reserve Program FAPRI-UMC Report #01

  18. Complex Intermetallic Phases | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconductors, and energy storage and conversion. We are making quality single crystalline materials and to evaluate their electronic, magnetic, and thermoelectric...

  19. CASE STUDY OF KRESGE FOUNDATION OFFICE COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goins, John

    2011-01-01

    on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for 22  Stormwater Quality  and in biodiversity and stormwater criteria.     + The Center 

  20. Case study of Kresge Foundation office complex.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goins, John

    2011-01-01

    on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for 22  Stormwater Quality  and in biodiversity and stormwater criteria.     + The Center