National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for weak gravitational lensing

  1. Weak gravitational lensing with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, M L; Camera, S; Harrison, I; Joachimi, B; Metcalf, R B; Pourtsidou, A; Takahashi, K; Zuntz, J A; Abdalla, F B; Bridle, S; Jarvis, M; Kitching, T D; Miller, L; Patel, P

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the capabilities of various stages of the SKA to perform world-leading weak gravitational lensing surveys. We outline a way forward to develop the tools needed for pursuing weak lensing in the radio band. We identify the key analysis challenges and the key pathfinder experiments that will allow us to address them in the run up to the SKA. We identify and summarize the unique and potentially very powerful aspects of radio weak lensing surveys, facilitated by the SKA, that can solve major challenges in the field of weak lensing. These include the use of polarization and rotational velocity information to control intrinsic alignments, and the new area of weak lensing using intensity mapping experiments. We show how the SKA lensing surveys will both complement and enhance corresponding efforts in the optical wavebands through cross-correlation techniques and by way of extending the reach of weak lensing to high redshift.

  2. Quantum Lukewarm Black Holes and Weak Gravitational Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffarnejad, H

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the paper is study gravitational lensing of quantum Lukewarm black hole (QLBL) and compare with results of gravitational lensing from classical Lukewarm black hole lens (CLBL). Applying numerical method, we evaluate deflection angle, image positions and magnifications in weak deflection limits. In CLBL case, bending light ray moves from both side of the lens but in QLBL case it moves from one side of the lens. Increasing amount of dimensionless cosmological parameter (quantum matter interaction parameter), rake of bending light ray is decreased in case of QLBL with respect to CLBL. Number and size of radius of Einstein rings rises in case of QLBL with respect to CLBL. Maximum number of rings is 3 in case of QLBL namely one more with respect to case of CLBL which is physically related to effects of quantum matter. There is two images (elementary and secondary) with maximum magnification which their locations are changed in case of QLBL with respect to case of CLBL. Also their locations changed by increa...

  3. Quantum Lukewarm Black Holes and Weak Gravitational Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ghaffarnejad; M. A. Mojahedi

    2015-07-10

    Aim of the paper is study gravitational lensing of quantum Lukewarm black hole (QLBL) and compare with results of gravitational lensing from classical Lukewarm black hole lens (CLBL). Applying numerical method, we evaluate deflection angle, image positions and magnifications in weak deflection limits. In CLBL case, bending light ray moves from both side of the lens but in QLBL case it moves from one side of the lens. Increasing amount of dimensionless cosmological parameter (quantum matter interaction parameter), rake of bending light ray is decreased in case of QLBL with respect to CLBL. Number and size of radius of Einstein rings rises in case of QLBL with respect to CLBL. Maximum number of rings is 3 in case of QLBL namely one more with respect to case of CLBL which is physically related to effects of quantum matter. There is two images (elementary and secondary) with maximum magnification which their locations are changed in case of QLBL with respect to case of CLBL. Also their locations changed by increasing amount of dimensionless cosmological parameter. Same results are obtained for tangential magnification. Location of image with minimum radial magnification is lefthanded (righthanded) in case of QLBL (CLBL) and rises by decreasing the cosmological parameter. Also maximum value of the radial magnification decreases by increasing the effects of dimensionless cosmological parameter.

  4. A compilation of weak gravitational lensing studies of clusters of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Dahle

    2007-01-21

    We present a list of clusters that have had their dark matter content measured using weak gravitational lensing. The list consists of 139 clusters, with weak lensing measurements reported in 64 different publications. Details are provided about the selection criteria and some basic properties of the sample, such as the redshift distribution. An electronic, sortable version of this list with links to public database information on the clusters and publications is provided at http://folk.uio.no/hdahle/WLclusters.html

  5. On Weak Lensing Shape Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemi, Sami-Matias; Cropper, Mark

    2015-01-01

    One of the most powerful techniques to study the dark sector of the Universe is weak gravitational lensing. In practice, to infer the reduced shear, weak lensing measures galaxy shapes, which are the consequence of both the intrinsic ellipticity of the sources and of the integrated gravitational lensing effect along the line of sight. Hence, a very large number of galaxies is required in order to average over their individual properties and to isolate the weak lensing cosmic shear signal. If this `shape noise' can be reduced, significant advances in the power of a weak lensing surveys can be expected. This paper describes a general method for extracting the probability distributions of parameters from catalogues of data using Voronoi cells, which has several applications, and has synergies with Bayesian hierarchical modelling approaches. This allows us to construct a probability distribution for the variance of the intrinsic ellipticity as a function of galaxy property using only photometric data, allowing a ...

  6. The Effect of Weak Gravitational Lensing on the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy: Flat versus Open Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Martinez-Gonzalez; Jose L. Sanz; Laura Cayon

    1997-02-26

    We have studied the effect of gravitational lensing on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy in flat and open universes. We develop a formalism to calculate the changes on the radiation power spectrum induced by lensing in the Newtonian and synchronous-comoving gauges. The previously considered negligible contribution to the CMB radiation power spectrum of the anisotropic term of the lensing correlation is shown to be appreciable. However, considering the nonlinear evolution of the matter power spectrum produces only slight differences on the results based on linear evolution. The general conclusion for flat as well as open universes is that lensing slightly smoothes the radiation power spectrum. For a given range of multipoles the effect of lensing increases with Omega but for the same acoustic peak it decreases with $\\Omega$. The maximum contribution of lensing to the radiation power spectrum for $l\\leq 2000$ is $\\sim$ 5% for $\\Omega$ values in the range 0.1-1.

  7. Weak Lensing Simulations for the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Prina; Makhathini, Sphesihle; Abdalla, Filipe; Bacon, David; Brown, Michael L; Heywood, Ian; Jarvis, Matt; Smirnov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing measurements are traditionally made at optical wavelengths where many highly resolved galaxy images are readily available. However, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) holds great promise for this type of measurement at radio wavelengths owing to its greatly increased sensitivity and resolution over typical radio surveys. The key to successful weak lensing experiments is in measuring the shapes of detected sources to high accuracy. In this document we describe a simulation pipeline designed to simulate radio images of the quality required for weak lensing, and will be typical of SKA observations. We provide as input, images with realistic galaxy shapes which are then simulated to produce images as they would have been observed with a given radio interferometer. We exploit this pipeline to investigate various stages of a weak lensing experiment in order to better understand the effects that may impact shape measurement. We first show how the proposed SKA1-Mid array configurations perfor...

  8. Lossy compression of weak lensing data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vanderveld, R. Ali; Bernstein, Gary M.; Stoughton, Chris; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Dobke, Benjamin M.

    2011-07-12

    Future orbiting observatories will survey large areas of sky in order to constrain the physics of dark matter and dark energy using weak gravitational lensing and other methods. Lossy compression of the resultant data will improve the cost and feasibility of transmitting the images through the space communication network. We evaluate the consequences of the lossy compression algorithm of Bernstein et al. (2010) for the high-precision measurement of weak-lensing galaxy ellipticities. This square-root algorithm compresses each pixel independently, and the information discarded is by construction less than the Poisson error from photon shot noise. For simulated space-based images (without cosmicmore »rays) digitized to the typical 16 bits per pixel, application of the lossy compression followed by image-wise lossless compression yields images with only 2.4 bits per pixel, a factor of 6.7 compression. We demonstrate that this compression introduces no bias in the sky background. The compression introduces a small amount of additional digitization noise to the images, and we demonstrate a corresponding small increase in ellipticity measurement noise. The ellipticity measurement method is biased by the addition of noise, so the additional digitization noise is expected to induce a multiplicative bias on the galaxies measured ellipticities. After correcting for this known noise-induced bias, we find a residual multiplicative ellipticity bias of m {approx} -4 x 10-4. This bias is small when compared to the many other issues that precision weak lensing surveys must confront, and furthermore we expect it to be reduced further with better calibration of ellipticity measurement methods.« less

  9. Origins of weak lensing systematics, and requirements on future...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Origins of weak lensing systematics, and requirements on future instrumentation (or knowledge of instrumentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Origins of weak lensing...

  10. Gravitational Lensing by Rotating Naked Singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galin N. Gyulchev; Stoytcho S. Yazadjiev

    2008-06-19

    We model massive compact objects in galactic nuclei as stationary, axially-symmetric naked singularities in the Einstein-massless scalar field theory and study the resulting gravitational lensing. In the weak deflection limit we study analytically the position of the two weak field images, the corresponding signed and absolute magnifications as well as the centroid up to post-Newtonian order. We show that there are a static post-Newtonian corrections to the signed magnification and their sum as well as to the critical curves, which are function of the scalar charge. The shift of the critical curves as a function of the lens angular momentum is found, and it is shown that they decrease slightingly for the weakly naked and vastly for the strongly naked singularities with the increase of the scalar charge. The point-like caustics drift away from the optical axis and do not depend on the scalar charge. In the strong deflection limit approximation we compute numerically the position of the relativistic images and their separability for weakly naked singularities. All of the lensing quantities are compared to particular cases as Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes as well as Janis--Newman--Winicour naked singularities.

  11. Gravitational lensing by rotating naked singularities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyulchev, Galin N.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2008-10-15

    We model massive compact objects in galactic nuclei as stationary, axially symmetric naked singularities in the Einstein-massless scalar field theory and study the resulting gravitational lensing. In the weak deflection limit we study analytically the position of the two weak field images, the corresponding signed and absolute magnifications as well as the centroid up to post-Newtonian order. We show that there are static post-Newtonian corrections to the signed magnification and their sum as well as to the critical curves, which are functions of the scalar charge. The shift of the critical curves as a function of the lens angular momentum is found, and it is shown that they decrease slightly for the weakly naked and vastly for the strongly naked singularities with the increase of the scalar charge. The pointlike caustics drift away from the optical axis and do not depend on the scalar charge. In the strong deflection limit approximation, we compute numerically the position of the relativistic images and their separability for weakly naked singularities. All of the lensing quantities are compared to particular cases as Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes as well as Janis-Newman-Winicour naked singularities.

  12. A Computer Program to Visualize Gravitational Lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Frutos-Alfaro

    2014-06-12

    Gravitational lenses are presently playing an important role in astrophysics. By means of these lenses the parameters of the deflector such as its mass, ellipticity, etc. and Hubble's constant can be determined. Using C, Xforms, Mesa and Imlib a computer program to visualize this lens effect has been developed. This program has been applied to generate sequences of images of a source object and its corresponding images. It has also been used to visually test different models of gravitational lenses.

  13. Separating weak lensing and intrinsic alignments using radio observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittaker, Lee; Battye, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    We discuss methods for performing weak lensing using radio observations to recover information about the intrinsic structural properties of the source galaxies. Radio surveys provide unique information that can benefit weak lensing studies, such as HI emission, which may be used to construct galaxy velocity maps, and polarized synchrotron radiation; both of which provide information about the unlensed galaxy and can be used to reduce galaxy shape noise and the contribution of intrinsic alignments. Using a proxy for the intrinsic position angle of an observed galaxy, we develop techniques for cleanly separating weak gravitational lensing signals from intrinsic alignment contamination in forthcoming radio surveys. Random errors on the intrinsic orientation estimates introduce biases into the shear and intrinsic alignment estimates. However, we show that these biases can be corrected for if the error distribution is accurately known. We demonstrate our methods using simulations, where we reconstruct the shear an...

  14. Magnified Weak Lensing Cross Correlation Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmer, Melville P., Clowe, Douglas I.

    2010-11-30

    This project carried out a weak lensing tomography (WLT) measurement around rich clusters of galaxies. This project used ground based photometric redshift data combined with HST archived cluster images that provide the WLT and cluster mass modeling. The technique has already produced interesting results (Guennou et al, 2010,Astronomy & Astrophysics Vol 523, page 21, and Clowe et al, 2011 to be submitted). Guennou et al have validated that the necessary accuracy can be achieved with photometric redshifts for our purposes. Clowe et al titled "The DAFT/FADA survey. II. Tomographic weak lensing signal from 10 high redshift clusters," have shown that for the **first time** via this purely geometrical technique, which does not assume a standard rod or candle, that a cosmological constant is **required** for flat cosmologies. The intent of this project is not to produce the best constraint on the value of the dark energy equation of state, w. Rather, this project is to carry out a sustained effort of weak lensing tomography that will naturally feed into the near term Dark Energy Survey (DES) and to provide invaluable mass calibration for that project. These results will greatly advance a key cosmological method which will be applied to the top-rated ground-based project in the Astro2020 decadal survey, LSST. Weak lensing tomography is one of the key science drivers behind LSST. CO-I Clowe is on the weak lensing LSST committee, and senior scientist on this project, at FNAL James Annis, plays a leading role in the DES. This project has built on successful proposals to obtain ground-based imaging for the cluster sample. By 1 Jan, it is anticipated the project will have accumulated complete 5-color photometry on 30 (or about 1/3) of the targeted cluster sample (public webpage for the survey is available at http://cencos.oamp.fr/DAFT/ and has a current summary of the observational status of various clusters). In all, the project has now been awarded the equivalent of over 60 nights on 4-m class telescopes, which gives concrete evidence of strong community support for this project. The WLT technique is based on the dependence of the gravitational shear signal on the angular diameter distances between the observer, the lens, and the lensed galaxy to measure cosmological parameters. By taking the ratio of measured shears of galaxies with different redshifts around the same lens, one obtains a measurement of the ratios of the angular diameter distances involved. Making these observations over a large range of lenses and background galaxy redshifts will measure the history of the expansion rate of the universe. Because this is a purely geometric measurement, it is insensitive to any form of evolution of objects or the necessity to understand the physics in the early universe. Thus, WLT was identified by the Dark Energy Task Force as perhaps the best method to measure the evolution of DE. To date, however, the conjecture of the DETF has not been experimentally verified, but will be by the proposed project. The primary reason for the lack of tomography measurements is that one must have an exceptional data-set to attempt the measurement. One needs both extremely good seeing (or space observations) in order to minimize the point spread function smearing corrections on weak lensing shear measurements and deep, multi-color data, from B to z, to measure reliable photometric redshifts of the background galaxies being lensed (which are typically too faint to obtain spectroscopic redshifts). Because the entire process from multi-drizzling the HST images, and then creating shear maps, to gathering the necessary ground based observations, to generating photo-zs and then carrying out the tomography is a complicated task, until the creation of our team, nobody has taken the time to connect all the levels of expertise necessary to carry out this project based on HST archival data. Our data are being used in 2 Ph.D. theses. Kellen Murphy, at Ohio University, is using the tomography data along with simulations in a thesis expected to be completed in Jun

  15. Weak Lensing: Dark Matter, Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh (University of Pennsylvania) [University of Pennsylvania

    2006-02-27

    The light rays from distant galaxies are deflected by massive structures along the line of sight, causing the galaxy images to be distorted. Measurements of these distortions, known as weak lensing, provide a way of measuring the distribution of dark matter as well as the spatial geometry of the universe. I will describe the ideas underlying this approach to cosmology. With planned large imaging surveys, weak lensing is a powerful probe of dark energy. I will discuss the observational challenges ahead and recent progress in developing multiple, complementary approaches to lensing measurements.

  16. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed themore »statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.« less

  17. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed the statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.

  18. Lensing of 21-cm Fluctuations by Primordial Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Book; Marc Kamionkowski; Fabian Schmidt

    2011-12-02

    Weak-gravitational-lensing distortions to the intensity pattern of 21-cm radiation from the dark ages can be decomposed geometrically into curl and curl-free components. Lensing by primordial gravitational waves induces a curl component, while the contribution from lensing by density fluctuations is strongly suppressed. Angular fluctuations in the 21-cm background extend to very small angular scales, and measurements at different frequencies probe different shells in redshift space. There is thus a huge trove of information with which to reconstruct the curl component of the lensing field, allowing tensor-to-scalar ratios conceivably as small as r ~ 10^{-9} - far smaller than those currently accessible - to be probed.

  19. Inclination Effects in Spiral Galaxy Gravitational Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariyeh Maller; Ricardo Flores; Joel Primack

    1997-05-05

    Spheroidal components of spiral galaxies have been considered the only dynamically important component in gravitational lensing studies thus far. Here we point out that including the disk component can have a significant effect, depending on the disk inclination, on a variety of lensing properties that are relevant to present studies and future surveys. As an example, we look at the multiple image system B1600+434, recently identified as being lensed by a spiral galaxy. We find that including the disk component one can understand the fairly large image separation as being due to the inclination of a typical spiral, rather than the presence of a very massive halo. The fairly low magnification ratio can also be readily understood if the disk is included. We also discuss how such lensed systems might allow one to constrain parameters of spiral galaxies such as a disk-to-halo mass ratio, and disk mass scale length. Another example we consider is the quasar multiple-lensing cross section, which we find can increase many-fold at high inclination for a typical spiral. Finally, we discuss the changes in the gravitational lensing effects on damped Lyman alpha systems (DLAS) when disk lensing is included.

  20. Cluster Cores, Gravitational Lensing, and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo A. Flores; Joel R. Primack

    1995-12-11

    Many multiply--imaged quasars have been found over the years, but none so far with image separation in excess of $8\\arcsec$. The absence of such large splittings has been used as a test of cosmological models: the standard Cold Dark Matter model has been excluded on the basis that it predicts far too many large--separation double images. These studies assume that the lensing structure has the mass profile of a singular isothermal sphere. However, such large splittings would be produced by very massive systems such as clusters of galaxies, for which other gravitational lensing data suggest less singular mass profiles. Here we analyze two cases of mass profiles for lenses: an isothermal sphere with a finite core radius (density $\\rho \\propto (r^2+r_{core}^2)^{-1})$, and a Hernquist profile ($\\rho \\propto r^{-1}(r+a)^{-3}$). We find that small core radii $r_{core} \\sim 30 h^{-1}$ kpc, as suggested by the cluster data, or large $a \\gsim 300 h^{-1}$ kpc, as needed for compatibility with gravitational distortion data, would reduce the number of large--angle splittings by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, it appears that these tests are sensitive both to the cosmological model (number density of lenses) and to the inner lens structure, which is unlikely to depend sensitively on the cosmology, making it difficult to test the cosmological models by large--separation quasar lensing until we reliably know the structure of the lenses themselves.

  1. Cosmological test using strong gravitational lensing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, C C

    2015-01-01

    As one of the probes of universe, strong gravitational lensing systems allow us to compare different cosmological models and constrain vital cosmological parameters. This purpose can be reached from the dynamic and geometry properties of strong gravitational lensing systems, for instance, time-delay $\\Delta\\tau$ of images, the velocity dispersion $\\sigma$ of the lensing galaxies and the combination of these two effects, $\\Delta\\tau/\\sigma^2$. In this paper, in order to carry out one-on-one comparisons between $\\Lambda$CDM universe and $R_h=ct$ universe, we use a sample containing 36 strong lensing systems with the measurement of velocity dispersion from the SLACS and LSD survey. Concerning the time-delay effect, 12 two-image lensing systems with $\\Delta\\tau$ are also used. In addition, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used to compare the efficiency of the three methods as mentioned above. From simulations, we estimate the number of lenses required to rule out one model at the $99.7\\%$ confidence level. Compar...

  2. Weak lensing of large scale structure in the presence of screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tessore, Nicolas; Metcalf, R Benton; Ferreira, Pedro G

    2015-01-01

    A number of alternatives to general relativity exhibit gravitational screening in the non-linear regime of structure formation. We describe a set of algorithms that can produce weak lensing maps of large scale structure in such theories and can be used to generate mock surveys for cosmological analysis. By analysing a few basic statistics we indicate how these alternatives can be distinguished from general relativity with future weak lensing surveys.

  3. A toolbox for general elliptical gravitational lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Schramm

    1993-11-09

    We introduce a formalism to describe 2D-Potentials for 2D-matter (or charge) distributions with arbitrary elliptical symmetry including varying eccentricity and twisting of the iso-density curves. We use this approach to describe elliptical matter distributions such as elliptical galaxies or clusters as gravitational lenses. Figures are available upon request: tschramm@hs.uni-hamburg.de

  4. A Method for Weak Lensing Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Kaiser; Gordon Squires; Tom Broadhurst

    1994-11-01

    We develop and test a method for measuring the gravitational lensing induced distortion of faint background galaxies. We first describe how we locate the galaxies and measure a 2-component `polarisation' or ellipticity statistic $e_\\alpha$ whose expectation value should be proportional to the gravitational shear $\\gamma_\\alpha$. We then show that an anisotropic instrumental psf perturbs the polarisation by $\\delta e_\\alpha = P^s_{\\alpha\\beta} p_\\beta$, where $p_\\alpha$ is a measure of the psf anisotropy and $P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}$ is the `linearised smear polarisability tensor'. By estimating $P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}$ for each object we can determine $p_\\alpha$ from the foreground stars and apply a correction $-P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}p_\\beta$ to the galaxies. We test this procedure using deep high-resolution images from HST which are smeared with an anisotropic psf and then have noise added to simulate ground-based observations. We find that the procedure works very well. A similar analysis yields a linear shear polarisability tensor $P^\\gamma_{\\alpha\\beta}$ which describes the response to a gravitational shear. This calibrates the polarisation-shear relation, but only for galaxies which are well resolved. To empirically calibrate the effect of seeing on the smaller galaxies we artificially stretch HST images to simulate lensing and then degrade them as before. These experiments provide a rigorous and exacting test of the method under realistic conditions. They show that it is possible to remove the effect of instrumental psf anisotropy, and that the method provides an efficient and quantitative measurement of the gravitational shear.

  5. Origins of weak lensing systematics, and requirements on future...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Origins of weak lensing systematics, and requirements on future instrumentation (or knowledge of instrumentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  6. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves in Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Biesiada, Marek [Department of Astrophysics and Cosmology, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Zhu, Zong-Hong, E-mail: aleksandra.piorkowska@us.edu.pl, E-mail: marek.biesiada@us.edu.pl, E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Gravitational wave experiments have entered a new stage which gets us closer to the opening a new observational window on the Universe. In particular, the Einstein Telescope (ET) is designed to have a fantastic sensitivity that will provide with tens or hundreds of thousand NS-NS inspiral events per year up to the redshift z = 2. Some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral NS-NS events in the Einstein telescope. Being conservative we consider the lens population of elliptical galaxies. It turns out that depending on the local insipral rate ET should detect from one per decade detection in the pessimistic case to a tens of detections per year for the most optimistic case. The detection of gravitationally lensed source in gravitational wave detectors would be an invaluable source of information concerning cosmography, complementary to standard ones (like supernovae or BAO) independent of the local cosmic distance ladder calibrations.

  7. Wave optics and image formation in gravitational lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasusada Nambu

    2012-07-30

    We discuss image formation in gravitational lensing systems using wave optics. Applying the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction formula to waves scattered by a gravitational potential of a lens object, we demonstrate how images of source objects are obtained directly from wave functions without using a lens equation for gravitational lensing.

  8. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the samemore »sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per ?z = 0.1 bin at z –2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M? have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter ? (f = ??m), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy ?(?) ? 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M?. We also find that the ?(?) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 1013 -1014 h–1 M?, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. As a result, the gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is uncertain by > 0.5%.« less

  9. Time delay and magnification centroid due to gravitational lensing by black holes and naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. S. Virbhadra; C. R. Keeton

    2007-10-11

    We model the massive dark object at the center of the Galaxy as a Schwarzschild black hole as well as Janis-Newman-Winicour naked singularities, characterized by the mass and scalar charge parameters, and study gravitational lensing (particularly time delay, magnification centroid, and total magnification) by them. We find that the lensing features are qualitatively similar (though quantitatively different) for the Schwarzschild black holes, weakly naked, and marginally strongly naked singularities. However, the lensing characteristics of strongly naked singularities are qualitatively very different from those due the Schwarzschild black holes. The images produced by Schwarzschild black hole lenses and weakly naked and marginally strongly naked singularity lenses always have positive time delays. On the other hand, the strongly naked singularity lenses can give rise to images with positive, zero, or negative time delays. In particular, for a large angular source position the direct image (the outermost image on the same side as the source) due to strongly naked singularity lensing always has negative time delay. We also found that the scalar field decreases the time delay and increases the magnitude of magnifications of images; this result could have important implications for cosmology. As the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric also describes the exterior gravitational field of a scalar star, naked singularities as well as scalar star lenses, if these exist in nature, will serve as more efficient cosmic telescopes than regular gravitational lenses.

  10. Time delay and magnification centroid due to gravitational lensing by black holes and naked singularities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virbhadra, K. S.; Keeton, C. R.

    2008-06-15

    We model the massive dark object at the center of the Galaxy as a Schwarzschild black hole as well as Janis-Newman-Winicour naked singularities, characterized by the mass and scalar charge parameters, and study gravitational lensing (particularly time delay, magnification centroid, and total magnification) by them. We find that the lensing features are qualitatively similar (though quantitatively different) for Schwarzschild black holes, weakly naked, and marginally strongly naked singularities. However, the lensing characteristics of strongly naked singularities are qualitatively very different from those due to Schwarzschild black holes. The images produced by Schwarzschild black hole lenses and weakly naked and marginally strongly naked singularity lenses always have positive time delays. On the other hand, strongly naked singularity lenses can give rise to images with positive, zero, or negative time delays. In particular, for a large angular source position the direct image (the outermost image on the same side as the source) due to strongly naked singularity lensing always has a negative time delay. We also found that the scalar field decreases the time delay and increases the total magnification of images; this result could have important implications for cosmology. As the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric also describes the exterior gravitational field of a scalar star, naked singularities as well as scalar star lenses, if these exist in nature, will serve as more efficient cosmic telescopes than regular gravitational lenses.

  11. Distance Duality Relation from Strong Gravitational Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Kai; Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Under very general assumptions of metric theory of spacetime, photons traveling along null geodesics and photon number conservation, two observable concepts of cosmic distance, i.e. the angular diameter and the luminosity distances are related to each other by the so called distance duality relation (DDR) $D^L=D^A(1+z)^2$. Observational validation of this relation is quite important because any evidence of its violation could be a signal of new physics. In this letter we introduce a new method to test DDR based on strong gravitational lensing systems and supernovae Ia. Using a new compilation of strong lensing systems and JLA compilation of SNe Ia we found no evidence of DDR violation. However, not so much the final result but the method itself is worth attention, because unlike previously proposed techniques, it does not depend on prior assumptions concerning the details of cosmological model and galaxy cluster modelling.

  12. Constraints on warm dark matter from weak lensing in anomalous quadruple lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiki Taro Inoue; Ryuichi Takahashi; Tomo Takahashi; Tomoaki Ishiyama

    2015-02-12

    We investigate the weak lensing effect by line-of-sight structures with a surface mass density of solar mass/arcsec^2 in QSO-galaxy quadruple lens systems. Using high-resolution N-body simulations in warm dark matter (WDM) models and observed four quadruple lenses that show anomalies in the flux ratios, we obtain constraints on the mass of thermal WDM, m_WDM>= 1.3keV(95%CL) assuming that the density of the primary lens is described by a singular isothermal ellipsoid (SIE). The obtained constraint is consistent with those from Lyman-$\\alpha$ forests and the number counts of high-redshift galaxies at z>4. Our results show that WDM with a free-streaming comoving wavenumber k_{fs} <= 27 h/Mpc is disfavored as the major component of cosmological density at redshifts 0.5 <~ z <~ 4 provided that the SIE models describe the gravitational potentials of the primary lenses correctly.

  13. Lossy compression of weak lensing data (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lossy compression of weak lensing data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lossy compression of weak lensing data You are accessing a document from the Department of...

  14. Lossy compression of weak lensing data (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Lossy compression of weak lensing data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lossy compression of weak lensing data Future orbiting observatories will survey...

  15. Three QSOs acting as strong gravitational lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courbin, F; Djorgovski, S G; Rerat, F; Tewes, M; Meylan, G; Stern, D; Mahabal, A; Boroson, T; Dheeraj, R; Sluse, D

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of three new cases of QSOs acting as strong gravitational lenses on background emission line galaxies: SDSS J0827+5224 (zQSO = 0.293, zs = 0.412), SDSS J0919+2720 (zQSO = 0.209, zs = 0.558), SDSS J1005+4016 (zQSO = 0.230, zs = 0.441). The selection was carried out using a sample of 22,298 SDSS spectra displaying at least four emission lines at a redshift beyond that of the foreground QSO. The lensing nature is confirmed from Keck imaging and spectroscopy, as well as from HST/WFC3 imaging in the F475W and F814W filters. Two of the QSOs have face-on spiral host galaxies and the third is a QSO+galaxy pair. The velocity dispersion of the host galaxies, inferred from simple lens modeling, is between \\sigma_v = 210 and 285 km/s, making these host galaxies comparable in mass with the SLACS sample of early-type strong lenses.

  16. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Merten, Julian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Matheson, Thomas [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Bartelmann, Matthias [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Balestra, Italo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Benítez, Narciso [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Camino Bajo de Huétor 24, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Bouwens, Rychard [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: bpatel02@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); and others

    2014-05-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was ?1.0 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is ?0.2 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log{sub 10}?): 0.83 ± 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 ± 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 ± 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  17. Gravitational lensing in eclipsing binary stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Marsh

    2000-12-18

    I consider the effect of the gravitational deflection of light upon the light curves of eclipsing binary stars, focussing mainly upon systems containing at least one white dwarf component. In absolute terms the effects are small, however they are strongest at the time of secondary eclipse when the white dwarf transits its companion, and act to reduce the depth of this feature. If not accounted for, this may lead to under-estimation of the radius of the white dwarf compared to that of its companion. I show that the effect is significant for plausible binary parameters, and that it leads to ~25% reduction in the transit depth in the system KPD 1930+2752. The reduction of eclipse depth is degenerate with the stellar radius ratio, and therefore cannot be used to establish the existence of lensing. A second order effect of the light bending is to steepen the ingress and egress features of the secondary eclipse relative to the primary eclipse, although it will be difficult to see this in practice. I consider also binaries containing neutron stars and black-holes. I conclude that, although relatively large effects are possible in such systems, a combination of rarity, faintness and intrinsic variability make it unlikely that lensing will be detectable in them.

  18. Potential sources of contamination to weak lensing measurements: constraints from N-body simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catherine Heymans; Martin White; Alan Heavens; Chris Vale; Ludovic Van Waerbeke

    2006-06-16

    We investigate the expected correlation between the weak gravitational shear of distant galaxies and the orientation of foreground galaxies, through the use of numerical simulations. This shear-ellipticity correlation can mimic a cosmological weak lensing signal, and is potentially the limiting physical systematic effect for cosmology with future high-precision weak lensing surveys. We find that, if uncorrected, the shear-ellipticity correlation could contribute up to 10% of the weak lensing signal on scales up to 20 arcminutes, for lensing surveys with a median depth z=1. The most massive foreground galaxies are expected to cause the largest correlations, a result also seen in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the redshift dependence of the effect is proportional to the lensing efficiency of the foreground, and this offers prospects for removal to high precision, although with some model dependence. The contamination is characterised by a weakly negative B-mode, which can be used as a diagnostic of systematic errors. We also provide more accurate predictions for a second potential source of error, the intrinsic alignment of nearby galaxies. This source of contamination is less important, however, as it can be easily removed with distance information.

  19. Searching for massive clusters in weak lensing surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Hamana; Masahiro Takada; Naoki Yoshida

    2004-02-02

    We explore the ability of weak lensing surveys to locate massive clusters. We use both analytic models of dark matter halos and mock weak lensing surveys generated from a large cosmological N-body simulation. The analytic models describe average properties of weak lensing halos and predict the number counts, enabling us to compute an effective survey selection function. We test the model prediction for the peak number counts in weak lensing mass maps against the mock numerical data, and find that the noise due to intrinsic galaxy ellipticities causes a systematic effect which increases the peak counts. We develop a correction scheme for the systematic effect in an empirical manner, and show that, after the correction, the model prediction agrees well with the mock data. The mock data is also used to examine the completeness and efficiency of the weak lensing halo search with fully taking into account the noise and the projection effect by large-scale structures. We show that the detection threshold of S/N=4-5 gives an optimal balance between completeness and efficiency. Our results suggest that, for a weak lensing survey with a galaxy number density of ng=30/arcmin^2 with a mean redshift z=1, the mean number of peaks in the 10sq deg area is N_peak=62 for a detection threshold S/N=4. The contamination rate is 42%, and thus, on average, 36 out of 62 peaks (at least) are signals from real halos. Weak lensing surveys thus provide a reasonably efficient way to searching for massive clusters.

  20. Gravitational Lensing Effect on the Two-point Correlation of Hotspots in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takada; Eiichiro Komatsu; Toshifumi Futamase

    2000-05-17

    We investigate the weak gravitational lensing effect due to the large-scale structure of the universe on two-point correlations of local maxima ({\\em hotspots}) in the 2D sky map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy. According to the Gaussian random statistics as most inflationary scenarios predict, the hotspots are discretely distributed with some {\\em characteristic} angular separations on the last scattering surface owing to oscillations of the CMB angular power spectrum. The weak lensing then causes pairs of hotspots which are separated with the characteristic scale to be observed with various separations. We found that the lensing fairly smoothes the oscillatory features of the two-point correlation function of hotspots. This indicates that the hotspots correlations can be a new statistical tool for measuring shape and normalization of the power spectrum of matter fluctuations from the lensing signatures.

  1. What is Gravitational Lensing? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Nakajima, Reiko [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Gravitational lensing is explained by Einstein's general theory of relativity: galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which are very massive objects, act on spacetime by causing it to become curved. Alexie Leauthaud and Reiko Nakajima, astrophysicists with the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, will discuss how scientists use gravitational lensing to investigate the nature of dark energy and dark matter in the universe.

  2. What is Gravitational Lensing?(LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alexie, Leauthaud; Reiko, Nakajima [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Berkely, California, United States

    2010-01-08

    July 28, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Gravitational lensing is explained by Einstein's general theory of relativity: galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which are very massive objects, act on spacetime by causing it to become curved. Alexie Leauthaud and Reiko Nakajima, astrophysicists with the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, will discuss how scientists use gravitational lensing to investigate the nature of dark energy and dark matter in the universe.

  3. What is Gravitational Lensing? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Nakajima, Reiko

    2009-07-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Gravitational lensing is explained by Einstein's general theory of relativity: galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which are very massive objects, act on spacetime by causing it to become curved. Alexie Leauthaud and Reiko Nakajima, astrophysicists with the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, will discuss how scientists use gravitational lensing to investigate the nature of dark energy and dark matter in the universe.

  4. Designing Weak Lensing Surveys: A Generalised Eigenmode Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Kilbinger; Dipak Munshi

    2005-11-17

    We study the estimators of various second-order weak lensing statistics such as the shear correlation functions xi_\\pm and the aperture mass dispersion which can directly be constructed from weak lensing shear maps. We compare the efficiency with which these estimators can be used to constrain cosmological parameters. To this end we introduce the Karhunen-Loeve (KL) eigenmode analysis techniques for weak lensing surveys. These tools are shown to be very effective as a diagnostics for optimising survey strategies. The usefulness of these tools to study the effect of angular binning, the depth and width of the survey and noise contributions due to intrinsic ellipticities and number density of source galaxies on the estimation of cosmological parameters is demonstrated. Results from independent analysis of various parameters and joint estimations are compared. We also study how degeneracies among various cosmological and survey parameters affect the eigenmodes associated with these parameters.

  5. Strong Gravitational Lensing in a Brane-World Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GuoPing Li; Biao Cao; Zhongwen Feng; Xiaotao Zu

    2015-06-28

    Adopting the strong field limit approach, we investigated the strong gravitational lensing in a Brane-World black hole, which means that the strong field limit coefficients and the deflection angle in this gravitational field are obtained. With this result, it can be said with certainly that the strong gravitational lensing is related to the metric of gravitational fields closely, the cosmology parameter {\\alpha} and the dark matter parameter \\b{eta} come from the Brane-World black hole exerts a great influence on it. Comparing with the Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime and the Schwarzschild-XCMD spacetime, the parameters {\\alpha}, \\b{eta} of black holes have the similar effects on the gravitational lensing. In some way, we infer that the real gravitational fields in our universe can be described by this metric, so the results of the strong gravitational lensing in this spacetime will be more reasonable for us to observe. Finally, it has to be noticed that the influence which the parameters {\\alpha}, \\b{eta} exerted on the main observable quantities of this gravitational field is discussed.

  6. HerMES: Candidate Gravitationally Lensed Galaxies and Lensing Statistics at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardlow, Julie L; De Bernardis, Francesco; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Baker, A J; Béthermin, M; Blundell, R; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Bridge, C; Buat, V; Burgarella, D; Bussmann, R S; Calanog, J; Carpenter, J M; Casey, C M; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Chapman, S C; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Cox, P; Dowell, C D; Dye, S; Eales, S; Farrah, D; Franceschini, A; Frayer, D T; Frazer, C; Fu, Hai; Gavazzi, R; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Gurwell, M A; Harris, A I; Hatziminaoglou, E; Hopwood, R; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Kim, S; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Negrello, M; Neri, R; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Riechers, D; Rigopoulou, D; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Scoville, N; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Trichas, M; Vaccari, M; Vieira, J D; Viero, M; Wang, L; Xu, C K; Yan, L; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    We present a list of 13 candidate gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from 95 square degrees of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, a surface density of 0.14\\pm0.04deg^{-2}. These sources have 500um flux densities (S_500) greater than 100mJy. Follow-up observations confirm gravitational lensing in 9 of the 13 systems (70%); the lensing status of the four remaining sources is undetermined. We also present a supplementary sample of 29 (0.31\\pm0.06deg^{-2}) gravitationally lensed SMG candidates with S_500=80--100mJy, which are expected to contain a higher fraction of interlopers than the primary candidates. The number counts of the candidate lensed galaxies are consistent with a simple statistical model of the lensing rate, which uses a foreground matter distribution, the intrinsic SMG number counts, and an assumed SMG redshift distribution. The model predicts that 43--83% of our S_500>100mJy candidates are strongly gravitationally lensed, with the brightest sources being the most ro...

  7. The cosmology dependence of weak lensing cluster counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Marian; Robert E. Smith; Gary M. Bernstein

    2009-06-30

    We present the main results of a numerical study of weak lensing cluster counting. We examine the scaling with cosmology of the projected-density-peak mass function. Our main conclusion is that the projected-peak and the three-dimensional mass functions scale with cosmology in an astonishingly close way. This means that, despite being derived from a two-dimensional field, the weak lensing cluster abundance can be used to constrain cosmology in the same way as the three-dimensional mass function probed by other types of surveys.

  8. The effect of weak lensing on distance estimates from supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Mathew; Maartens, Roy [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Bacon, David J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Clarkson, Chris [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Bassett, Bruce A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Cinabro, David [Wayne State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Finley, David A.; Frieman, Joshua A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Galbany, Lluis [CENTRA Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofísica, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Olmstead, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Shapiro, Charles [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, La Canada Flintridge, CA 91109 (United States); Sollerman, Jesper, E-mail: matsmith2@gmail.com [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of 608 Type Ia supernovae from the SDSS-II and BOSS surveys, combined with a sample of foreground galaxies from SDSS-II, we estimate the weak lensing convergence for each supernova line of sight. We find that the correlation between this measurement and the Hubble residuals is consistent with the prediction from lensing (at a significance of 1.7?). Strong correlations are also found between the residuals and supernova nuisance parameters after a linear correction is applied. When these other correlations are taken into account, the lensing signal is detected at 1.4?. We show, for the first time, that distance estimates from supernovae can be improved when lensing is incorporated, by including a new parameter in the SALT2 methodology for determining distance moduli. The recovered value of the new parameter is consistent with the lensing prediction. Using cosmic microwave background data from WMAP7, H {sub 0} data from Hubble Space Telescope and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, we find the best-fit value of the new lensing parameter and show that the central values and uncertainties on ? {sub m} and w are unaffected. The lensing of supernovae, while only seen at marginal significance in this low-redshift sample, will be of vital importance for the next generation of surveys, such as DES and LSST, which will be systematics-dominated.

  9. Catastrophic photometric redshift errors: Weak-lensing survey requirements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bernstein, Gary; Huterer, Dragan

    2010-01-11

    We study the sensitivity of weak lensing surveys to the effects of catastrophic redshift errors - cases where the true redshift is misestimated by a significant amount. To compute the biases in cosmological parameters, we adopt an efficient linearized analysis where the redshift errors are directly related to shifts in the weak lensing convergence power spectra. We estimate the number Nspec of unbiased spectroscopic redshifts needed to determine the catastrophic error rate well enough that biases in cosmological parameters are below statistical errors of weak lensing tomography. While the straightforward estimate of Nspec is ~106 we find that using onlymore »the photometric redshifts with z ? 2.5 leads to a drastic reduction in Nspec to ~ 30,000 while negligibly increasing statistical errors in dark energy parameters. Therefore, the size of spectroscopic survey needed to control catastrophic errors is similar to that previously deemed necessary to constrain the core of the zs – zp distribution. We also study the efficacy of the recent proposal to measure redshift errors by cross-correlation between the photo-z and spectroscopic samples. We find that this method requires ~ 10% a priori knowledge of the bias and stochasticity of the outlier population, and is also easily confounded by lensing magnification bias. In conclusion, the cross-correlation method is therefore unlikely to supplant the need for a complete spectroscopic redshift survey of the source population.« less

  10. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance ap - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Dependingmore »on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.« less

  11. Measuring primordial non-Gaussianity through weak lensing peak counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Marian; Stefan Hilbert; Robert E. Smith; Peter Schneider; Vincent Desjacques

    2012-04-18

    We explore the possibility of detecting primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type using weak lensing peak counts. We measure the peak abundance in sets of simulated weak lensing maps corresponding to three models f_NL={0, +100, -100}. Using survey specifications similar to those of Euclid and without assuming any knowledge of the lens and source redshifts, we find the peak functions of the non-Gaussian models with f_NL=+-100 to differ by up to 15% from the Gaussian peak function at the high-mass end. For the assumed survey parameters, the probability of fitting an f_NL=0 peak function to the f_NL=+-100 peak functions is less than 0.1%. Assuming the other cosmological parameters known, f_NL can be measured with an error \\Delta f_NL ~ 13. It is therefore possible that future weak lensing surveys like Euclid and LSST may detect primordial non-Gaussianity from the abundance of peak counts, and provide complementary information to that obtained from the cosmic microwave background.

  12. Gravitational Lensing Characteristics of the Transparent Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijunath Patla; Robert J. Nemiroff

    2011-12-12

    The transparent Sun is modeled as a spherically symmetric and centrally condensed gravitational lens using recent Standard Solar Model (SSM) data. The Sun's minimum focal length is computed to a refined accuracy of 23.5 +/- 0.1 AU, just beyond the orbit of Uranus. The Sun creates a single image of a distant point source visible to observers inside this minimum focal length and to observers sufficiently removed from the line connecting the source through the Sun's center. Regions of space are mapped where three images of a distant point source are created, along with their associated magnifications. Solar caustics, critical curves, and Einstein rings are computed and discussed. Extremely high gravitational lens magnifications exist for observers situated so that an angularly small, unlensed source appears near a three-image caustic. Types of radiations that might undergo significant solar lens magnifications as they can traverse the core of the Sun, including neutrinos and gravitational radiation, are discussed.

  13. Higher-order gravitational lensing reconstruction using Feynman diagrams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Yadav, Amit P.S.; Waalewijn, Wouter J. E-mail: amanohar@ucsd.edu E-mail: ayadav@physics.ucsd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We develop a method for calculating the correlation structure of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) using Feynman diagrams, when the CMB has been modified by gravitational lensing, Faraday rotation, patchy reionization, or other distorting effects. This method is used to calculate the bias of the Hu-Okamoto quadratic estimator in reconstructing the lensing power spectrum up to  O (?{sup 4}) in the lensing potential ?. We consider both the diagonal noise TT TT, EB EB, etc. and, for the first time, the off-diagonal noise TT TE, TB EB, etc. The previously noted large  O (?{sup 4}) term in the second order noise is identified to come from a particular class of diagrams. It can be significantly reduced by a reorganization of the ? expansion. These improved estimators have almost no bias for the off-diagonal case involving only one B component of the CMB, such as EE EB.

  14. Strong gravitational lensing with Gauss-Bonnet correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi, J.; Vaez, H. E-mail: h.vaez@umz.ac.ir

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the strong gravitational lensing in a five dimensional background with Gauss-Bonnet gravity, so that in 4-dimensions the Gauss-Bonnet correction disappears. By considering the logarithmic term for deflection angle, we obtain the deflection angle ?-circumflex and corresponding parameters ? and b-bar . Finally, we estimate some properties of relativistic images such as ?{sub ?}, s and r{sub m}.

  15. Imaging the invisible : constraining dark matter distributions in galaxy clusters using strong gravitational lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corless, Virginia Leigh

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, I design and construct a Monte-Carlo gravitational lensing simulation that statistically studies the strong lensing of extended galactic sources by dark matter distributions in galaxy clusters, using recent ...

  16. Statistical and systematic errors in the measurement of weak-lensing Minkowski functionals: Application to the Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki

    2014-05-01

    The measurement of cosmic shear using weak gravitational lensing is a challenging task that involves a number of complicated procedures. We study in detail the systematic errors in the measurement of weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). Specifically, we focus on systematics associated with galaxy shape measurements, photometric redshift errors, and shear calibration correction. We first generate mock weak-lensing catalogs that directly incorporate the actual observational characteristics of the Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We then perform a Fisher analysis using the large set of mock catalogs for various cosmological models. We find that the statistical error associated with the observational effects degrades the cosmological parameter constraints by a factor of a few. The Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey with a sky coverage of ?1400 deg{sup 2} will constrain the dark energy equation of the state parameter with an error of ?w {sub 0} ? 0.25 by the lensing MFs alone, but biases induced by the systematics can be comparable to the 1? error. We conclude that the lensing MFs are powerful statistics beyond the two-point statistics only if well-calibrated measurement of both the redshifts and the shapes of source galaxies is performed. Finally, we analyze the CFHTLenS data to explore the ability of the MFs to break degeneracies between a few cosmological parameters. Using a combined analysis of the MFs and the shear correlation function, we derive the matter density ?{sub m0}=0.256±{sub 0.046}{sup 0.054}.

  17. An attempt to measure the time delays of three gravitational lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chistol, Gheorghe

    2007-01-01

    I present the results of reduction and analysis of two seasons of gravitational lens monitoring using the Very Large Array (VLA) at 8.5 GHz. The campaign monitored five gravitational lenses, GL1608, GL1830, GL1632, GL1838, ...

  18. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs in DES Science Verification data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruen, D; Amara, A; Bacon, D; Bonnett, C; Hartley, W; Jain, B; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Krause, E; Mana, A; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Seitz, S; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Vikram, V; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Becker, M R; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Bridle, S L; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Melchior, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Walker, A R; Wechsler, R H; Weller, J; Zhang, Y; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    We measure the weak lensing shear around galaxy troughs, i.e. the radial alignment of background galaxies relative to underdensities in projections of the foreground galaxy field over a wide range of redshift in Science Verification data from the Dark Energy Survey. Our detection of the shear signal is highly significant (10 to 15sigma for the smallest angular scales) for troughs with the redshift range z in [0.2,0.5] of the projected galaxy field and angular diameters of 10'...1{\\deg}. These measurements probe the connection between the galaxy, matter density, and convergence fields. By assuming galaxies are biased tracers of the matter density with Poissonian noise, we find agreement of our measurements with predictions in a fiducial LambdaCDM model. The prediction for the lensing signal on large trough scales is virtually independent of the details of the underlying model for the connection of galaxies and matter. Our comparison of the shear around troughs with that around cylinders with large galaxy count...

  19. Gravitational lens equation for embedded lenses; magnification and ellipticity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Mathematics Department, University of Oklahoma, 601 Elm Avenue, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Kantowski, R.; Dai, X. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We give the lens equation for light deflections caused by point mass condensations in an otherwise spatially homogeneous and flat universe. We assume the signal from a distant source is deflected by a single condensation before it reaches the observer. We call this deflector an embedded lens because the deflecting mass is part of the mean density. The embedded lens equation differs from the conventional lens equation because the deflector mass is not simply an addition to the cosmic mean. We prescribe an iteration scheme to solve this new lens equation and use it to compare our results with standard linear lensing theory. We also compute analytic expressions for the lowest order corrections to image amplifications and distortions caused by incorporating the lensing mass into the mean. We use these results to estimate the effect of embedding on strong lensing magnifications and ellipticities and find only small effects, <1%, contrary to what we have found for time delays and for weak lensing, {approx}5%.

  20. Gravitational Lensing by Self-Dual Black Holes in Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satyabrata Sahu; Kinjalk Lochan; D. Narasimha

    2015-03-13

    We study gravitational lensing by a recently proposed black hole solution in Loop Quantum Gravity. We highlight the fact that the quantum gravity corrections to the Schwarzschild metric in this model evade the `mass suppression' effects (that the usual quantum gravity corrections are susceptible to) by virtue of one of the parameters in the model being dimensionless, which is unlike any other quantum gravity motivated parameter. Gravitational lensing in the strong and weak deflection regimes is studied and a sample consistency relation is presented which could serve as a test of this model. We discuss that though the consistency relation for this model is qualitatively similar to what would have been in Brans-Dicke, in general it can be a good discriminator between many alternative theories. Although the observational prospects do not seem to be very optimistic even for a galactic supermassive black hole case, time delay between relativistic images for billion solar mass black holes in other galaxies might be within reach of future relativistic lensing observations.

  1. Strong gravitational lensing constraints on holographic dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Jing-Lei; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing (SGL) has provided an important tool for probing galaxies and cosmology. In this paper, we use the SGL data to constrain the holographic dark energy model, as well as models that have the same parameter number, such as the $w$CDM and Ricci dark energy models. We find that only using SGL is difficult to effectively constrain the model parameters. However, when the SGL data are combined with CBS (CMB+BAO+SN) data, the reasonable estimations can be given and the constraint precision is improved to a certain extent, relative to the case of CBS only. Therefore, SGL is an useful way to tighten constraints on model parameters.

  2. Calibrating the Nonlinear Matter Power Spectrum: Requirements for Future Weak Lensing Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragan Huterer; Masahiro Takada

    2005-06-01

    Uncertainties in predicting the nonlinear clustering of matter are among the most serious theoretical systematics facing the upcoming wide-field weak gravitational lensing surveys. We estimate the accuracy with which the matter power spectrum will need to be calibrated in order not to contribute appreciably to the error budget for future weak lensing surveys. We consider the random statistical errors and the systematic biases in P(k), as well as some estimates based on current N-body simulations. While the power spectrum on relevant scales (0.1 < k/h Mpc^{-1} < 10) is currently calibrated with N-body simulations to about 5-10%, in the future it will have to be calibrated to about 1-2% accuracy, depending on the specifications of the survey. Encouragingly, we find that even the worst-case error that mimics the effect of cosmological parameters needs to be calibrated to no better than about 0.5-1%. These goals require a suite of high resolution N-body simulations on a relatively fine grid in cosmological parameter space, and should be achievable in the near future.

  3. Stacking weak lensing signals of SZ clusters to constrain cluster physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolyn Sealfon; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2006-01-12

    We show how to place constraints on cluster physics by stacking the weak lensing signals from multiple clusters found through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For a survey that covers about 200 sq. deg. both in SZ and weak lensing observations, the slope and amplitude of the mass vs. SZ luminosity relation can be measured with few percent error for clusters at z~0.5. This can be used to constrain cluster physics, such as the nature of feedback. For example, we can distinguish a pre-heated model from a model with a decreased accretion rate at more than 5sigma. The power to discriminate among different non-gravitational processes in the ICM becomes even stronger if we use the central Compton parameter y_0, which could allow one to distinguish between models with pre-heating, SN feedback and AGN feedback, for example, at more than 5sigma. Measurement of these scaling relations as a function of redshift makes it possible to directly observe e.g., the evolution of the hot gas in clusters. With this approach the mass-L_SZ relation can be calibrated and its uncertainties can be quantified, leading to a more robust determination of cosmological parameters from clusters surveys. The mass-L_SZ relation calibrated in this way from a small area of the sky can be used to determine masses of SZ clusters from very large SZ-only surveys and is nicely complementary to other techniques proposed in the literature.

  4. Strong and weak lensing united III: Measuring the mass distribution of the merging galaxy cluster 1E0657-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusa Bradac; Douglas Clowe; Anthony H. Gonzalez; Phil Marshall; William Forman; Christine Jones; Maxim Markevitch; Scott Randall; Tim Schrabback; Dennis Zaritsky

    2006-08-18

    The galaxy cluster 1E0657-56 (z = 0.296) is remarkably well-suited for addressing outstanding issues in both galaxy evolution and fundamental physics. We present a reconstruction of the mass distribution from both strong and weak gravitational lensing data. Multi-color, high-resolution HST ACS images allow detection of many more arc candidates than were previously known, especially around the subcluster. Using the known redshift of one of the multiply imaged systems, we determine the remaining source redshifts using the predictive power of the strong lens model. Combining this information with shape measurements of "weakly" lensed sources, we derive a high-resolution, absolutely-calibrated mass map, using no assumptions regarding the physical properties of the underlying cluster potential. This map provides the best available quantification of the total mass of the central part of the cluster. We also confirm the result from Clowe et al. (2004,2006a).

  5. Three Gravitational Lenses for the Price of One: Enhanced Strong Lensing Through Galaxy Clustering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassnacht, Chris D.; McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Treu, T.; Blandford, R.D.; Auger, M.W.; Jeltema, T.E.; Lubin, L.M.; Margoniner, V.E.; Wittman, D.; /UC, Davis

    2006-04-03

    We report the serendipitous discovery of two strong gravitational lens candidates (ACS J160919+6532 and ACS J160910+6532) in deep images obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, each less than 40'' from the previously known gravitational lens system CLASS B1608+656. The redshifts of both lens galaxies have been measured with Keck and Gemini: one is a member of a small galaxy group at z {approx} 0.63, which also includes the lensing galaxy in the B1608+656 system, and the second is a member of a foreground group at z {approx} 0.43. By measuring the effective radii and surface brightnesses of the two lens galaxies, we infer their velocity dispersions based on the passively evolving Fundamental Plane (FP) relation. Elliptical isothermal lens mass models are able to explain their image configurations within the lens hypothesis, with a velocity dispersion compatible with that estimated from the FP for a reasonable source-redshift range. Based on the large number of massive early-type galaxies in the field and the number-density of faint blue galaxies, the presence of two additional lens systems around CLASS B1608+656 is not unlikely in hindsight. Gravitational lens galaxies are predominantly early-type galaxies, which are clustered, and the lensed quasar host galaxies are also clustered. Therefore, obtaining deep high-resolution images of the fields around known strong lens systems is an excellent method of enhancing the probability of finding additional strong gravitational lens systems.

  6. High Shear Regions in Weak Lensing Surveys Determine Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng Wang; Zoltan Haiman; Morgan May; John Kehayias

    2008-09-24

    We propose to use a simple observable, the fractional area of "hot spots" in weak lensing mass maps which are detected with high significance, to determine background cosmological parameters. Because these high-shear regions are directly related to the physical non-linear structures of the universe, they derive cosmological information mainly from the non-linear regime of density fluctuations. We show that in combination with future cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements, this method can place constraints on cosmological parameters that are comparable to those from the redshift distribution of galaxy cluster abundances. In particular, adding the information from this simple shear statistic derived from an LSST-like survey to CMB anisotropy information from a Planck-like experiment improves the constraints on the dark energy parameters (energy density and equation of state) and the normalization of the matter power spectrum by over a factor of ten. The main advantage of the statistic proposed in this paper is that projection effects, normally the main source of uncertainty when determining the presence and the mass of a galaxy cluster, here serve as a source of information.

  7. SKA Engineering Change Proposal: Gridded Visibilities to Enable Precision Cosmology with Radio Weak Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This document was submitted as supporting material to an Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). This ECP requests gridded visibilities as an extra imaging data product from the SKA, in order to enable bespoke analysis techniques to measure source morphologies to the accuracy necessary for precision cosmology with radio weak lensing. We also discuss the properties of an SKA weak lensing data set and potential overlaps with other cosmology science goals.

  8. Measuring primordial non-Gaussianity with weak-lensing surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Hilbert; Laura Marian; Robert E. Smith; Vincent Desjacques

    2012-11-02

    We study the ability of future weak lensing (WL) surveys to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type. We use a large ensemble of simulated WL maps with survey specifications relevant to Euclid and LSST. The simulations assume Cold Dark Matter cosmologies that vary certain parameters around fiducial values: the non-Gaussianity parameter f_NL, the matter density parameter Omega_m, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum sigma_8, the spectral index of the primordial power spectrum n_s, and the dark-energy equation-of-state parameter w_0. We assess the sensitivity of the cosmic shear correlation functions, the third-order aperture mass statistics, and the abundance of shear peaks to these parameters. We find that each of the considered probes provides unmarginalized constraints of Delta f_NL ~ 20 on f_NL. Marginalized constraints from any individual WL probe are much weaker due to strong correlations between parameters. However, the parameter errors can be substantially reduced by combining information from different WL probes. Combining all WL probes yields the following marginal (68% confidence level) uncertainties: Delta f_NL ~ 50, Delta Omega_m ~ 0.002, Delta sigma_8 ~ 0.004, Delta n_s ~ 0.007, and Delta w_0 ~ 0.03. We examine the bias induced by neglecting f_NL on the constraints on the other parameters. We find sigma_8 and w_0 to be the most affected. Moreover, neglecting non-Gaussianity leads to a severe underestimation of the uncertainties in the other cosmological parameters.

  9. Numerical wave optics and the lensing of gravitational waves by globular clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Moylan; David E. McClelland; Susan M. Scott; Antony C. Searle; G. V. Bicknell

    2007-10-16

    We consider the possible effects of gravitational lensing by globular clusters on gravitational waves from asymmetric neutron stars in our galaxy. In the lensing of gravitational waves, the long wavelength, compared with the usual case of optical lensing, can lead to the geometrical optics approximation being invalid, in which case a wave optical solution is necessary. In general, wave optical solutions can only be obtained numerically. We describe a computational method that is particularly well suited to numerical wave optics. This method enables us to compare the properties of several lens models for globular clusters without ever calling upon the geometrical optics approximation, though that approximation would sometimes have been valid. Finally, we estimate the probability that lensing by a globular cluster will significantly affect the detection, by ground-based laser interferometer detectors such as LIGO, of gravitational waves from an asymmetric neutron star in our galaxy, finding that the probability is insignificantly small.

  10. Constraints on early-type galaxy structure from spectroscopically selected gravitational lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Adam Stallard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes all aspects of a unique spectroscopic survey for strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lenses: motivation, candidate selection, ground-based spectroscopic follow-up, Hubble Space Telescope imaging, data ...

  11. COMPARING DENSE GALAXY CLUSTER REDSHIFT SURVEYS WITH WEAK-LENSING MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Zahid, H. Jabran [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, V. Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Rines, Kenneth J., E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: harus.zahid@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We use dense redshift surveys of nine galaxy clusters at z ? 0.2 to compare the galaxy distribution in each system with the projected matter distribution from weak lensing. By combining 2087 new MMT/Hectospec redshifts and the data in the literature, we construct spectroscopic samples within the region of weak-lensing maps of high (70%-89%) and uniform completeness. With these dense redshift surveys, we construct galaxy number density maps using several galaxy subsamples. The shape of the main cluster concentration in the weak-lensing maps is similar to the global morphology of the number density maps based on cluster members alone, mainly dominated by red members. We cross-correlate the galaxy number density maps with the weak-lensing maps. The cross-correlation signal when we include foreground and background galaxies at 0.5z {sub cl} < z < 2z {sub cl} is 10%-23% larger than for cluster members alone at the cluster virial radius. The excess can be as high as 30% depending on the cluster. Cross-correlating the galaxy number density and weak-lensing maps suggests that superimposed structures close to the cluster in redshift space contribute more significantly to the excess cross-correlation signal than unrelated large-scale structure along the line of sight. Interestingly, the weak-lensing mass profiles are not well constrained for the clusters with the largest cross-correlation signal excesses (>20% for A383, A689, and A750). The fractional excess in the cross-correlation signal including foreground and background structures could be a useful proxy for assessing the reliability of weak-lensing cluster mass estimates.

  12. CLASH: Weak-lensing shear-and-magnification analysis of 20 galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umetsu, Keiichi; Czakon, Nicole [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Medezinski, Elinor; Lemze, Doron; Ford, Holland [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Nonino, Mario; Balestra, Italo; Biviano, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Merten, Julian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Meneghetti, Massimo [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Donahue, Megan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Molino, Alberto; Benítez, Narciso [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), E-18008 Granada (Spain); Seitz, Stella; Gruen, Daniel [Universitäts-Sternwarte, München, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Munich Germany (Germany); Broadhurst, Tom [Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, Alameda Urquijo, 36-5 Plaza Bizkaia, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain); Grillo, Claudio [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Melchior, Peter, E-mail: keiichi@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2014-11-10

    We present a joint shear-and-magnification weak-lensing analysis of a sample of 16 X-ray-regular and 4 high-magnification galaxy clusters at 0.19 ? z ? 0.69 selected from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Our analysis uses wide-field multi-color imaging, taken primarily with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. From a stacked-shear-only analysis of the X-ray-selected subsample, we detect the ensemble-averaged lensing signal with a total signal-to-noise ratio of ? 25 in the radial range of 200-3500 kpc h {sup –1}, providing integrated constraints on the halo profile shape and concentration-mass relation. The stacked tangential-shear signal is well described by a family of standard density profiles predicted for dark-matter-dominated halos in gravitational equilibrium, namely, the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW), truncated variants of NFW, and Einasto models. For the NFW model, we measure a mean concentration of c{sub 200c}=4.01{sub ?0.32}{sup +0.35} at an effective halo mass of M{sub 200c}=1.34{sub ?0.09}{sup +0.10}×10{sup 15} M{sub ?}. We show that this is in excellent agreement with ? cold dark matter (?CDM) predictions when the CLASH X-ray selection function and projection effects are taken into account. The best-fit Einasto shape parameter is ?{sub E}=0.191{sub ?0.068}{sup +0.071}, which is consistent with the NFW-equivalent Einasto parameter of ?0.18. We reconstruct projected mass density profiles of all CLASH clusters from a joint likelihood analysis of shear-and-magnification data and measure cluster masses at several characteristic radii assuming an NFW density profile. We also derive an ensemble-averaged total projected mass profile of the X-ray-selected subsample by stacking their individual mass profiles. The stacked total mass profile, constrained by the shear+magnification data, is shown to be consistent with our shear-based halo-model predictions, including the effects of surrounding large-scale structure as a two-halo term, establishing further consistency in the context of the ?CDM model.

  13. UP TO 100,000 RELIABLE STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSES IN FUTURE DARK ENERGY EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serjeant, S.

    2014-09-20

    The Euclid space telescope will observe ?10{sup 5} strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens events in its wide field imaging survey over around half the sky, but identifying the gravitational lenses from their observed morphologies requires solving the difficult problem of reliably separating the lensed sources from contaminant populations, such as tidal tails, as well as presenting challenges for spectroscopic follow-up redshift campaigns. Here I present alternative selection techniques for strong gravitational lenses in both Euclid and the Square Kilometre Array, exploiting the strong magnification bias present in the steep end of the H? luminosity function and the H I mass function. Around 10{sup 3} strong lensing events are detectable with this method in the Euclid wide survey. While only ?1% of the total haul of Euclid lenses, this sample has ?100% reliability, known source redshifts, high signal-to-noise, and a magnification-based selection independent of assumptions of lens morphology. With the proposed Square Kilometre Array dark energy survey, the numbers of reliable strong gravitational lenses with source redshifts can reach 10{sup 5}.

  14. Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Bou-Cabo, M. [Institut d'Investigació per a la Gestió Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Universitat Politècnica de València, C/ Paranimf 1, Gandia, 46730 Spain (Spain); Albert, A. [GRPHE - Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit BP 50568, Colmar, 68008 France (France); André, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Rambla Exposició, Vilanova i la Geltrú, Barcelona, 08800 Spain (Spain); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, Erlangen, 91058 Germany (Germany); Aubert, J.-J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille, 13288 France (France); Baret, B. [APC, AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Irfu, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, Paris Cedex 13, F-75205 France (France); Barrios-Martí, J. [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificios Investigación de Paterna, CSIC - Universitat de València, Apdo de Correos 22085, Valencia, 46071 Spain (Spain); Basa, S. [LAM - Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Pôle de l'Étoile Site de Château-Gombert, rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie 38, Marseille Cedex 13, 13388 France (France); Biagi, S. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, Bologna, 40127 Italy (Italy); Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Bruijn, R. [Nikhef, Science Park 105, Amsterdam, 1098XG The Netherlands (Netherlands); Capone, A. [INFN -Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 2, Roma, 00185 Italy (Italy); Caramete, L., E-mail: antares.spokesperson@in2p3.fr [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest, M?gurele, R-77125 Romania (Romania); and others

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazar populations. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars. The magnification factor is estimated for each system assuming a singular isothermal profile for the lens. Based on data collected from 2007 to 2012 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope, the strongest constraint is obtained from the lensed quasar B0218+357, providing a limit on the total neutrino luminosity of this source of 1.08× 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. This limit is about one order of magnitude lower than those previously obtained in the ANTARES standard point source searches with non-lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars.

  15. Realistic simulations of gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters: extracting arc parameters from mock DUNE images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meneghetti, Massimo; Grazian, Andrea; De Lucia, Gabriella; Dolag, Klaus; Bartelmann, Matthias; Heymans, Catherine; Moscardini, Lauro; Radovich, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We present a newly developed code that allows simulations of optical observations of galaxy fields with a variety of instruments. The code incorporates gravitational lensing effects and is targetted at simulating lensing by galaxy clusters. Our goal is to create the tools required for comparing theoretical expectations with observations to obtain a better understanding of how observational noise affects lensing applications such as mass estimates, studies on the internal properties of galaxy clusters and arc statistics. Starting from a set of input parameters, characterizing both the instruments and the observational conditions, the simulator provides a virtual observation of a patch of the sky. It includes several sources of noise such as photon-noise, sky background, seeing, and instrumental noise. Ray-tracing through simulated mass distributions accounts for gravitational lensing. Source morphologies are realistically simulated based on shapelet decompositions of galaxy images retrieved from the GOODS-ACS ...

  16. Gravitational Interaction of Higgs Boson and Weak Boson Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Zhi Xianyu; Jing Ren; Hong-Jian He

    2013-11-04

    With the LHC discovery of a 125 GeV Higgs-like boson, we study gravitational interaction of the Higgs boson via the unique dimension-4 operator involving Higgs doublet and scalar curvature, $\\,\\xi H^\\dag H R\\,$, with nonminimal coupling $\\,\\xi\\,$. This Higgs portal term can be transformed away in Einstein frame and induces gauge-invariant effective interactions in the Higgs sector. We study the weak boson scattering in Einstein frame, and explicitly demonstrate the longitudinal-Goldstone boson equivalence theorem in the presence of $\\,\\xi\\,$ coupling. With these, we derive unitarity bound on the Higgs gravitational coupling $\\,\\xi\\,$ in Einstein frame, which is stronger than that inferred from the current LHC Higgs measurements. We further study $\\xi$-dependent weak boson scattering cross sections at TeV scale, and propose a new LHC probe of the Higgs-gravity coupling $\\,\\xi\\,$ via weak boson scattering experiments.

  17. Electroweak Corrections to Photon Scattering, Polarization and Lensing in a Gravitational Background and the Near Horizon Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Coriano; Luigi Delle Rose; Matteo Maria Maglio; Mirko Serino

    2015-01-16

    We investigate the semiclassical approach to the lensing of photons in a spherically symmetric gravitational background, starting from Born level and include in our analysis the radiative corrections obtained from the electroweak theory for the graviton/photon/photon vertex. In this approach, the cross section is related to the angular variation of the impact parameter ($b$), which is then solved for $b$ as a function of the angle of deflection, and measured in horizon units ($b_h\\equiv b/(2 G M)$). Exact numerical solutions for the angular deflection are presented. The numerical analysis shows that perturbation theory in a weak background agrees with the classical Einstein formula for the deflection already at distances of the order of $20$ horizon units ($\\sim 20\\, b_h$) and it is optimal in the description both of very strong and weak lensings. We show that the electroweak corrections to the cross section are sizeable, becoming very significant for high energy gamma rays. Our analysis covers in energy most of the photon spectrum, from the cosmic microwave background up to very high energy gamma rays, and scatterings with any value of the photon impact parameter. We also study the helicity-flip photon amplitude, which is of $O(\\alpha^2)$ in the weak coupling $\\alpha$, and its massless fermion limit, which involves the exchange of a conformal anomaly pole. The corresponding cross section is proportional to the Born level result and brings to a simple renormalization of Einsten's formula.

  18. Kernel regression estimates of time delays between gravitationally lensed fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otaibi, Sultanah AL; Cuevas-Tello, Juan C; Mandel, Ilya; Raychaudhury, Somak

    2015-01-01

    Strongly lensed variable quasars can serve as precise cosmological probes, provided that time delays between the image fluxes can be accurately measured. A number of methods have been proposed to address this problem. In this paper, we explore in detail a new approach based on kernel regression estimates, which is able to estimate a single time delay given several datasets for the same quasar. We develop realistic artificial data sets in order to carry out controlled experiments to test of performance of this new approach. We also test our method on real data from strongly lensed quasar Q0957+561 and compare our estimates against existing results.

  19. Gravitational Lensing by Power-Law Mass Distributions: A Fast and Exact Series Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyu-Hyun Chae; Valery K. Khersonsky; David A. Turnshek

    1998-08-31

    We present an analytical formulation of gravitational lensing using familiar triaxial power-law mass distributions, where the 3-dimensional mass density is given by $\\rho(X,Y,Z) = \\rho_0 [1 + (\\frac{X}{a})^2 + (\\frac{Y}{b})^2 + (\\frac{Z}{c})^2]^{-\

  20. Resolved Spectroscopy of a Gravitationally Lensed L* Lyman-break Galaxy at z~5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Swinbank; R. G. Bower; G. P. Smith; R. J. Wilman; Ian Smail; R. S. Ellis; S. L. Morris; J. -P. Kneib; ;

    2007-01-09

    By combining HST imaging with optical (VIMOS) and near-infrared (SINFONI) integral field spectroscopy we exploit the gravitational potential of a massive, rich cluster at z=0.9 to study the internal properties of a gravitationally lensed galaxy at z=4.88. Using a detailed gravitational lens model of the cluster RCS0224-002 we reconstruct the source-frame morphology of the lensed galaxy on 200pc scales and find an ~L* Lyman-break galaxy with an intrinsic size of only 2.0x0.8kpc, a velocity gradient of 30kpc from the galaxy, is escaping at a speed of upto ~500km/s. Although the mass of the outflow is uncertain, the geometry and velocity of the outflow suggests that the ejected material is travelling far faster than escape velocity and will travel more than 1Mpc (comoving) before eventually stalling.

  1. Sources of contamination to weak lensing three-point statistics: constraints from N-body simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisabetta Semboloni; Catherine Heymans; Ludovic van Waerbeke; Peter Schneider

    2008-02-27

    We investigate the impact of the observed correlation between a galaxies shape and its surrounding density field on the measurement of third order weak lensing shear statistics. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the systematic error contribution to a measurement of the third order moment of the aperture mass statistic (GGG) from three-point intrinsic ellipticity correlations (III), and the three-point coupling between the weak lensing shear experienced by distant galaxies and the shape of foreground galaxies (GGI and GII). We find that third-order weak lensing statistics are typically more strongly contaminated by these physical systematics compared to second-order shear measurements, contaminating the measured three-point signal for moderately deep surveys with a median redshift z_m ~ 0.7 by ~ 15%. It has been shown that accurate photometric redshifts will be crucial to correct for this effect, once a model and the redshift dependence of the effect can be accurately constrained. To this end we provide redshift-dependent fitting functions to our results and propose a new tool for the observational study of intrinsic galaxy alignments. For a shallow survey with z_m ~ 0.4 we find III to be an order of magnitude larger than the expected cosmological GGG shear signal. Compared to the two-point intrinsic ellipticity correlation which is similar in amplitude to the two-point shear signal at these survey depths, third order statistics therefore offer a promising new way to constrain models of intrinsic galaxy alignments. Early shallow data from the next generation of very wide weak lensing surveys will be optimal for this type of study.

  2. High-Resolution Radio Imaging of Gravitational Lensing Candidates in the 1 Jansky BL Lac Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Rector; J. T. Stocke

    2003-02-19

    While BL Lacertae objects are widely believed to be highly beamed, low-luminosity radio galaxies, many radio-selected BL Lacs have extended radio power levels and optical emission lines that are too luminous to be low-luminosity radio galaxies. Also, Stocke & Rector discovered an excess of MgII absorption systems along BL Lac sightlines compared to quasars, suggesting that gravitational lensing may be another means of creating the BL Lac phenomenon in some cases. We present a search for gravitationally-lensed BL Lacs with deep, high-resolution, two-frequency VLA radio maps of seven lensing candidates from the 1 Jansky BL Lac sample. We find that none of these objects are resolved into an Einstein ring like B 0218+357, nor do any show multiple images of the core. All of the lensing candidates that were resolved show a flat-spectrum core and very unusual, steep-spectrum extended morphology that is incompatible with a multiply lensed system. Thus, while these observations do not rule out microlensing, no macrolensing is observed.

  3. Time-domain studies of gravitationally lensed quasars (GLQs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goicoechea, Luis J

    2012-01-01

    We present the overview and current results of an ongoing optical/NIR monitoring of seven GLQs with the 2-m Liverpool Robotic Telescope. The photometric data over the first seven years of this programme (2005-2011) are leading to high-quality light curves, which in turn are being used as key tools for different standard and novel studies. While brightness records of non-lensed distant quasars may contain unrecognized extrinsic variations, one can disentangle intrinsic from extrinsic signal in certain GLQs. Thus, some GLQs in our sample allow us to assess their extrinsic and intrinsic variations, as well as to discuss the origin of both kinds of fluctuations. We also demonstrate the usefulness of GLQ time-domain data to obtain successful reverberation maps of inner regions of accretion disks around distant supermassive black holes, and to estimate redshifts of distant lensing galaxies.

  4. A Hubble Space Telescope Survey of X-ray Luminous Galaxy Clusters: Gravitationally Lensed Arcs and EROs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham P. Smith

    2002-01-15

    We are conducting a systematic lensing survey of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z~0.2 using the Hubble Space Telescope and large ground-based telescopes. We summarize initial results from our survey, including a measurement of the inner slope of the mass profile of A383, and a search for gravitationally lensed Extremely Red Objects.

  5. Constraints on a $?$CDM model from strong gravitational lensing and updated Hubble parameter measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Chen; Chao-Qiang Geng; Shuo Cao; Yu-Mei Huang; Zong-Hong Zhu

    2015-01-18

    We constrain the scalar field dark energy model with an inverse power-law potential, i.e., $V(\\phi)\\propto {\\phi}^{-\\alpha}$ ($\\alpha>0$), from a set of recent cosmological observations by compiling an updated sample of Hubble parameter measurements including 30 independent data points. Our results show that the constraining power of the updated sample of $H(z)$ data with the HST prior on $H_0$ is stronger than those of the SCP Union2 and Union2.1 compilations. A recent sample of strong gravitational lensing systems is also adopted to confine the model even though the results are not significant. A joint analysis of the strong gravitational lensing data with the more restrictive updated Hubble parameter measurements and the Type Ia supernovae data from SCP Union2 indicates that the recent observations still can not distinguish whether dark energy is a time-independent cosmological constant or a time-varying dynamical component.

  6. Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Martì, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bogazzi, C; Bormuth, R; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Core, L; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; De Rosa, G; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; DeBonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Escoffier, S; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Herrero, A; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, E; Lambard, G; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, S; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Müller, C; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; P?v?la?, G E; Perrina, C; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tayalati, Y; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tönnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yatkin, K; Yepes, H; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Falco, E E

    2014-01-01

    Context. The jets of radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei are among the most powerful particle accelerators in the Universe, and a plausible production site for high-energy cosmic rays. The detection of high-energy neutrinos from these sources would provide unambiguous evidence of a hadronic component in such jets. High-luminosity blazars, such as the flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), are promising candidates to search for such emission. Because of the low fluxes due to large redshift, these sources are however challenging for the current generation of neutrino telescopes such as ANTARES and IceCube. Aims. This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazars. Methods. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed blazars, using data collected from 2007 to 2012 by ANTARES. The magnification factor is estimated for each syst...

  7. Realistic simulations of gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters: extracting arc parameters from mock DUNE images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Meneghetti; Peter Melchior; Andrea Grazian; Gabriella De Lucia; Klaus Dolag; Matthias Bartelmann; Catherine Heymans; Lauro Moscardini; Mario Radovich

    2007-11-21

    We present a newly developed code that allows simulations of optical observations of galaxy fields with a variety of instruments. The code incorporates gravitational lensing effects and is targetted at simulating lensing by galaxy clusters. Our goal is to create the tools required for comparing theoretical expectations with observations to obtain a better understanding of how observational noise affects lensing applications such as mass estimates, studies on the internal properties of galaxy clusters and arc statistics. Starting from a set of input parameters, characterizing both the instruments and the observational conditions, the simulator provides a virtual observation of a patch of the sky. It includes several sources of noise such as photon-noise, sky background, seeing, and instrumental noise. Ray-tracing through simulated mass distributions accounts for gravitational lensing. Source morphologies are realistically simulated based on shapelet decompositions of galaxy images retrieved from the GOODS-ACS archive. According to their morphological class, spectral-energy-distributions are assigned to the source galaxies in order to reproduce observations of each galaxy in arbitrary photometric bands. We illustrate our techniques showing virtual observations of a galaxy-cluster core as it would be observed with the space telescope DUNE, which was recently proposed to ESA within its "Cosmic vision" programme. (Abridged)

  8. The time delay in strong gravitational lensing with Gauss-Bonnet correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jingyun Man; Hongbo Cheng

    2014-09-13

    The time delay between two relativistic images in the strong gravitational lensing governed by Gauss-Bonnet gravity is studied. We derive and calculate the expression of time delay due to the Gauss-Bonnet coupling. It is shown that the time delay for two images with larger space each other is longer. We also find that the ratio of Gauss-Bonnet coefficient and the mass of gravitational source changes in the region like $\\frac{\\alpha}{M}\\in[0,2)$. The time delay is divergent with $\\frac{\\alpha}{M}\\longrightarrow 2$.

  9. Detectability of CMB tensor B modes via delensing with weak lensing galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Marian; Gary M. Bernstein

    2007-10-15

    We analyze the possibility of delensing CMB polarization maps using foreground weak lensing (WL) information. We build an estimator of the CMB lensing potential out of optimally combined projected potential estimators to different source redshift bins. Our estimator is most sensitive to the redshift depth of the WL survey, less so to the shape noise level. Estimators built using galaxy surveys like LSST and SNAP yield a 30-50% reduction in the lensing B-mode power. We illustrate the potential advantages of a 21-cm survey by considering a fiducial WL survey for which we take the redshift depth zmax and the effective angular concentration of sources n as free parameters. For a noise level of 1 muK arcmin in the polarization map itself, as projected for a CMBPol experiment, and a beam with FWHM=10 arcmin, we find that going to zmax=20 at n=100 gal/sqarcmin yields a delensing performance similar to that of a quadratic lensing potential estimator applied to small-scale CMB maps: the lensing B-mode contamination is reduced by almost an order of magnitude. In this case, there is also a reduction by a factor of ~4 in the detectability threshold of the tensor B-mode power. At this CMB noise level, there is little gain from sources with zmax>20. The delensing gains are lost if the CMB beam exceeds ~20 arcmin. The delensing efficiency and useful zmax depend acutely on the CMB map noise level, but beam sizes below 10 arcmin do not help. Delensing via foreground sources does not require arcminute-resolution CMB observations, a substantial practical advantage over the use of CMB observables for delensing.

  10. A NEW APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING THE MOST POWERFUL GRAVITATIONAL LENSING TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.; Hogg, David W.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2013-05-20

    The best gravitational lenses for detecting distant galaxies are those with the largest mass concentrations and the most advantageous configurations of that mass along the line of sight. Our new method for finding such gravitational telescopes uses optical data to identify projected concentrations of luminous red galaxies (LRGs). LRGs are biased tracers of the underlying mass distribution, so lines of sight with the highest total luminosity in LRGs are likely to contain the largest total mass. We apply this selection technique to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and identify the 200 fields with the highest total LRG luminosities projected within a 3.'5 radius over the redshift range 0.1 {<=} z {<=} 0.7. The redshift and angular distributions of LRGs in these fields trace the concentrations of non-LRG galaxies. These fields are diverse; 22.5% contain one known galaxy cluster and 56.0% contain multiple known clusters previously identified in the literature. Thus, our results confirm that these LRGs trace massive structures and that our selection technique identifies fields with large total masses. These fields contain two to three times higher total LRG luminosities than most known strong-lensing clusters and will be among the best gravitational lensing fields for the purpose of detecting the highest redshift galaxies.

  11. Strong gravitational lensing as the photons couple to Weyl tensor in a Schwarzschild black hole spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Songbai Chen; Jiliang Jing

    2015-02-04

    We study the equation of motion of photons and the strong gravitational lensing in a Schwarzschild black hole spacetime when the photons couple to Weyl tensor. We find that the propagation of the coupled photons and the corresponding gravitational lensing depend sharply on the coupling constant $\\alpha$ and the photon polarization directions. The marginally stable circular radius $r_{ps}$ exists only in the regime $\\alpha\\geq\\alpha_{c1}=-M^2/2$ for the photon with the polarization along $l_{\\mu}$ and in the regime $\\alpha\\leq\\alpha_{c2}=M^2$ for the photon with the polarization along $m_{\\mu}$. When the value of $\\alpha$ is beyond the above regime, we find that the marginally stable circular radius vanishes and there exists a singularity outside the event horizon of black hole in the propagation of the coupled photons. The deflection angle of the light ray near the singularity is a negative finite value, which is different entirely from that of the usual photons without the coupling to Weyl tensor. Finally, we estimated three observables in the strong gravitational lensing for the coupled photons in the case with the marginally circular orbit by assuming the supermassive central object in our Galaxy as a Schwarzschild compact object.

  12. NOISY WEAK-LENSING CONVERGENCE PEAK STATISTICS NEAR CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AND BEYOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan Zuhui; Shan Huanyuan; Liu Jiayi

    2010-08-20

    Taking into account noise from intrinsic ellipticities of source galaxies, in this paper, we study the peak statistics in weak-lensing convergence maps around clusters of galaxies and beyond. We emphasize how the noise peak statistics is affected by the density distribution of nearby clusters, and also how cluster-peak signals are changed by the existence of noise. These are the important aspects to be thoroughly understood in weak-lensing analyses for individual clusters as well as in cosmological applications of weak-lensing cluster statistics. We adopt Gaussian smoothing with the smoothing scale {theta} {sub G} = 0.5arcmin in our analyses. It is found that the noise peak distribution near a cluster of galaxies sensitively depends on the density profile of the cluster. For a cored isothermal cluster with the core radius R{sub c} , the inner region with R {<=} R{sub c} appears noisy containing on average {approx}2.4 peaks with {nu} {>=} 5 for R{sub c} = 1.7arcmin and the true peak height of the cluster {nu} = 5.6, where {nu} denotes the convergence signal-to-noise ratio. For a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) cluster of the same mass and the same central {nu}, the average number of peaks with {nu} {>=} 5 within R {<=} R{sub c} is {approx}1.6. Thus a high peak corresponding to the main cluster can be identified more cleanly in the NFW case. In the outer region with R{sub c} < R {<=} 5R{sub c} , the number of high noise peaks is considerably enhanced in comparison with that of the pure noise case without the nearby cluster. For {nu} {>=} 4, depending on the treatment of the mass-sheet degeneracy in weak-lensing analyses, the enhancement factor f is in the range of {approx}5 to {approx}55 for both clusters as their outer density profiles are similar. The properties of the main-cluster-peak identified in convergence maps are also significantly affected by the presence of noise. Scatters as well as a systematic shift for the peak height are present. The height distribution is peaked at {nu} {approx} 6.6, rather than at {nu} = 5.6, corresponding to a shift of {Delta}{nu} {approx} 1, for the isothermal cluster. For the NFW cluster, {Delta}{nu} {approx} 0.8. The existence of noise also causes a location offset for the weak-lensing identified main-cluster-peak with respect to the true center of the cluster. The offset distribution is very broad and extends to R {approx} R{sub c} for the isothermal case. For the NFW cluster, it is relatively narrow and peaked at R {approx} 0.2R{sub c} . We also analyze NFW clusters of different concentrations. It is found that the more centrally concentrated the mass distribution of a cluster is, the less its weak-lensing signal is affected by noise. Incorporating these important effects and the mass function of NFW dark matter halos, we further present a model calculating the statistical abundances of total convergence peaks, true and false ones, over a large field beyond individual clusters. The results are in good agreement with those from numerical simulations. The model then allows us to probe cosmologies with the convergence peaks directly without the need of expensive follow-up observations to differentiate true and false peaks.

  13. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as themore »planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-? level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.« less

  14. Three-Point Correlations in Weak Lensing Surveys: Model Predictions and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takada; Bhuvnesh Jain

    2003-07-21

    We use the halo model of clustering to compute two- and three-point correlation functions for weak lensing, and apply them in a new statistical technique to measure properties of massive halos. We present analytical results on the eight shear three-point correlation functions constructed using combination of the two shear components at each vertex of a triangle. We compare the amplitude and configuration dependence of the functions with ray-tracing simulations and find excellent agreement for different scales and models. These results are promising, since shear statistics are easier to measure than the convergence. In addition, the symmetry properties of the shear three-point functions provide a new and precise way of disentangling the lensing E-mode from the B-mode due to possible systematic errors. We develop an approach based on correlation functions to measure the properties of galaxy-group and cluster halos from lensing surveys. Shear correlations on small scales arise from the lensing matter within halos of mass M > 10^13 solar masses. Thus the measurement of two- and three-point correlations can be used to extract information on halo density profiles, primarily the inner slope and halo concentration. We demonstrate the feasibility of such an analysis for forthcoming surveys. We include covariances in the correlation functions due to sample variance and intrinsic ellipticity noise to show that 10% accuracy on profile parameters is achievable with surveys like the CFHT Legacy survey, and significantly better with future surveys. Our statistical approach is complementary to the standard approach of identifying individual objects in survey data and measuring their properties.

  15. Model-free analysis of quadruply imaged gravitationally lensed systems and substructured galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woldesenbet, Addishiwot Girma

    2015-01-01

    Multiple image gravitational lens systems, and especially quads are invaluable in determining the amount and distribution of mass in galaxies. This is usually done by mass modeling using parametric or free-form methods. An alternative way of extracting information about lens mass distribution is to use lensing degeneracies and invariants. Where applicable, they allow one to make conclusions about whole classes of lenses without model fitting. Here, we use approximate, but observationally useful invariants formed by the three relative polar angles of quad images around the lens center to show that many smooth elliptical+shear lenses can reproduce the same set of quad image angles within observational error. This result allows us to show in a model-free way what the general class of smooth elliptical+shear lenses looks like in the three dimensional (3D) space of image relative angles, and that this distribution does not match that of the observed quads. We conclude that, even though smooth elliptical+shear lens...

  16. ELLIPTICAL WEIGHTED HOLICs FOR WEAK LENSING SHEAR MEASUREMENT. III. THE EFFECT OF RANDOM COUNT NOISE ON IMAGE MOMENTS IN WEAK LENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okura, Yuki; Futamase, Toshifumi E-mail: tof@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2013-07-01

    This is the third paper on the improvement of systematic errors in weak lensing analysis using an elliptical weight function, referred to as E-HOLICs. In previous papers, we succeeded in avoiding errors that depend on the ellipticity of the background image. In this paper, we investigate the systematic error that depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the background image. We find that the origin of this error is the random count noise that comes from the Poisson noise of sky counts. The random count noise makes additional moments and centroid shift error, and those first-order effects are canceled in averaging, but the second-order effects are not canceled. We derive the formulae that correct this systematic error due to the random count noise in measuring the moments and ellipticity of the background image. The correction formulae obtained are expressed as combinations of complex moments of the image, and thus can correct the systematic errors caused by each object. We test their validity using a simulated image and find that the systematic error becomes less than 1% in the measured ellipticity for objects with an IMCAT significance threshold of {nu} {approx} 11.7.

  17. Mask effects on cosmological studies with weak-lensing peak statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiangkun; Pan, Chuzhong; Fan, Zuhui; Wang, Qiao

    2014-03-20

    With numerical simulations, we analyze in detail how the bad data removal, i.e., the mask effect, can influence the peak statistics of the weak-lensing convergence field reconstructed from the shear measurement of background galaxies. It is found that high peak fractions are systematically enhanced because of the presence of masks; the larger the masked area is, the higher the enhancement is. In the case where the total masked area is about 13% of the survey area, the fraction of peaks with signal-to-noise ratio ? ? 3 is ?11% of the total number of peaks, compared with ?7% of the mask-free case in our considered cosmological model. This can have significant effects on cosmological studies with weak-lensing convergence peak statistics, inducing a large bias in the parameter constraints if the effects are not taken into account properly. Even for a survey area of 9 deg{sup 2}, the bias in (? {sub m}, ?{sub 8}) is already intolerably large and close to 3?. It is noted that most of the affected peaks are close to the masked regions. Therefore, excluding peaks in those regions in the peak statistics can reduce the bias effect but at the expense of losing usable survey areas. Further investigations find that the enhancement of the number of high peaks around the masked regions can be largely attributed to the smaller number of galaxies usable in the weak-lensing convergence reconstruction, leading to higher noise than that of the areas away from the masks. We thus develop a model in which we exclude only those very large masks with radius larger than 3' but keep all the other masked regions in peak counting statistics. For the remaining part, we treat the areas close to and away from the masked regions separately with different noise levels. It is shown that this two-noise-level model can account for the mask effect on peak statistics very well, and the bias in cosmological parameters is significantly reduced if this model is applied in the parameter fitting.

  18. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as the planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-? level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.

  19. The impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petri, Andrea [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); May, Morgan [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Haiman, Zoltan [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Kratochvil, Jan M. [Univ. of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biases from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2?10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ?100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.

  20. Impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2014-12-30

    We research, residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biasesmore »from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2 ? 10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ? 100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.« less

  1. Impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2014-12-30

    We research, residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biases from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2 ? 10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ? 100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.

  2. Galaxy bias from the DES Science Verification Data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, C; Gaztanaga, E; Amara, A; Refregier, A; Bacon, D; Becker, M R; Bonnett, C; Carretero, J; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; Fosalba, P; Giannantonio, T; Hartley, W; Jain, B; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Ross, A J; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Vikram, V; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lima, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Melchior, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias from a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a $\\sim$116 deg$^{2}$ area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. (2012) and later re-examined in a companion paper (Pujol et al., in prep) with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1$\\sigma$ error bars in 4 photometric redshift bins to be 1.33$\\pm$0.18 (z=0.2-0.4), 1.19$\\pm$0.23 (z=0.4-0.6), 0.99$\\pm$0.36 ( z=0.6-0.8), and 1.66$\\pm$0.56 (z=0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 1-2$\\sigma$ level with mea- surements on the same dataset using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with CMB lensing. In addition, our method provides the only $\\sigma_8$-independent constraint amon...

  3. Cosmology Constraints from the Weak Lensing Peak Counts and the Power Spectrum in CFHTLenS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Jia; May, Morgan; Petri, Andrea; Haiman, Zoltan; Hui, Lam; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2015-03-04

    Lensing peaks have been proposed as a useful statistic, containing cosmological information from non-Gaussianities that is inaccessible from traditional two-point statistics such as the power spectrum or two-point correlation functions. Here we examine constraints on cosmological parameters from weak lensing peak counts, using the publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a new suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, covering broad ranges of the three parameters ?m, ?8, and w, and replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts, and shape noise in the CFHTLenS observations. We then build an emulator thatmore »interpolates the power spectrum and the peak counts to an accuracy of ? 5%, and compute the likelihood in the three-dimensional parameter space (?m, ?8, w) from both observables. We find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined. Neither observable can constrain w without external data. When the power spectrum and peak counts are combined, the area of the error “banana” in the (?m, ?8) plane reduces by a factor of ? two, compared to using the power spectrum alone. For a flat ? cold dark matter model, combining both statistics, we obtain the constraint ?8(?m/0.27)0.63 = 0.85+0.03-0.03.« less

  4. Cosmology Constraints from the Weak Lensing Peak Counts and the Power Spectrum in CFHTLenS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Jia [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); May, Morgan [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, (United States); Petri, Andrea [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Haiman, Zoltan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics (ISCAP), Columbia University, New York, (United States); Hui, Lam [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics (ISCAP), Columbia University, New York, (United States); Kratochvil, Jan M. [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, (South Africa)

    2015-03-01

    Lensing peaks have been proposed as a useful statistic, containing cosmological information from non-Gaussianities that is inaccessible from traditional two-point statistics such as the power spectrum or two-point correlation functions. Here we examine constraints on cosmological parameters from weak lensing peak counts, using the publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a new suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, covering broad ranges of the three parameters ?m, ?8, and w, and replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts, and shape noise in the CFHTLenS observations. We then build an emulator that interpolates the power spectrum and the peak counts to an accuracy of ? 5%, and compute the likelihood in the three-dimensional parameter space (?m, ?8, w) from both observables. We find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined. Neither observable can constrain w without external data. When the power spectrum and peak counts are combined, the area of the error “banana” in the (?m, ?8) plane reduces by a factor of ? two, compared to using the power spectrum alone. For a flat ? cold dark matter model, combining both statistics, we obtain the constraint ?8(?m/0.27)0.63 = 0.85+0.03-0.03.

  5. Teraflop per second gravitational lensing ray-shooting using graphics processing units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Alexander C; Barnes, David G; Barsdell, Benjamin R

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational lensing calculation using a direct inverse ray-shooting approach is a computationally expensive way to determine magnification maps, caustic patterns, and light-curves (e.g. as a function of source profile and size). However, as an easily parallelisable calculation, gravitational ray-shooting can be accelerated using programmable graphics processing units (GPUs). We present our implementation of inverse ray-shooting for the NVIDIA G80 generation of graphics processors using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) software development kit. We also extend our code to multiple-GPU systems, including a 4-GPU NVIDIA S1070 Tesla unit. We achieve sustained processing performance of 182 Gflop/s on a single GPU, and 1.28 Tflop/s using the Tesla unit. We demonstrate that billion-lens microlensing simulations can be run on a single computer with a Tesla unit in timescales of order a day without the use of a hierarchical tree code.

  6. Weak lensing study of low mass galaxy groups: implications for Omega_m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Hoekstra; M. Franx; K. Kuijken; R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; H. Lin; S. L. Morris; P. B. Hall; D. R. Patton; M. Sawicki; G. D. Wirth

    2000-12-07

    We report on the first measurement of the average mass and mass-to-light ratio of galaxy groups by analysing the weak lensing signal induced by these systems. The groups, which have velocity dispersions of 50-400 km/s, have been selected from the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (CNOC2). This survey allows the identification of a large number of groups with redshifts ranging from z=0.12-0.55, ideal for a weak lensing analysis of their mass distribution. For our analysis we use a sample of 50 groups which are selected on the basis of a careful dynamical analysis of group candidates. We detect a signal at the 99% confidence limit. The best fit singular isothermal sphere model yields an Einstein radius of 0.72+-0.29". This corresponds to a velocity dispersion of 274^{+48}_{-59} km/s (using photometric redshift distributions for the source galaxies), which is in good agreement with the dynamical estimate. Under the assumption that the light traces the mass, we find an average mass-to-light ratio of 191+-83 h Msun/Lsun in the restframe B band. Unlike dynamical estimates, this result is insensitive to problems associated with determining group membership. After correction of the observed mass-to-light ratio for luminosity evolution to z=0, we find 254+-110 h Msun/Lsun, lower than what is found for rich clusters. We use the observed mass-to-light ratio to estimate the matter density of the universe, for which we find Omega_m=0.19+-0.10 (Omega_Lambda=0), in good agreement with other recent estimates. For a closed universe, we obtain Omega_m=0.13+-0.07.

  7. Planck's Dusty GEMS: Gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies discovered with the Planck survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canameras, R; Guery, D; McKenzie, T; Koenig, S; Petitpas, G; Dole, H; Frye, B; Flores-Cacho, I; Montier, L; Negrello, M; Beelen, A; Boone, F; Dicken, D; Lagache, G; Floch, E Le; Altieri, B; Bethermin, M; Chary, R; De Zotti, G; Giard, M; Kneissl, R; Krips, M; Malhotra, S; Martinache, C; Omont, A; Pointecouteau, E; Puget, J -L; Scott, D; Soucail, G; Valtchanov, I; Welikala, N; Yan, L

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of 11 bright far-IR/submm sources discovered through a combination of the Planck survey and follow-up Herschel-SPIRE imaging. Each source has a redshift z=2.2-3.6 obtained through a blind redshift search with EMIR at the IRAM 30-m telescope. Interferometry obtained at IRAM and the SMA, and optical/near-infrared imaging obtained at the CFHT and the VLT reveal morphologies consistent with strongly gravitationally lensed sources. Additional photometry was obtained with JCMT/SCUBA-2 and IRAM/GISMO at 850 um and 2 mm, respectively. All objects are bright, isolated point sources in the 18 arcsec beam of SPIRE at 250 um, with spectral energy distributions peaking either near the 350 um or the 500 um bands of SPIRE, and with apparent far-infrared luminosities of up to 3x10^14 L_sun. Their morphologies and sizes, CO line widths and luminosities, dust temperatures, and far-infrared luminosities provide additional empirical evidence that these are strongly gravitationally lensed high-redshift gala...

  8. Was SN1997ff at z~1.7 magnified by gravitational lensing?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis; Rodrigo A. Ibata

    2001-04-25

    The quest for the cosmological parameters has come to fruition with the identification of a number of supernovae at a redshift of $z\\sim1$. Analyses of the brightness of these standard candles reveal that the Universe is dominated by a large cosmological constant. The recent identification of the $z\\sim1.7$ SN1997ff in the northern Hubble Deep Field has provided further evidence for this cosmology. Here we examine the case for gravitational lensing of SN1997ff due to the presence of galaxies lying along our line of sight. We find that, while the alignment of SN1997ff with foreground masses was not favorable for it to be multiply imaged and strongly magnified, two galaxies did lie close enough to result in significant magnification: $\\mu\\sim1.4$ for the case where these elliptical galaxies have velocity dispersion $200 {\\rm km/s}$. Given the small difference between supernova brightnesses in different cosmologies, detailed modeling of the gravitational lensing properties of the intervening matter is therefore required before the true cosmological significance of SN1997ff can be deduced.

  9. Strong gravitational lensing by an electrically charged black hole in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sotani, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    We systematically examine the properties of null geodesics around an electrically charged, asymptotically flat black hole in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity, varying the electric charge of black hole and the coupling constant in the theory. We find that the radius of the unstable circular orbit for massless particle decreases with the coupling constant, if the value of the electrical charge is fixed. Additionally, we consider the strong gravitational lensing around such a black hole. We show that the deflection angle, the position angle of the relativistic images, and the magnification due to the light bending in strong gravitational field are quite sensitive to the parameters determining the black hole solution. Thus, through the accurate observations associated with the strong gravitational lensing, it might be possible to reveal the gravitational theory in a strong field regime.

  10. Bayesian analysis of joint strong gravitational lensing and dynamic galactic mass in SLACS: evidence of line-of-sight contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio C. C. Guimarães; Laerte Sodré Jr.

    2007-06-21

    We readdress the calculation of the mass of early-type galaxies using strong gravitational lensing and stellar dynamics. Our sample comprises 27 galaxies in the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. Comparing the mass estimates from these two independent methods in a Bayesian framework, we find evidence of significant line-of-sight mass contamination. Assuming a power-law mass distribution, the best fit density profile is given by $\\rho \\propto r^{-1.69\\pm0.05}$. We show that neglecting the line-of-sight mass contamination produces an overestimate of the mass attributed to the lens-galaxy by the lensing method, which introduces a bias in favor of a SIS profile when using the joint lensing and dynamic analysis to determine the slope of the density profile. We suggest that the line-of-sight contamination could also be important for other astrophysical and cosmological uses of joint lensing and dynamical measurements.

  11. Degeneracies and scaling relations in general power-law models for gravitational lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Wucknitz

    2002-02-20

    The time delay in gravitational lenses can be used to derive the Hubble constant in a relatively simple way. The results of this method are less dependent on astrophysical assumptions than in many other methods. The most important uncertainty is related to the mass model used. We discuss a family of models with a separable radial power-law and an arbitrary angular dependence for the potential psi = r^beta * F(theta). Isothermal potentials are a special case of these models with beta=1. An additional external shear is used to take into account perturbations from other galaxies. Using a simple linear formalism for quadruple lenses, we can derive H0 as a function of the observables and the shear. If the latter is fixed, the result depends on the assumed power-law exponent according to H0 proportional to (2-beta)/beta. The effect of external shear is quantified by introducing a `critical shear' gamma_c as a measure for the amount of shear that changes the result significantly. The analysis shows, that in the general case H0 and gamma_c do not depend on the position of the lens galaxy. We discuss these results and compare with numerical models for a number of real lens systems.

  12. Strong gravitational lensing as a tool to investigate the structure of jets at high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnacka, Anna; Geller, Margaret J.; Benbow, Wystan; Dell'antonio, Ian P.

    2014-06-20

    The components of blazar jets that emit radiation span a factor of 10{sup 10} in scale. The spatial structure of these emitting regions depends on the observed energy. Photons emitted at different sites cross the lens plane at different distances from the mass-weighted center of the lens. Thus there are differences in magnification ratios and time delays between the images of lensed blazars observed at different energies. When the lens structure and redshift are known from optical observations, these constraints can elucidate the structure of the source at high energies. At these energies, current technology is inadequate to resolve these sources, and the observed light curve is thus the sum of the images. Durations of ?-ray flares are short compared with typical time delays; thus both the magnification ratio and the time delay can be measured for the delayed counterparts. These measurements are a basis for localizing the emitting region along the jet. To demonstrate the power of strong gravitational lensing, we build a toy model based on the best studied and the nearest relativistic jet M87.

  13. NEW DEVELOPMENTS ON INVERSE POLYGON MAPPING TO CALCULATE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING MAGNIFICATION MAPS: OPTIMIZED COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mediavilla, E.; Lopez, P.; Gonzalez-Morcillo, C.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.

    2011-11-01

    We derive an exact solution (in the form of a series expansion) to compute gravitational lensing magnification maps. It is based on the backward gravitational lens mapping of a partition of the image plane in polygonal cells (inverse polygon mapping, IPM), not including critical points (except perhaps at the cell boundaries). The zeroth-order term of the series expansion leads to the method described by Mediavilla et al. The first-order term is used to study the error induced by the truncation of the series at zeroth order, explaining the high accuracy of the IPM even at this low order of approximation. Interpreting the Inverse Ray Shooting (IRS) method in terms of IPM, we explain the previously reported N {sup -3/4} dependence of the IRS error with the number of collected rays per pixel. Cells intersected by critical curves (critical cells) transform to non-simply connected regions with topological pathologies like auto-overlapping or non-preservation of the boundary under the transformation. To define a non-critical partition, we use a linear approximation of the critical curve to divide each critical cell into two non-critical subcells. The optimal choice of the cell size depends basically on the curvature of the critical curves. For typical applications in which the pixel of the magnification map is a small fraction of the Einstein radius, a one-to-one relationship between the cell and pixel sizes in the absence of lensing guarantees both the consistence of the method and a very high accuracy. This prescription is simple but very conservative. We show that substantially larger cells can be used to obtain magnification maps with huge savings in computation time.

  14. Shape profiles and orientation bias for weak and strong lensing cluster halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groener, A. M.; Goldberg, D. M.

    2014-11-10

    We study the intrinsic shape and alignment of isodensities of galaxy cluster halos extracted from the MultiDark MDR1 cosmological simulation. We find that the simulated halos are extremely prolate on small scales and increasingly spherical on larger ones. Due to this trend, analytical projection along the line of sight produces an overestimation of the concentration index as a decreasing function of radius, which we quantify by using both the intrinsic distribution of three-dimensional concentrations (c {sub 200}) and isodensity shape on weak and strong lensing scales. We find this difference to be ?18% (?9%) for low- (medium-)mass cluster halos with intrinsically low concentrations (c {sub 200} = 1-3), while we find virtually no difference for halos with intrinsically high concentrations. Isodensities are found to be fairly well aligned throughout the entirety of the radial scale of each halo population. However, major axes of individual halos have been found to deviate by as much as ?30°. We also present a value-added catalog of our analysis results, which we have made publicly available to download.

  15. Detectability of Gravitational Lensing Effect on the Two-point Correlation Function of Hotspots in the CMB maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takada; Toshifumi Futamase

    2000-08-24

    We present quantitative investigations of the weak lensing effect on the two-point correlation functions of local maxima (hotspots), $\\xipk(\\theta)$, in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps. The lensing effect depends on the projected mass fluctuations between today and the redshift $z_{\\rm rec}\\approx1100$. If adopting the Gaussian assumption for the primordial temperature fluctuations field, the peak statistics can provide an additional information about the intrinsic distribution of hotspots that those pairs have some characteristic separation angles. The weak lensing then redistributes hotspots in the observed CMB maps from the intrinsic distribution and consequently imprints non-Gaussian signatures onto $\\xipk(\\theta)$. Especially, since the intrinsic $\\xipk(\\theta)$ has a pronounced depression feature around the angular scale of $\\theta\\approx 70'$ for a flat universe, the weak lensing induces a large smoothing at the scale. We show that the lensing signature therefore has an advantage to effectively probe mass fluctuations with large wavelength modes around $\\lambda\\approx 50 h^{-1}{\\rm Mpc}$. To reveal the detectability, we performed numerical experiments with specifications of {\\em MAP} and {\\em Planck Surveyor} including the instrumental effects of beam smoothing and detector noise. It is then found that our method can successfully provide constraints on amplitude of the mass fluctuations and cosmological parameters in a flat universe with and without cosmological constant, provided that we use maps with 65% sky coverage expected from Planck.

  16. TESTING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS THE SOURCE OF ENHANCED STRONG Mg II ABSORPTION TOWARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapoport, Sharon; Onken, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tucker, Brad E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyithe, J. Stuart B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Sixty percent of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) reveal strong Mg II absorbing systems, which is a factor of {approx}2 times the rate seen along lines of sight to quasars. Previous studies argue that the discrepancy in the strong Mg II covering factor is most likely to be the result of either quasars being obscured due to dust or the consequence of many GRBs being strongly gravitationally lensed. We analyze observations of quasars that show strong foreground Mg II absorption. We find that GRB lines of sight pass closer to bright galaxies than would be expected for random lines of sight within the impact parameter expected for strong Mg II absorption. While this cannot be explained by obscuration in the GRB sample, it is a natural consequence of gravitational lensing. Upon examining the particular configurations of galaxies near a sample of GRBs with strong Mg II absorption, we find several intriguing lensing candidates. Our results suggest that lensing provides a viable contribution to the observed enhancement of strong Mg II absorption along lines of sight to GRBs, and we outline the future observations required to test this hypothesis conclusively.

  17. Observations of radio-quiet quasars at 10mas resolution by use of gravitational lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Neal; Roberts, Carl; Sluse, Dominique; Stacey, Hannah; Vives-Arias, Hector; Wucknitz, Olaf; Volino, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    We present VLA detections of radio emission in four four-image gravitational lens systems with quasar sources: HS0810+2554, RXJ0911+0511, HE0435$-$1223 and SDSSJ0924+0219, and e-MERLIN observations of two of the systems. The first three are detected at a high level of significance, and SDSS J0924+0219 is detected. HS0810+2554 is resolved, allowing us for the first time to achieve 10-mas resolution of the source frame in the structure of a radio quiet quasar. The others are unresolved or marginally resolved. All four objects are among the faintest radio sources yet detected, with intrinsic flux densities in the range 1-5$\\mu$Jy; such radio objects, if unlensed, will only be observable routinely with the Square Kilometre Array. The observations of HS0810+2554, which is also detected with e-MERLIN, strongly suggest the presence of a mini-AGN, with a radio core and milliarcsecond scale jet. The flux densities of the lensed images in all but HE0435-1223 are consistent with smooth galaxy lens models without the req...

  18. Test of relativistic gravity using microlensing of relativistically broadened lines in gravitationally lensed quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neronov, A

    2015-01-01

    We show that observation of the time-dependent effect of microlensing of relativistically broadened emission lines (such as e.g. the Fe Kalpha line in X-rays) in strongly lensed quasars could provide data on celestial mechanics of circular orbits in the direct vicinity of the horizon of supermassive black holes. This information can be extracted from the observation of evolution of red / blue edge of the magnified line just before and just after the period of crossing of the innermost stable circular orbit by the microlensing caustic. The functional form of this evolution is insensitive to numerous astrophysical parameters of the accreting black hole and of the microlensing caustics network system (as opposed to the evolution the full line spectrum). Measurement of the temporal evolution of the red / blue edge could provide a precision measurement of the radial dependence of the gravitational redshift and of velocity of the circular orbits, down to the innermost stable circular orbit. These measurements could...

  19. A Measurement of Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters Using Data from the South Pole Telescope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baxter, E. J.; Keisler, R.; Dodelson, S.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Ashby, M. L.N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; et al

    2015-06-22

    Clusters of galaxies are expected to gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby generate a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurements of this effect can be used to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters with CMB data alone. Here we present a measurement of lensing of the CMB by galaxy clusters using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We also develop a maximum likelihood approach to extract the CMB cluster lensing signal and validate the method on mock data. We quantify the effects on our analysis of several potential sources of systematic error andmore »find that they generally act to reduce the best-fit cluster mass. It is estimated that this bias to lower cluster mass is roughly 0.85? in units of the statistical error bar, although this estimate should be viewed as an upper limit. Furthermore, we apply our maximum likelihood technique to 513 clusters selected via their Sunyaev–Zeldovich (SZ) signatures in SPT data, and rule out the null hypothesis of no lensing at 3.1?. The lensing-derived mass estimate for the full cluster sample is consistent with that inferred from the SZ flux: (68% C.L., statistical error only).« less

  20. An Investigation of Gravitational Lensing in the Southern BL Lac PKS 0537-441

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Lewis; R. A. Ibata

    1999-08-16

    The BL-Lac family of active galaxies possess almost featureless spectra and exhibit rapid variability over their entire spectral range. A number of models have been developed to explain these extreme properties, several of which have invoked the action of microlensing by sub-stellar mass objects in a foreground galaxy; this not only introduces variability, but also amplifies an otherwise normal quasar source. Here we present recent spectroscopy and photometry of the southern BL Lac PKS 0537-441; with an inferred redshift of z~0.9 it represents one of the most distant and most luminous members of the BL Lac family. The goal of the observations was not only to confirm the redshift of PKS~0537-441, but also to determine the redshift of a putative galaxy along the line of sight to the BL-Lac; it has been proposed that this galaxy is the host of microlensing stars that account for PKS 0537-441's extreme properties. While several observations have failed to detect any extended emission in PKS 0537-441, the HST imaging data presented here indicate the presence of a galactic component, although we fail to identify any absorption features that reveal the redshift of the emission. It is also noted that PKS 0537-441 is accompanied by several small, but extended companions, located a few arcseconds from the point-like BL-Lac source. Two possibilities present themselves; either they represent true companions of PKS 0537-441, or are themselves gravitationally lensed images of more distant sources.

  1. Combining rotation curves and gravitational lensing: How to measure the equation of state of dark matter in the galactic halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Faber; Matt Visser

    2006-07-18

    We argue that combined observations of galaxy rotation curves and gravitational lensing not only allow the deduction of a galaxy's mass profile, but also yield information about the pressure in the galactic fluid. We quantify this statement by enhancing the standard formalism for rotation curve and lensing measurements to a first post-Newtonian approximation. This enhanced formalism is compatible with currently employed and established data analysis techniques, and can in principle be used to reinterpret existing data in a more general context. The resulting density and pressure profiles from this new approach can be used to constrain the equation of state of the galactic fluid, and therefore might shed new light on the persistent question of the nature of dark matter.

  2. LoCuSS: Exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziparo, Felicia; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P; Pereira, Maria J; Egami, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogs derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z~0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to identify safely faint blue background galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. We therefore develop a pragmatic method to c...

  3. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey A. Agnello 1,? ,T.selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based oncollaboration of the Dark Energy Survey 2 (DES, http://

  4. Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster Sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, N; Miyatake, H; Hasselfield, M; Gralla, M B; Allison, R; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Crichton, D; Devlin, M J; Dunkley, J; Dünner, R; Erben, T; Ferrara, S; Halpern, M; Hilton, M; Hill, J C; Hincks, A D; Hložek, R; Huffenberger, K M; Hughes, J P; Kneib, J P; Kosowsky, A; Makler, M; Marriage, T A; Menanteau, F; Miller, L; Moodley, K; Moraes, B; Niemack, M D; Page, L; Shan, H; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J L; Sifón, C; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Taylor, J; Thornton, R; van Waerbeke, L; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The average weak lensing mass is $\\left(4.8\\pm0.8\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of $\\left(4.70\\pm1.0\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously neglected.

  5. ACCOUNTING FOR COSMIC VARIANCE IN STUDIES OF GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES IN THE HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELD CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Brant E.; Stark, Dan P.; Ellis, Richard S.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; McLeod, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides a powerful means for studying faint galaxies in the distant universe. By magnifying the apparent brightness of background sources, massive clusters enable the detection of galaxies fainter than the usual sensitivity limit for blank fields. However, this gain in effective sensitivity comes at the cost of a reduced survey volume and, in this Letter, we demonstrate that there is an associated increase in the cosmic variance uncertainty. As an example, we show that the cosmic variance uncertainty of the high-redshift population viewed through the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744 increases from ?35% at redshift z ? 7 to ? 65% at z ? 10. Previous studies of high-redshift galaxies identified in the Frontier Fields have underestimated the cosmic variance uncertainty that will affect the ultimate constraints on both the faint-end slope of the high-redshift luminosity function and the cosmic star formation rate density, key goals of the Frontier Field program.

  6. The Red Radio Ring: a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared radio galaxy at z=2.553 discovered through citizen science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geach, J E; Verma, A; Marshall, P J; Jackson, N; Belles, P -E; Beswick, R; Baeten, E; Chavez, M; Cornen, C; Cox, B E; Erben, T; Erickson, N J; Garrington, S; Harrison, P A; Harrington, K; Hughes, D H; Ivison, R J; Jordan, C; Lin, Y -T; Leauthaud, A; Lintott, C; Lynn, S; Kapadia, A; Kneib, J -P; Macmillan, C; Makler, M; Miller, G; Montana, A; Mujica, R; Muxlow, T; Narayanan, G; Briain, D O; O'Brien, T; Oguri, M; Paget, E; Parrish, M; Ross, N P; Rozo, E; Rusu, E; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez-Arguelles, D; Simpson, R; Snyder, C; Schloerb, F P; Tecza, M; Van Waerbeke, L; Wilcox, J; Viero, M; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S; Zeballos, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared galaxy (L_IR~10^13 L_sun) with strong radio emission (L_1.4GHz~10^25 W/Hz) at z=2.553. The source was identified in the citizen science project SpaceWarps through the visual inspection of tens of thousands of iJKs colour composite images of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs), groups and clusters of galaxies and quasars. Appearing as a partial Einstein ring (r_e~3") around an LRG at z=0.2, the galaxy is extremely bright in the sub-millimetre for a cosmological source, with the thermal dust emission approaching 1 Jy at peak. The redshift of the lensed galaxy is determined through the detection of the CO(3-2) molecular emission line with the Large Millimetre Telescope's Redshift Search Receiver and through [OIII] and H-alpha line detections in the near-infrared from Subaru/IRCS. We have resolved the radio emission with high resolution (300-400 mas) eMERLIN L-band and JVLA C-band imaging. These observations are used in combination with the near-...

  7. DETECTION OF SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR MG0414+0534 USING MID-INFRARED AND RADIO VLBI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L. [Physics Department, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21403 (United States); Jones, Ramsey; Agol, Eric [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S., E-mail: macleod@usna.edu [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    We present 11.2 {mu}m observations of the gravitationally lensed, radio-loud z{sub s} = 2.64 quasar MG0414+0534, obtained using the Michelle camera on Gemini North. We find a flux ratio anomaly of A2/A1 = 0.93 {+-} 0.02 for the quasar images A1 and A2. When combined with the 11.7 {mu}m measurements from Minezaki et al., the A2/A1 flux ratio is nearly 5{sigma} from the expected ratio for a model based on the two visible lens galaxies. The mid-IR flux ratio anomaly can be explained by a satellite (substructure), 0.''3 northeast of image A2, as can the detailed very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) structures of the jet produced by the quasar. When we combine the mid-IR flux ratios with high-resolution VLBI measurements, we find a best-fit mass between 10{sup 6.2} and 10{sup 7.5} M{sub Sun} inside the Einstein radius for a satellite substructure modeled as a singular isothermal sphere at the redshift of the main lens (z{sub l} = 0.96). We are unable to set an interesting limit on the mass to light ratio due to its proximity to the quasar image A2. While the observations used here were technically difficult, surveys of flux anomalies in gravitational lenses with the James Webb Space Telescope will be simple, fast, and should well constrain the abundance of substructure in dark matter halos.

  8. Intrinsic galaxy alignments from the 2SLAQ and SDSS surveys: luminosity and redshift scalings and implications for weak lensing surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher M. Hirata; Rachel Mandelbaum; Mustapha Ishak; Uros Seljak; Robert Nichol; Kevin A. Pimbblet; Nicholas P. Ross; David Wake

    2007-10-28

    Correlations between intrinsic shear and the density field on large scales, a potentially important contaminant for cosmic shear surveys, have been robustly detected at low redshifts with bright galaxies in SDSS data. Here we present a more detailed characterization of this effect, which can cause anti-correlations between gravitational lensing shear and intrinsic ellipticity (GI correlations). This measurement uses 36278 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the SDSS spectroscopic sample with 0.153sigma detections of the effect for all galaxy subsamples within the SDSS LRG sample; for the 2SLAQ sample, we find a 2sigma detection for a bright subsample, and no detection for a fainter subsample. Fitting formulae are provided for the scaling of the GI correlations with luminosity, transverse separation, and redshift. We estimate contamination in the measurement of sigma_8 for future cosmic shear surveys on the basis of the fitted dependence of GI correlations on galaxy properties. We find contamination to the power spectrum ranging from -1.5 (optimistic) to -33 per cent (pessimistic) for a toy cosmic shear survey using all galaxies to a depth of R=24 using scales l~500. This corresponds to a bias in sigma_8 of Delta sigma_8=-0.004 (optimistic), -0.02 (central), or -0.10 (pessimistic). We provide a prescription for inclusion of this error in cosmological parameter estimation codes. The principal uncertainty is in the treatment of the L<=L* blue galaxies. Characterization of the tidal alignments of these galaxies, especially at redshifts relevant for cosmic shear, should be a high priority for the cosmic shear community. (Abridged)

  9. A Keck Adaptive Optics Survey of a Representative Sample of Gravitationally-Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies: High Spatial Resolution Studies of Kinematics and Metallicity Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leethochawalit, Nicha; Ellis, Richard S; Stark, Daniel P; Richard, Johan; Zitrin, Adi; Auger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We discuss spatially resolved emission line spectroscopy secured for a total sample of 15 gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at a mean redshift of $z\\simeq2$ based on Keck laser-assisted adaptive optics observations undertaken with the recently-improved OSIRIS integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph. By exploiting gravitationally lensed sources drawn primarily from the CASSOWARY survey, we sample these sub-L$^{\\ast}$ galaxies with source-plane resolutions of a few hundred parsecs ensuring well-sampled 2-D velocity data and resolved variations in the gas-phase metallicity. Such high spatial resolution data offers a critical check on the structural properties of larger samples derived with coarser sampling using multiple-IFU instruments. We demonstrate how serious errors of interpretation can only be revealed through better sampling. Although we include four sources from our earlier work, the present study provides a more representative sample unbiased with respect to emission line strength. Contrary t...

  10. Higgs gravitational interaction, weak boson scattering, and Higgs inflation in Jordan and Einstein frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jing; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian E-mail: xianyuzhongzhi@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    We study gravitational interaction of Higgs boson through the unique dimension-4 operator ?H{sup †}HR, with H  the Higgs doublet and R  the Ricci scalar curvature. We analyze the effect of this dimensionless nonminimal coupling ?  on weak gauge boson scattering in both Jordan and Einstein frames. We explicitly establish the longitudinal-Goldstone equivalence theorem with nonzero ? coupling in both frames, and analyze the unitarity constraints. We study the ?-induced weak boson scattering cross sections at O(1?30) TeV scales, and propose to probe the Higgs-gravity coupling via weak boson scattering experiments at the LHC (14 TeV) and the next generation pp colliders (50-100 TeV). We further extend our study to Higgs inflation, and quantitatively derive the perturbative unitarity bounds via coupled channel analysis, under large field background at the inflation scale. We analyze the unitarity constraints on the parameter space in both the conventional Higgs inflation and the improved models in light of the recent BICEP2 data.

  11. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The General Catalog of Stars in the Galactic Bulge. I. The Stars in the Central Baade's Window OGLE Field BWC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Szymanski; A. Udalski; M. Kubiak; J. Kaluzny; M. Mateo; W. Krzeminski

    1996-04-16

    This paper presents the first part of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) General Catalog of Stars in the Galactic bulge. The Catalog is based on observations collected during the OGLE microlensing search. This part contains 33196 stars brighter than I=18mag identified in the Baade's Window BWC field. Stars from remaining 20 OGLE fields will be presented in similar form in the next parts of the Catalog. The Catalog is available to the astronomical community over the Internet network.

  12. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Adriano; Ostrovski, Fernanda; Schechter, Paul L; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J; Lin, Huan; Auger, Matthew W; Courbin, Frederic; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Frieman, Josh; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Marshall, Philip J; McMahon, Richard G; Meylan, Georges; More, Anupreeta; Suyu, Sherry H; Rusu, Cristian E; Finley, David; Abbott, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe B; Allam, Sahar; Annis, James; Banerji, Manda; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Burke, David L; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Carretero, Jorge; Cunha, Carlos E; D'Andrea, Chris B; da Costa, Luiz N; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, H Thomas; Dietrich, Jörg P; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F; Estrada, Juan; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gerdes, David W; Gruen, Daniel; Gutierrez, Gaston; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David J; Kuehn, Kyler; Lahav, Ofer; Lima, Marco; Maia, Marcio A G; March, Marina; Marshall, Jennifer L; Martini, Paul; Melchior, Peter; Miller, Christopher J; Miquel, Ramon; Nichol, Robert C; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres A; Reil, Kevin; Romer, A Kathy; Roodman, Aaron; Sako, Masao; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basilio; Scarpine, Vic; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, R Chris; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E C; Tarle, Gregory; Thaler, Jon; Tucker, Douglas; Walker, Alistair R; Wechsler, Risa H; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at $z_{s}=1.64.$ The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is $0.51$". DES J2200+0110 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at $z_{s}=2.38$ and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at $z_{l}=0.799$, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein Radius is $0.68$" corresponding to an e...

  13. Discovery of Two Gravitationally Lensed Quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agnello, A.

    2015-08-05

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at zs = 1.64. The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is 0.51'' . DES J2146-0047 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloanmore »Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at zs = 2.38 and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at zl = 0.799, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. Furthermore, the Einstein Radius is 0.68'' corresponding to an enclosed mass of 1.6 × 1011 M?. Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data-mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES dataset.« less

  14. THE SERENDIPITOUS OBSERVATION OF A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED GALAXY AT z = 0.9057 FROM THE BLANCO COSMOLOGY SURVEY: THE ELLIOT ARC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Lin, H.; Drabek, E. R.; Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; Frieman, J. A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Armstrong, R. [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois, 1205 West Clark Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Barkhouse, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Bertin, E. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Brodwin, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Desai, S.; Ngeow, C.-C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hansen, S. M. [University of California Observatories and Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); High, F. W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Mohr, J. J.; Zenteno, A. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany); Lin, Y.-T. [Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277- 8568 (Japan); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Smith, R. C. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, La Serena (Chile); Song, J. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-11-20

    We report on the serendipitous discovery in the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) imaging data of a z = 0.9057 galaxy that is being strongly lensed by a massive galaxy cluster at a redshift of z = 0.3838. The lens (BCS J2352-5452) was discovered while examining i- and z-band images being acquired in 2006 October during a BCS observing run. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument on the Gemini-South 8 m telescope confirmed the lensing nature of this system. Using weak-plus-strong lensing, velocity dispersion, cluster richness N{sub 200}, and fitting to a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) cluster mass density profile, we have made three independent estimates of the mass M{sub 200} which are all very consistent with each other. The combination of the results from the three methods gives M{sub 200} = (5.1 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }, which is fully consistent with the individual measurements. The final NFW concentration c{sub 200} from the combined fit is c{sub 200} = 5.4{sup +1.4}{sub -1.1}. We have compared our measurements of M{sub 200} and c{sub 200} with predictions for (1) clusters from {Lambda}CDM simulations, (2) lensing-selected clusters from simulations, and (3) a real sample of cluster lenses. We find that we are most compatible with the predictions for {Lambda}CDM simulations for lensing clusters, and we see no evidence based on this one system for an increased concentration compared to {Lambda}CDM. Finally, using the flux measured from the [O II]3727 line we have determined the star formation rate of the source galaxy and find it to be rather modest given the assumed lens magnification.

  15. The serendipitous observation of a gravitationally lensed galaxy at z = 0.9057 from the Blanco Cosmology Survey: The Elliot Arc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley-Geer, E J; Lin, H; Drabek, E R; Allam, S S; Tucker, D L; Armstrong, R; Barkhouse, W A; Bertin, E; Brodwin, M; Desai, S; Frieman, J A

    2011-11-03

    We report on the serendipitous discovery in the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) imaging data of a z = 0.9057 galaxy that is being strongly lensed by a massive galaxy cluster at a redshift of z = 0.3838. The lens (BCS J2352-5452) was discovered while examining i- and z-band images being acquired in October 2006 during a BCS observing run. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the GMOS instrument on the Gemini South 8m telescope confirmed the lensing nature of this system. Using weak plus strong lensing, velocity dispersion, cluster richness N200, and fitting to an NFW cluster mass density profile, we have made three independent estimates of the mass M200 which are all very consistent with each other. The combination of the results from the three methods gives M200 = (5.1 x 1.3) x 1014 circle_dot, which is fully consistent with the individual measurements. The final NFW concentration c200 from the combined fit is c200 = 5.4-1.1+1.4. We have compared our measurements of M200 and c200 with predictions for (a) clusters from ?CDM simulations, (b) lensing selected clusters from simulations, and (c) a real sample of cluster lenses. We find that we are most compatible with the predictions for ?CDM simulations for lensing clusters, and we see no evidence based on this one system for an increased concentration compared to ?CDM. Finally, using the flux measured from the [OII]3727 line we have determined the star formation rate (SFR) of the source galaxy and find it to be rather modest given the assumed lens magnification.

  16. The serendipitous observation of a gravitationally lensed galaxy at z = 0.9057 from the Blanco Cosmology Survey: The Elliot Arc

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buckley-Geer, E J; Lin, H; Drabek, E R; Allam, S S; Tucker, D L; Armstrong, R; Barkhouse, W A; Bertin, E; Brodwin, M; Desai, S; Frieman, J A

    2011-11-03

    We report on the serendipitous discovery in the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) imaging data of a z = 0.9057 galaxy that is being strongly lensed by a massive galaxy cluster at a redshift of z = 0.3838. The lens (BCS J2352-5452) was discovered while examining i- and z-band images being acquired in October 2006 during a BCS observing run. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the GMOS instrument on the Gemini South 8m telescope confirmed the lensing nature of this system. Using weak plus strong lensing, velocity dispersion, cluster richness N200, and fitting to an NFW cluster mass density profile, we have made three independent estimates of the mass M200 which are all very consistent with each other. The combination of the results from the three methods gives M200 = (5.1 x 1.3) x 1014 circle_dot, which is fully consistent with the individual measurements. The final NFW concentration c200 from the combined fit is c200 = 5.4-1.1+1.4. We have compared our measurements of M200 and c200 with predictions for (a) clusters from ?CDM simulations, (b) lensing selected clusters from simulations, and (c) a real sample of cluster lenses. We find that we are most compatible with the predictions for ?CDM simulations for lensing clusters, and we see no evidence based on this one system for an increased concentration compared to ?CDM. Finally, using the flux measured from the [OII]3727 line we have determined the star formation rate (SFR) of the source galaxy and find it to be rather modest given the assumed lens magnification.

  17. The serendipitous observation of a gravitationally lensed galaxy at z = 0.9057 from the Blanco Cosmology Survey: the Elliot Arc

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Lin, H.; Drabek, E. R.; Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; Armstrong, R.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Desai, S.; et al

    2011-11-03

    We report on the serendipitous discovery in the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) imaging data of a z = 0.9057 galaxy that is being strongly lensed by a massive galaxy cluster at a redshift of z = 0.3838. The lens (BCS J2352-5452) was discovered while examining i- and z-band images being acquired in October 2006 during a BCS observing run. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the GMOS instrument on the Gemini South 8m telescope confirmed the lensing nature of this system. Using weak plus strong lensing, velocity dispersion, cluster richness N200, and fitting to an NFW cluster mass density profile, we havemore »made three independent estimates of the mass M200 which are all very consistent with each other. The combination of the results from the three methods gives M200 = (5.1 x 1.3) x 1014 circle_dot, which is fully consistent with the individual measurements. The final NFW concentration c200 from the combined fit is c200 = 5.4-1.1+1.4. We have compared our measurements of M200 and c200 with predictions for (a) clusters from ?CDM simulations, (b) lensing selected clusters from simulations, and (c) a real sample of cluster lenses. We find that we are most compatible with the predictions for ?CDM simulations for lensing clusters, and we see no evidence based on this one system for an increased concentration compared to ?CDM. Finally, using the flux measured from the [OII]3727 line we have determined the star formation rate (SFR) of the source galaxy and find it to be rather modest given the assumed lens magnification.« less

  18. The Ultraviolet-Far Infrared Energy Budget of the Gravitationally Lensed Lyman Break Galaxy MS1512-cB58

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Sawicki

    2001-02-12

    A 2-hour service-mode SCUBA observation of the gravitationally-lensed Lyman break galaxy MS1512-cB58 resulted in a 3 sigma upper limit of 3.9 mJy at 850um. A comparison of this upper limit with values expected from rest-UV/optical measurements of extiction suggests that dust temperature (T_d) and/or emissivity index (beta) in cB58 may be substantially higher than is seen in local galaxies, or that the attenuation curve in cB58 may be even gentler than the already quite mild SMC dust law. If dust temperature T_d and emissivity index beta in cB58 are similar to those seen in local IRAS-seleceted galaxies, then cB58's dust mass is M_d <~ 10^7.7 Msun and its star formation rate is SFR <~ 10 Msun/yr (for q_0=0.1, H_0=75 km/s/Mpc). This SFR upper limit is lower than the star formation rate measured from Halpha, thus giving further support to the notion that (T_d, beta) values in cB58 are higher than those seen in local galaxies. It thus appears that our understanding of dust in this extensively studied Lyman break galaxy is poor, and observations at other wavelentghs are needed to better understand dust at high redshift. Such observations can be provided by the upcoming SIRTF mission for which cB58's expected flux densities are calculated.

  19. Keck spectroscopy of gravitationally lensed z ? 4 galaxies: Improved constraints on the escape fraction of ionizing photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Tucker A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    The fraction of ionizing photons that escape from young star-forming galaxies is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the role of galaxies in cosmic reionization. Yet traditional techniques for measuring this fraction are inapplicable at the redshifts of interest due to foreground screening by the Ly? forest. In an earlier study, we demonstrated a reduction in the equivalent width of low-ionization absorption lines in composite spectra of Lyman break galaxies at z ? 4 compared to similar measures at z ? 3. This might imply a lower covering fraction of neutral gas and hence an increase with redshift in the escape fraction of ionizing photons. However, our spectral resolution was inadequate to differentiate between several alternative explanations, including changes with redshift in the outflow kinematics. Here we present higher quality spectra of three gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxies at z ? 4 with a spectral resolution sufficient to break this degeneracy of interpretation. We present a method for deriving the covering fraction of low-ionization gas as a function of outflow velocity and compare the results with similar quality data taken for galaxies at lower redshift. We find an interesting but tentative trend of lower covering fractions of low-ionization gas for galaxies with strong Ly? emission. In combination with the demographic trends of Ly? emission with redshift from our earlier work, our results provide new evidence for a reduction in the average H I covering fraction, and hence an increase in the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from Lyman break galaxies, with redshift.

  20. JOINT ANALYSIS OF CLUSTER OBSERVATIONS. II. CHANDRA/XMM-NEWTON X-RAY AND WEAK LENSING SCALING RELATIONS FOR A SAMPLE OF 50 RICH CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahdavi, Andisheh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94131 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Babul, Arif; Bildfell, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Jeltema, Tesla [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Henry, J. Patrick [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    We present a study of multiwavelength X-ray and weak lensing scaling relations for a sample of 50 clusters of galaxies. Our analysis combines Chandra and XMM-Newton data using an energy-dependent cross-calibration. After considering a number of scaling relations, we find that gas mass is the most robust estimator of weak lensing mass, yielding 15% {+-} 6% intrinsic scatter at r{sub 500}{sup WL} (the pseudo-pressure Y{sub X} yields a consistent scatter of 22% {+-} 5%). The scatter does not change when measured within a fixed physical radius of 1 Mpc. Clusters with small brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) to X-ray peak offsets constitute a very regular population whose members have the same gas mass fractions and whose even smaller (<10%) deviations from regularity can be ascribed to line of sight geometrical effects alone. Cool-core clusters, while a somewhat different population, also show the same (<10%) scatter in the gas mass-lensing mass relation. There is a good correlation and a hint of bimodality in the plane defined by BCG offset and central entropy (or central cooling time). The pseudo-pressure Y{sub X} does not discriminate between the more relaxed and less relaxed populations, making it perhaps the more even-handed mass proxy for surveys. Overall, hydrostatic masses underestimate weak lensing masses by 10% on the average at r{sub 500}{sup WL}; but cool-core clusters are consistent with no bias, while non-cool-core clusters have a large and constant 15%-20% bias between r{sub 2500}{sup WL} and r{sub 500}{sup WL}, in agreement with N-body simulations incorporating unthermalized gas. For non-cool-core clusters, the bias correlates well with BCG ellipticity. We also examine centroid shift variance and power ratios to quantify substructure; these quantities do not correlate with residuals in the scaling relations. Individual clusters have for the most part forgotten the source of their departures from self-similarity.

  1. Eikonal approximation, Finsler structures, and implications for Lorentz-violating photons in weak gravitational fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schreck

    2015-08-02

    The current article shall contribute to understanding the classical analogue of the minimal photon sector in the Lorentz-violating Standard-Model Extension (SME). It is supposed to complement all studies performed on classical point-particle equivalents of SME fermions. The classical analogue of a photon is not a massive particle being described by a usual equation of motion, but a geometric ray underlying the eikonal equation. The first part of the paper will set up the necessary tools to understand this correspondence for interesting cases of the minimal SME photon sector. In conventional optics the eikonal equation follows from an action principle, which is demonstrated to work in most (but not all) Lorentz-violating cases as well. The integrands of the action functional correspond to Finsler structures, which establishes the connection to Finsler geometry. The second part of the article treats Lorentz-violating light rays in a weak gravitational background by implementing the principle of minimal coupling. Thereby it is shown how Lorentz violation in the photon sector can be constrained by measurements of light bending at massive bodies such as the Sun. The phenomenological studies are based on the currently running ESA mission GAIA and the planned NASA/ESA mission LATOR. The final part of the paper discusses certain aspects of explicit Lorentz violation in gravity based on the setting of Finsler geometry.

  2. Type-Ia Supernova Remnant Shell At $Z=3.5$ Seen In The Three Sightlines Toward The Gravitationally Lensed Qso B1422+231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamano, Satoshi; Kondo, Sohei; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Okoshi, Katsuya; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Using the Subaru 8.2m Telescope with an IRCS Echelle spectrograph, we obtained high-resolution (R=10,000) near-infrared (1.01-1.38 \\mu m) spectra of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed QSO B1422+231 (z=3.628) consisting of four known lensed images. We detected MgII absorption lines at z=3.54, which show a large variance of column densities (~ 0.3 dex) and velocities (~ 10 km/s) between the sightlines A and B with a projected separation of only 8.4h_{70}^{-1} pc at the redshift. This is the smallest spatial structure of the high-z gas clouds ever detected after Rauch et al. found a 20-pc scale structure for the same z=3.54 absorption system using optical spectra of images A and C. The observed systematic variances imply that the system is an expanding shell as originally suggested by Rauch et al. By combining the data for three sightlines, we managed to constrain the radius and expansion velocity of the shell (~ 50-100 pc, 130 km/s), concluding that the shell is truly a supernova remnant (SNR) rather ...

  3. Fast and Accurate Fourier Series Solutions to Gravitational Lensing by A General Family of Two Power-Law Mass Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyu-Hyun Chae

    2001-12-10

    Fourier series solutions to the deflection and magnification by a family of three-dimensional cusped two power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are presented. The cusped two power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are characterized by inner and outer power-law radial indices and a break (or, transition) radius. The model family includes mass models mimicking Jaffe, Hernquist, and $\\eta$ models and dark matter halo profiles from numerical simulations. The Fourier series solutions for the cusped two power-law mass distributions are relatively simple, and allow a very fast calculation even for a chosen small fractional calculational error (e.g. $10^{-5}$). These results will be particularly useful for studying lensed systems which provide a number of accurate lensing constraints and for systematic analyses of large numbers of lenses. Subroutines employing these results for the two power-law model and the results by Chae, Khersonsky, & Turnshek for the generalized single power-law mass model are made publicly available.

  4. Lensing signals from Spin-2 perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamek, Julian; Tansella, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    We compute the angular power spectra of the E-type and B-type lensing potentials for gravitational waves from inflation and for tensor perturbations induced by scalar perturbations. We derive the tensor-lensed CMB power spectra for both cases. We also apply our formalism to determine the linear lensing potential for a Bianchi I spacetime with small anisotropy.

  5. Lensing signals from Spin-2 perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Adamek; Ruth Durrer; Vittorio Tansella

    2015-10-06

    We compute the angular power spectra of the E-type and B-type lensing potentials for gravitational waves from inflation and for tensor perturbations induced by scalar perturbations. We derive the tensor-lensed CMB power spectra for both cases. We also apply our formalism to determine the linear lensing potential for a Bianchi I spacetime with small anisotropy.

  6. Resolved nuclear CO(1-0) emission in APM08279+5255: Gravitational lensing by a naked cusp?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis; Chris Carilli; Padeli Papadopoulos; R. J. Ivison

    2001-12-12

    The ultraluminous broad absorption line quasar APM08279+5255 is one of the most luminous systems known. Here, we present an analysis of its nuclear CO(1-0) emission. Its extended distribution suggests that the gravitational lens in this system is highly elliptical, probably a highly inclined disk. The quasar core, however, lies in the vicinity of naked cusp, indicating that APM08279+5255 is truly the only odd-image gravitational lens. This source is the second system for which the gravitational lens can be used to study structure on sub-kpc scales in the molecular gas associated with the AGN host galaxy. The observations and lens model require CO distributed on a scale of $\\sim 400$ pc. Using this scale, we find that the molecular gas mass makes a significant, and perhaps dominant, contribution to the total mass within a couple hundred parsecs of the nucleus of APM08279+5255.

  7. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHELL AT z = 3.5 SEEN IN THE THREE SIGHTLINES TOWARD THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QSO B1422+231

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamano, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Naoto [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Kondo, Sohei [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto-Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Okoshi, Katsuya [Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 102-1 Tomino, Oshamanbe, Hokkaido 049-3514 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: hamano@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Using the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope with the IRCS Echelle spectrograph, we obtained high-resolution (R = 10,000) near-infrared (1.01-1.38 {mu}m) spectra of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed QSO B1422+231 (z = 3.628) consisting of four known lensed images. We detected Mg II absorption lines at z = 3.54, which show a large variance of column densities ({approx}0.3 dex) and velocities ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}) between sightlines A and B with a projected separation of only 8.4h{sup -1}{sub 70} pc at that redshift. This is the smallest spatial structure of the high-z gas clouds ever detected after Rauch et al. found a 20 pc scale structure for the same z = 3.54 absorption system using optical spectra of images A and C. The observed systematic variances imply that the system is an expanding shell as originally suggested by Rauch et al. By combining the data for three sightlines, we managed to constrain the radius and expansion velocity of the shell ({approx}50-100 pc, 130 km s{sup -1}), concluding that the shell is truly a supernova remnant (SNR) rather than other types of shell objects, such as a giant H II region. We also detected strong Fe II absorption lines for this system, but with much broader Doppler width than that of {alpha}-element lines. We suggest that this Fe II absorption line originates in a localized Fe II-rich gas cloud that is not completely mixed with plowed ambient interstellar gas clouds showing other {alpha}-element low-ion absorption lines. Along with the Fe richness, we conclude that the SNR is produced by an SN Ia explosion.

  8. Prospects for clustering and lensing measurements with forthcoming intensity mapping and optical surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Crittenden, Robert; Metcalf, R Benton

    2015-01-01

    We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect HI clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the HI density $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$, the HI bias $b_{\\rm HI}$ and the galaxy-HI correlation coefficient $r_{\\rm HI-g}$.

  9. A Study of Interstellar Gas and Stars in the Gravitationally Lensed Galaxy `The Cosmic Eye' from Rest-Frame Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quider, Anna M; Pettini, Max; Steidel, Charles C; Stark, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of a study of the rest-frame UV spectrum of the Cosmic Eye, a luminous Lyman break galaxy at z=3.07331 gravitationally lensed by a factor of 25. The spectrum, recorded with the ESI spectrograph on the Keck II telescope, is rich in absorption features from the gas and massive stars in this galaxy. The interstellar absorption lines are resolved into two components of approximately equal strength and each spanning several hundred km/s in velocity. One component has a net blueshift of -70 km/s relative to the stars and H II regions and presumably arises in a galaxy-scale outflow similar to those seen in most star-forming galaxies at z = 2-3. The other is more unusual in showing a mean redshift of +350 km/s relative to the systemic redshift; possible interpretations include a merging clump, or material ejected by a previous star formation episode and now falling back onto the galaxy, or more simply a chance alignment with a foreground galaxy. In the metal absorption lines, both components onl...

  10. The Ultraviolet Spectrum of the Gravitationally Lensed Galaxy `The Cosmic Horseshoe': A Close-up of a Star-forming Galaxy at z = 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quider, Anna M; Shapley, Alice E; Steidel, Charles C

    2009-01-01

    Taking advantage of strong gravitational lensing, we have recorded the rest-frame UV spectrum of the z = 2.38115 galaxy `The Cosmic Horseshoe' (J1148+1930) at higher resolution and S/N than is currently feasible for unlensed galaxies at z = 2 -3. From the analysis of stellar spectral features, we conclude that a continuous mode of star formation with a Salpeter slope gives a good representation of the UV spectrum, ruling out significant departures from a `standard' IMF. Generally, we find good agreement between the values of metallicity deduced from stellar and nebular tracers. Interstellar absorption is present over a velocity range of 1000 km/s, from -800$ to +250 km/s relative to the stars and their H II regions, and there is evidence that the outflowing interstellar gas may be patchy, covering only 60% of the UV stellar continuum. The Lya line shares many of the characteristics of the so-called Lya emitters. Its double-peaked profile can be reproduced by models of Lya photons resonantly scattered by an ex...

  11. CVS $Revision: 2.0 $Date: 2002/10/10 15:47:21 Weak Lensing Results from the 75 Square Degree CTIO Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Gary

    noise." This was the primary impetus behind the construction of the Big Throughput Camera (BTC; Wittman-lensing survey conducted with the BTC camera and its successor, the NOAO Mosaic II imager (Muller et al. 1998

  12. arXiv:astro-ph/0402442v227Feb2004 Weak Lensing of the CMB: Sampling Errors on B-modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wayne

    such as the neutrino mass and dark energy equation of state. The net sample variance on the small scale B modes out the dark side of the universe, namely the dark energy and neutrino dependent growth of structure, as well also provides the key to mapping the dark matter [6, 7] and hence the separation of the lensing

  13. Magnification relations for Kerr lensing and testing cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, M. C.; Petters, A. O.

    2007-09-15

    A Kerr black hole with mass parameter m and angular momentum parameter a acting as a gravitational lens gives rise to two images in the weak field limit. We study the corresponding magnification relations, namely, the signed and absolute magnification sums and the centroid up to post-Newtonian order. We show that there are post-Newtonian corrections to the total absolute magnification and centroid proportional to a/m, which is in contrast to the spherically symmetric case where such corrections vanish. Hence we also propose a new set of lensing observables for the two images involving these corrections, which should allow measuring a/m with gravitational lensing. In fact, the resolution capabilities needed to observe this for the Galactic black hole should in principle be accessible to current and near-future instrumentation. Since a/m>1 indicates a naked singularity, a most interesting application would be a test of the cosmic censorship conjecture. The technique used to derive the image properties is based on the degeneracy of the Kerr lens and a suitably displaced Schwarzschild lens at post-Newtonian order. A simple physical explanation for this degeneracy is also given.

  14. Formalism for testing theories of gravity using lensing by compact objects: Static, spherically symmetric case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeton, Charles R.; Petters, A.O.

    2005-11-15

    We are developing a general, unified, and rigorous analytical framework for using gravitational lensing by compact objects to test different theories of gravity beyond the weak-deflection limit. In this paper we present the formalism for computing corrections to lensing observables for static, spherically symmetric gravity theories in which the corrections to the weak-deflection limit can be expanded as a Taylor series in one parameter, namely, the gravitational radius of the lens object. We take care to derive coordinate-independent expressions and compute quantities that are directly observable. We compute series expansions for the observables that are accurate to second order in the ratio {epsilon}={theta} /{theta}{sub E} of the angle subtended by the lens's gravitational radius to the weak-deflection Einstein radius, which scales with mass as {epsilon}{proportional_to}M {sup 1/2}. The positions, magnifications, and time delays of the individual images have corrections at both first and second order in {epsilon}, as does the differential time delay between the two images. Interestingly, we find that the first-order corrections to the total magnification and centroid position vanish in all gravity theories that agree with general relativity in the weak-deflection limit, but they can remain nonzero in modified theories that disagree with general relativity in the weak-deflection limit. For the Reissner-Nordstroem metric and a related metric from heterotic string theory, our formalism reveals an intriguing connection between lensing observables and the condition for having a naked singularity, which could provide an observational method for testing the existence of such objects. We apply our formalism to the galactic black hole and predict that the corrections to the image positions are at the level of 10 {mu}arc s (microarcseconds), while the correction to the time delay is a few hundredths of a second. These corrections would be measurable today if a pulsar were found to be lensed by the galactic black hole, and they should be readily detectable with planned missions like MAXIM.

  15. Abell 370 revisited: refurbished Hubble imaging of the first strong lensing cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard, Johan; Limousin, Marceau; Edge, Alastair; Jullo, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We present a strong lensing analysis of the galaxy cluster Abell 370 (z=0.375) based on the recent multicolor ACS images obtained as part of the Early Release Observation (ERO) that followed the Hubble Service Mission #4. Back in 1987, the giant gravitational arc (z=0.725) in Abell 370 was one of the first pieces of evidence that massive clusters are dense enough to act as strong gravitational lenses. The new observations reveal in detail its disklike morphology, and we show that it can be interpreted as a complex five-image configuration, with a total magnification factor of 32+/-4. Moreover, the high resolution multicolor information allowed us to identify 10 multiply imaged background galaxies. We derive a mean Einstein radius of RE=39+/-2" for a source redshift at z=2, corresponding to a mass of M(weak-lensing measurements. The typical mass model error is smaller than 5%, a factor 3 of improvement compare...

  16. A TWO-YEAR TIME DELAY FOR THE LENSED QUASAR SDSS J1029+2623

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fohlmeister, Janine; Wambsganss, Joachim [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Falco, Emilio E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Oguri, Masamune [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)] [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Dai, Xinyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We present 279 epochs of optical monitoring data spanning 5.4 years from 2007 January to 2012 June for the largest image separation (22.''6) gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J1029+2623. We find that image A leads the images B and C by {Delta} t {sub AB} = (744 {+-} 10) days (90% confidence); the uncertainty includes both statistical uncertainties and systematic differences due to the choice of models. With only a {approx}1% fractional error, the interpretation of the delay is limited primarily by cosmic variance due to fluctuations in the mean line-of-sight density. We cannot separate the fainter image C from image B, but since image C trails image B by only 2-3 days in all models, the estimate of the time delay between images A and B is little affected by combining the fluxes of images B and C. There is weak evidence for a low level of microlensing, perhaps created by the small galaxy responsible for the flux ratio anomaly in this system. Interpreting the delay depends on better constraining the shape of the gravitational potential using the lensed host galaxy, other lensed arcs, and the structure of the X-ray emission.

  17. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vikram, V.; Sheldon, E.; Chang, C.; Jain, B.; Bacon, D.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S.; et al

    2015-07-29

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These “mass maps” provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg2 area from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidate superclusters andmore »voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N-body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8? level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. We analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.« less

  18. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vikram, V.; Sheldon, E.; Chang, C.; Jain, B.; Bacon, D.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S.; Brout, D.; Busha, M.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Kovacs, A.; Lahav, O.; Leistedt, B.; Lin, H.; Melchior, P.; Peiris, H.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sanchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Wechsler, R.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.

    2015-07-29

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These “mass maps” provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg2 area from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidate superclusters and voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N-body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8? level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. We analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.

  19. Lensed CMB simulation and parameter estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2010-11-16

    Modelling of the weak lensing of the CMB will be crucial to obtain correct cosmological parameter constraints from forthcoming precision CMB anisotropy observations. The lensing affects the power spectrum as well as inducing non-Gaussianities. We discuss the simulation of full sky CMB maps in the weak lensing approximation and describe a fast numerical code. The series expansion in the deflection angle cannot be used to simulate accurate CMB maps, so a pixel remapping must be used. For parameter estimation accounting for the change in the power spectrum but assuming Gaussianity is sufficient to obtain accurate results up to Planck sensitivity using current tools. A fuller analysis may be required to obtain accurate error estimates and for more sensitive observations. We demonstrate a simple full sky simulation and subsequent parameter estimation at Planck-like sensitivity. The lensed CMB simulation and parameter estimation codes are publicly available.

  20. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from DES Science Verification Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vikram, V; Jain, B; Bacon, D; Amara, A; Becker, M; Bernstein, G; Bonnett, C; Bridle, S; Brout, D; Busha, M; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Hartley, W; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Lahav, O; Leistedt, B; Lin, H; Melchior, P; Peiris, H; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E; Sanchez, C; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M; Wechsler, R; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Armstrong, R; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Cunha, C E; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; March, M; Marshall, J; Martini, Paul; Merritt, K W; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Walker, A R; Weller, J

    2015-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These "mass maps" provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg^2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data overlapping with the South Pole Telescope survey. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. Cross-correlating the mass map with the foreground galaxies from the same DES SV data gives results consistent with mock catalogs that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8 sigma level with 20 arcminute smoothing. A maj...

  1. A Consistent Picture Emerges: A Compact X-ray Continuum Emission Region in the Gravitationally Lensed Quasar SDSS J0924+0219

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLeod, Chelsea L; Mosquera, A; Kochanek, C; Tewes, M; Courbin, F; Meylan, G; Chen, B; Dai, X; Chartas, G

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the optical, UV, and X-ray microlensing variability of the lensed quasar SDSS J0924+0219 using six epochs of Chandra data in two energy bands (spanning 0.4-8.0 keV, or 1-20 keV in the quasar rest frame), 10 epochs of F275W (rest-frame 1089A) Hubble Space Telescope data, and high-cadence R-band (rest-frame 2770A) monitoring spanning eleven years. Our joint analysis provides robust constraints on the extent of the X-ray continuum emission region and the projected area of the accretion disk. The best-fit half-light radius of the soft X-ray continuum emission region is between 5x10^13 and 10^15 cm, and we find an upper limit of 10^15 cm for the hard X-rays. The best-fit soft-band size is about 13 times smaller than the optical size, and roughly 7 GM_BH/c^2 for a 2.8x10^8 M_sol black hole, similar to the results for other systems. We find that the UV emitting region falls in between the optical and X-ray emitting regions at 10^14 cm < r_1/2,UV < 3x10^15 cm. Finally, the optical size is significant...

  2. Lensing-induced Non-Gaussian Signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takada

    2001-04-30

    We propose a new method for extracting the non-Gaussian signatures on the isotemperature statistics in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, which is induced by the gravitational lensing due to the intervening large-scale structure of the universe. To develop the method, we focus on a specific statistical property of the intrinsic Gaussian CMB field; a field point in the map that has a larger absolute value of the temperature threshold tends to have a larger absolute value of the curvature parameter defined by a trace of second derivative matrix of the temperature field, while the ellipticity parameter similarly defined is uniformly distributed independently of the threshold because of the isotropic nature of the Gaussian field. The weak lensing then causes a stronger distortion effect on the isotemperature contours with higher threshold and especially induces a coherent distribution of the ellipticity parameter correlated with the threshold as a result of the coupling between the CMB curvature parameter and the gravitational tidal shear in the observed map. These characteristic patterns can be statistically picked up by considering three independent characteristic functions, which are obtained from the averages of quadratic combinations of the second derivative fields of CMB over isotemperature contours with each threshold. Consequently, we find that the lensing effect generates non-Gaussian signatures on those functions that have a distinct functional dependence of the threshold. We test the method using numerical simulations of CMB maps and show that the lensing signals can be measured definitely, provided that we use CMB data with sufficiently low noise and high angular resolution.

  3. Multipole Expansion Model in Gravitational Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Fukuyama; Y. Kakigi; T. Okamura

    1997-01-31

    Non-transparent models of multipole expansion model and two point-mass model are analyzed from the catastrophe theory. Singularity behaviours of $2^n$-pole moments are discussed. We apply these models to triple quasar PG1115+080 and compare with the typical transparent model, softened power law spheroids. Multipole expansion model gives the best fit among them.

  4. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from DES Science Verification Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, C.; Vikram, V.; Jain, B.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for super-clusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8? level with 20 arcminute smoothing. These measurementsmore »are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on ?CDM Nbody simulations, suggesting low systematics uncertainties in the map. We summarize our key findings in this letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.« less

  5. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from DES Science Verification Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, C; Jain, B; Bacon, D; Amara, A; Becker, M R; Bernstein, G; Bonnett, C; Bridle, S; Brout, D; Busha, M; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Hartley, W; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Kovacs, A; Lahav, O; Lin, H; Melchior, P; Peiris, H; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E; Sanchez, C; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Wechsler, R; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Levy, A; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Merritt, K W; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Walker, A R

    2015-01-01

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 sq. deg from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for super-clusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 5-7 sigma level on a large range of scales. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on LCDM N-body simulations, suggesting low systematics uncertainties in the map. We summarize our key findings in this letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.

  6. Cosmology with Strong Lensing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Shuo; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 118 strong gravitational lensing systems from SLACS, BELLS, LSD and SL2S surveys and use them to constrain the cosmic equation of state. In particular we consider two cases of dark energy phenomenology: $XCDM$ model where dark energy is modeled by a fluid with constant $w$ equation of state parameter and in Chevalier - Polarski - Linder (CPL) parametrization where $w$ is allowed to evolve with redshift: $w(z) = w_0 + w_1 \\frac{z}{1+z}$. We assume spherically symmetric mass distribution in lensing galaxies, but relax the rigid assumption of SIS model in favor to more general power-law index $\\gamma$, also allowing it to evolve with redshifts $\\gamma(z)$. Our results for the $XCDM$ cosmology show the agreement with values (concerning both $w$ and $\\gamma$ parameters) obtained by other authors. We go further and constrain the CPL parameters jointly with $\\gamma(z)$. The resulting confidence regions for the parameters are much better than those obtained with a similar metho...

  7. Mass Distributions of Clusters Using Gravitational Magnification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-05-03

    Lensing in the context of rich clusters is normally quantified from small image distortions, yielding a relative mass distribution in the limit of weak lensing. Here we show the magnification effect of lensing can also be mapped over a cluster, resulting in absolute mass determinations for the weak limit. Furthermore, given both magnification and distortion measurements, the mass distribution may be constrained in the strong regime. Methods for obtaining the magnification using spectroscopic and/or photometric information are discussed, for object detection within a fixed isophote or to a given flux limit. A map of the magnification around A1689 is constructed from the observed depletion of background red galaxy counts.

  8. Invited Review Article: Development of crystal lenses for energetic photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, Robert K. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    This paper follows the development of crystal diffraction lenses designed to focus energetic photons. It begins with the search for a solution to the astrophysics problem of how to detect weak astrophysics sources of gamma rays and x-rays. This led to the basic designs for a lens and to the understanding of basic limitations of lens design. The discussion of the development of crystal diffraction lenses is divided into two parts: lenses using crystals with mosaic structure, and lenses that use crystals with curved crystal planes. This second group divides into two sub-groups: (1) Curved crystals that are used to increase the acceptance angle of the diffraction of a monochromatic beam and to increase the energy bandwidth of the diffraction. (2) Curved crystals used to focus gamma ray beams. The paper describes how these two types of crystals affect the design of the corresponding crystal lenses in different fields: astrophysics, medical imaging, detection of weak, distant, gamma-ray sources, etc. The designs of crystal lenses for these applications are given in enough detail to allow the reader to design a lens for his own application.

  9. Gravitational wave in Lorentz violating gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Li; Zhe Chang

    2012-04-01

    By making use of the weak gravitational field approximation, we obtain a linearized solution of the gravitational vacuum field equation in an anisotropic spacetime. The plane-wave solution and dispersion relation of gravitational wave is presented explicitly. There is possibility that the speed of gravitational wave is larger than the speed of light and the casuality still holds. We show that the energy-momentum of gravitational wave in the ansiotropic spacetime is still well defined and conserved.

  10. Entropy, Gravitation, and Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John A. Gowan

    2009-07-02

    The relationship between the intrinsic motion of gravity, light, and time is explored in terms of the principles of entropy, causality, energy, and symmetry conservation. A conceptual mechanism for gravity and the gravitational connection between quantum mechanics and relativity is explored. A "concept equation" is given for the gravitational annihilation of space and the extraction of a metrically equivalent temporal residue. The relationship of gravity to the other forces is discussed, including the reason for the weakness of gravity.

  11. Galaxy density profiles and shapes -- I. simulation pipeline for lensing by realistic galaxy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van de Ven, Glenn; Keeton, Charles R

    2008-01-01

    Studies of strong gravitational lensing in current and upcoming wide and deep photometric surveys, and of stellar kinematics from (integral-field) spectroscopy at increasing redshifts, promise to provide valuable constraints on galaxy density profiles and shapes, but only if we understand selection and modelling biases that affect both methods. To investigate the many different biases in a consistent way, we develop a flexible but efficient pipeline to simulate lensing by realistic galaxy models. We construct a variety of galaxy models with separate stellar and dark matter components that have a range of density profiles and shapes representative of early-type, central (non-satellite) galaxies. We use Fourier methods to calculate the lensing properties of galaxies with arbitrary surface density distributions, and Monte Carlo methods to compute lensing statistics such as point-source lensing cross-sections. Incorporating a variety of magnification bias modes lets us examine different survey strategies. We rigo...

  12. Lense-Thirring Field and the Solar Limb Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. I. Wanas; A. B. Morcos; S. I. El Gammal

    2010-08-05

    Solar-Limb Effect is an observational phenomena connected to the solar gravitational red-shift. It shows a variation of the magnitude of the gravitational red-shift from the center to the limb of the solar disc. In the present work an attempt, for interpreting this phenomena using a general relativistic red-shift formula, is given . This formula takes into account the effect of the the Sun's gravitational field, the effect of the solar rotation, the effect of inclination of the line of sight and the motion of the observer. In this study the gravitational field of the Sun is assumed to be given by Lense-Thirring field instead of the Schwarzschild one. The Earth is assumed to move along an elliptic orbit. Comparison with a previous relativistic study and with observation is given.

  13. Cosmological applications of weak gravitational flexion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Barnaby Thomas Peter

    Modern cosmology has reached an important juncture, at which the ability to make measurements of unprecedented accuracy has led to conclusions that are a fundamental challenge to natural science. The discovery that, in ...

  14. CMB ISW-lensing bispectrum from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Takahashi, Keitaro E-mail: sendouda@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

    2014-02-01

    We study the effect of weak lensing by cosmic (super-)strings on the higher-order statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A cosmic string segment is expected to cause weak lensing as well as an integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the so-called Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins (GKS) effect, to the CMB temperature fluctuation, which are thus naturally cross-correlated. We point out that, in the presence of such a correlation, yet another kind of the post-recombination CMB temperature bispectra, the ISW-lensing bispectra, will arise in the form of products of the auto- and cross-power spectra. We first present an analytic method to calculate the autocorrelation of the temperature fluctuations induced by the strings, and the cross-correlation between the temperature fluctuation and the lensing potential both due to the string network. In our formulation, the evolution of the string network is assumed to be characterized by the simple analytic model, the velocity-dependent one scale model, and the intercommutation probability is properly incorporated in order to characterize the possible superstringy nature. Furthermore, the obtained power spectra are dominated by the Poisson-distributed string segments, whose correlations are assumed to satisfy the simple relations. We then estimate the signal-to-noise ratios of the string-induced ISW-lensing bispectra and discuss the detectability of such CMB signals from the cosmic string network. It is found that in the case of the smaller string tension, G? << 10{sup -7}, the ISW-lensing bispectrum induced by a cosmic string network can constrain the string-model parameters even more tightly than the purely GKS-induced bispectrum in the ongoing and future CMB observations on small scales.

  15. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Bruno, D.; Binello, S.; Costanzo, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Hock, K.; Harvey, M.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Mi, C.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Pikin, A. I.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Samms, T.; Shrey, T. C.; Schoefer, V.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; White, S. M.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  16. Combining time delays and image positions for quadruple lenses: a moment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Time delays in gravitational lenses can be used to determine the Hubble constant and the lens potential. In future surveys, many gravitational lenses can be discovered, and their time delays and image positions can in principle be measured. Using an elliptical power-law potential, we show that combinations of image positions and time delays for quadruple lenses yield simple analytical expressions that are connected with observable quantities. These relations can be used to obtain the approximate axis ratio q, the Einstein radius and the slope. We apply this method to RX J1131-1231, and show that our analytical results match the full numerical determinations approximately. Our approach can quickly determine rough values of lens parameters, which can then be used as initial guesses for further refinement through numerical modelling and may be useful for automated lens search in large surveys.

  17. Five New High-Redshift Quasar Lenses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-08

    We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z > 2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z{sub s} = 2.237, lens redshift z{sub l} = 0.294, and image separation {theta} = 4.04 inch), SDSS J1254+2235 (z{sub s} = 3.626, {theta} = 1.56 inch), SDSS J1258+1657 (z{sub s} = 2.702, {theta} = 1.28 inch), SDSS J1339+1310 (z{sub s} = 2.243, {theta} = 1.69 cin), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z{sub s} = 3.317, {theta} = 1.74 inch). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z{sub l} = 0.4-0.6 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z{sub s} < 2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.

  18. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, C.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We also find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8? level with 20 arc min smoothing. Thesemore »measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. Finally, we summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.« less

  19. Relativistic images in Randall-Sundrum II braneworld lensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bin-Nun, Amitai Y.

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we explore the properties of gravitational lensing by black holes in the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld. We use numerical techniques to calculate lensing observables using the tidal Reissner-Nordstrom (TRN) and Garriga-Tanaka metrics to examine supermassive black holes and primordial black holes. We introduce a new way to parametrize tidal charge in the TRN metric which results in a large increase in image magnifications for braneworld primordial black holes compared to their 4-dimensional analogs. Finally, we offer a mathematical analysis that allows us to assess the validity of the logarithmic approximation of the bending angle for any static, spherically symmetric metric. We apply this to the TRN metric and show that it is valid for any amount of tidal charge.

  20. Gravitational `Convergence' and Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-12-01

    Two colour photometry of the cluster A1689 reveals a `relative magnification-bias' between lensed blue and red background galaxies, arising from a dependence of the faint galaxy count-slope on colour. The colour distribution is skewed blueward of the far field, allowing us to measure the cluster magnification and to understand the notorious blueness of large arcs. We show that the magnification information can be combined with the usual image distortion measurements to isolate the local `convergence' component of lensing and hence derive the projected mass. This is achieved through a simple local relation between the convergence and the observables, which can be applied generally over the surface a cluster. In the weak lensing limit, the convergence reduces to a dependence on the magnification alone, so that in the outskirts of clusters the surface-density of matter is obtained directly from the surface-density of background galaxies. Hence, useful lensing work requires colour information but not necessarily good seeing. Interestingly, convergence varies slowly at high redshift, saturating at a level depending on the Horizon distance, allowing a useful model-independent measurement of the Global Geometry.

  1. Observation and Confirmation of Six Strong Lensing Systems in The Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nord, B; Lin, H; Diehl, H T; Helsby, J; Kuropatkin, N; Amara, A; Collett, T; Allam, S; Caminha, G; De Bom, C; Desai, S; Dúmet-Montoya, H; Pereira, M Elidaiana da S; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Furlanetto, C; Gaitsch, H; Gill, M; Merritt, K W; More, A; Tucker, D; Rykoff, E S; Rozo, E; Abdalla, F B; Agnello, A; Auger, M; Brunner, R J; Kind, M Carrasco; Castander, F J; Cunha, C E; da Costa, L N; Foley, R; Gerdes, D W; Glazebrook, K; Gschwend, J; Hartley, W; Kessler, R; Lagattuta, D; Lewis, G; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Menanteau, F; Niernberg, A; Scolnic, D; Vieira, J D; Gramillano, R; Abbott, T M C; Banerji, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Carretero, J; D'Andrea, C B; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Evrard, A E; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Li, T S; Lima, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Melchior, P; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation and confirmation of the first group- and cluster-scale strong gravitational lensing systems found in Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. Through visual inspection of data from the Science Verification (SV) season, we identified 53 candidate systems. We then obtained spectroscopic follow-up of 21 candidates using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) at the Gemini South telescope and the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) at the Magellan/Baade telescope. With this follow-up, we confirmed six candidates as gravitational lenses: Three of the systems are newly discovered, and the remaining three were previously known. Of the 21 observed candidates, the remaining 15 were either not detected in spectroscopic observations, were observed and did not exhibit continuum emission (or spectral features), or were ruled out as lensing systems. The confirmed sample consists of one group-scale and five galaxy cluster-scale lenses. The lensed sources range in redshift z ~ 0.80-3.2...

  2. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Voyatzis; L. Vlahos; S. Ichtiaroglou; D. Papadopoulos

    2005-12-07

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  3. Gravitational energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Katz

    2005-10-20

    Observers at rest in a stationary spacetime flat at infinity can measure small amounts of rest-mass+internal energies+kinetic energies+pressure energy in a small volume of fluid attached to a local inertial frame. The sum of these small amounts is the total "matter energy" for those observers. The total mass-energy minus the matter energy is the binding gravitational energy. Misner, Thorne and Wheeler evaluated the gravitational energy of a spherically symmetric static spacetime. Here we show how to calculate gravitational energy in any static and stationary spacetime for isolated sources with a set of observers at rest. The result of MTW is recovered and we find that electromagnetic and gravitational 3-covariant energy densities in conformastatic spacetimes are of opposite signs. Various examples suggest that gravitational energy is negative in spacetimes with special symmetries or when the energy-momentum tensor satisfies usual energy conditions.

  4. The M31 pixel lensing plan campaign: MACHO lensing and self-lensing signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Bozza, V.; Bruni, I.; Gualandi, R.; Dall'Ora, M.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Nucita, A.; Strafella, F.; Dominik, M.; Jetzer, Ph.; Mancini, L.; Safonova, M.; Subramaniam, A.; Sereno, M.; Gould, A.; Collaboration: PLAN Collaboration

    2014-03-10

    We present the final analysis of the observational campaign carried out by the PLAN (Pixel Lensing Andromeda) collaboration to detect a dark matter signal in form of MACHOs through the microlensing effect. The campaign consists of about 1 month/year observations carried out over 4 years (2007-2010) at the 1.5 m Cassini telescope in Loiano (Astronomical Observatory of BOLOGNA, OAB) plus 10 days of data taken in 2010 at the 2 m Himalayan Chandra Telescope monitoring the central part of M31 (two fields of about 13' × 12.'6). We establish a fully automated pipeline for the search and the characterization of microlensing flux variations. As a result, we detect three microlensing candidates. We evaluate the expected signal through a full Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment completed by an analysis of the detection efficiency of our pipeline. We consider both 'self lensing' and 'MACHO lensing' lens populations, given by M31 stars and dark matter halo MACHOs, in M31 and the Milky Way, respectively. The total number of events is consistent with the expected self-lensing rate. Specifically, we evaluate an expected signal of about two self-lensing events. As for MACHO lensing, for full 0.5(10{sup –2}) M {sub ?} MACHO halos, our prediction is for about four (seven) events. The comparatively small number of expected MACHO versus self-lensing events, together with the small number statistics at our disposal, do not enable us to put strong constraints on that population. Rather, the hypothesis, suggested by a previous analysis, on the MACHO nature of OAB-07-N2, one of the microlensing candidates, translates into a sizeable lower limit for the halo mass fraction in form of the would-be MACHO population, f, of about 15% for 0.5 M {sub ?} MACHOs.

  5. Fresnel phase plates as reconfigurable microfluidic lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsikata, Sedina, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    In this study, Fresnel phase plates were tested as reconfigurable lenses. The lenses were constructed from a Fresnel pattern which was transferred to a silicon substrate via photolithography. A layer of PDMS was spin-coated ...

  6. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (United States) Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of...

  7. Discovery of Four Gravitationally Lensed Quasarsfrom the Sloan Digital Sky

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solidSwitchgrass|FeTe0.55Se0.45SciTech ConnectfromSurvey

  8. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decaysArticle) | SciTechworkSciTech Connect

  9. Monitoring lensed starlight emitted close to the Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adi Nusser; Tom Broadhurst

    2004-07-12

    We describe the feasibility of detecting the gravitational deflection of light emitted by stars moving under the influence of the massive object at the Galactic center. Light emitted by a star orbiting behind the central mass has a smaller impact parameter than the star itself, and suffers the effect of gravitational lensing, providing a closer probe of the central mass distribution and hence a stricter test of the black hole hypothesis. A mass of $4.3\\times 10^{6} M_{\\odot}$ causes a $0.1-2\\rm mas$ deviation in the apparent position of orbiting stars projected within $10^{\\circ}$ of the line of sight to the galactic center. In addtion, we may uniquely constrain the distance to the center of the galaxy because lensing deflections constrain the ratio $\\rg/R_{0}$ of the Schwarzschild radius to the distance to the black hole, $R_{o}$, whereas the ratio $\\rg/R_{o}^{3}$ is obtained by fitting the orbit.

  10. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune, E-mail: eabaltz@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: oguri@slac.stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, PO Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, PO Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  11. Gravitational Microlensing Events as a Target for SETI project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Detection of signals from a possible extrasolar technological civilization is one of the challenging efforts of science. In this work, we propose using natural telescopes made of single or binary gravitational lensing systems to magnify leakage of electromagnetic signals from a remote planet harbours an Extra Terrestrial Intelligent (ETI) technology. The gravitational microlensing surveys are monitoring a large area of Galactic bulge for searching microlensing events and each year they find more than $2000$ events. These lenses are capable of playing the role of natural telescopes and in some occasions they can magnify signals from planets orbiting around the source stars in the gravitational microlensing systems. Assuming that frequency of electromagnetic waves used for telecommunication in ETIs is similar to ours, we propose follow-up observation of microlensing events with radio telescopes such as Square Kilometre Array (SKA), Low Frequency Demonstrators (LFD) and Mileura Wide-Field Array (MWA). Amplifying...

  12. TANGENTIAL VELOCITY OF THE DARK MATTER IN THE BULLET CLUSTER FROM PRECISE LENSED IMAGE REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molnar, Sandor M. [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, Tom [Fisika Teorikoa, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, 644 Posta Kutxatila, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Zitrin, Adi [Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rephaeli, Yoel; Shimon, Meir, E-mail: sandor@phys.ntu.edu.tw [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2013-09-01

    We show that the fast-moving component of the ''Bullet Cluster'' (1E0657-56) can induce potentially resolvable redshift differences between multiply lensed images of background galaxies. This moving cluster effect, due to the tangential peculiar velocity of the lens, can be expressed as the scalar product of the lensing deflection angle with the tangential velocity of the mass components; the effect is maximal for clusters colliding in the plane of the sky with velocities boosted by their mutual gravity. The Bullet Cluster is likely to be the best candidate for the first measurement of this effect due to the large collision velocity and because the lensing deflection and the cluster fields can be calculated in advance. We derive the deflection field using multiply lensed background galaxies detected with the Hubble Space Telescope. The velocity field is modeled using self-consistent N-body/hydrodynamical simulations constrained by the observed X-ray and gravitational lensing features of this system. We predict that the triply lensed images of systems ''G'' and ''H'' straddling the critical curve of the bullet component will show the largest frequency shifts up to {approx}0.5 km s{sup -1}. These shifts are within the range of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array for molecular emission, and are near the resolution limit of the new generation high-throughput optical-IR spectrographs. The detection of this effect measures the tangential motion of the subclusters directly, thereby clarifying the tension with {Lambda}CDM, which is inferred from the gas motion less directly. This method may be extended to smaller redshift differences using the Ly{alpha} forest toward QSOs lensed by more typical clusters of galaxies. More generally, the tangential component of the peculiar velocities of clusters derived by our method complements the radial component determined by the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, providing a full three-dimensional description of velocities.

  13. Gravitational Microlensing of Fractal Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis

    2004-08-11

    Gravitational microlensing has proven to be a powerful tool in the study of quasars, providing some of the strongest limits on the scales of structure in the central engine. Typically sources are considered to be smoothly varying on some particular scale; such simple sources result in recognisable time scales in microlensing light curves from which the size of the source can be determined. Various emission processes, however, result in sources with a fractal appearance, possessing structure on a range of scales. Here, the gravitational microlensing of such fractal sources at the heart of quasars is considered. It is shown that the resulting light curves reflect the fractal nature of the sources, possessing pronounced structure at various scales, markedly different to the case with the random distribution of emission clouds that are typically considered. Hence, the determination of a characteristic scale of variability in a microlensing light curve may not necessarily reveal the size of the individual emission clouds, the key value that is required to determine the physical state of the emission region, rather it may correspond to a particular hierarchy in a fractal structure. Current X-ray satellites can detect such fractal structure via the monitoring of gravitationally lensed quasars during a microlensing event, providing a test of high energy emission processes in quasars.

  14. M31 Pixel Lensing PLAN Campaign: MACHO Lensing and Self Lensing Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novati, S Calchi; Bruni, I; Dall'Ora, M; De Paolis, F; Dominik, M; Gualandi, R; Ingrosso, G; Jetzer, Ph; Mancini, L; Nucita, A; Safonova, M; Scarpetta, G; Sereno, M; Strafella, F; Subramaniam, A; Gould, A

    2014-01-01

    We present the final analysis of the observational campaign carried out by the PLAN (Pixel Lensing Andromeda) collaboration to detect a dark matter signal in form of MACHOs through the microlensing effect. The campaign consists of about 1 month/year observations carried out during 4 years (2007-2010) at the 1.5m Cassini telescope in Loiano ("Astronomical Observatory of BOLOGNA", OAB) plus 10 days of data taken in 2010 at the 2m Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) monitoring the central part of M31 (two fields of about 13'x12.6'). We establish a fully automated pipeline for the search and the characterization of microlensing flux variations: as a result we detect 3 microlensing candidates. We evaluate the expected signal through a full Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment completed by an analysis of the detection efficiency of our pipeline. We consider both "self lensing" and "MACHO lensing" lens populations, given by M31 stars and dark matter halo MACHOs, in the M31 and the Milky Way (MW), respectively. The...

  15. Modified Entropic Gravitation in Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2011-08-19

    Verlinde recently developed a theoretical account of gravitation in terms of an entropic force. The central element in Verlinde's derivation is information and its relation with entropy through the holographic principle. The application of this approach to the case of superconductors requires to take into account that information associated with superconductor's quantum vacuum energy is not stored on Planck size surface elements, but in four volume cells with Planck-Einstein size. This has profound consequences on the type of gravitational force generated by the quantum vacuum condensate in superconductors, which is closely related with the cosmological repulsive acceleration responsible for the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Remarkably this new gravitational type force depends on the level of breaking of the weak equivalence principle for cooper pairs in a given superconducting material, which was previously derived by the author starting from similar principles. It is also shown that this new gravitational force can be interpreted as a surface force. The experimental detection of this new repulsive gravitational-type force appears to be challenging.

  16. CLASH: COMPLETE LENSING ANALYSIS OF THE LARGEST COSMIC LENS MACS J0717.5+3745 AND SURROUNDING STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medezinski, Elinor; Lemze, Doron; Ford, Holland [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Nonino, Mario [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Merten, Julian; Mroczkowski, Tony [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zitrin, Adi [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Broadhurst, Tom [Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Donahue, Megan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Sayers, Jack; Czakon, Nicole [Division of Physics, Math, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Waizmann, Jean-Claude; Meneghetti, Massimo [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universit'a di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Koekemoer, Anton; Coe, Dan; Postman, Marc [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Molino, Alberto [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Melchior, Peter [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Grillo, Claudio, E-mail: elinor@pha.jhu.edu [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Mariesvej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

    2013-11-01

    The galaxy cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 (z = 0.55) is the largest known cosmic lens, with complex internal structures seen in deep X-ray, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and dynamical observations. We perform a combined weak- and strong-lensing analysis with wide-field BVR{sub c} i'z' Subaru/Suprime-Cam observations and 16-band Hubble Space Telescope observations taken as part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. We find consistent weak distortion and magnification measurements of background galaxies and combine these signals to construct an optimally estimated radial mass profile of the cluster and its surrounding large-scale structure out to 5 Mpc h {sup –1}. We find consistency between strong-lensing and weak-lensing in the region where these independent data overlap, <500 kpc h {sup –1}. The two-dimensional weak-lensing map reveals a clear filamentary structure traced by distinct mass halos. We model the lensing shear field with nine halos, including the main cluster, corresponding to mass peaks detected above 2.5?{sub ?}. The total mass of the cluster as determined by the different methods is M{sub vir} ? (2.8 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 15} M{sub ?}. Although this is the most massive cluster known at z > 0.5, in terms of extreme value statistics, we conclude that the mass of MACS J0717.5+3745 by itself is not in serious tension with ?CDM, representing only a ?2? departure above the maximum simulated halo mass at this redshift.

  17. Plasma waves driven by gravitational waves in an expanding universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2002-05-22

    In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with zero spatial curvature, we consider the interaction of the gravitational waves with the plasma in the presence of a weak magnetic field. Using the relativistic hydromagnetic equations it is verified that large amplitude magnetosonic waves are excited, assuming that both, the gravitational field and the weak magnetic field do not break the homogeneity and isotropy of the considered FRW spacetime.

  18. Quasar Image Shifts due to Gravitational Microlensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis; Rodrigo A. Ibata

    1998-02-23

    Gravitational microlensing of quasars by stars in external galaxies can introduce fluctuations in the centroid of the ``point-like'' macro--images. The induced shifts are extremely small, on micro--arcsecond scales, below the limits of current optical observations. However, such shifts will become measurable with the proposed ``Space Interferometry'' mission, due to fly in 2005. The degree of the centroid shifts and their application as probes of both quasar structure and the stellar mass function in the lensing galaxy are discussed.

  19. Cosmography with cluster strong lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Gilmore; Priyamvada Natarajan

    2009-05-29

    By stacking an ensemble of strong lensing clusters, we demonstrate the feasibility of placing constraints on the dark energy equation of state. This is achieved by using multiple images of sources at two or more distinct redshift planes. The sample of smooth clusters in our simulations is based on observations of massive clusters and the distribution of background galaxies is constructed using the Hubble Deep Field. Our source distribution reproduces the observed redshift distribution of multiply imaged sources in Abell 1689. The cosmology recovery depends on the number of image families with known spectroscopic redshifts and the number of stacked clusters. Our simulations suggest that constraints comparable to those derived from other competing established techniques on a constant dark energy equation of state can be obtained using 10 to 40 clusters with 5 or more families of multiple images. We have also studied the observational errors in the image redshifts and positions. We find that spectroscopic redshifts and high resolution {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images are required to eliminate confidence contour relaxation relative to the ideal case in our simulations. This suggests that the dark energy equation of state, and other cosmological parameters, can be constrained with existing {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images of lensing clusters coupled with dedicated ground-based arc spectroscopy.

  20. Strongly lensed neutral hydrogen emission: detection predictions with current and future radio interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deane, R P; Heywood, I

    2015-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides some of the deepest views of the Universe, enabling studies of high-redshift galaxies only possible with next-generation facilities without the lensing phenomenon. To date, 21 cm radio emission from neutral hydrogen has only been detected directly out to z~0.2, limited by the sensitivity and instantaneous bandwidth of current radio telescopes. We discuss how current and future radio interferometers such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will detect lensed HI emission in individual galaxies at high redshift. Our calculations rely on a semi-analytic galaxy simulation with realistic HI disks (by size, density profile and rotation), in a cosmological context, combined with general relativistic ray tracing. Wide-field, blind HI surveys with the SKA are predicted to be efficient at discovering lensed HI systems, increasingly so at z > 2. This will be enabled by the combination of the magnification boosts, the steepness of the HI luminosity function at the high-mass end, and t...

  1. Weakly sufficient quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Lubnauer; Andrzej ?uczak; Hanna Pods?dkowska

    2009-11-23

    Some aspects of weak sufficiency of quantum statistics are investigated. In particular, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a weakly sufficient statistic for a given family of vector states, investigate the problem of its minimality, and find the relation between weak sufficiency and other notions of sufficiency employed so far.

  2. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab /SLAC /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  3. Spectroscopic Gravitational Lens Candidates in the CNOC2 Field Galaxy Redshift Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick B. Hall; H. K. C. Yee; Huan Lin; Simon L. Morris; Michael D. Gladders; R. G. Carlberg; David R. Patton; Marcin Sawicki; Charles W. Shepherd; Gregory D. Wirth

    2000-06-29

    We present five candidate gravitational lenses discovered spectroscopically in the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (CNOC2), along with one found in followup observations. Each has a secure redshift based on several features, plus a discrepant emission line which does not match any known or plausible feature and is visible in multiple direct spectral images. We identify these lines as Lyman-alpha or [OII] emission from galaxies lensed by, or projected onto, the CNOC2 target galaxies. Einstein radii estimated from the candidate deflector galaxy luminosities indicate that for two candidates the lines are probably [OII] from projected z3 galaxies. We estimate that only 1.9+-0.7 [OII]-emitting galaxies are expected to project onto target galaxies in the original CNOC2 sample, consistent with three or four of the six candidates being true gravitational lenses.

  4. Tailoring Strong Lensing Cosmographic Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    Strong lensing time delay cosmography has excellent complementarity with other dark energy probes, and will soon have abundant systems detected. We investigate two issues in the imaging and spectroscopic followup required to obtain the time delay distance. The first is optimization of spectroscopic resources. We develop a code to optimize the cosmological leverage under the constraint of constant spectroscopic time, and find that sculpting the lens system redshift distribution can deliver a 40% improvement in dark energy figure of merit. The second is the role of systematics, correlated between different quantities of a given system or model errors common to all systems. We show how the levels of different systematics affect the cosmological parameter estimation, and derive guidance for the fraction of double image vs quad image systems to follow as a function of differing systematics between them.

  5. Total Magnification and Magnification Centroid Due to Strongly Naked Singularity Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAndrea, Justin

    2015-01-01

    A strongly naked singularity (SNS) was modelled at the center of the Galaxy. This specific type of naked singularity was characterized in 2008 by Virbhadra and Keeton. The lens is described using the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric, which has an ordinary mass and massless scalar charge parameters. Gravitational lensing by the SNS gives rise to 4 images: 2 images on the same side as the source and 2 images on the opposite side of the source from the optic axis. We compute magnification centroid, magnification centroid shift, and total absolute magnification for many values of the angular source position. The nature of the curve for all three results are qualitatively similar to Schwarzschild black hole lenses, but quantitatively different. Magnification centroid increases as angular source position increases. As angular source position increases, magnification centroid shift increases to a maximum value, and then begins to decrease. As angular source position becomes large, magnification centroid shift will appro...

  6. Dark energy constraints from lensing-detected galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Marian; Gary M. Bernstein

    2006-05-31

    We study the ability of weak lensing surveys to detect galaxy clusters and constrain cosmological parameters, in particular the equation of state of dark energy. There are two major sources of noise for weak lensing cluster measurements: the ``shape noise'' from the intrinsic ellipticities of galaxies; and the large scale projection noise. We produce a filter for the shear field which optimizes the signal-to-noise of shape-noise-dominated shear measurements. Our Fisher-matrix analysis of this projected-mass observable makes use of the shape of this mass function, and takes into account the Poisson variance, sample variance, shape noise, and projected-mass noise, and also the fact that the conversion of the shear signal into mass is cosmology-dependent. The Fisher analysis is applied to both a nominal 15,000 square degree ground-based survey and a 1000 square degree space-based survey. Assuming a detection threshold of S/N=5, we find both experiments detect \\~20,000 clusters, and yield 1-sigma constraints of ~0.07 for w0 and ~0.2 for wa when combined with CMB data (for flat universe). The projection noise exceeds the shape noise only for clusters at z<=0.1 and has little effect on the derived dark-energy constraints. Sample variance does not significantly affect either survey. Finally, we note that all these results are extremely sensitive to the noise levels and detection thresholds that we impose. They can be significantly improved if we combine ground and space surveys as independent experiments and add their corresponding Fisher matrices.

  7. Electron lenses for particle collimation in LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, v.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Electron Lenses built and installed in Tevatron have proven themselves as safe and very reliable instruments which can be effectively used in hadron collider operation for a number of applications, including compensation of beam-beam effects [1], DC beam removal from abort gaps [2], as a diagnostic tool. In this presentation we - following original proposal [3] - consider in more detail a possibility of using electron lenses with hollow electron beam for ion and proton collimation in LHC.

  8. Electromagnetic radiation by gravitating bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwo Bialynicki-Birula; Zofia Bialynicka-Birula

    2008-05-06

    Gravitating bodies in motion, regardless of their constitution, always produce electromagnetic radiation in the form of photon pairs. This phenomenon is an analog of the radiation caused by the motion of dielectric (or magnetic) bodies. It is a member of a wide class of phenomena named dynamical Casimir effects, and it may be viewed as the squeezing of the electromagnetic vacuum. Production of photon pairs is a purely quantum-mechanical effect. Unfortunately, as we show, the emitted radiation is extremely weak as compared to radiation produced by other mechanisms.

  9. Weak Interaction | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weak Interaction February 22, 2011 Jefferson Lab has an accelerator designed to do incisive medium energy physics. This program is dominated by experiments aimed at developing our...

  10. A redshift survey of the strong-lensing cluster ABELL 383

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kurtz, Michael J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Coe, Dan [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rines, Kenneth J., E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it, E-mail: DCoe@STScI.edu, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Abell 383 is a famous rich cluster (z = 0.1887) imaged extensively as a basis for intensive strong- and weak-lensing studies. Nonetheless, there are few spectroscopic observations. We enable dynamical analyses by measuring 2360 new redshifts for galaxies with r {sub Petro} ? 20.5 and within 50' of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG; R.A.{sub 2000} = 42.°014125, decl.{sub 2000} = –03.°529228). We apply the caustic technique to identify 275 cluster members within 7 h {sup –1} Mpc of the hierarchical cluster center. The BCG lies within –11 ± 110 km s{sup –1} and 21 ± 56 h {sup –1} kpc of the hierarchical cluster center; the velocity dispersion profile of the BCG appears to be an extension of the velocity dispersion profile based on cluster members. The distribution of cluster members on the sky corresponds impressively with the weak-lensing contours of Okabe et al. especially when the impact of foreground and background structure is included. The values of R {sub 200} = 1.22 ± 0.01 h {sup –1} Mpc and M {sub 200} = (5.07 ± 0.09) × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ?} obtained by application of the caustic technique agree well with recent completely independent lensing measures. The caustic estimate extends direct measurement of the cluster mass profile to a radius of ?5 h {sup –1} Mpc.

  11. Gravitational lens modelling in a citizen science context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Küng, Rafael; More, Anupreeta; Baeten, Elisabeth; Coles, Jonathan; Cornen, Claude; Macmillan, Christine; Marshall, Phil; More, Surhud; Odermatt, Jonas; Verma, Aprajita; Wilcox, Julianne K

    2015-01-01

    We develop a method to enable collaborative modelling of gravitational lenses and lens candidates, that could be used by non-professional lens enthusiasts. It uses an existing free-form modelling program (glass), but enables the input to this code to be provided in a novel way, via a user-generated diagram that is essentially a sketch of an arrival-time surface. We report on an implementation of this method, SpaghettiLens, which has been tested in a modelling challenge using 29 simulated lenses drawn from a larger set created for the Space Warps citizen science strong lens search. We find that volunteers from this online community asserted the image parities and time ordering consistently in some lenses, but made errors in other lenses depending on the image morphology. While errors in image parity and time ordering lead to large errors in the mass distribution, the enclosed mass was found to be more robust: the model-derived Einstein radii found by the volunteers were consistent with those produced by one of...

  12. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  13. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more »This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  14. The effects of structure anisotropy on lensing observables in an exact general relativistic setting for precision cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troxel, M. A.; Ishak, Mustapha; Peel, Austin, E-mail: troxel@utdallas.edu, E-mail: mishak@utdallas.edu, E-mail: austin.peel@utdallas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The study of relativistic, higher order, and nonlinear effects has become necessary in recent years in the pursuit of precision cosmology. We develop and apply here a framework to study gravitational lensing in exact models in general relativity that are not restricted to homogeneity and isotropy, and where full nonlinearity and relativistic effects are thus naturally included. We apply the framework to a specific, anisotropic galaxy cluster model which is based on a modified NFW halo density profile and described by the Szekeres metric. We examine the effects of increasing levels of anisotropy in the galaxy cluster on lensing observables like the convergence and shear for various lensing geometries, finding a strong nonlinear response in both the convergence and shear for rays passing through anisotropic regions of the cluster. Deviation from the expected values in a spherically symmetric structure are asymmetric with respect to path direction and thus will persist as a statistical effect when averaged over some ensemble of such clusters. The resulting relative difference in various geometries can be as large as approximately 2%, 8%, and 24% in the measure of convergence (1??) for levels of anisotropy of 5%, 10%, and 15%, respectively, as a fraction of total cluster mass. For the total magnitude of shear, the relative difference can grow near the center of the structure to be as large as 15%, 32%, and 44% for the same levels of anisotropy, averaged over the two extreme geometries. The convergence is impacted most strongly for rays which pass in directions along the axis of maximum dipole anisotropy in the structure, while the shear is most strongly impacted for rays which pass in directions orthogonal to this axis, as expected. The rich features found in the lensing signal due to anisotropic substructure are nearly entirely lost when one treats the cluster in the traditional FLRW lensing framework. These effects due to anisotropic structures are thus likely to impact lensing measurements and must be fully examined in an era of precision cosmology.

  15. Gravity Wave Lensing Ryan Elandt, Mostafa Shakeri & Reza Alam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    Gravity Wave Lensing Ryan Elandt, Mostafa Shakeri & Reza Alam Department of Mechanical Engineering waves caused by small seabed features (the so called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely

  16. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    General relativity (GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton's theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This is the first confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without additional assumption...

  17. Arm Weakness and Deformity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galer, Meghan; Heiner, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Figure. Appearance of the patient’s affected right arm andnormal left arm. Volume XV, NO . 4 : July 2014 WesternI n E mergency M edicine Arm Weakness and Deformity Meghan

  18. Handbook for the GREAT08 Challenge: An image analysis competition for cosmological lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah Bridle; John Shawe-Taylor; Adam Amara; Douglas Applegate; Sreekumar T. Balan; Joel Berge; Gary Bernstein; Hakon Dahle; Thomas Erben; Mandeep Gill; Alan Heavens; Catherine Heymans; F. William High; Henk Hoekstra; Mike Jarvis; Donnacha Kirk; Thomas Kitching; Jean-Paul Kneib; Konrad Kuijken; David Lagatutta; Rachel Mandelbaum; Richard Massey; Yannick Mellier; Baback Moghaddam; Yassir Moudden; Reiko Nakajima; Stephane Paulin-Henriksson; Sandrine Pires; Anais Rassat; Alexandre Refregier; Jason Rhodes; Tim Schrabback; Elisabetta Semboloni; Marina Shmakova; Ludovic van Waerbeke; Dugan Witherick; Lisa Voigt; David Wittman

    2009-06-15

    The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2008 (GREAT08) Challenge focuses on a problem that is of crucial importance for future observations in cosmology. The shapes of distant galaxies can be used to determine the properties of dark energy and the nature of gravity, because light from those galaxies is bent by gravity from the intervening dark matter. The observed galaxy images appear distorted, although only slightly, and their shapes must be precisely disentangled from the effects of pixelisation, convolution and noise. The worldwide gravitational lensing community has made significant progress in techniques to measure these distortions via the Shear TEsting Program (STEP). Via STEP, we have run challenges within our own community, and come to recognise that this particular image analysis problem is ideally matched to experts in statistical inference, inverse problems and computational learning. Thus, in order to continue the progress seen in recent years, we are seeking an infusion of new ideas from these communities. This document details the GREAT08 Challenge for potential participants. Please visit http://www.great08challenge.info for the latest information.

  19. Gamma Ray Fresnel lenses - why not?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. K. Skinner

    2006-02-03

    Fresnel lenses offer the possibility of concentrating the flux of X-rays or gamma-rays flux falling on a geometric area of many square metres onto a focal point which need only be a millimetre or so in diameter (and which may even be very much smaller). They can do so with an efficiency that can approach 100%, and yet they are easily fabricated and have no special alignment requirements. Fresnel lenses can offer diffraction-limited angular resolution, even in a domain where that limit corresponds to less than a micro second of arc. Given all these highly desirable attributes, it is natural to ask why Fresnel gamma ray lenses are not already being used, or at least why there is not yet any mission that plans to use the technology. Possible reasons (apart from the obvious one that nobody thought of doing so) include the narrow bandwidth of simple Fresnel lenses, their very long focal length, and the problems of target finding. It is argued that none of these is a "show stopper" and that this technique should be seriously considered for nuclear astrophysics.

  20. Inverse Square Law of Gravitation in (2+1)-Dimensional Space-Time as a Consequence of Casimir Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. H. Soleng

    1993-10-04

    The gravitational effect of vacuum polarization in space exterior to a particle in (2+1)-dimensional Einstein theory is investigated. In the weak field limit this gravitational field corresponds to an inverse square law of gravitational attraction, even though the gravitational mass of the quantum vacuum is negative. The paradox is resolved by considering a particle of finite extension and taking into account the vacuum polarization in its interior.

  1. The Gravitational Bohr Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Oldershaw

    2008-03-08

    The gravitational Bohr radius (GBR) characterizes the size of a hypothetical ground state hydrogen atom wherein the binding interaction between its nucleus and its electronic structure is purely gravitational. The conventional calculation of the GBR, based on the standard Newtonian gravitational coupling constant, yields an astronomical size for the "gravitational atom". On the other hand, a discrete fractal cosmological paradigm asserts that the gravitational coupling constant that applies within Atomic Scale systems is roughly 38 orders of magnitude larger than the conventional gravitational constant. According to calculations based on predictions of this discrete fractal paradigm, the value of the GBR is actually on the order of 2 pi times the standard Bohr radius. Implications of this revised gravitational Bohr radius are discussed.

  2. Matter effects on neutrino oscillations in gravitational and magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Athar; Jose F. Nieves

    2000-01-10

    When neutrinos propagate in a background, their gravitational couplings are modified by their weak interactions with the particles in the background. In a medium that contains electrons but no muons or taons, the matter-induced gravitational couplings of neutrinos are different for the various neutrino flavors, and they must be taken into account in describing the phenomena associated with the neutrino oscillations in the presence of strong gravitational fields. Here we incorporate those couplings in that description, including also the effects of a magnetic field, and consider the implications that they have for the emission of high energy neutrinos in the vicinity of Active Galactic Nuclei.

  3. A Gravitational Lens Solution for IRAS F10214+4724

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst; Joseph Lehar

    1995-05-03

    We show that the high redshift IRAS source F10214 is highly magnified by the gravitational field of an intervening elliptical galaxy, accounting for its many anomalous properties. Detailed radio and near-IR images identify the IRAS source with a symmetric arc, centered on a red object, or lensing galaxy. To explain the observed structures, the center of the source must much more highly magnified than its outer regions. Lensing predicts a small counterimage to the arc, which we find adjacent to the lensing galaxy. A red component in the observed spectrum suggests a lens redshift of unity, and the lens model yields a mass estimate of $M(r<3kpc)\\approx10^{11}{M_solar}$, consistent with an ordinary elliptical galaxy. We present new high-resolution optical images which show a thin arc of emission, implying an intrinsically small source ($<0.5kpc$) which is highly magnified ($\\sim20\\times$). Since the optical is strongly polarized with a Seyfert~II spectrum, we propose that the optical arc is magnified image of the inner region of an obscured AGN. The obscuring ``torus'' will be similarly magnified, naturally accounting for the large IR flux. We show that finding objects like F10214+4724 in redshift surveys is probable, given the level of magnification bias expected for compact luminous IRAS sources. Such cases represent the obscured AGN counterparts to the lensed QSO population and, because of their extended sizes, are useful in determining the mass distribution in the lensing galaxies.

  4. Velocity Effects on the Deflection of Light by Gravitational Microlenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Heyrovsky

    2004-10-07

    We study the influence of general lens and source velocities on the gravitational deflection of light by single and two-point-mass microlenses with general axis orientation. We demonstrate that in all cases the lens equation preserves its form exactly. However, its parameters -- the Einstein radius and the binary-lens separation -- are influenced by the lens velocity. In Galactic microlensing settings the velocity mainly affects the inferred separation for wide binary-star or star+planet microlenses oriented close to the line of sight. We briefly discuss the case of lenses moving with highly relativistic velocities.

  5. The Gravitational Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fran De Aquino

    2013-12-03

    There is an electromagnetic factor of correlation between gravitational mass and inertial mass, which in specific electromagnetic conditions, can be reduced, made negative and increased in numerical value. This means that gravitational forces can be reduced, inverted and intensified by means of electromagnetic fields. Such control of the gravitational interaction can have a lot of practical applications. For example, a new concept of spacecraft and aerospace flight arises from the possibility of the electromagnetic control of the gravitational mass. The novel spacecraft called Gravitational Spacecraft possibly will change the paradigm of space flight and transportation in general. Here, its operation principles and flight possibilities, it will be described. Also it will be shown that other devices based on gravity control, such as the Gravitational Motor and the Quantum Transceivers, can be used in the spacecraft, respectively, for Energy Generation and Telecommunications.

  6. Tomography of lensing cross power spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takada; Martin White

    2004-09-14

    By obtaining photometric redshift information, tomography allows us to cross-correlate galaxy ellipticities in different source redshift bins. The cross-correlation is non-vanishing because the different bins share much of the foreground mass distribution from which, over Gpc scales, the lensing signal is built. If the redshift bins are thick enough however, the cross-correlations are insensitive to contamination from the intrinsic alignments of galaxies since these fall off rapidly on scales larger than a few tens of Mpc. We forecast how lensing tomography using only the cross-power spectra can constrain cosmological parameters compared to tomography including the auto-spectra. It is shown that the parameter errors are degraded by only O(10%) for 5 or more source redshift bins. Thus, the cross-power spectrum tomography can be a simple, model-independent means of reducing the intrinsic alignment contamination while retaining most of the constraints on cosmology.

  7. Gravitation and electromagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Dmitriyev

    2002-07-23

    Maxwell's equations comprise both electromagnetic and gravitational fields. The transverse part of the vector potential belongs to magnetism, the longitudinal one is concerned with gravitation. The Coulomb gauge indicates that longitudinal components of the fields propagate instantaneously. The delta-function singularity of the field of the divergence of the vector potential, referred to as the dilatation center, represents an elementary agent of gravitation. Viewing a particle as a source or a scattering center of the point dilatation, the Newton's gravitation law can be reproduced.

  8. Automation Enhancement of Multilayer Laue Lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauer K. R.; Conley R.

    2010-12-01

    X-ray optics fabrication at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been facilitated by a new, state of the art magnetron sputtering physical deposition system. With its nine magnetron sputtering cathodes and substrate carrier that moves on a linear rail via a UHV brushless linear servo motor, the system is capable of accurately depositing the many thousands of layers necessary for multilayer Laue lenses. I have engineered a versatile and automated control program from scratch for the base system and many subsystems. Its main features include a custom scripting language, a fully customizable graphical user interface, wireless and remote control, and a terminal-based interface. This control system has already been successfully used in the creation of many types of x-ray optics, including several thousand layer multilayer Laue lenses.Before reaching the point at which a deposition can be run, stencil-like masks for the sputtering cathodes must be created to ensure the proper distribution of sputtered atoms. Quality of multilayer Laue lenses can also be difficult to measure, given the size of the thin film layers. I employ my knowledge of software and algorithms to further ease these previously painstaking processes with custom programs. Additionally, I will give an overview of an x-ray optic simulator package I helped develop during the summer of 2010. In the interest of keeping my software free and open, I have worked mostly with the multiplatform Python and the PyQt application framework, utilizing C and C++ where necessary.

  9. Gravitational wave astronomy - astronomy of the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Dhurandhar

    2011-04-15

    An enigmatic prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity is gravitational waves. With the observed decay in the orbit of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar agreeing within a fraction of a percent with the theoretically computed decay from Einstein's theory, the existence of gravitational waves was firmly established. Currently there is a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves with interferometric gravitational wave observatories or detectors and several such detectors have been built or being built. The initial detectors have reached their design sensitivities and now the effort is on to construct advanced detectors which are expected to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. The era of gravitational wave astronomy has arrived. This article describes the worldwide effort which includes the effort on the Indian front - the IndIGO project -, the principle underlying interferometric detectors both on ground and in space, the principal noise sources that plague such detectors, the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves that one expects to detect by these detectors and some glimpse of the data analysis methods involved in extracting the very weak gravitational wave signals from detector noise.

  10. Torsion-balance tests of the weak equivalence principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Wagner; S. Schlamminger; J. H. Gundlach; E. G. Adelberger

    2012-07-10

    We briefly summarize motivations for testing the weak equivalence principle and then review recent torsion-balance results that compare the differential accelerations of beryllium-aluminum and beryllium-titanium test body pairs with precisions at the part in $10^{13}$ level. We discuss some implications of these results for the gravitational properties of antimatter and dark matter, and speculate about the prospects for further improvements in experimental sensitivity.

  11. On possible use of electron lenses in LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    We present basic facts about electron lenses used in high-energy accelerators and discuss their possible application in the LHC. Four proposals are presented: (a) electron lenses for compensation of head-on beam-beam effects; (b) electron lens as tune-spreader for better beam stability; (c) as electromagnetic primary collimator for ions and protons; (d) satellite bunch cleaning by electron lenses. Main requirements are discussed.

  12. Impact of magnification and size bias on the weak lensing power...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Name: Physical Review D; Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 2 Research Org: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Sponsoring Org: USDOE SC OFFICE OF SCIENCE (SC) Country of...

  13. Impact of magnification and size bias on the weak lensing power spectrum

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article) |SciTechphysicalNH3 Over Cu-zeoliteand peak

  14. Electromagnetism and Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth Dalton

    1997-03-10

    The classical concept of "mass density" is not fundamental to the quantum theory of matter. Therefore, mass density cannot be the source of gravitation. Here, we treat electromagnetic energy, momentum, and stress as its source. The resulting theory predicts that the gravitational potential near any charged elementary particle is many orders of magnitude greater than the Newtonian value.

  15. Gravitational Field Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Barnett

    2014-12-05

    We present a tensorial relative of the familiar affine connection and argue that it should be regarded as the gravitational field tensor. Remarkably, the Lagrangian density expressed in terms of this tensor has a simple form, which depends only on the metric and its first derivatives and, moreover, is a true scalar quantity. The geodesic equation, moreover, shows that our tensor plays a role that is strongly reminiscent of the gravitational field in Newtonian mechanics and this, together with other evidence, which we present, leads us to identify it as the gravitational field tensor. We calculate the gravitational field tensor for the Schwarzschild metric. We suggest some of the advantages to be gained from applying our tensor to the study of gravitational waves.

  16. Improving LLR Tests of Gravitational Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Thomas W. Murphy Jr

    2003-11-07

    Accurate analysis of precision ranges to the Moon has provided several tests of gravitational theory including the Equivalence Principle, geodetic precession, parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters $\\gamma$ and $\\beta$, and the constancy of the gravitational constant {\\it G}. Since the beginning of the experiment in 1969, the uncertainties of these tests have decreased considerably as data accuracies have improved and data time span has lengthened. We are exploring the modeling improvements necessary to proceed from cm to mm range accuracies enabled by the new Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO) currently under development in New Mexico. This facility will be able to make a significant contribution to the solar system tests of fundamental and gravitational physics. In particular, the Weak and Strong Equivalence Principle tests would have a sensitivity approaching 10$^{-14}$, yielding sensitivity for the SEP violation parameter $\\eta$ of $\\sim 3\\times 10^{-5}$, $v^2/c^2$ general relativistic effects would be tested to better than 0.1%, and measurements of the relative change in the gravitational constant, $\\dot{G}/G$, would be $\\sim0.1$% the inverse age of the universe. Having this expected accuracy in mind, we discusses the current techniques, methods and existing physical models used to process the LLR data. We also identify the challenges for modeling and data analysis that the LLR community faces today in order to take full advantage of the new APOLLO ranging station.

  17. Semiclassical and Effective Theories of Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo Paszko

    2008-01-15

    First and second order corrections for the scattering of different types of particles by a weak gravitational field, treated as an external field, are calculated. These computations indicate a violation of the Equivalence Principle: to first order, the cross-sections are spin dependent; if the calculations are pushed to the next order, they become dependent upon energy as well. Interesting enough, the aforementioned results are equivalent to those obtained by means of the so-called Effective Theory of Gravitation, in the limit in which one of the masses is much greater than all the other energies involved. We discuss also some applications of our research, such as the determination of an upper bound for the photon mass, and the possible detection, in the foreseeable future, of these violations of the Equivalence Principle.

  18. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-10-07

    The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP), is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, $m$, and gravitational, $m_g$, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no proof for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear -- current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits $-65 solar gravitational potential. Our result clearly rules out the speculated antigravity. By considering the absolute potential of the Local Supercluster (LS), we also predict the bounds $1 - 4\\times 10^{-7} < m_g/m < 1 + 2\\times 10^{-7}$ for an electron and positron. Finally, we comment on a possibility of performing complementary tests at the future International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC).

  19. Dust emission from the lensed Lyman break galaxy cB58

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, A J; Genzel, R; Tacconi, L J; Lehnert, M D

    2001-01-01

    We detect 1.2mm continuum emission from dust in the gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxy MS 1512+36-cB58. Our detected flux is surprisingly low: relative to local starburst galaxies, cB58 appears to produce somewhat less far-IR emission than its UV reddening predicts. After comparing several different estimates of the source's dust content, we conclude that the apparent discrepancy is most likely related to uncertainty in its UV spectral slope. Alternate scenarios to account for a far-IR "deficit" which rely on a high dust temperature or differential magnification are less satisfactory. Our result underscores one of the risks inherent in characterizing the cosmic star formation history from rest-UV data alone.

  20. Total Magnification and Magnification Centroid Due to Strongly Naked Singularity Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin DeAndrea; Shreya Patel

    2015-08-16

    A strongly naked singularity (SNS) was modelled at the center of the Galaxy. This specific type of naked singularity was characterized in 2008 by Virbhadra and Keeton. The lens is described using the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric, which has an ordinary mass and massless scalar charge parameters. Gravitational lensing by the SNS gives rise to 4 images: 2 images on the same side as the source and 2 images on the opposite side of the source from the optic axis. We compute magnification centroid, magnification centroid shift, and total absolute magnification for many values of the angular source position. The nature of the curve for all three results are qualitatively similar to Schwarzschild black hole lenses, but quantitatively different. Magnification centroid increases as angular source position increases. As angular source position increases, magnification centroid shift increases to a maximum value, and then begins to decrease. As angular source position becomes large, magnification centroid shift will approach zero. Total magnification is large for small values of angular source position, and decreases to a limiting value of one. The results expand upon previous work on an SNS of {\

  1. ALMA Observations of SPT-Discovered, Strongly Lensed, Dusty, Star-Forming Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hezaveh, Y D; Fassnacht, C D; Spilker, J S; Vieira, J D; Aguirre, J E; Aird, K A; Aravena, M; Ashby, M L N; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bothwell, M; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chapman, S C; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; De Breuck, C; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Fomalont, E B; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Greve, T R; Halverson, N W; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Husband, K; Hunter, T R; Keisler, R; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Malkan, M; McIntyre, V; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L M; Murphy, E J; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Sharon, K; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Vanderlinde, K; Weiß, A; Welikala, N; Williamson, R

    2013-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 860 micrometer imaging of four high-redshift (z=2.8-5.7) dusty sources that were detected using the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at 1.4 mm and are not seen in existing radio to far-infrared catalogs. At 1.5 arcsec resolution, the ALMA data reveal multiple images of each submillimeter source, separated by 1-3 arcsec, consistent with strong lensing by intervening galaxies visible in near-IR imaging of these sources. We describe a gravitational lens modeling procedure that operates on the measured visibilities and incorporates self-calibration-like antenna phase corrections as part of the model optimization, which we use to interpret the source structure. Lens models indicate that SPT0346-52, located at z=5.7, is one of the most luminous and intensely star-forming sources in the universe with a lensing corrected FIR luminosity of 3.7 X 10^13 L_sun and star formation surface density of 4200 M_sun yr^-1 kpc^-2. We find magnification factors of 5 to 22, w...

  2. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  3. Construction progress of the RHIC electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer W.; Altinbas, Z.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; et al

    2012-05-20

    In polarized proton operation the RHIC performance is limited by the head-on beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation two electron lenses are under construction. We give an overview of the construction progress. Guns, collectors and the warm electron beam transport solenoids with their power supplies have been constructed. The superconducting solenoids that guide the electron beam during the interaction with the proton beam are near completion. A test stand has been set up to verify the performance of the gun, collector and some of the instrumentation. The infrastructure is being prepared for installation, and simulations continue to optimize the performance.

  4. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-07-09

    The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP), is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, $m$, and gravitational, $m_g$, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no proof for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear -- current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits $-65 International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC).

  5. The theory of stochastic cosmological lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Fleury; Julien Larena; Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2015-08-28

    On the scale of the light beams subtended by small sources, e.g. supernovae, matter cannot be accurately described as a fluid, which questions the applicability of standard cosmic lensing to those cases. In this article, we propose a new formalism to deal with small-scale lensing as a diffusion process: the Sachs and Jacobi equations governing the propagation of narrow light beams are treated as Langevin equations. We derive the associated Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equations, and use them to deduce general analytical results on the mean and dispersion of the angular distance. This formalism is applied to random Einstein-Straus Swiss-cheese models, allowing us to: (1) show an explicit example of the involved calculations; (2) check the validity of the method against both ray-tracing simulations and direct numerical integrations of the Langevin equation. As a byproduct, we obtain a post-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder approximation, accounting for the effect of tidal distortions on the angular distance, in excellent agreement with numerical results. Besides, the dispersion of the angular distance is correctly reproduced in some regimes.

  6. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  7. The theory of stochastic cosmological lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleury, Pierre; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    On the scale of the light beams subtended by small sources, e.g. supernovae, matter cannot be accurately described as a fluid, which questions the applicability of standard cosmic lensing to those cases. In this article, we propose a new formalism to deal with small-scale lensing as a diffusion process: the Sachs and Jacobi equations governing the propagation of narrow light beams are treated as Langevin equations. We derive the associated Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equations, and use them to deduce general analytical results on the mean and dispersion of the angular distance. This formalism is applied to random Einstein-Straus Swiss-cheese models, allowing us to: (1) show an explicit example of the involved calculations; (2) check the validity of the method against both ray-tracing simulations and direct numerical integrations of the Langevin equation. As a byproduct, we obtain a post-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder approximation, accounting for the effect of tidal distortions on the angular distance, in excellent agree...

  8. Gravitational Waves on Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2004-03-12

    We consider a gravitational wave of arbitrary frequency incident on a normal or a super-conductor. The gravitationally induced fields inside the conductor are derived. The outward propagating EM waves are calculated for a low frequency wave on a small sphere and for a high frequency wave incident on a large disk. We estimate for both targets the GW to EM conversion efficiencies and also the magnitude of the superconductor's phase perturbation.

  9. Analytic Expression of the Genus in Weakly Non-Gaussian Field Induced by Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Matsubara

    1994-05-16

    The gravitational evolution of the genus of the density field in large-scale structure is analytically studied in a weakly nonlinear regime using second-order perturbation theory. Weakly nonlinear evolution produces asymmetry in the symmetric genus curve for Gaussian initial density field. The effect of smoothing the density field in perturbation theory on the genus curve is also evaluated and gives the dependence of the asymmetry of the genus curve on spectra of initial fluctuations.

  10. Modeling a nonperturbative spinor vacuum interacting with a strong gravitational wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Dzhunushaliev; Vladimir Folomeev

    2015-03-15

    We consider the propagation of strong gravitational waves interacting with a nonperturbative vacuum of spinor fields. To described the latter, we suggest an approximate model. The corresponding Einstein equation has the form of the Schr\\"odinger equation. Its gravitational-wave solution is analogous to the solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for an electron moving in a periodic potential. The general solution for the periodic gravitational waves is found. The analog of the Kronig-Penney model for gravitational waves is considered. It is shown that the suggested gravitational-wave model permits the existence of weak electric charge and current densities concomitant with the gravitational wave. Based on this observation, a possible experimental verification of the model is suggested.

  11. THE FAINTEST RADIO SOURCE YET: EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL LENS SDSS J1004+4112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, N.

    2011-09-20

    We present new radio observations of the large-separation gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1004+4112, taken in a total of 6 hr of observations with the Expanded Very Large Array. The maps reach a thermal noise level of approximately 4 {mu}Jy. We detect four of the five lensed images at the 15-35 {mu}Jy level, representing a source of intrinsic flux density, after allowing for lensing magnification, of about 1 {mu}Jy, intrinsically probably the faintest radio source yet detected. This reinforces the utility of gravitational lensing in potentially allowing us to study nJy-level sources before the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. In an optical observation taken three months after the radio observation, image C is the brightest image, whereas the radio map shows flux density ratios consistent with previous optical observations. Future observations separated by a time delay will give the intrinsic flux ratios of the images in this source.

  12. Contamination of early-type galaxy alignments to galaxy lensing-CMB lensing cross-correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisari, Nora Elisa; Miller, Lance; Allison, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy shapes are subject to distortions due to the tidal field of the Universe. The cross-correlation of galaxy lensing with the lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) cannot easily be separated from the cross-correlation of galaxy intrinsic shapes with CMB lensing. Previous work suggested that the intrinsic alignment contamination can be $15\\%$ of this cross-spectrum for the CFHT Stripe 82 (CS82) and Atacama Cosmology Telescope surveys. Here we re-examine these estimates using up-to-date observational constraints of intrinsic alignments at a redshift more similar to that of CS82 galaxies. We find a $\\approx$ $10\\%$ contamination of the cross-spectrum from red galaxies, with $\\approx$ $3\\%$ uncertainty due to uncertainties in the redshift distribution of source galaxies and the modelling of the spectral energy distribution. Blue galaxies are consistent with being unaligned, but could contaminate the cross-spectrum by an additional $9.5\\%$ within current $95\\%$ confidence levels. While our fiducial ...

  13. A millimeter-wave antireflection coating for cryogenic silicon lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Lau; J. W. Fowler; T. A. Marriage; L. Page; J. Leong; E. Wishnow; R. Henry; E. Wollck; M. Halpern; D. Marsden; G. Marsden

    2007-01-04

    We have developed and tested an antireflection (AR) coating method for silicon lenses at cryogenic temperatures and millimeter wavelengths. Our particular application is a measurement of the cosmic microwave background. The coating consists of machined pieces of Cirlex glued to the silicon. The measured reflection from an AR coated flat piece is less than 1.5% at the design wavelength. The coating has been applied to flats and lenses and has survived multiple thermal cycles from 300 to 4 K. We present the manufacturing method, the material properties, the tests performed, and estimates of the loss that can be achieved in practical lenses.

  14. A Universe Without Weak Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-01-01

    stars in the Weakless Universe begin fusion by the fastof obtaining a habitable universe. Acknowledgments We11795, hep-ph/0604027 A Universe Without Weak Interactions

  15. Gravitational-wave cosmology across 29 decades in frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul D. Lasky; Chiara M. F. Mingarelli; Tristan L. Smith; John T. Giblin Jr.; Eric Thrane; Daniel J. Reardon; Robert Caldwell; Matthew Bailes; N. D. Ramesh Bhat; Sarah Burke-Spolaor; William Coles; Shi Dai; James Dempsey; George Hobbs; Matthew Kerr; Yuri Levin; Richard N. Manchester; Stefan Os?owski; Vikram Ravi; Pablo A. Rosado; Ryan M. Shannon; Renée Spiewak; Willem van Straten; Lawrence Toomey; Jingbo Wang; Linqing Wen; Xiaopeng You; Xingjiang Zhu

    2015-11-18

    Quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field in the early Universe, amplified by inflation, produce a primordial gravitational-wave background across a broad frequency band. We derive constraints on the spectrum of this gravitational radiation, and hence on theories of the early Universe, by combining experiments that cover 29 orders of magnitude in frequency. These include Planck observations of cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization power spectra and lensing, together with baryon acoustic oscillations and big bang nucleosynthesis measurements, as well as new pulsar timing array and ground-based interferometer limits. While individual experiments constrain the gravitational-wave energy density in specific frequency bands, the combination of experiments allows us to constrain cosmological parameters, including the inflationary spectral index, $n_t$, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$. Results from individual experiments include the most stringent nanohertz limit of the primordial background to date from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, $\\Omega_{\\rm gw}(f)<2.3\\times10^{-10}$. Observations of the cosmic microwave background alone limit the gravitational-wave spectral index at 95\\% confidence to $n_t\\lesssim5$ for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of $r = 0.11$. However, the combination of all the above experiments limits $n_t<0.36$. Future Advanced LIGO observations are expected to further constrain $n_t<0.34$ by 2020. When cosmic microwave background experiments detect a non-zero $r$, our results will imply even more stringent constraints on $n_t$ and hence theories of the early Universe.

  16. Limits on weak magnetic confinement of neutral atoms C. A. Sackett*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackett, Cass

    Limits on weak magnetic confinement of neutral atoms C. A. Sackett* Physics Department, University It is shown that when a magnetic field is used to support neutral atoms against the gravitational force mg, the total curvature of the field magnitude B must be larger than m2 g2 / 2 2 B , where is the magnetic

  17. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    y Tecnol´ ogicas (CIEMAT), Madrid, Spain 40 Instituto de F´Cruz, University of Cambridge, CIEMAT-Madrid, University of

  18. Cosmology of gravitational vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Burdyuzha; G. Vereshkov; J. Pacheco

    2007-12-29

    Production of gravitational vacuum defects and their contribution to the energy density of our Universe are discussed. These topological microstructures (defects) could be produced in the result of creation of the Universe from "nothing" when a gravitational vacuum condensate has appeared. They must be isotropically distributed over the isotropic expanding Universe. After Universe inflation these microdefects are smoothed, stretched and broken up. A part of them could survive and now they are perceived as the structures of Lambda-term and an unclustered dark matter. It is shown that the parametrization noninvariance of the Wheeler-De Witt equation can be used to describe phenomenologically vacuum topological defects of different dimensions (worm-holes, micromembranes, microstrings and monopoles). The mathematical illustration of these processes may be the spontaneous breaking of the local Lorentz-invariance of the quasi-classical equations of gravity. Probably the gravitational vacuum condensate has fixed time in our Universe. Besides, 3-dimensional topological defects renormalize Lambda-term.

  19. MEASURING MICROLENSING USING SPECTRA OF MULTIPLY LENSED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, V.; Mediavilla, E.; Munoz, J. A. E-mail: emg@iac.es E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es

    2012-08-10

    We report on a program of spectroscopic observations of gravitationally lensed QSOs with multiple images. We seek to establish whether microlensing is occurring in each QSO image using only single-epoch observations. We calculate flux ratios for the cores of emission lines in image pairs to set a baseline for no microlensing. The offset of the continuum flux ratios relative to this baseline yields the microlensing magnification free from extinction, as extinction affects the continuum and the lines equally. When we find chromatic microlensing, we attempt to constrain the size of the QSO accretion disk. SDSSJ1004+4112 and HE1104-1805 show chromatic microlensing with amplitudes 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.6 and 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.4 mag, respectively. Modeling the accretion disk with a Gaussian source (I{proportional_to}exp (- R{sup 2}/2r{sup 2}{sub s})) of size r{sub s} {proportional_to}{lambda}{sup p} and using magnification maps to simulate microlensing, we find r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 7 {+-} 3 lt-day(18.1 {+-} 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 1.1 {+-} 0.4 for SDSS1004+4112, and r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 6 {+-} 2 lt-day(15.5 {+-} 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 0.7 {+-} 0.1 for HE1104-1805. For SDSSJ1029+2623, we find strong chromaticity of {approx}0.4 mag in the continuum flux ratio, which probably arises from microlensing, although not all the available data fit within this explanation. For Q0957+561, we measure B - A magnitude differences of 0.4 mag, much greater than the {approx}0.05 mag amplitude usually inferred from light-curve variability. It may substantially modify the current interpretations of microlensing in this system, likely favoring the hypothesis of smaller sources and/or larger microdeflectors. For HS0818+1227, our data yield possible evidence of microlensing.

  20. Affine Defects and Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Petti

    2014-12-12

    We argue that the structure general relativity (GR) as a theory of affine defects is deeper than the standard interpretation as a metric theory of gravitation. Einstein-Cartan theory (EC), with its inhomogenous affine symmetry, should be the standard-bearer for GR-like theories. A discrete affine interpretation of EC (and gauge theory) yields topological definitions of momentum and spin (and Yang Mills current), and their conservation laws become discrete topological identities. Considerations from quantum theory provide evidence that discrete affine defects are the physical foundation for gravitation.

  1. Logistic regression Weakly informative priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Logistic regression Weakly informative priors Conclusions Bayesian generalized linear models default p #12;Logistic regression Weakly informative priors Conclusions Classical logistic regression The problem of separation Bayesian solution Logistic regression -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 y = logit

  2. Coupling effect on the proton optics from the electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we calculate the effect of the electron lense solenoids on the proton optics. Electron lenses (e-lenses) are to be used for head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Electron lenses are to be used for head-on beam-beam compensation in the polarized proton (pp) runs to compensate the large tune spread generated by the head-on proton-proton beam-beam interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The main part of an electron lens is a superconducting solenoid with a longitudinal magnetic field up to 6 T. In this report, we will estimate the e-elenses effects on the {beta} and dispersion functions with 100 GeV and 250 GeV pp run lattices. Table 1 lists some lattice and beam parameters to be used in the following study.

  3. Negative Time Delay in Strongly Naked Singularity Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin P. DeAndrea; Kevin Alexander

    2014-05-12

    We model the supermassive galactic center of the Milky Way galaxy as a strongly naked singularity lens described by the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric. This metric has an ordinary mass and massless scalar charge parameters. For very accurate results, we use the Virbhadra-Ellis lens equation for computations. The galactic center serving as gravitational lens gives rise to 4 images: 2 images on the same side as the source and 2 images on the opposite side of the source from the optic axis. We compute positions and time delays of these images for many values of the angular source position. The time delays of primary images decrease with an increase in angular source position and are always negative. The time delays of the other 3 images are negative for small angular source position; however, they increase with an increase in angular source position. Such observations would support strongly naked singularity interpretation of the galactic center and, if ever observed, would disprove the cosmic censorship hypothesis proposed by Roger Penrose as well as a weaker version by Virbhadra that allows existence of weakly, but not marginally and strongly naked singularities.

  4. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  5. The Gravitational Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The eLISA Consortium; :; P. Amaro Seoane; S. Aoudia; H. Audley; G. Auger; S. Babak; J. Baker; E. Barausse; S. Barke; M. Bassan; V. Beckmann; M. Benacquista; P. L. Bender; E. Berti; P. Binétruy; J. Bogenstahl; C. Bonvin; D. Bortoluzzi; N. C. Brause; J. Brossard; S. Buchman; I. Bykov; J. Camp; C. Caprini; A. Cavalleri; M. Cerdonio; G. Ciani; M. Colpi; G. Congedo; J. Conklin; N. Cornish; K. Danzmann; G. de Vine; D. DeBra; M. Dewi Freitag; L. Di Fiore; M. Diaz Aguilo; I. Diepholz; R. Dolesi; M. Dotti; G. Fernández Barranco; L. Ferraioli; V. Ferroni; N. Finetti; E. Fitzsimons; J. Gair; F. Galeazzi; A. Garcia; O. Gerberding; L. Gesa; D. Giardini; F. Gibert; C. Grimani; P. Groot; F. Guzman Cervantes; Z. Haiman; H. Halloin; G. Heinzel; M. Hewitson; C. Hogan; D. Holz; A. Hornstrup; D. Hoyland; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Hughes; P. Jetzer; V. Kalogera; N. Karnesis; M. Kilic; C. Killow; W. Klipstein; E. Kochkina; N. Korsakova; A. Krolak; S. Larson; M. Lieser; T. Littenberg; J. Livas; I. Lloro; D. Mance; P. Madau; P. Maghami; C. Mahrdt; T. Marsh; I. Mateos; L. Mayer; D. McClelland; K. McKenzie; S. McWilliams; S. Merkowitz; C. Miller; S. Mitryk; J. Moerschell; S. Mohanty; A. Monsky; G. Mueller; V. Müller; G. Nelemans; D. Nicolodi; S. Nissanke; M. Nofrarias; K. Numata; F. Ohme; M. Otto; M. Perreur-Lloyd; A. Petiteau; E. S. Phinney; E. Plagnol; S. Pollack; E. Porter; P. Prat; A. Preston; T. Prince; J. Reiche; D. Richstone; D. Robertson; E. M. Rossi; S. Rosswog; L. Rubbo; A. Ruiter; J. Sanjuan; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Schlamminger; B. Schutz; D. Schütze; A. Sesana; D. Shaddock; S. Shah; B. Sheard; C. F. Sopuerta; A. Spector; R. Spero; R. Stanga; R. Stebbins; G. Stede; F. Steier; T. Sumner; K. -X. Sun; A. Sutton; T. Tanaka; D. Tanner; I. Thorpe; M. Tröbs; M. Tinto; H. -B. Tu; M. Vallisneri; D. Vetrugno; S. Vitale; M. Volonteri; V. Wand; Y. Wang; G. Wanner; H. Ward; B. Ware; P. Wass; W. J. Weber; Y. Yu; N. Yunes; P. Zweifel

    2013-05-24

    The last century has seen enormous progress in our understanding of the Universe. We know the life cycles of stars, the structure of galaxies, the remnants of the big bang, and have a general understanding of how the Universe evolved. We have come remarkably far using electromagnetic radiation as our tool for observing the Universe. However, gravity is the engine behind many of the processes in the Universe, and much of its action is dark. Opening a gravitational window on the Universe will let us go further than any alternative. Gravity has its own messenger: Gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime. They travel essentially undisturbed and let us peer deep into the formation of the first seed black holes, exploring redshifts as large as z ~ 20, prior to the epoch of cosmic re-ionisation. Exquisite and unprecedented measurements of black hole masses and spins will make it possible to trace the history of black holes across all stages of galaxy evolution, and at the same time constrain any deviation from the Kerr metric of General Relativity. eLISA will be the first ever mission to study the entire Universe with gravitational waves. eLISA is an all-sky monitor and will offer a wide view of a dynamic cosmos using gravitational waves as new and unique messengers to unveil The Gravitational Universe. It provides the closest ever view of the early processes at TeV energies, has guaranteed sources in the form of verification binaries in the Milky Way, and can probe the entire Universe, from its smallest scales around singularities and black holes, all the way to cosmological dimensions.

  6. An investigation of gravitational lens determinations of H_o in quintessence cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis; Rodrigo A. Ibata

    2002-06-25

    There is growing evidence that the majority of the energy density of the universe is not baryonic or dark matter, rather it resides in an exotic component with negative pressure. The nature of this `quintessence' influences our view of the universe, modifying angular diameter and luminosity distances. Here, we examine the influence of a quintessence component upon gravitational lens time delays. As well as a static quintessence component, an evolving equation of state is also considered. It is found that the equation of state of the quintessence component and its evolution influence the value of the Hubble's constant derived from gravitational lenses. However, the differences between evolving and non-evolving cosmologies are relatively small. We undertake a suite of Monte Carlo simulations to examine the potential constraints that can be placed on the universal equation of state from the monitoring of gravitational lens system, and demonstrate that at least an order of magnitude more lenses than currently known will have to be discovered and analysed to accurately probe any quintessence component.

  7. Quantum Averages of Weak Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir Aharonov; Alonso Botero

    2005-08-23

    We re-examine the status of the weak value of a quantum mechanical observable as an objective physical concept, addressing its physical interpretation and general domain of applicability. We show that the weak value can be regarded as a \\emph{definite} mechanical effect on a measuring probe specifically designed to minimize the back-reaction on the measured system. We then present a new framework for general measurement conditions (where the back-reaction on the system may not be negligible) in which the measurement outcomes can still be interpreted as \\emph{quantum averages of weak values}. We show that in the classical limit, there is a direct correspondence between quantum averages of weak values and posterior expectation values of classical dynamical properties according to the classical inference framework.

  8. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-03-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities.

  9. Gravitating lepton bag model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    As is known, the gravitational and electromagnetic (EM) field of the Dirac electron is described by an over-extremal Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole (BH) solution which has the naked singular ring and two-sheeted topology. This space is regulated by the formation of a regular source based on the Higgs mechanism of broken symmetry. This source shares much in common with the known MIT- and SLAC-bag models, but has the important advantage, of being in accordance with gravitational and electromagnetic field of the external KN solution. The KN bag model is flexible. At rotations, it takes the shape of a thin disk, and similar to other bag models, under deformations it creates a string-like structure which is positioned along the sharp border of the disk.

  10. Gravitating lepton bag model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Burinskii

    2015-04-30

    As is known, the gravitational and electromagnetic (EM) field of the Dirac electron is described by an over-extremal Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole (BH) solution which has the naked singular ring and two-sheeted topology. This space is regulated by the formation of a regular source based on the Higgs mechanism of broken symmetry. This source shares much in common with the known MIT- and SLAC-bag models, but has the important advantage, of being in accordance with gravitational and electromagnetic field of the external KN solution. The KN bag model is flexible. At rotations, it takes the shape of a thin disk, and similar to other bag models, under deformations it creates a string-like structure which is positioned along the sharp border of the disk.

  11. Matrix theory of gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Koehler

    2011-03-23

    A new classical theory of gravitation within the framework of general relativity is presented. It is based on a matrix formulation of four-dimensional Riemann-spaces and uses no artificial fields or adjustable parameters. The geometrical stress-energy tensor is derived from a matrix-trace Lagrangian, which is not equivalent to the curvature scalar R. To enable a direct comparison with the Einstein-theory a tetrad formalism is utilized, which shows similarities to teleparallel gravitation theories, but uses complex tetrads. Matrix theory might solve a 27-year-old, fundamental problem of those theories (sec. 4.1). For the standard test cases (PPN scheme, Schwarzschild-solution) no differences to the Einstein-theory are found. However, the matrix theory exhibits novel, interesting vacuum solutions.

  12. Gravitation and Electromagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Sidharth

    2001-06-16

    The realms of gravitation, belonging to Classical Physics, and Electromagnetism, belonging to the Theory of the Electron and Quantum Mechanics have remained apart as two separate pillars, inspite of a century of effort by Physicists to reconcile them. In this paper it is argued that if we extend ideas of Classical spacetime to include in addition to non integrability non commutavity also, then such a reconcilation is possible.

  13. Thermodynamics and gravitational collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Malafarina; Pankaj S. Joshi

    2011-06-19

    It is known now that a typical gravitational collapse in general relativity, evolving from regular initial data and under physically reasonable conditions would end in either a black hole or a naked singularity final state. An important question that needs to be answered in this connection is, whether the analogues of the laws of thermodynamics, as formulated for relativistic horizons are respected by the dynamical spacetimes for collapse that end in the formation of a naked singularity. We investigate here the thermodynamical behaviour of the dynamical horizons that form in spherically symmetric gravitational collapse and we show that the first and second laws of black hole thermodynamics, as extended to dynamical spacetimes in a suitable manner, are not violated whether the collapse ends in a black hole or a naked singularity. We then make a distinction between the naked singularities that result from gravitational collapse, and those that exist in solutions of Einstein equations in vacuum axially symmetric and stationary spacetimes, and discuss their connection with thermodynamics in view of the cosmic censorship conjecture and the validity of the third law of black hole mechanics.

  14. Adhesive Gravitational Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Buchert; Alvaro Dominguez

    2005-06-21

    The notion of `adhesion' has been advanced for the phenomenon of stabilization of large-scale structure emerging from gravitational instability of a cold medium. Recently, the physical origin of adhesion has been identified: a systematic derivation of the equations of motion for the density and the velocity fields leads naturally to the key equation of the `adhesion approximation' - however, under a set of strongly simplifying assumptions. In this work, we provide an evaluation of the current status of adhesive gravitational clustering and a clear explanation of the assumptions involved. Furthermore, we propose systematic generalizations with the aim to relax some of the simplifying assumptions. We start from the general Newtonian evolution equations for self-gravitating particles on an expanding Friedmann background and recover the popular `dust model' (pressureless fluid), which breaks down after the formation of density singularities; then we investigate, in a unified framework, two other models which, under the restrictions referred to above, lead to the `adhesion approximation'. We apply the Eulerian and Lagrangian perturbative expansions to these new models and, finally, we discuss some non-perturbative results that may serve as starting points for workable approximations of non-linear structure formation in the multi-stream regime. In particular, we propose a new approximation that includes, in limiting cases, the standard `adhesion model' and the Eulerian as well as Lagrangian first-order approximations.

  15. Cosmological parameters from lensing power spectrum and bispectrum tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takada; Bhuvnesh Jain

    2005-07-20

    We examine how lensing tomography with the bispectrum and power spectrum can constrain cosmological parameters and the equation of state of dark energy. Our analysis uses the full information at the two- and three-point level from angular scales of a few degrees to 5 arcminutes (50 < l < 3000), which will be probed by lensing surveys. We use all triangle configurations, cross-power spectra and bispectra constructed from up to three redshift bins with photometric redshifts, and relevant covariances in our analysis. We find that the parameter constraints from bispectrum tomography are comparable to those from power spectrum tomography. Combining the two improves parameter accuracies by a factor of three due to their complementarity. For the dark energy parameterization w(a) = w0 + wa(1-a), the marginalized errors from lensing alone are sigma(w0) = 0.03 fsky^{-1/2} and sigma(wa) = 0.1 fsky^{-1/2}. We show that these constraints can be further improved when combined with measurements of the cosmic microwave background or Type Ia supernovae. The amplitude and shape of the mass power spectrum are also shown to be precisely constrained. We use hyper-extended perturbation theory to compute the nonlinear lensing bispectrum for dark energy models. Accurate model predictions of the bispectrum in the moderately nonlinear regime, calibrated with numerical simulations, will be needed to realize the parameter accuracy we have estimated. Finally, we estimate how well the lensing bispectrum can constrain a model with primordial non-Gaussianity.

  16. Projected Constraints on Lorentz-Violating Gravity with Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devin Hansen; Nicolas Yunes; Kent Yagi

    2014-12-12

    Gravitational waves are excellent tools to probe the foundations of General Relativity in the strongly dynamical and non-linear regime. One such foundation is Lorentz symmetry, which can be broken in the gravitational sector by the existence of a preferred time direction, and thus, a preferred frame at each spacetime point. This leads to a modification in the orbital decay rate of binary systems, and also in the generation and chirping of their associated gravitational waves. We here study whether waves emitted in the late, quasi-circular inspiral of non-spinning, neutron star binaries can place competitive constraints on two proxies of gravitational Lorentz-violation: Einstein-\\AE{}ther theory and khronometric gravity. We model the waves in the small-coupling (or decoupling) limit and in the post-Newtonian approximation, by perturbatively solving the field equations in small deformations from General Relativity and in the small-velocity/weak-gravity approximation. We assume a gravitational wave consistent with General Relativity has been detected with second- and third-generation, ground-based detectors, and with the proposed space-based mission, DECIGO, with and without coincident electromagnetic counterparts. Without a counterpart, a detection consistent with General Relativity of neutron star binaries can only place competitive constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation when using future, third-generation or space-based instruments. On the other hand, a single counterpart is enough to place constraints that are 10 orders of magnitude more stringent than current binary pulsar bounds, even when using second-generation detectors. This is because Lorentz violation forces the group velocity of gravitational waves to be different from that of light, and this difference can be very accurately constrained with coincident observations.

  17. Combing gravitational hair in 2+1 dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Donnelly; Donald Marolf; Eric Mintun

    2015-10-02

    The gravitational Gauss law requires any addition of energy to be accompanied by the addition of gravitational flux. The possible configurations of this flux for a given source may be called gravitational hair, and several recent works discuss gravitational observables (`gravitational Wilson lines') which create this hair in highly-collimated `combed' configurations. We construct and analyze time-symmetric classical solutions of 2+1 Einstein-Hilbert gravity such as might be created by smeared versions of such operators. We focus on the AdS$_3$ case, where this hair is characterized by the profile of the boundary stress tensor; the desired solutions are those where the boundary stress tensor at initial time $t=0$ agrees precisely with its vacuum value outside an angular interval $[-\\alpha,\\alpha]$. At linear order in source strength the energy is independent of the combing parameter $\\alpha$, but non-linearities cause the full energy to diverge as $\\alpha \\to 0$. In general, solutions with combed gravitational flux also suffer from what we call displacement from their naive location. For weak sources and large $\\alpha$ one may set the displacement to zero by further increasing the energy, though for strong sources and small $\\alpha$ we find no preferred notion of a zero-displacement solution. In the latter case we conclude that naively-expected gravitational Wilson lines do not exist. In the zero-displacement case, taking the AdS scale $\\ell$ to infinity gives finite-energy flux-directed solutions that may be called asymptotically flat.

  18. Gravitational lens optical scalars in terms of energy-momentum distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel Gallo; Osvaldo M. Moreschi

    2011-05-09

    This is a general work on gravitational lensing. We present new expressions for the optical scalars and the deflection angle in terms of the energy-momentum tensor components of matter distributions. Our work generalizes standard references in the literature where normally stringent assumptions are made on the sources. The new expressions are manifestly gauge invariant, since they are presented in terms of curvature components. We also present a method of approximation for solving the lens equations, that can be applied to any order.

  19. The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). IV. Mass reconstruction of the lensing cluster Abell 2744 from frontier field imaging and GLASS spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X; Huang, K; Treu, T; Bradac, M; Schmidt, K B; Brammer, G B; Vulcani, B; Jones, T A; Ryan, R; Amorin, R; Castellano, M; Fontana, A; Merlin, E; Trenti, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep \\emph{Hubble Frontier Field} (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the \\emph{Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space} (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using GLASS spectra, we obtain 5 secure spectroscopic redshifts and 2 tentative ones. We confirm 1 strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all 3 multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photo-z estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectrosco...

  20. c-Ray lenses taking a deeper look at sites of nucleosynthesis Cornelia B. Wunderer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    c-Ray lenses ­ taking a deeper look at sites of nucleosynthesis Cornelia B. Wunderer Space Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617 5. Using lenses to study nucleosynthesis of nucleosynthesis, namely massive stars, novae, and superno

  1. A Recipe to Probe Alternative Theories of Gravitation via N-body Numerical Simulations. I. Spiral Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. S. Brandao; J. C. N. de Araujo

    2012-04-24

    A way to probe alternative theories of gravitation is to study if they could account for the structures of the universe. We then modified the well-known Gadget-2 code to probe alternative theories of gravitation through galactic dynamics. As an application, we simulate the evolution of spiral galaxies to probe alternative theories of gravitation whose weak field limits have a Yukawa-like gravitational potential. These simulations show that galactic dynamics can be used to constrain the parameters associated with alternative theories of gravitation. It is worth stressing that the recipe given in the present study can be applied to any other alternative theory of gravitation in which the superposition principle is valid.

  2. A RECIPE TO PROBE ALTERNATIVE THEORIES OF GRAVITATION VIA N-BODY NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS. I. SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandao, C. S. S.; De Araujo, J. C. N., E-mail: claudiosoriano.uesc@gmail.com, E-mail: jcarlos.dearaujo@inpe.br [Divisao de Astrofisica, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, S. J. Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil)

    2012-05-01

    A way to probe alternative theories of gravitation is to study if they could account for the structures of the universe. We therefore modified the well-known Gadget-2 code to probe alternative theories of gravitation through galactic dynamics. As an application, we simulate the evolution of spiral galaxies to probe alternative theories of gravitation whose weak field limits have a Yukawa-like gravitational potential. These simulations show that galactic dynamics can be used to constrain the parameters associated with alternative theories of gravitation. It is worth stressing that the recipe given in this study can be applied to any other alternative theory of gravitation in which the superposition principle is valid.

  3. A Lorentz-Poincaré type interpretation of the Weak Equivalence Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan; Broekaert

    2007-03-22

    The validity of the Weak Equivalence Principle relative to a local inertial frame is detailed in a scalar-vector gravitation model with Lorentz-Poincar\\'e type interpretation. Given the previously established first Post-Newtonian concordance of dynamics with General Relativity, the principle is to this order compatible with GRT. The gravitationally modified Lorentz transformations, on which the observations in physical coordinates depend, are shown to provide a physical interpretation of \\emph{parallel transport}. A development of ``geodesic'' deviation in terms of the present model is given as well.

  4. On the Energy of Rotating Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahram Mashhoon; James C. McClune; Enrique Chavez; Hernando Quevedo

    1996-09-06

    A class of solutions of the gravitational field equations describing vacuum spacetimes outside rotating cylindrical sources is presented. A subclass of these solutions corresponds to the exterior gravitational fields of rotating cylindrical systems that emit gravitational radiation. The properties of these rotating gravitational wave spacetimes are investigated. In particular, we discuss the energy density of these waves using the gravitational stress-energy tensor.

  5. Determination and modeling of the 3-D gradient refractive indices in crystalline lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    Determination and modeling of the 3-D gradient refractive indices in crystalline lenses Derek Y. C gradient refractive-index profiles in crystalline lenses is proposed. The input data are derivedfrom 2 crystalline lenses.2 This method is based on measuring the total refraction suffered by a light beam

  6. Accurate and fast simulation of Fresnel zone plates and multi-level diffractive lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Accurate and fast simulation of Fresnel zone plates and multi-level diffractive lenses Qing Cao, such as various Fresnel zone plates [1, 2] and muti-level diffractive lenses [3], can be used for focusing and fast simulation of various Fresnel zone plates and multi-level diffractive lenses. As two tests, we

  7. Searching for Novel Gravitational Effects

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christopher Stubb

    2010-09-01

    Stubbs, Chair of the Physics Department at Harvard University, discusses experiments that search for novel gravitational effect and scientific observations about it.

  8. Spherical gravitational collapse in N dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Rituparno; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate here spherically symmetric gravitational collapse in a space-time with an arbitrary number of dimensions and with a general type I matter field, which is a broad class that includes most of the physically reasonable matter forms. We show that given the initial data for matter in terms of the initial density and pressure profiles at an initial surface t=t{sub i} from which the collapse evolves, there exist the rest of the initial data functions and classes of solutions of Einstein equations which we construct here, such that the space-time evolution goes to a final state which is either a black hole or a naked singularity, depending on the nature of initial data and evolutions chosen, and subject to validity of the weak energy condition. The results are discussed and analyzed in the light of the cosmic censorship hypothesis in black hole physics. The formalism here combines the earlier results on gravitational collapse in four dimensions in a unified treatment. Also the earlier work is generalized to higher-dimensional space-times to allow a study of the effect of the number of dimensions on the possible final outcome of the collapse in terms of either a black hole or naked singularity. No restriction is adopted on the number of dimensions, and other limiting assumptions such as self-similarity of space-time are avoided, in order to keep the treatment general. Our methodology allows us to consider to an extent the genericity and stability aspects related to the occurrence of naked singularities in gravitational collapse.

  9. Radio wave emissions due to gravitational radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattias Marklund; Gert Brodin; Peter Dunsby

    2000-02-29

    We consider the interaction of a weak gravitational wave with electromagnetic fields in a thin plasma on a Minkowski background spacetime using the 1+3 orthonormal frame formalism. Because gravitational and electromagnetic waves satisfy the same dispersion relation, electromagnetic waves can be effectively generated as a result of this interaction. In the case of the interaction with a static magnetic field, the amplitude of the electromagnetic waves depends on the size of the excitation region in which the magnetic field is contained. It is argued that due to the presence of a plasma this process can also lead to the generation of higher harmonics of the original mode. Estimates are given for this effect in the case of a binary pulsar and a cold electron plasma. It is found that the emmited radiation will lie in the radio frequency band. We also speculate on the possible relevance of this process on situations in cosmology, in particular whether this could be used to constrain primordial magnetic fields.

  10. Weak-Chaos Ratchet Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana; Vladislav B. Roitberg

    2012-05-28

    Classical Hamiltonian systems with a mixed phase space and some asymmetry may exhibit chaotic ratchet effects. The most significant such effect is a directed momentum current or acceleration. In known model systems, this effect may arise only for sufficiently strong chaos. In this paper, a Hamiltonian ratchet accelerator is introduced, featuring a momentum current for arbitrarily weak chaos. The system is a realistic, generalized kicked rotor and is exactly solvable to some extent, leading to analytical expressions for the momentum current. While this current arises also for relatively strong chaos, the maximal current is shown to occur, at least in one case, precisely in a limit of arbitrarily weak chaos.

  11. CLUSTER LENSING PROFILES DERIVED FROM A REDSHIFT ENHANCEMENT OF MAGNIFIED BOSS-SURVEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: coupon@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-07-20

    We report the first detection of a redshift-depth enhancement of background galaxies magnified by foreground clusters. Using 300,000 BOSS survey galaxies with accurate spectroscopic redshifts, we measure their mean redshift depth behind four large samples of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, totaling 5000-15,000 clusters. A clear trend of increasing mean redshift toward the cluster centers is found, averaged over each of the four cluster samples. In addition, we find similar but noisier behavior for an independent X-ray sample of 158 clusters lying in the foreground of the current BOSS sky area. By adopting the mass-richness relationships appropriate for each survey, we compare our results with theoretical predictions for each of the four SDSS cluster catalogs. The radial form of this redshift enhancement is well fitted by a richness-to-mass weighted composite Navarro-Frenk-White profile with an effective mass ranging between M{sub 200} {approx} 1.4-1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the optically detected cluster samples, and M{sub 200} {approx} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the X-ray sample. This lensing detection helps to establish the credibility of these SDSS cluster surveys, and provides a normalization for their respective mass-richness relations. In the context of the upcoming bigBOSS, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph, and EUCLID-NISP spectroscopic surveys, this method represents an independent means of deriving the masses of cluster samples for examining the cosmological evolution, and provides a relatively clean consistency check of weak-lensing measurements, free from the systematic limitations of shear calibration.

  12. Electromagnetic Induced Gravitational Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Adamo; E. T. Newman

    2008-07-23

    We study the physical consequences of two diffferent but closely related perturbation schemes applied to the Einstein-Maxwell equations. In one case the starting space-time is flat while in the other case it is Schwarzschild. In both cases the perturbation is due to a combined electric and magnetic dipole field. We can see, within the Einstein-Maxwell equations a variety of physical consequences. They range from induced gravitational energy-momentum loss, to a well defined spin angular momentum with its loss and a center-of-mass with its equations of motion.

  13. Quantum Gravitational Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham M Shore

    2003-04-15

    In quantum theory, the curved spacetime of Einstein's general theory of relativity acts as a dispersive optical medium for the propagation of light. Gravitational rainbows and birefringence replace the classical picture of light rays mapping out the null geodesics of curved spacetime. Even more remarkably, {\\it superluminal} propagation becomes a real possibility, raising the question of whether it is possible to send signals into the past. In this article, we review recent developments in the quantum theory of light propagation in general relativity and discuss whether superluminal light is compatible with causality.

  14. The Structure of Naked Singularity in Self-similar Gravitational Collapse II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Joshi; I. H. Dwivedi

    1993-02-09

    Generalizing the results of Joshi and Dwivedi in Commun.Math.Phys. 146, p.333 (1992), it is pointed out that strong curvature naked singularities could occur in the self-similar gravitational collapse of any form of matter satisfying the weak energy condition for the positivity of mass-energy density.

  15. Coincident-Frequency Entangled Photons in a Homogenous Gravitational Field - A Thought Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2010-11-24

    Assuming that the Principle of energy conservation holds for coincident-frequency entangled photons propagating in a homogeneous gravitational field. It is argued that in this physical context, either Quantum entanglement or the weak equivalence principle are broken by the photons.

  16. Weak Values and Relational Generalisations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-04-20

    We justify generalisations of weak values from a tentatively relational perspective by deriving them from a generalisation of Bayes' rule. We also argue that these generalisations have implications of quantum nonlocality and may form a novel approach to quantum gravity and cosmology.

  17. Fully Degenerate Self-Gravitating Fermionic Dark Matter: Implications to the Density Profile of the Cluster of Galaxies A1689, and the Mass Hierarchy of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadashi Nakajima; Masahiro Morikawa

    2005-06-25

    Equilibrium configurations of weakly interacting fully degenerate fermionic dark matter are considered at various scales in the Universe. We treat the general situations for the gravity from Newtonian to general relativity and the degeneracy from nonrelativistic to relativistic. A dimensionless equilibrium configuration is specified by a single parameter regardless of particle properties, the Fermi velocity at the center, and the scalings of mass and length are specified by the rest mass and statistical weight of the dark matter particle. We focus our attention to the flat-top nature of the mass column density profile of the cluster of galaxies, A1689, recently reported by Broadhurst et al. using gravitational lensing. We convert the column density profile to a volume density profile assuming spherical symmetry and derive a 3D encircled mass profile of A1689, which is compared with the model profiles of degenerate fermion structures. The flat-top profile is reproduced. The corresponding fermion mass ranges from 2 eV to 30 eV depending on the actual scale of the degenerate structure. If massive neutrinos are the dominant dark matter, the rest mass will be about 4.7 or 2.3 eV respectively for Majorana or Dirac neutrinos. The mass and size of the degenerate structure are $10^{14}M_\\odot$ and 100 kpc for Majorana neutrinos, and 5$\\times10^{14}M_\\odot$ and 300 kpc for Dirac neutrinos. If we identify the fermions as heavier sterile neutrinos, they yield the characteristic mass hierarchy of black holes; giant black hole at the center of a galaxy and the intermediate mass black holes. Thus we propose the possibility that the mass hierarchy of fermions determines that of black holes in the Universe.

  18. Dismantlability of weakly systolic complexes and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chepoi, Victor

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the structural properties of weakly systolic complexes introduced recently by the second author and of their 1-skeletons, the weakly bridged graphs. We present several characterizations of weakly systolic complexes and weakly bridged graphs. Then we prove that weakly bridged graphs are dismantlable. Using this, we establish the fixed point theorem for weakly systolic complexes. As a consequence, we get results about conjugacy classes of finite subgroups and classifying spaces for finite subgroups of weakly systolic groups. As immediate corollaries, we obtain new results on systolic complexes and systolic groups.

  19. Neutrino and Photon Lensing by Black Holes: Radiative Lens Equations and Post-Newtonian Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Coriano; Antonio Costantini; Marta Dell'Atti; Luigi Delle Rose

    2015-07-11

    We extend a previous phenomenological analysis of photon lensing in an external gravitational background to the case of a massless neutrino, and propose a method to incorporate radiative effects in the classical lens equations of neutrinos and photons. The study is performed for a Schwarzschild metric, generated by a point-like source, and expanded in the Newtonian potential at first order. We use a semiclassical approach, where the perturbative corrections to neutrino scattering, evaluated at one-loop in the Standard Model, are compared with the Einstein formula for the deflection using an impact parameter formulation. For this purpose, we use the renormalized expression of the graviton/fermion/fermion vertex presented in previous studies. We show the agreement between the classical and the semiclassical formulations, for values of the impact parameter $b_h$ of the neutrinos of the order of $b_h\\sim 20$, measured in units of the Schwarzschild radius. The analysis is then extended with the inclusion of the post Newtonian corrections in the external gravity field, showing that this extension finds application in the case of the scattering of a neutrino/photon off a primordial black hole. The energy dependence of the deflection, generated by the quantum corrections, is then combined with the standard formulation of the classical lens equations. We illustrate our approach by detailed numerical studies, using as a reference both the thin lens and the nonlinear Virbhadra-Ellis lens.

  20. Weak values and weak coupling maximizing the output of weak measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio, E-mail: dilorenzo.antonio@gmail.com

    2014-06-15

    In a weak measurement, the average output ?o? of a probe that measures an observable A{sup -hat} of a quantum system undergoing both a preparation in a state ?{sub i} and a postselection in a state E{sub f} is, to a good approximation, a function of the weak value A{sub w}=Tr[E{sub f}A{sup -hat} ?{sub i}]/Tr[E{sub f}?{sub i}], a complex number. For a fixed coupling ?, when the overlap Tr[E{sub f}?{sub i}] is very small, A{sub w} diverges, but ?o? stays finite, often tending to zero for symmetry reasons. This paper answers the questions: what is the weak value that maximizes the output for a fixed coupling? What is the coupling that maximizes the output for a fixed weak value? We derive equations for the optimal values of A{sub w} and ?, and provide the solutions. The results are independent of the dimensionality of the system, and they apply to a probe having a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension. Using the Schrödinger–Robertson uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that, in an important case, the amplification ?o? cannot exceed the initial uncertainty ?{sub o} in the observable o{sup -hat}, we provide an upper limit for the more general case, and a strategy to obtain ?o???{sub o}. - Highlights: •We have provided a general framework to find the extremal values of a weak measurement. •We have derived the location of the extremal values in terms of preparation and postselection. •We have devised a maximization strategy going beyond the limit of the Schrödinger–Robertson relation.

  1. Gravitational quantum states of neutrons in a rough waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Meyerovich; V. V. Nesvizhevsky

    2006-03-22

    A theory of gravitational quantum states of ultracold neutrons in waveguides with absorbing/scattering walls is presented. The theory covers recent experiments in which the ultracold neutrons were beamed between a mirror and a rough scatterer/absorber. The analysis is based on a recently developed theory of quantum transport along random rough walls which is modified in order to include leaky (absorbing) interfaces and, more importantly, the low-amplitude high-aperture roughness. The calculations are focused on a regime when the direct transitions into the continuous spectrum above the absorption threshold dominate the depletion of neutrons from the gravitational states and are more efficient than the processes involving the intermediate states. The theoretical results for the neutron count are sensitive to the correlation radius (lateral size) of surface inhomogeneities and to the ratio of the particle energy to the absorption threshold in a weak roughness limit. The main impediment for observation of the higher gravitational states is the "overhang" of the particle wave functions which can be overcome only by use scatterers with strong roughness. In general, the strong roughness with high amplitude is preferable if one wants just to detect the individual gravitational states, while the strong roughness experiments with small amplitude and high aperture are preferable for the quantitative analysis of the data. We also discuss the ways to further improve the accuracy of calculations and to optimize the experimental regime.

  2. Global Superdiffusion of Weak Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana

    2003-10-20

    A class of kicked rotors is introduced, exhibiting accelerator-mode islands (AIs) and {\\em global} superdiffusion for {\\em arbitrarily weak} chaos. The corresponding standard maps are shown to be exactly related to generalized web maps taken modulo an ``oblique cylinder''. Then, in a case that the web-map orbit structure is periodic in the phase plane, the AIs are essentially {\\em normal} web islands folded back into the cylinder. As a consequence, chaotic orbits sticking around the AI boundary are accelerated {\\em only} when they traverse tiny {\\em ``acceleration spots''}. This leads to chaotic flights having a quasiregular {\\em steplike} structure. The global weak-chaos superdiffusion is thus basically different in nature from the strong-chaos one in the usual standard and web maps.

  3. Sudden gravitational transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, Robert R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Komp, William [Physics Department, University of Louisville, 102 Natural Sciences, Louisville, Kentucky 40292 (United States); Parker, Leonard [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Vanzella, Daniel A. T. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC-USP), Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense, 400 Cx. Postal 369 - CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-01-15

    We investigate the properties of a cosmological scenario which undergoes a gravitational phase transition at late times. In this scenario, the Universe evolves according to general relativity in the standard, hot big bang picture until a redshift z < or approx. 1. Nonperturbative phenomena associated with a minimally-coupled scalar field catalyzes a transition, whereby an order parameter consisting of curvature quantities such as R{sup 2}, R{sub ab}R{sup ab}, R{sub abcd}R{sup abcd} acquires a constant expectation value. The ensuing cosmic acceleration appears driven by a dark-energy component with an equation-of-state w<-1. We evaluate the constraints from type 1a supernovae, the cosmic microwave background, and other cosmological observations. We find that a range of models making a sharp transition to cosmic acceleration are consistent with observations.

  4. The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey:II. Gravitational lens candidate selection and follow-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. W. A. Browne; P. N. Wilkinson; N. J. F. Jackson; S. T. Myers; C. D. Fassnacht; L. V. E. Koopmans; D. R. Marlow; M. Norbury; D. Rusin; C. M. Sykes; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; A. G. de Bruyn; K-H. Chae; P. Helbig; L. J. King; J. P. McKean; T. J. Pearson; P. M. Phillips; A. C. S. Readhead; E. Xanthopoulos; T. York

    2002-11-11

    We report the final results of the search for gravitationally lensed flat-spectrum radio sources found in the combination of CLASS (Cosmic Lens All Sky Survey) and JVAS (Jodrell-Bank VLA Astrometric Survey). VLA observations of 16,503 sources have been made, resulting in the largest sample of arcsec-scale lens systems available. Contained within the 16,503 sources is a complete sample of 11,685 sources having two-point spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz flatter than -0.5 and 5 GHz flux densities $\\geq$30 mJy. A subset of 8,958 sources form a well-defined statistical sample suitable for analysis of the lens statistics. We describe the systematic process by which 149 candidate lensed sources were picked from the statistical sample on the basis of possessing multiple compact components in the 0.2 arcsec-resolution VLA maps. Candidates were followed up with 0.05 arcsec resolution MERLIN and 0.003 arcsec VLBA observations at 5 GHz and rejected as lens systems if they failed well-defined surface brightness and/or morphological tests. Maps for all the candidates can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/research/gravlens/index.html We summarize the properties of each of the 22 gravitational lens systems in JVAS/CLASS. Twelve are double-image systems, nine are four-image systems and one is a six-image system. Thirteen constitute a statistically well-defined sample giving a point-source lensing rate of 1:690$\\pm$190. The interpretation of the results in terms of the properties of the lensing galaxy population and cosmological parameters will be published elsewhere. (Abridged)

  5. Photon rockets and gravitational radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1994-12-21

    The absence of gravitational radiation in Kinnersley's ``photon rocket'' solution of Einstein's equations is clarified by studying the mathematically well-defined problem of point-like photon rockets in Minkowski space (i.e. massive particles emitting null fluid anisotro\\-pically and accelerating because of the recoil). We explicitly compute the (uniquely defined) {\\it linearized} retarded gravitational waves emitted by such objects, which are the coherent superposition of the gravitational waves generated by the motion of the massive point-like rocket and of those generated by the energy-momentum distribution of the photon fluid. In the special case (corresponding to Kinnersley's solution) where the anisotropy of the photon emission is purely dipolar we find that the gravitational wave amplitude generated by the energy-momentum of the photons exactly cancels the usual $1/r$ gravitational wave amplitude generated by the accelerated motion of the rocket. More general photon anisotropies would, however, generate genuine gravitational radiation at infinity. Our explicit calculations show the compatibility between the non-radiative character of Kinnersley's solution and the currently used gravitational wave generation formalisms based on post-Minkowskian perturbation theory.

  6. Week 13: Chapter 13 Universal Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Week 13: Chapter 13 Universal Gravitation Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation Every particle placed near the small ones The angle of rotation was measured Law of Gravitation, cont's Third Law action-reaction pair Gravitation is a field force that always exists between two particles

  7. Dissipation of Modified Entropic Gravitational Energy Through Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2011-11-04

    The phenomenological nature of a new gravitational type interaction between two different bodies derived from Verlinde's entropic approach to gravitation in combination with Sorkin's definition of Universe's quantum information content, is investigated. Assuming that the energy stored in this entropic gravitational field is dissipated under the form of gravitational waves and that the Heisenberg principle holds for this system, one calculates a possible value for an absolute minimum time scale in nature $\\tau=15/16 \\frac{\\Lambda^{1/2}\\hbar G}{c^4}\\sim9.27\\times10^{-105}$ seconds, which is much smaller than the Planck time $t_{P}=(\\hbar G/c^5)^{1/2}\\sim 5.38\\times10^{-44}$ seconds. This appears together with an absolute possible maximum value for Newtonian gravitational forces generated by matter $F_g=32/30\\frac{c^7}{\\Lambda \\hbar G^2}\\sim 3.84\\times 10^{165}$ Newtons, which is much higher than the gravitational field between two Planck masses separated by the Planck length $F_{gP}=c^4/G\\sim1.21\\times10^{44}$ Newtons.

  8. Probing the Proton's Weak Side | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    force. The weak force acts on subatomic particles, such as the protons, neutrons and electrons that make up atoms. These particles carry a weak charge, a measure of the influence...

  9. Gravitational waves: a foundational review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Pereira

    2015-05-27

    The standard linear approach to the gravitational waves theory is critically reviewed. Contrary to the prevalent understanding, it is pointed out that this theory contains many conceptual and technical obscure issues that require further analysis.

  10. Dark Energy, Gravitation and Electromagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Sidharth

    2004-01-08

    In the context of the fact that the existence of dark energy causing the accelerated expansion of the universe has been confirmed by the WMAP and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we re-examine gravitation itself, starting with the formulation of Sakharov and show that it is possible to obtain gravitation in terms of the electromagnetic charge of elementary particles, once the ZPF and its effects at the Compton scale are taken into account.

  11. Microscopic Lensing by a Dense, Cold Atomic Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stetson Roof; Kasie Kemp; Mark Havey; I. M. Sokolov; D. V. Kupriyanov

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that a cold, dense sample of 87Rb atoms can exhibit a micron-scale lensing effect, much like that associated with a macroscopically-sized lens. The experiment is carried out in the fashion of traditional z-scan measurements but in much weaker fields and where close attention is paid to the detuning dependence of the transmitted light. The results are interpreted using numerical simulations and by modeling the sample as a thin lens with a spherical focal length.

  12. A magnified glance into the dark sector: probing cosmological models with strong lensing in A1689

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magaña, Juan; Cardenas, Victor H; Verdugo, T; Jullo, Eric

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we constrain four alternative models to the late cosmic acceleration in the Universe: Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL), interacting dark energy (IDE), Ricci holographic dark energy (HDE), and modified polytropic Cardassian (MPC). Strong lensing (SL) images of background galaxies produced by the galaxy cluster Abell $1689$ are used to test these models. To perform this analysis we modify the LENSTOOL lens modeling code. The value added by this probe is compared with other complementary probes: Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We found that the CPL constraints obtained of the SL data are consistent with those estimated using the other probes. The IDE constraints are consistent with the complementary bounds only if large errors in the SL measurements are considered. The Ricci HDE and MPC constraints are weak but they are similar to the BAO, SNIa and CMB estimations. We also compute the figure-of-merit as a tool to quantify the goo...

  13. Weak interactions at the SSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-03-01

    Prospects for the study of standard model weak interactions at the SSC are reviewed, with emphasis on the unique capability of the SSC to study the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking whether the associated new quanta are at the TeV scale or higher. Symmetry breaking by the minimal Higgs mechanism and by related strong interaction dynamical variants is summarized. A set of measurements is outlined that would calibrate the proton structure functions and the backgrounds to new physics. The ability to measure the three weak gauge boson vertex is found to complement LEP II, with measurements extending to larger Q/sup 2/ at a comparable statistical level in detectable decays. B factory physics is briefly reviewed as one example of a possible broad program of high statistics studies of sub-TeV scale phenomena. The largest section of the talk is devoted to the possible manifestations of symmetry breaking in the WW and ZZ production cross sections. Some new results are presented bearing on the ability to detect high mass WW and ZZ pairs. The principal conclusion is that although nonstandard model scenarios are typically more forgiving, the capability to study symmetry breaking in the standard model (and in related strong interaction dynamical variants) requires achieving the SSC design goals of ..sqrt.. s,L = 40Tev, 10/sup 33/cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  14. The Third Image of the Large-Separation Lensed Quasar SDSS J1029+2623

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguri, Masamune; Ofek, Eran O.; Inada, Naohisa; Morokuma, Tomoki; Falco, Emilio E.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Kayo, Issha; Broadhurst, Tom; Richards, Gordon T.

    2008-02-22

    We identify a third image in the unique quasar lens SDSS J1029+2623, the second known quasar lens produced by a massive cluster of galaxies. The spectrum of the third image shows similar emission and absorption features, but has a redder continuum than the other two images which can be explained by differential extinction or microlensing. We also identify several lensed arcs. Our observations suggest a complicated structure of the lens cluster at z {approx} 0.6. We argue that the three lensed images are produced by a naked cusp on the basis of successful mass models, the distribution of cluster member galaxies, and the shapes and locations of the lensed arcs. Lensing by a naked cusp is quite rare among galaxy-scale lenses but is predicted to be common among large-separation lensed quasars. Thus the discovery can be viewed as support for an important theoretical prediction of the standard cold dark matter model.

  15. Hydro-gravitational fragmentation, diffusion and condensation of the primordial plasma, dark-matter and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson

    2003-05-19

    The first structures were proto-voids formed in the primordial plasma. Viscous and weak turbulence forces balanced gravitational forces when the scale of causal connection at time 30,000 years matched the viscous and turbulent Schwarz scales of hydro-gravitational theory (Gibson 1996). The photon viscosity allows only weak turbulence from the Reynolds number Re = 200, with fragmentation to give proto-supercluster voids, buoyancy forces, fossil vorticity turbulence, and strong sonic damping. The expanding, cooling, plasma continued fragmentation to proto-galaxy-mass with the density and rate-of-strain preserved as fossils of the weak turbulence and first structure. Turbulence fossilization by self-gravitational buoyancy explains the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations, not sonic oscillations in cold-dark-matter fragments. After plasma to gas transition at 300,000 years, gas fragmentation occurred within the proto-galaxies to form proto-globular-star-cluster (PGCs) clouds of small-planetary-mass primordial-fog-particles (PFPs). Dark PGC clumps of frozen PFPs persist as the inner-galaxy-halo dark matter, supporting Schild's 1996 quasar-microlensing interpretation. Non-baryonic dark matter diffused into the plasma proto-cluster-voids and later fragmented as outer-galaxy-halos at diffusive Schwarz scales, indicating light, weakly-collisional fluid particles (possibly neutrinos). Observations support the theory (Gibson and Schild 2003).

  16. Gravitational Waves from Quasi-Circular Black Hole Binaries in Dynamical Chern-Simons Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi; Nicolas Yunes; Takahiro Tanaka

    2013-02-07

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity cannot be strongly constrained with current experiments because it reduces to General Relativity in the weak-field limit. This theory, however, introduces modifications in the non-linear, dynamical regime, and thus, it could be greatly constrained with gravitational waves from the late inspiral of black hole binaries. We complete the first self-consistent calculation of such gravitational waves in this theory. For favorable spin-orientations, advanced ground-based detectors may improve existing solar-system constraints by 6 orders of magnitude.

  17. Durability of Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) Lenses Used in Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Gedvilas, L.; To, B.; Kennedy, C.; Kurtz, S.

    2010-10-21

    This presentation reports the findings of NREL's screen test to characterize the durability of poly (methyl methacrylate) lenses used in concentrated photovoltaics.

  18. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but...

  19. Linearly resummed hydrodynamics in a weakly curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanyan Bu; Michael Lublinsky

    2015-02-27

    We extend our study of all-order linearly resummed hydrodynamics in a flat space~\\cite{1406.7222,1409.3095} to fluids in weakly curved spaces. The underlying microscopic theory is a finite temperature $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling. The AdS/CFT correspondence relates black brane solutions of the Einstein gravity in asymptotically \\emph{locally} $\\textrm{AdS}_5$ geometry to relativistic conformal fluids in a weakly curved 4D background. To linear order in the amplitude of hydrodynamic variables and metric perturbations, the fluid's energy-momentum tensor is computed with derivatives of both the fluid velocity and background metric resummed to all orders. We extensively discuss the meaning of all order hydrodynamics by expressing it in terms of the memory function formalism, which is also suitable for practical simulations. In addition to two viscosity functions discussed at length in refs.~\\cite{1406.7222,1409.3095}, we find four curvature induced structures coupled to the fluid via new transport coefficient functions. In ref.~\\cite{0905.4069}, the latter were referred to as gravitational susceptibilities of the fluid. We analytically compute these coefficients in the hydrodynamic limit, and then numerically up to large values of momenta.

  20. Refraction-Based Alternative Explanation for: Bending of Light Near a Star, Gravitational Red/Blue Shift and Black-Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Gupta; Anirudh Pradhan; Sushant Gupta

    2010-04-09

    Many of the general-relativity-tests such as bending of light near a star and gravitational red/blue shift are explained without general-relativity & without Newtonian-approach. The authors first cast doubts on both, the Newtonian and the relativistic approach; and proposes a novel alternative-explanation. The new alternative explanation is based on refraction-phenomenon of optics. Estimation of results, with new approach, are in agreement with known values. Though physics is different, but it is argued that general-relativity based gravitational-bending and refraction-based bending have more in common than is generally realized. Also discussed are black-hole and gravitational-lensing in the new perspective of refraction. The new refraction-based theory makes a few new predictions and also suggests a few tests..

  1. Refraction-Based Alternative Explanation for: Bending of Light Near a Star, Gravitational Red/Blue Shift and Black-Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Gupta; Anirudh Pradhan; Sushant Gupta

    2015-10-22

    In this research-paper, many of the general-relativity-tests such as bending of light near a star and gravitational red/blue shift are explained without general-relativity & even without Newtonian-approach. The authors first raise questions on the validity of both, the Newtonian and the relativistic approach; and then propose a novel alternative-explanation. The new alternative explanation is based on refraction-phenomenon of optics. Estimation of results with new approach are in agreement with known values. Though physics is different, but it is argued that general-relativity based gravitational-bending and refraction based bending have more in common than is generally realized. Also discussed are black-hole and gravitational-lensing in the new perspective of refraction. The new refraction-based theory makes a few new predictions and also suggests a few tests.

  2. NALCAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Erin Sheldon, Brookhaven National Laboratory Title: Weak Gravitational Lensing of Galaxy Clusters 3:30 DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK 2nd Flr X-Over 4:00 All Experimenters' Meeting...

  3. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghiglieri, J

    2015-01-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future ge...

  4. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ghiglieri; M. Laine

    2015-07-17

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  5. Electrostatic self-force in a static weak gravitational field with cylindrical symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau; C. Charmousis; B. Linet

    1996-03-04

    We determine the electrostatic self-force at rest in an arbitrary static metric with cylindrical symmetry in the linear approximation in the Newtonian constant. In linearised Einstein theory, we express it in terms of the components of the energy-momentum tensor.

  6. Maximal Holevo quantity based on weak measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao-Kun Wang; Shao-Ming Fei; Zhi-Xi Wang; Jun-Peng Cao; Heng Fan

    2015-01-13

    The Holevo bound is a keystone in many applications of quantum information theory. We propose "weak maximal Holevo quantity" with weak measurements as the generalization of the standard Holevo quantity which is defined as the optimal projective measurements. The scenarios that weak measurements is necessary are that only the weak measurements can be performed because for example the system is macroscopic or that one intentionally tries to do so such that the disturbance on the measured system can be controlled for example in quantum key distribution protocols. We evaluate systematically the weak maximal Holevo quantity for Bell-diagonal states and find a series of results. Furthermore, we find that weak measurements can be realized by noise and project measurements.

  7. Stochastic force in gravitational systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo

    2001-05-10

    In this paper I study the probability distribution of the gravitational force in gravitational systems through numerical experiments. I show that Kandrup's (1980) and Antonuccio-Delogu & Atrio-Barandela's (1992) theories describe correctly the stochastic force probability distribution respectively in inhomogeneous and clustered systems. I find equations for the probability distribution of stochastic forces in finite systems, both homogeneous and clustered, which I use to compare the theoretical predictions with Montecarlo simulations of spherically symmetric systems. The agreement between theoretical predictions and simulations proves to be quite satisfactory.

  8. Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Scott A.

    Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

  9. Einstein's Energy-Free Gravitational Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth Dalton

    1998-03-13

    We show that Einstein's gravitational field has zero energy, momentum, and stress. This conclusion follows directly from the gravitational field equations, in conjunction with the differential law of energy-momentum conservation $ T^{\\mu\

  10. Weak measurement and control of entanglement generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Hill; J. F. Ralph

    2008-01-28

    In this paper we show how weak joint measurement and local feedback can be used to control entanglement generation between two qubits. To do this, we make use of a decoherence free subspace (DFS). Weak measurement and feedback can be used to drive the system into this subspace rapidly. Once within the subspace, feedback can generate entanglement rapidly, or turn off entanglement generation dynamically. We also consider, in the context of weak measurement, some of differences between purification and generating entanglement.

  11. Modeling of the HERMES J105751.1+573027 submillimeter source lensed by a dark matter dominated foreground group of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavazzi, R; Conley, A; Aguirre, J E; Amblard, A; Auld, R; Beelen, A; Blain, A; Blundell, R; Bock, J; Bradford, C M; Bridge, C; Brisbin, D; Burgarella, D; Chanial, P; Chapin, E; Christopher, N; Clements, D L; Cox, P; Djorgovski, S G; Dowell, C D; Eales, S; Earle, L; Ellsworth-Bowers, T P; Farrah, D; Franceschini, A; Fu, H; Glenn, J; Solares, E A González; Griffin, M; Gurwell, M A; Halpern, M; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Jarvis, M; Kamenetzky, J; Kim, S; Krips, M; Levenson, L; Lupu, R; Mahabal, A; Maloney, P D; Maraston, C; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Matsuhara, H; Mortier, A M J; Murphy, E; Naylor, B J; Neri, R; Nguyen, H T; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rangwala, N; Rawlings, J I; Raymond, G; Riechers, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Scott, K S; Serra, P; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valiante, E; Valtchanov, I; Verma, A; Vieira, J D; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Wardlow, J; Wiebe, D; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zeimann, G; Zemcov, M; Zmuidzinas, J

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a gravitational lensing analysis of the bright $\\zs=2.957$ sub-millimeter galaxy (SMG), HERMES J105751.1+573027 found in {\\it Herschel}/SPIRE Science Demonstration Phase data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) project. The high resolution imaging available in optical and Near-IR channels, along with CO emission obtained with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, allow us to precisely estimate the intrinsic source extension and hence estimate the total lensing magnification to be $\\mu=10.9\\pm 0.7$. We measure the half-light radius $R_{\\rm eff}$ of the source in the rest-frame Near-UV and $V$ bands that characterize the unobscured light coming from stars and find $R_{\\rm eff,*}= [2.0 \\pm 0.1]$ kpc, in good agreement with recent studies on the Submillimeter Galaxy population. This lens model is also used to estimate the size of the gas distribution ($R_{\\rm eff,gas}= [1.1\\pm0.5]$) kpc by mapping back in the source plane the CO (J=5-4) transition line emission. Th...

  12. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornung, Thorsten Nitz, Peter

    2014-09-26

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

  13. Low-energy Electro-weak Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doron Gazit

    2012-10-16

    Chiral effective field theory (EFT) provides a systematic and controlled approach to low-energy nuclear physics. Here, we use chiral EFT to calculate low-energy weak Gamow-Teller transitions. We put special emphasis on the role of two-body (2b) weak currents within the nucleus, and discuss their applications in predicting physical observables.

  14. Weak rigidity in the PPN formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Olmo, V.; Olivert, J.

    1987-04-01

    The influence of the concept of weakly rigid almost-thermodynamic material schemes on the classical deformations is analyzed. The methods of the PPN approximation are considered. In this formalism, the equations that characterize the weak rigidity are expressed. As a consequence of that, an increase of two orders of magnitude in the strain rate tensor is obtained.

  15. Weak measurement based on thermal noise effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gang Li; Tao Wang; Shuang Xu; He-Shan Song

    2015-07-03

    Weak measurement with thermal state pointer can give rise to an amplification effect, and we give the generalization of the mechanism behind the amplification with pure Gaussion state pointer. We find that the maximal value of this effect can reach thermal fluctuations, and propose two schemes to implement room temperature weak measurement with thermal state pointer in optomechanical system.

  16. SEEING AND COMMUNICATING THROUGH WEAK ELECTRIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their lives bathed in their own internally generated mild electric field, interpreting perturbations. But in the case of electric field generation, the signals are easy to record, analyse and mimic, and you canInside JEB i SEEING AND COMMUNICATING THROUGH WEAK ELECTRIC FIELDS Weakly electric fish spend

  17. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul D. Lasky

    2015-08-26

    Neutron stars are excellent emitters of gravitational waves. Squeezing matter beyond nuclear densities invites exotic physical processes, many of which violently transfer large amounts of mass at relativistic velocities, disrupting spacetime and generating copious quantities of gravitational radiation. I review mechanisms for generating gravitational waves with neutron stars. This includes gravitational waves from radio and millisecond pulsars, magnetars, accreting systems and newly born neutron stars, with mechanisms including magnetic and thermoelastic deformations, various stellar oscillation modes and core superfluid turbulence. I also focus on what physics can be learnt from a gravitational wave detection, and where additional research is required to fully understand the dominant physical processes at play.

  18. Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-05-19

    Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

  19. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasky, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Neutron stars are excellent emitters of gravitational waves. Squeezing matter beyond nuclear densities invites exotic physical processes, many of which violently transfer large amounts of mass at relativistic velocities, disrupting spacetime and generating copious quantities of gravitational radiation. I review mechanisms for generating gravitational waves with neutron stars. This includes gravitational waves from radio and millisecond pulsars, magnetars, accreting systems and newly born neutron stars, with mechanisms including magnetic and thermoelastic deformations, various stellar oscillation modes and core superfluid turbulence. I also focus on what physics can be learnt from a gravitational wave detection, and where additional research is required to fully understand the dominant physical processes at play.

  20. A STUDY OF GRAVITATIONAL LENS CHROMATICITY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, J. A.; Mosquera, A. M.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Falco, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    We report Hubble Space Telescope observations of six gravitational lenses with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We measured the flux ratios between the lensed images in seven filters from 8140 #Angstrom# to 2200 #Angstrom#. In three of the systems, HE0512-3329, B1600+434, and H1413+117, we were able to construct UV extinction curves partially overlapping the 2175 #Angstrom# feature and characterize the properties of the dust relative to the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. In HE1104-1804, we detect chromatic microlensing and use it to study the physical properties of the quasar accretion disk. For a Gaussian model of the disk exp (- r{sup 2}/2r{sup 2}{sub s}), scaling with wavelength as r{sub s} {proportional_to}{lambda}{sup p}, we estimate r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 4{sup +4}{sub -2} (7 {+-} 4) light days and p = 1.1 {+-} 0.6 (1.0 {+-} 0.6) for a logarithmic (linear) prior on r{sub s} . The remaining two systems, FBQ0951+2635 and SBS1520+530, yielded no useful estimates of extinction or chromatic microlensing.

  1. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. Photometry of the MACHO-SMC-98-1 Binary Microlensing Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Udalski; M. Kubiak; M. Szymanski; G. Pietrzynski; P. Wozniak; K. Zebrun

    1998-09-02

    We present photometry of the unique binary microlensing event MACHO-SMC-98-1 collected by the OGLE group. Particularly interesting observation was made close to the first caustic crossing which was not covered by observations of other groups. It allows to test proposed models of which Model~1 proposed by PLANET group seems to be in the best agreement with the OGLE observations.

  2. Gravitational cooling of self-gravitating Bose-Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Siddhartha Guzman; L. Arturo Urena-Lopez

    2006-03-22

    Equilibrium configurations for a self-gravitating scalar field with self-interaction are constructed. The corresponding Schr\\"odinger-Poisson (SP) system is solved using finite differences assuming spherical symmetry. It is shown that equilibrium configurations of the SP system are late-time attractor solutions for initially quite arbitrary density profiles, which relax and virialize through the emission of scalar field bursts; a process dubbed gravitational cooling. Among other potential applications, these results indicate that scalar field dark matter models (in its different flavors) tolerate the introduction of a self-interaction term in the SP equations. This study can be useful in exploring models in which dark matter in galaxies is not point-like.

  3. Non-Relativistic Approximation of Dirac Equation for Slow Fermions Coupled to the Chameleon and Torsion Fields in the Gravitational Field of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, A N

    2015-01-01

    We analyse a non-relativistic approximation of the Dirac equation for slow fermions, coupled to the chameleon field and torsion in the spacetime with the Schwarzschild metric, taken in the weak gravitational field of the Earth approximation. We follow the analysis of the Dirac equation in the curved spacetime with torsion, proposed by Kostelecky (Phys. Rev. D69, 105009 (2004)), and apply the Foldy--Wouthuysen transformations. We derive the effective low-energy gravitational potentials for slow fermions, coupled to the gravitational field of the Earth, the chameleon field and to torsion with minimal and non-minimal couplings.

  4. Stellar masses and star formation rates of lensed dusty star-forming galaxies from the SPT survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Jingzhe; Spilker, J S; Strandet, M; Ashby, M L N; Aravena, M; Béthermin, M; Bothwell, M S; de Breuck, C; Brodwin, M; Chapman, S C; Fassnacht, C D; Greve, T R; Gullberg, B; Hezaveh, Y; Malkan, M; Marrone, D P; Saliwanchik, B R; Vieira, J D; Weiß, A; Welikala, N

    2015-01-01

    To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift ($2.8\\leq z \\leq 5.7$) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using {\\it HST}, {\\it Spitzer}, {\\it Herschel} and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution {\\it HST}/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in {\\it Spitzer}/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses...

  5. Thermal Duality and Gravitational Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewitt, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Thermal duality is a relationship between the behaviour of heterotic string models of the $E(8)x E(8)$ or $SO(32)$ types at inversely related temperatures, a variant of T duality in the Euclidean regime. This duality would have consequences for the nature of the Hagedon transition in these string models. We propose that the vacuum admits a family of deformations in situations where there are closed surfaces of constant area but high radial acceleration (a string regularized version of a Penrose trapped surface), such as would be formed in situations of extreme gravitational collapse. This would allow a radical resolution of the firewall paradox by allowing quantum effects to significantly modify the spacetime geometry around a collapsed object. A string bremsstrahlung process would convert the kinetic energy of infalling matter in extreme gravitational collapse to form a region of the deformed vacuum, which would be equivalent to forming a high temperature string phase. This process might have observable cons...

  6. Gravitational waves from perturbed stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeria Ferrari

    2011-05-09

    Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

  7. RESOLVING THE BARYON-FRACTION PROFILE IN LENSING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leier, Dominik; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit; Falco, Emilio E.

    2011-10-20

    The study of the distribution of baryonic matter within dark halos enriches our understanding of galaxy formation. We show the radial dependence of stellar baryon-fraction curves derived for 21 lensing galaxies from the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey (CASTLES) by means of stellar population synthesis and pixel-based mass reconstruction. The sample covers a stellar mass range of M{sub s} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 9}-3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (solar masses) which corresponds to a total enclosed mass range of M{sub L} {approx_equal} 7 x 10{sup 9}-3 x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} on radial scales from 0.25R{sub e} to 5R{sub e} (effective radii). By examining the M{sub s} and M{sub L} dependence on radial distance to the center of each galaxy, we find that there are pairs of lenses on small to intermediate mass scales which approach at large radii the same values for their enclosed total mass but exhibit very different stellar masses and stellar baryon fractions. This peculiar behavior subsides for the most massive lensing galaxies. All the baryon-fraction profiles show that the dark matter halo overtakes the stellar content between 1.5 and 2.5R{sub e}. At 3R{sub e} most of the stellar component is enclosed. We find evidence for a stellar baryon fraction steadily declining over the full mass range. Furthermore, we shed light on the Fundamental Plane puzzle by showing that the slope of the M{sub L} (< R)-to-M{sub s} (< R) relation approaches the mass-to-light relation of recent Fundamental Plane studies at large radii. We also introduce novel concentration indices c = R90/R50 for stellar and total mass profiles (i.e., the ratio of radii enclosing 90% and 50% of the stellar or total mass). We show that the value c = 2.6 originally determined by light profiles which separates early-type galaxies from late-type galaxies also holds for stellar mass. In particular, less massive dark matter halos turn out to be influenced by the distribution of stellar matter on resolved scales below 10 kpc. The ongoing study of resolved baryon-fraction profiles will make it possible to evaluate the validity of star formation models as well as adiabatic contraction prescriptions commonly used in simulations.

  8. Quantum correlation cost of the weak measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Zhang; Shao-xiong Wu; Chang-shui Yu

    2014-09-14

    Quantum correlation cost (QCC) characterizing how much quantum correlation is used in a weak-measurement process is presented based on the trace norm. It is shown that the QCC is related to the trace-norm-based quantum discord (TQD) by only a factor that is determined by the strength of the weak measurement, so it only catches partial quantumness of a quantum system compared with the TQD. We also find that the residual quantumness can be `extracted' not only by the further von Neumann measurement, but also by a sequence of infinitesimal weak measurements. As an example, we demonstrate our outcomes by the Bell-diagonal state.

  9. Development of Ground-testable Phase Fresnel Lenses in Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Krizmanic; Brian Morgan; Robert Streitmatter; Neil Gehrels; Keith Gendreau; Zaven Arzoumanian; Reza Ghodssi; Gerry Skinner

    2006-01-03

    Diffractive/refractive optics, such as Phase Fresnel Lenses (PFL's), offer the potential to achieve excellent imaging performance in the x-ray and gamma-ray photon regimes. In principle, the angular resolution obtained with these devices can be diffraction limited. Furthermore, improvements in signal sensitivity can be achieved as virtually the entire flux incident on a lens can be concentrated onto a small detector area. In order to verify experimentally the imaging performance, we have fabricated PFL's in silicon using gray-scale lithography to produce the required Fresnel profile. These devices are to be evaluated in the recently constructed 600-meter x-ray interferometry testbed at NASA/GSFC. Profile measurements of the Fresnel structures in fabricated PFL's have been performed and have been used to obtain initial characterization of the expected PFL imaging efficiencies.

  10. High-resolution ALMA Observations of SDP.81. II. Molecular Clump Properties of a Lensed Submillimeter Galaxy at z=3.042

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Iono, Daisuke; Matsuda, Yuichi; Hayashi, Masao; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-01

    We present spatially-resolved properties of molecular gas and dust in a gravitationally-lensed submillimeter galaxy H-ATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81) at $z=3.042$ revealed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We identified 14 molecular clumps in the CO(5-4) line data, all with a spatial scale of $\\sim$50-300 pc in the source plane. The surface density of molecular gas ($\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$) and star-formation rate ($\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$) of the clumps are more than three orders of magnitude higher than those found in local spiral galaxies. The clumps are placed in the `burst' sequence in the $\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$-$\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ plane, suggesting that $z \\sim 3$ molecular clumps follow the star-formation law derived for local starburst galaxies. With our gravitational lens model, the positions in the source plane are derived for the molecular clumps, dust clumps, and stellar components identified in the {\\sl Hubble Space Telescope} image. The molecular and dust clumps coexist in a similar re...

  11. WEAK APPROXIMATION OF FRACTIONAL SDES: THE DONSKER ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-07-23

    Jun 6, 2010 ... introduction. Indeed, in the latter reference, the .... Electronic Communications in Probability .... structure of weakly controlled process introduced in [10]. ...... [13] T. Lyons and Z. Qian (2002): System control and rough paths.

  12. Can the trace formula describe weak localisation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert S. Whitney; Igor V. Lerner; Robert A. Smith

    1999-02-24

    We attempt to systematically derive perturbative quantum corrections to the Berry diagonal approximation of the two-level correlation function (TLCF) for chaotic systems. To this end, we develop a ``weak diagonal approximation'' based on a recent description of the first weak localisation correction to conductance in terms of the Gutzwiller trace formula. This semiclassical method is tested by using it to derive the weak localisation corrections to the TLCF for a semiclassically disordered system. Unfortunately the method is unable to correctly reproduce the ``Hikami boxes'' (the relatively small regions where classical paths are glued together by quantum processes). This results in the method failing to reproduce the well known weak localisation expansion. It so happens that for the first order correction it merely produces the wrong prefactor. However for the second order correction, it is unable to reproduce certain contributions, and leads to a result which is of a different form to the standard one.

  13. Uncertainty and Complementarity Relations in Weak Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arun Kumar Pati; Junde Wu

    2014-11-26

    We prove uncertainty relations that quantitatively express the impossibility of jointly sharp preparation of pre- and post-selected quantum states for measuring incompatible observables during the weak measurement. By defining a suitable operator whose average in the pre-selected quantum state gives the weak value, we show that one can have new uncertainty relations for variances of two such operators corresponding to two non-commuting observables. These generalize the recent stronger uncertainty relations that give non-trivial lower bounds for the sum of variances of two observables which fully capture the concept of incompatible observables. Furthermore, we show that weak values for two non-commuting projection operators obey a complementarity relation. Specifically, we show that for a pre-selected state if we measure a projector corresponding to an observable $A$ weakly followed by the strong measurement of another observable $B$ (for the post-selection) and, for the same pre-selected state we measure a projector corresponding to an observable $B$ weakly followed by the strong measurement of the observable $A$ (for the post-selection), then the product of these two weak values is always less than one. This shows that even though individually they are complex and can be large, their product is always bounded.

  14. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  15. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

    2012-04-25

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  16. Broadband detuned Sagnac interferometer for future generation gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voronchev, N V; Danilishin, S L

    2015-01-01

    Broadband suppression of quantum noise below the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL) becomes a top-priority problem for the future generation of large-scale terrestrial detectors of gravitational waves, as the interferometers of the Advanced LIGO project, predesigned to be quantum-noise-limited in the almost entire detection band, are phased in. To this end, among various proposed methods of quantum noise suppression or signal amplification, the most elaborate approach implies a so-called *xylophone* configuration of two Michelson interferometers, each optimised for its own frequency band, with a combined broadband sensitivity well below the SQL. Albeit ingenious, it is a rather costly solution. We demonstrate that changing the optical scheme to a Sagnac interferometer with weak detuned signal recycling and frequency dependent input squeezing can do almost as good a job, as the xylophone for significantly lower spend. We also show that the Sagnac interferometer is more robust to optical loss in filter cavity, used f...

  17. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of a parabolic encounter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. L. Berry; Jonathan R. Gair

    2010-11-18

    We derive an analytic expression for the energy spectrum of gravitational waves from a parabolic Keplerian binary by taking the limit of the Peters and Matthews spectrum for eccentric orbits. This demonstrates that the location of the peak of the energy spectrum depends primarily on the orbital periapse rather than the eccentricity. We compare this weak-field result to strong-field calculations and find it is reasonably accurate (~10%) provided that the azimuthal and radial orbital frequencies do not differ by more than ~10%. For equatorial orbits in the Kerr spacetime, this corresponds to periapse radii of rp > 20M. These results can be used to model radiation bursts from compact objects on highly eccentric orbits about massive black holes in the local Universe, which could be detected by LISA.

  18. Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; H. Augustus; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; G. Castaldi; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; R. P. Croce; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; C. Cutler; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; J. Dickson; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. Ha; E. D. Hall; W. Hamilton; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; T. Horrom; D. Hoske; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; A. Idrisy; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; G. Islas; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang

    2014-04-17

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational-wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational-wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational-wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational-wave data is available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational-wave emission energy of $10^{-2}M_{\\odot}c^2$ at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors, and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational-wave detectors.

  19. An electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydia Bieri; David Garfinkle

    2013-09-10

    We present an electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory. That is, we consider what change has occurred to a detector of electromagnetic radiation after the wave has passed. Rather than a distortion in the detector, as occurs in the gravitational wave case, we find a residual velocity (a "kick") to the charges in the detector. In analogy with the two types of gravitational wave memory ("ordinary" and "nonlinear") we find two types of electromagnetic kick.

  20. MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jacqueline

    The CXOCY J220132.8-320144 system consists of an edge-on spiral galaxy lensing a background quasar into two bright images. Previous efforts to constrain the mass distribution in the galaxy have suggested that at least one ...

  1. The Gini Coefficient as a Morphological Measurement of Strongly Lensed Galaxies in the Image Plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian, Michael K; Gladders, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the morphology of strongly lensed galaxies is challenging because images of such galaxies are typically highly distorted. Lens modeling and source plane reconstruction is one approach that can provide reasonably undistorted images on which morphological measurements can be made, although at the expense of a highly spatially variable telescope PSF when mapped back to the source plane. Unfortunately, modeling the lensing mass is a time and resource intensive process, and in many cases there are too few constraints to precisely model the lensing mass. If, however, useful morphological measurements could be made in the image plane rather than the source plane, it would bypass this issue and obviate the need for a source reconstruction process. We examine the use of the Gini coefficient as one such measurement. Because it depends on the cumulative distribution of the light of a galaxy, but not the relative spatial positions, the fact that surface brightness is conserved by lensing means that th...

  2. Expanding the Area of Gravitational Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    2002-11-12

    I describe how gravitational entropy is intimately connected with the concept of gravitational heat, expressed as the difference between the total and free energies of a given gravitational system. From this perspective one can compute these thermodyanmic quantities in settings that go considerably beyond Bekenstein's original insight that the area of a black hole event horizon can be identified with thermodynamic entropy. The settings include the outsides of cosmological horizons and spacetimes with NUT charge. However the interpretation of gravitational entropy in these broader contexts remains to be understood.

  3. Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics of Planets and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Carl H

    2008-01-01

    Self-gravitational fluid mechanical methods termed hydro-gravitational-dynamics (HGD) predict plasma fragmentation 0.03 Myr after the turbulent big bang to form protosuperclustervoids, turbulent protosuperclusters, and protogalaxies at the 0.3 Myr transition from plasma to gas. Linear protogalaxyclusters fragment at 0.003 Mpc viscous-inertial scales along turbulent vortex lines or in spirals, as observed. The plasma protogalaxies fragment on transition into white-hot planet-mass gas clouds (PFPs) in million-solar-mass clumps (PGCs) that become globular-star-clusters (GCs) from tidal forces or dark matter (PGCs) by freezing and diffusion into 0.3 Mpc halos with 97% of the galaxy mass. The weakly collisional non-baryonic dark matter diffuses to > Mpc scales and frag-ments to form galaxy cluster halos. Stars and larger planets form by binary mergers of the trillion PFPs per PGC on 0.03 Mpc galaxy accretion disks. Star deaths depend on rates of planet accretion and internal star mixing. Moderate accretion rates p...

  4. Durability of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Lenses Used in Concentrating Photovoltaic Technology (Revised) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Carloni, J. D.; Pankow, J. W.; Gjersing, E. L.; To, B.; Packard, C. E.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-01-01

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) technology recently gained interest based on its expected low levelized cost of electricity, high efficiency, and scalability. Many CPV systems employ Fresnel lenses composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to obtain a high optical flux density on the cell. The optical and mechanical durability of these lenses, however, is not well established relative to the desired surface life of 30 years. Our research aims to quantify the expected lifetime of PMMA in key market locations (FL, AZ, and CO).

  5. Gravitational and non-gravitational energy: the need for background structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wüthrich, Christian

    Gravitational and non-gravitational energy: the need for background structures Vincent Lam- tional energy within the general theory of relativity. Some aspects of the difficulties to ascribe the usual features of localization and conservation to gravitational energy are reviewed and considered

  6. Q-weak Experiment Determines Proton's Weak Charge | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    of how the universe works-postulates that there are only four fundamental forces: electromagnetism, gravity, the "strong" force, and the "weak" force. The latter two are...

  7. Gravitational-wave sensitivity curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, C. J.; Cole, R. H.; Berry, C. P. L.

    2014-12-08

    timing residual of 100 ns. 4.4.3. SKA. The next great advancement in radio astronomy shall come with the completion of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA; Dewdney et al 2009). This shall greatly increase the sensitivity of pulsar timing (Kramer et al 2004... by producing plots that consistently compare different detectors. Similar figures can be generated on-line for general use at http://rhcole.com/apps/GWplotter. Keywords: gravitational waves, black holes, pulsar timing, pulsar timing arrays PACS numbers: 04...

  8. Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bischof, H; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campanelli, M; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Horrom, T; Hoske, D; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational-wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational-wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational-wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational-wave da...

  9. Theory and Modeling of Weakly Bound/Physisorbed Materials for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theory and Modeling of Weakly BoundPhysisorbed Materials for Hydrogen Storage Theory and Modeling of Weakly BoundPhysisorbed Materials for Hydrogen Storage Presentation on the...

  10. Thermal Duality and Gravitational Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Hewitt

    2015-04-19

    Thermal duality is a relationship between the behaviour of heterotic string models of the $E(8)x E(8)$ or $SO(32)$ types at inversely related temperatures, a variant of T duality in the Euclidean regime. This duality would have consequences for the nature of the Hagedon transition in these string models. We propose that the vacuum admits a family of deformations in situations where there are closed surfaces of constant area but high radial acceleration (a string regularized version of a Penrose trapped surface), such as would be formed in situations of extreme gravitational collapse. This would allow a radical resolution of the firewall paradox by allowing quantum effects to significantly modify the spacetime geometry around a collapsed object. A string bremsstrahlung process would convert the kinetic energy of infalling matter in extreme gravitational collapse to form a region of the deformed vacuum, which would be equivalent to forming a high temperature string phase. This process might have observable consequences for charged particles falling into a rotating collapsed object by producing high energy particles via a variant of the Penrose process.

  11. Quantum Communication Protocol Employing Weak Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso Botero; Benni Reznik

    1999-09-27

    We propose a communication protocol exploiting correlations between two events with a definite time-ordering: a) the outcome of a {\\em weak measurement} on a spin, and b) the outcome of a subsequent ordinary measurement on the spin. In our protocol, Alice, first generates a "code" by performing weak measurements on a sample of N spins. The sample is sent to Bob, who later performs a post-selection by measuring the spin along either of two certain directions. The results of the post-selection define the "key', which he then broadcasts publicly. Using both her previously generated code and this key, Alice is able to infer the {\\em direction} chosen by Bob in the post-selection. Alternatively, if Alice broadcasts publicly her code, Bob is able to infer from the code and the key the direction chosen by Alice for her weak measurement. Two possible experimental realizations of the protocols are briefly mentioned.

  12. Strong effects in weak nonleptonic decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, M.B.

    1980-04-01

    In this report the weak nonleptonic decays of kaons and hyperons are examined with the hope of gaining insight into a recently proposed mechanism for the ..delta..I = 1/2 rule. The effective Hamiltonian for ..delta..S = 1 weak nonleptonic decays and that for K/sup 0/-anti K/sup 0/ mixing are calculated in the six-quark model using the leading logarithmic approximation. These are used to examine the CP violation parameters of the kaon system. It is found that if Penguin-type diagrams make important contributions to K ..-->.. ..pi pi.. decay amplitudes then upcoming experiments may be able to distinguish the six-quark model for CP violation from the superweak model. The weak radiative decays of hyperons are discussed with an emphasis on what they can teach us about hyperon nonleptonic decays and the ..delta..I = 1/2 rule.

  13. Gravitational force between two electrons in superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2007-11-19

    The attractive gravitational force between two electrons in superconductors is deduced from the Eddington-Dirac large number relation, together with Beck and Mackey electromagnetic model of vacuum energy in superconductors. This force is estimated to be weaker than the gravitational attraction between two electrons in the vacuum.

  14. On multitemporal generalization of Newton's gravitational law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Ivashchuk

    2009-05-15

    A n-time generalization of Newton's law (of universal gravitation) formula in N =n + d + 1-dimensional space-time is conjectured. This formula implies a relation for effective N-dimensional gravitational constant G_{eff} = G cos^2 \\theta, where \\theta is the angle between the direction of motion of two particles in n-dimensional time manifold R^n.

  15. Centrifugal deformations of the gravitational kink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Maraner; Jiannis K. Pachos

    2008-11-29

    The Kaluza-Klein reduction of 4d conformally flat spacetimes is reconsidered. The corresponding 3d equations are shown to be equivalent to 2d gravitational kink equations augmented by a centrifugal term. For space-like gauge fields and non-trivial values of the centrifugal term the gravitational kink solutions describe a spacetime that is divided in two disconnected regions.

  16. Formation of Hydro-acoustic Waves in Weakly Compressible Fluid Interacting with Viscous Weakly Compressible Seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Formation of Hydro-acoustic Waves in Weakly Compressible Fluid Interacting with Viscous Weakly@udel.edu, giorgio.bellotti@uniroma3.it 1. Objective Enhancement of Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS) Hydro/s) [2]. Study of the characteristics of hydro-acoustic waves generated by sudden sea bottom motion

  17. Gravitational Interactions and Fine-Structure Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. D. Jentschura; J. H. Noble; I. Nandori

    2015-02-01

    Electromagnetic and gravitational central-field problems are studied with relativistic quantum mechanics on curved space-time backgrounds. Corrections to the transition current are identified. Analogies of the gravitational and electromagnetic spectra suggest the definition of a gravitational fine-structure constant. The electromagnetic and gravitational coupling constants enter the Einstein-Hilbert-Maxwell Lagrangian. We postulate that the variational principle holds with regard to a global dilation transformation of the space-time coordinates. The variation suggests is consistent with a functional relationship of the form alpha_QED being proportional to alpha_G^(1/2), where alpha_QED is the electrodynamic fine-structure constant, and alpha_G its gravitational analogue.

  18. Gravitational Waves in G4v

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mead, Carver

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational coupling of the propagation four-vectors of matter wave functions is formulated in flat space-time. Coupling at the momentum level rather than at the "force-law" level greatly simplifies many calculations. This locally Lorentz-invariant approach (G4v) treats electromagnetic and gravitational coupling on an equal footing. Classical mechanics emerges from the incoherent aggregation of matter wave functions. The theory reproduces, to first order beyond Newton, the standard GR results for Gravity-Probe B, deflection of light by massive bodies, precession of orbits, gravitational red shift, and total gravitational-wave energy radiated by a circular binary system. Its predictions of total radiated energy from highly eccentric Kepler systems are slightly larger than those of similar GR treatments. G4v predictions differ markedly from those of GR for the gravitational-wave radiation patterns from rotating massive systems, and for the LIGO antenna pattern. The predicted antenna patterns have been shown t...

  19. Gravitating sphalerons in the Skyrme model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ya. Shnir

    2015-08-26

    We construct self-gravitating axially symmetric sphaleron solutions of the 3+1 dimensional Skyrme model coupled to Einstein gravity. The solutions are static and asymptotically flat, they are characterized by two integers n and m, where n is the winding numbers of the constituents and the second integer m defines type of the solution. These configuration correspond to the chains of charge n Skyrmions and charge -n anti-Skyrmions placed along the axis of symmetry in alternating order. We investigate the dependency of the masses of the gravitating sphalerons on the gravitational coupling. We find new chains of self-gravitating |n| = 1 Skyrmions-anti-Skyrmions (S-A) which emerge at some critical non-zero value of the gravitational coupling and do not have flat space limit. In contrast, the branches of self-gravitating |n| $\\ge$ 2 S-A chains emerge from the corresponding flat space configurations. In both cases these branches merge at some maximal value of the effective gravitational coupling the branches of different type. The branch of gravitating S-A pair extends all the way back to the limit of vanishing coupling constant where solutions approach the corresponding generalised Bartnik-McKinnon solutions. The upper branch of gravitating S-A-S chain exist up to some critical value of the gravitational coupling at which the chain becomes broken. We further find that for small values of the coupling constant on the upper branches, the solutions correspond to composite systems, consisting of a scaled inner Einstein-Yang-Mills solution and outer Skyrmions which are separating from the inner configuration.

  20. High precision electrostatic potential calculations for cylindrically symmetric lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, David Jr. [238 Marylyn Lane, Newark, Vermont 05871 (United States)

    2007-02-15

    A method is developed for a potential calculation within cylindrically symmetric electrostatic lenses using mesh relaxation techniques, and it is capable of considerably higher accuracies than currently available. The method involves (i) creating very high order algorithms (orders of 6, 8, and 10) for determining the potentials at points in the net using surrounding point values, (ii) eliminating the effect of the large errors caused by singular points, and (iii) reducing gradients in the high gradient regions of the geometry, thereby allowing the algorithms used in these regions to achieve greater precisions--(ii) and (iii) achieved by the use of telescopic multiregions. In addition, an algorithm for points one unit from a metal surface is developed, allowing general mesh point algorithms to be used in these situations, thereby taking advantage of the enhanced precision of the latter. A maximum error function dependent on a sixth order gradient of the potential is defined. With this the single point algorithmic errors are able to be viewed over the entire net. Finally, it is demonstrated that by utilizing the above concepts and procedures, the potential of a point in a reasonably high gradient region of a test geometry can realize a precision of less than 10{sup -10}.

  1. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse physics.

  2. Researchers model birth of universe in one of largest cosmological...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    astrophysical phenomena as strong lensing, weak lensing shear, cluster lensing and galaxy-galaxy lensing. The code to run the simulation is called HardwareHybrid Accelerated...

  3. TIME DELAY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE MEASUREMENTS IN THE LENSED QUASAR SBS 0909+532 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH MICROLENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D. [Department of Physics, United States Naval Academy, 572C Holloway Rd, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy [United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-8521 (United States); Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Avda. de Los Castros s/n, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Falco, Emilio E., E-mail: hainline@usna.edu, E-mail: cmorgan@usna.edu, E-mail: macleod@usna.edu, E-mail: m123894@usna.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: trudy@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: goicol@unican.es, E-mail: vshal@ukr.net, E-mail: falco@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to {Delta}t{sub AB} = 50{sub -4}{sup +2} days, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1{sigma} confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {l_brace}(r{sub s,r}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 15.3 {+-} 0.3 and log {l_brace}(r{sub s,g}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 14.8 {+-} 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  4. Interaction of gravitational waves with matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cetoli; C. J. Pethick

    2011-10-03

    We develop a unified formalism for describing the interaction of gravitational waves with matter that clearly separates the effects of general relativity from those due to interactions in the matter. Using it, we derive a general expression for the dispersion of gravitational waves in matter in terms of correlation functions for the matter in flat spacetime. The self energy of a gravitational wave is shown to have contributions analogous to the paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions to the self energy of an electromagnetic wave. We apply the formalism to some simple systems - free particles, an interacting scalar field, and a fermionic superfluid.

  5. Generalized Gravitational Entropy from Total Derivative Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the generalized gravitational entropy from total derivative terms in the gravitational action. Following the method of Lewkowycz and Maldacena, we find that the generalized gravitational entropy from total derivatives vanishes. We compare our results with the work of Astaneh, Patrushev, and Solodukhin. We find that if total derivatives produced nonzero entropy, the holographic and the field-theoretic universal terms of entanglement entropy would not match. Furthermore, the second law of thermodynamics could be violated if the entropy of total derivatives did not vanish.

  6. Testing gravitational physics with superconducting gravimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachie Shiomi

    2009-02-24

    Superconducting gravimeters are the most sensitive instruments to measure surface gravity changes at low frequencies. Currently, about twenty five superconducting gravimeters are operating in the world and their global network has been developed. We investigate possible applications of the superconducting gravimeters to tests of gravitational physics. Previous experimental searches for spatial anisotropies in the gravitational constant G and for gravitational waves, performed with gravimeters in 1960's to 1970's, can be improved by applications of the current superconducting gravimeters. Also, we describe other proposed applications of testing the universality of free-fall and searching for composition-dependent dilatonic waves, and discuss future works necessary for these geophysical tests.

  7. The Gravitational Wave International Committee Roadmap: The future of gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Marx; Karsten Danzmann; James Hough; Kazuaki Kuroda; David McClelland; Benoit Mours; Sterl Phinney; Sheila Rowan; B. Sathyaprakash; Flavio Vetrano; Stefano Vitale; Stan Whitcomb; Clifford Will

    2011-11-24

    Gravitational wave science is on the verge of direct observation of the waves predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and opening the exciting new field of gravitational wave astronomy. In the coming decades, ultra-sensitive arrays of ground-based instruments and complementary spaced-based instruments will observe the gravitational wave sky, inevitably discovering entirely unexpected phenomena while providing new insight into many of the most profound astrophysical phenomena known. in July 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC) initiated the development of a strategic roadmap for the field of gravitational wave science with a 30-year horizon. The goal of this roadmap is to serve the international gravitational wave community and its stakeholders as a tool for the development of capabilities and facilities needed to address the exciting scientific opportunities on the intermediate and long-term horizons.

  8. The Gravitational Wave International Committee Roadmap: The future of gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave science is on the verge of direct observation of the waves predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and opening the exciting new field of gravitational wave astronomy. In the coming decades, ultra-sensitive arrays of ground-based instruments and complementary spaced-based instruments will observe the gravitational wave sky, inevitably discovering entirely unexpected phenomena while providing new insight into many of the most profound astrophysical phenomena known. in July 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC) initiated the development of a strategic roadmap for the field of gravitational wave science with a 30-year horizon. The goal of this roadmap is to serve the international gravitational wave community and its stakeholders as a tool for the development of capabilities and facilities needed to address the exciting scientific opportunities on the intermediate and long-term horizons.

  9. On naked singularities and the collapse of self-gravitating Higgs fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihalis Dafermos

    2004-11-02

    We consider the problem of collapse of a self-gravitating Higgs field, with potential bounded below by a (possibly negative) constant. The behaviour at infinity may be either asymptotically flat or asymptotically AdS. This problem has received much attention as a source for possible violations of weak cosmic censorship in string theory. In this paper, we prove under spherical symmetry that ``first singularities'' arising in the non-trapped region must necessarily emanate from the centre. In particular, this excludes the formation of a certain type of naked singularity which was recently conjectured to occur.

  10. Nuclear weak interaction rates in primordial nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George M. Fuller; Christel J. Smith

    2010-09-01

    We calculate the weak interaction rates of selected light nuclei during the epoch of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), and we assess the impact of these rates on nuclear abundance flow histories and on final light element abundance yields. We consider electron and electron antineutrino captures on 3He and 7Be, and the reverse processes of positron capture and electron neutrino capture on 3H and 7Li. We also compute the rates of positron and electron neutrino capture on 6He. We calculate beta and positron decay transitions where appropriate. As expected, the final standard BBN abundance yields are little affected by addition of these weak processes, though there can be slight alterations of nuclear flow histories. However, non-standard BBN scenarios, e.g., those involving out of equilibrium particle decay with energetic final state neutrinos, may be affected by these processes.

  11. The strict-weak lattice polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Corwin; Timo Seppäläinen; Hao Shen

    2015-07-06

    We introduce the strict-weak polymer model, and show the KPZ universality of the free energy fluctuation of this model for a certain range of parameters. Our proof relies on the observation that the discrete time geometric q-TASEP model, studied earlier by A. Borodin and I. Corwin, scales to this polymer model in the limit q->1. This allows us to exploit the exact results for geometric q-TASEP to derive a Fredholm determinant formula for the strict-weak polymer, and in turn perform rigorous asymptotic analysis to show KPZ scaling and GUE Tracy-Widom limit for the free energy fluctuations. We also derive moments formulae for the polymer partition function directly by Bethe ansatz, and identify the limit of the free energy using a stationary version of the polymer model.

  12. The effects of the RHIC E-lenses magnetic structure layout on the proton beam trajectory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Luo, Y.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed in RHIC IR10. First, the layout of these two E-lenses is introduced. Then the effects of e-lenses on proton beam are discussed. For example, the transverse fields of the e-lens bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. For the effects of the e-lens on proton beam trajectory, we calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera at first. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  13. Regular and chaotic dynamics of non-spherical bodies. Zeldovich's pancakes and emission of very long gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan; O. Yu. Tsupko

    2015-07-24

    In this paper we review a recently developed approximate method for investigation of dynamics of compressible ellipsoidal figures. Collapse and subsequent behaviour are described by a system of ordinary differential equations for time evolution of semi-axes of a uniformly rotating, three-axis, uniform-density ellipsoid. First, we apply this approach to investigate dynamic stability of non-spherical bodies. We solve the equations that describe, in a simplified way, the Newtonian dynamics of a self-gravitating non-rotating spheroidal body. We find that, after loss of stability, a contraction to a singularity occurs only in a pure spherical collapse, and deviations from spherical symmetry prevent the contraction to the singularity through a stabilizing action of nonlinear non-spherical oscillations. The development of instability leads to the formation of a regularly or chaotically oscillating body, in which dynamical motion prevents the formation of the singularity. We find regions of chaotic and regular pulsations by constructing a Poincare diagram. A real collapse occurs after damping of the oscillations because of energy losses, shock wave formation or viscosity. We use our approach to investigate approximately the first stages of collapse during the large scale structure formation. The theory of this process started from ideas of Ya. B. Zeldovich, concerning the formation of strongly non-spherical structures during nonlinear stages of the development of gravitational instability, known as 'Zeldovich's pancakes'. In this paper the collapse of non-collisional dark matter and the formation of pancake structures are investigated approximately. We estimate an emission of very long gravitational waves during the collapse, and discuss the possibility of gravitational lensing and polarization of the cosmic microwave background by these waves.

  14. Weakly nonlocal fluid mechanics - the Schrodinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Van; T. Fulop

    2004-06-09

    A weakly nonlocal extension of ideal fluid dynamics is derived from the Second Law of thermodynamics. It is proved that in the reversible limit the additional pressure term can be derived from a potential. The requirement of the additivity of the specific entropy function determines the quantum potential uniquely. The relation to other known derivations of Schr\\"odinger equation (stochastic, Fisher information, exact uncertainty) is clarified.

  15. Gravitational clustering in Static and Expanding Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    2003-08-28

    A brief summary of several topics in the study of gravitational many body problem is given. The discussion covers both static backgrounds (applicable to astrophysical systems) as well as clustering in an expanding background (relevant for cosmology)

  16. Novel Weak Decays in Doubly Strange Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Parreno; A. Ramos; C. Bennhold

    2001-06-22

    The strangeness-changing ($\\Delta S = 1$) weak baryon-baryon interaction is studied through the nonmesonic weak decay of double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei. Besides the usual nucleon-induced decay $\\Lambda N \\to N N$ we discuss novel hyperon-induced decay modes $\\Lambda \\Lambda \\to \\Lambda N$ and $\\Lambda \\Lambda \\to \\Sigma N$. These reactions provide unique access to the exotic $\\Lambda \\Lambda$K and $\\Lambda \\Sigma$K vertices which place new constraints on Chiral Pertubation Theory ($\\chi$PT) in the weak SU(3) sector. Within a meson-exchange framework, we use the pseudoscalar $\\pi,\\eta,K$ octet for the long-range part while parametrizing the short-range part through the vector mesons $\\rho, \\omega, K^*$. Realistic baryon-baryon forces for the $S=0,-1$ and -2 sectors account for the strong interaction in the initial and final states. For $^6_{\\Lambda \\Lambda}$He the new hyperon-induced decay modes account for up to 4% of the total nonmesonic decay rate. Predictions are made for all possible nonmesonic decay modes.

  17. Weak measurement and Bohmian conditional wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norsen, Travis; Struyve, Ward

    2014-11-15

    It was recently pointed out and demonstrated experimentally by Lundeen et al. that the wave function of a particle (more precisely, the wave function possessed by each member of an ensemble of identically-prepared particles) can be “directly measured” using weak measurement. Here it is shown that if this same technique is applied, with appropriate post-selection, to one particle from a perhaps entangled multi-particle system, the result is precisely the so-called “conditional wave function” of Bohmian mechanics. Thus, a plausibly operationalist method for defining the wave function of a quantum mechanical sub-system corresponds to the natural definition of a sub-system wave function which Bohmian mechanics uniquely makes possible. Similarly, a weak-measurement-based procedure for directly measuring a sub-system’s density matrix should yield, under appropriate circumstances, the Bohmian “conditional density matrix” as opposed to the standard reduced density matrix. Experimental arrangements to demonstrate this behavior–and also thereby reveal the non-local dependence of sub-system state functions on distant interventions–are suggested and discussed. - Highlights: • We study a “direct measurement” protocol for wave functions and density matrices. • Weakly measured states of entangled particles correspond to Bohmian conditional states. • Novel method of observing quantum non-locality is proposed.

  18. Searches for inspiral gravitational waves associated with short gamma-ray bursts in LIGO's fifth and Virgo's first science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Dietz

    2010-06-17

    Mergers of two compact objects, like two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, are the probable progenitor of short gamma-ray bursts. These events are also promising sources of gravitational waves, that are currently motivating related searches by an international network of gravitational wave detectors. Here we describe a search for gravitational waves from the in-spiral phase of two coalescing compact objects, in coincidence with short GRBs occurred during during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The search includes 22 GRBs for which data from more than one of the detectors in the LIGO/Virgo network were available. No statistically significant gravitational-wave candidate has been found, and a parametric test shows no excess of weak gravitational-wave signals in our sample of GRBs. The 90\\%~C.L. median exclusion distance for GRBs in our sample is of 6.7 Mpc, under the hypothesis of a neutron star - black hole progenitor model.

  19. Chiral Self-Gravitating Cosmic Vortices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rybakov, Yu.P. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Russian University of Peoples' Friendship, ul. Miklukho-Maklaya 6, Moscow, 117198 (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    In the framework of general relativity, an exact axisymmetric (vortex) solution of the equations of motion is obtained for the SU(2) symmetric sigma model. This solution is characterized by the topological charge (winding number) and angular deficit. In the linearized approximation, the Lyapunov stability of vortices is proved and the deflection angle of a light ray in the gravitational field of the vortex (gravitational lens effect) is calculated.

  20. Gravitational wave memory in de Sitter spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieri, Lydia; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-01-01

    We examine gravitational wave memory in the case where sources and detector are in an expanding cosmology. For simplicity, we treat the case where the cosmology is de Sitter spacetime, and discuss the possibility of generalizing our results to the case of a more realistic cosmology. We find results very similar to those of gravitational wave memory in an asymptotically flat spacetime, but with the magnitude of the effect multiplied by a redshift factor.

  1. Gravitational particle production in bouncing cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaume Haro; Emilio Elizalde

    2015-09-03

    It is argued that the Universe reheating in bouncing cosmologies could be explained via gravitational particle production, as due to a sudden phase transition in the contracting regime. To this end, it is shown that gravitational production of massive particles conformally coupled with gravity in a matter-ekpyrotic bouncing Universe, where the sudden phase transition occurs in the contracting regime, yields a reheating temperature which is in good agreement with cosmological observations.

  2. Gravitational Lorentz Violation and Superluminality via AdS/CFT Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman Sundrum

    2008-01-03

    A weak quantum mechanical coupling is constructed permitting superluminal communication within a preferred region of a gravitating AdS_5 spacetime. This is achieved by adding a spatially non-local perturbation of a special kind to the Hamiltonian of a four-dimensional conformal field theory with a weakly-coupled AdS dual, such as maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. In particular, two issues are given careful treatment: (1) the UV-completeness of our deformed CFT, guaranteeing the existence of a ``deformed string theory'' AdS dual, and (2) the demonstration that superluminal effects can take place in AdS, both on its boundary as well as in the bulk. Exotic Lorentz-violating properties such as these may have implications for tests of General Relativity, addressing the cosmological constant problem, or probing "behind'' horizons. Our construction may give insight into the interpretation of wormhole solutions in Euclidean AdS gravity.

  3. Gravitational Waves in G4v

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver Mead

    2015-03-16

    Gravitational coupling of the propagation four-vectors of matter wave functions is formulated in flat space-time. Coupling at the momentum level rather than at the "force-law" level greatly simplifies many calculations. This locally Lorentz-invariant approach (G4v) treats electromagnetic and gravitational coupling on an equal footing. Classical mechanics emerges from the incoherent aggregation of matter wave functions. The theory reproduces, to first order beyond Newton, the standard GR results for Gravity-Probe B, deflection of light by massive bodies, precession of orbits, gravitational red shift, and total gravitational-wave energy radiated by a circular binary system. Its predictions of total radiated energy from highly eccentric Kepler systems are slightly larger than those of similar GR treatments. G4v predictions differ markedly from those of GR for the gravitational-wave radiation patterns from rotating massive systems, and for the LIGO antenna pattern. The predicted antenna patterns have been shown to be highly distinguishable in the case of continuous gravitational-wave sources, and should therefore be testable as data from Advanced LIGO becomes available over the next few years.

  4. Effect of the electron lenses on the RHIC proton beam closed orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, X.; Luo, Y.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2011-02-01

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed at RHIC IR10. The transverse fields of the E-lenses bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. We calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  5. Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics of Planets and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson; Rudolph E. Schild

    2008-08-24

    Self-gravitational fluid mechanical methods termed hydro-gravitational-dynamics (HGD) predict plasma fragmentation 0.03 Myr after the turbulent big bang to form protosuperclustervoids, turbulent protosuperclusters, and protogalaxies at the 0.3 Myr transition from plasma to gas. Linear protogalaxyclusters fragment at 0.003 Mpc viscous-inertial scales along turbulent vortex lines or in spirals, as observed. The plasma protogalaxies fragment on transition into white-hot planet-mass gas clouds (PFPs) in million-solar-mass clumps (PGCs) that become globular-star-clusters (GCs) from tidal forces or dark matter (PGCs) by freezing and diffusion into 0.3 Mpc halos with 97% of the galaxy mass. The weakly collisional non-baryonic dark matter diffuses to > Mpc scales and frag-ments to form galaxy cluster halos. Stars and larger planets form by binary mergers of the trillion PFPs per PGC on 0.03 Mpc galaxy accretion disks. Star deaths depend on rates of planet accretion and internal star mixing. Moderate accretion rates produce white dwarfs that evaporate surrounding gas planets by spin-radiation to form planetary nebulae before Supernova Ia events, dimming some events to give systematic distance errors misinterpreted as the dark energy hypothesis and overestimates of the universe age. Failures of standard LCDM cosmological models reflect not only obsolete Jeans 1902 fluid mechanical assumptions, but also failures of standard turbulence models that claim the cascade of turbulent kinetic energy is from large scales to small. Because turbulence is always driven at all scales by inertial-vortex forces the turbulence cascade is always from small scales to large.

  6. Correcting Quadrupole Roll in Magnetic Lenses with Skew Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell

    2014-11-10

    Quadrupole rolls (i.e. rotation around the magnet axis) are known to be a significant source of image blurring in magnetic quadrupole lenses. These rolls may be caused by errors in mechanical mounting of quadrupoles, by uneven radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent-magnet quadrupoles, etc. Here a four-quadrupole ×10 lens with so-called ”Russian” or A -B B-A symmetry is used as a model problem. Existing SLAC 1/2 in. bore high-gradient quadrupoles are used in the design. The dominant quadrupole roll effect is changes in the first-order part of the transfer map (the R matrix) from the object to the image plane (Note effects on the R matrix can be of first order in rotation angle for some R-matrix elements and second order in rotation angle for other elements, as shown below). It is possible to correct roll-induced image blur by mechanically adjusting the roll angle of one or more of the quadrupoles. Usually, rotation of one quadrupole is sufficient to correct most of the combined effect of rolls in all four quadrupoles. There are drawbacks to this approach, however, since mechanical roll correction requires multiple entries into experimental area to make the adjustments, which are made according to their effect on images. An alternative is to use a single electromagnetic skew quadrupole corrector placed either between two of the quadrupoles or after the fourth quadrupole (so-called “non-local” correction). The basic feasibility of skew quadrupole correction of quadrupole roll effects is demonstrated here. Rolls of the third lens quadrupole of up to about 1 milliradian can be corrected with a 15 cm long skew quadrupole with a gradient of up to 1 T/m. Since the effect of rolls of the remaining three lens quadrupoles are lower, a weaker skew quadrupole can be used to correct them. Non-local correction of quadrupole roll effects by skew quadrupoles is shown to be about one-half as effective as local correction (i.e. rotating individual quadrupoles to zero roll angle or placing skew quadrupole correctors in the bores of main quadrupoles).

  7. A comparison of weak-turbulence and PIC simulations of weak electron-beam plasma interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratcliffe, Heather; Rozenan, Mohammed B Che; Nakariakov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    Quasilinear theory has long been used to treat the problem of a weak electron beam interacting with plasma and generating Langmuir waves. Its extension to weak-turbulence theory treats resonant interactions of these Langmuir waves with other plasma wave modes, in particular ion-sound waves. These are strongly damped in plasma of equal ion and electron temperatures, as sometimes seen in, for example, the solar corona and wind. Weak turbulence theory is derived in the weak damping limit, with a term describing ion-sound wave damping then added. In this paper we use the EPOCH particle-in-cell code to numerically test weak turbulence theory for a range of electron-ion temperature ratios. We find that in the cold ion limit the results agree well, but increasing ion temperature the three-wave resonance becomes broadened in proportion to the ion-sound wave damping rate. This may be important in, for example, the theory of solar radio bursts, where the spectrum of Langmuir waves is critical. Additionally we establish...

  8. Testing gravitational parity violation with coincident gravitational waves and short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Yunes; Richard O'Shaughnessy; Benjamin J. Owen; Stephon Alexander

    2010-05-18

    Gravitational parity violation is a possibility motivated by particle physics, string theory and loop quantum gravity. One effect of it is amplitude birefringence of gravitational waves, whereby left and right circularly-polarized waves propagate at the same speed but with different amplitude evolution. Here we propose a test of this effect through coincident observations of gravitational waves and short gamma-ray bursts from binary mergers involving neutron stars. Such gravitational waves are highly left or right circularly-polarized due to the geometry of the merger. Using localization information from the gamma-ray burst, ground-based gravitational wave detectors can measure the distance to the source with reasonable accuracy. An electromagnetic determination of the redshift from an afterglow or host galaxy yields an independent measure of this distance. Gravitational parity violation would manifest itself as a discrepancy between these two distance measurements. We exemplify such a test by considering one specific effective theory that leads to such gravitational parity-violation, Chern-Simons gravity. We show that the advanced LIGO-Virgo network and all-sky gamma-ray telescopes can be sensitive to the propagating sector of Chern-Simons gravitational parity violation to a level roughly two orders of magnitude better than current stationary constraints from the LAGEOS satellites.

  9. HISTORY OF WEAK INTERACTIONS. | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HISTORY OF WEAK INTERACTIONS. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HISTORY OF WEAK INTERACTIONS. You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech...

  10. Contradiction and grammar : the case of weak islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrusán, Márta

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is about weak islands. Weak islands are contexts that are transparent to some but not all operator-variable dependencies. For this reason, they are also sometimes called selective islands. Some paradigmatic ...

  11. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama

    2011-05-08

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

  12. Weak crystallization theory of metallic alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivar Martin; Sarang Gopalakrishnan; Eugene A. Demler

    2015-06-09

    We extend the Weak Crystallization theory to the case of metallic alloys. The additional ingredient -- itinerant electrons -- generates nontrivial dependence of free energy on the angles between ordering wave vectors of ionic density. That leads to stabilization of FCC, Rhombohedral, and icosahedral quasicrystalline (iQC) phases, which are absent in the generic theory with only local interactions. The condition for stability of iQC that we find, is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules known empirically for majority of stable iQC; namely, the length of the primary Bragg peak wavevector is approximately equal to the diameter of the Fermi surface.

  13. Thermodynamics of weakly measured quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Joaquin Alonso; Eric Lutz; Alessandro Romito

    2015-08-03

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superpositions of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  14. PLASMA EMISSION BY WEAK TURBULENCE PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J. E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br

    2014-11-10

    The plasma emission is the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and type III radio bursts. The first theory of plasma emission was put forth in the 1950s, but the rigorous demonstration of the process based upon first principles had been lacking. The present Letter reports the first complete numerical solution of electromagnetic weak turbulence equations. It is shown that the fundamental emission is dominant and unless the beam speed is substantially higher than the electron thermal speed, the harmonic emission is not likely to be generated. The present findings may be useful for validating reduced models and for interpreting particle-in-cell simulations.

  15. Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in Weak Boson Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hollik; T. Plehn; M. Rauch; H. Rzehak

    2008-04-17

    We compute the complete supersymmetric next-to-leading order corrections to the production of a light Higgs boson in weak boson fusion. The size of the electroweak corrections is of similar order as the next-to-leading order corrections in the Standard Model. The supersymmetric QCD corrections turn out to be significantly smaller than their electroweak counterparts. These higher--order corrections are an important ingredient to a precision analysis of the (supersymmetric) Higgs sector at the LHC, either as a known correction factor or as a contribution to the theory error.

  16. Boson Hubbard model with weakly coupled fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutchyn, Roman M.; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, S.

    2008-12-01

    Using an imaginary-time path integral approach, we develop the perturbation theory suited to the boson Hubbard model and apply it to calculate the effects of a dilute gas of spin-polarized fermions weakly interacting with the bosons. The full theory captures both the static and the dynamic effects of the fermions on the generic superfluid-insulator phase diagram. We find that, in a homogenous system described by a single-band boson Hubbard Hamiltonian, the intrinsic perturbative effect of the fermions is to generically suppress the insulating lobes and to enhance the superfluid phase.

  17. On Cosine-fourth and Vignetting Effects in Real Lenses* Manoj Aggarwal Hong Hua Narendra Ahuja

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahuja, Narendra

    On Cosine-fourth and Vignetting Effects in Real Lenses* Manoj Aggarwal Hong Hua Narendra Ahuja-off in irradiance for off-axis points and that accounted for by the cosine- fourth and vignetting effects. A closer this paper, we critically evalu- ate the roles of cosine-fourth and vignetting effects and demonstrate

  18. Subjective evaluation of intraocular lenses by visual acuity measurement using adaptive optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dainty, Chris

    Subjective evaluation of intraocular lenses by visual acuity measurement using adaptive optics Huanqing Guo,1, * Hamid R. Fallah,2 Chris Dainty,1 and Alexander V. Goncharov1 1 Applied Optics Group an ocular adaptive optics system by a single subject. To separate the spherical aberration

  19. Optical limiting and thermal lensing studies in C60 S. S. Harilal,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Optical limiting and thermal lensing studies in C60 S. S. Harilal,a) C. V. Bindhu, V. P. N 1999 Optical limiting and thermo-optic properties of C60 in toluene are studied using 532 nm, 9 ns pulses from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. Optical limiting studies in these fullerene molecules lead

  20. Electron lenses for compensation of beam-beam effects: Tevatron, RHIC, LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Since previous BEAM'06 workshop a year ago, significant progress has been made in the field of beam-beam compensation (BBC)--it has been experimentally demonstrated that both Tevatron Electron Lenses (TEL) significantly improve proton and luminosity lifetimes in high-luminosity stores. This article summarizes these results and discusses prospects of the BBC in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.

  1. Gradient-Index (GRIN) lenses by Slurry-based Three-Dimensional Printing (S-3DP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hong-Ren, 1973-

    2005-01-01

    GRIN lenses with vertical index variation and radial index variation have been successfully fabricated using S-3DPTM. Two silica-based material systems, A1203-SiO? and BaO-SiO?, have been studied and used for the fabrication ...

  2. Geometric control theory, closing lemma, and weak KAM theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Geometric control theory, closing lemma, and weak KAM theory Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Weak KAM Theory in Italy #12;Outline Lecture 1: Geometric control) Lecture 4: Closing Aubry sets Ludovic Rifford Weak KAM Theory in Italy #12;Lecture 1 Geometric control

  3. Neutrino energy transport in weak decoupling and big bang nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grohs, E; Kishimoto, C T; Paris, M W; Vlasenko, A

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of the early universe through the epochs of weak decoupling, weak freeze-out and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) by simultaneously coupling a full strong, electromagnetic, and weak nuclear reaction network with a multi-energy group Boltzmann neutrino energy transport scheme. Such an approach allows a detailed accounting of the evolution of the $\

  4. Testing Bell inequalities with weak measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shmuel Marcovitch; Benni Reznik

    2011-01-18

    Quantum theory is inconsistent with any local hidden variable model as was first shown by Bell. To test Bell inequalities two separated observers extract correlations from a common ensemble of identical systems. Since quantum theory does not allow simultaneous measurements of noncommuting observables, on each system every party measures a single randomly chosen observable out of a given set. Here we suggest a different approach for testing Bell inequalities that is experimentally realizable by current methods. We show that Bell inequalities can be maximally violated even when all observables are measured on each member of the ensemble. This is possible by using weak measurements that produce small disturbance, at the expense of accuracy. However, our approach does not constitute an independent test of quantum nonlocality since the local hidden variables may correlate the noise of the measurement instruments. Nevertheless, by adding a randomly chosen precise measurement at the end of every cycle of weak measurements, the parties can verify that the hidden variables were not interfering with the noise, and thus validate the suggested test.

  5. Energy Contents of Gravitational Waves in Teleparallel Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Sumaira Taj

    2009-10-02

    The conserved quantities, that are, gravitational energy-momentum and its relevant quantities are investigated for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity using the Hamiltonian approach. For both cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves, we obtain definite energy and constant momentum. The constant momentum shows consistency with the results available in General Relativity and teleparallel gravity. The angular momentum for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves also turn out to be constant. Further, we evaluate their gravitational energy-momentum fluxes and gravitational pressure.

  6. MOSFET Operation in Weak and Moderate Inversion R.R. Harrison The MOS Transistor in Weak Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Reid R.

    exponentially with decreasing gate voltage. Depletion Weak inversion Moderate inversion Strong inversion VGB VT0 axis: Weak inversion Moderate inversion Strong inversion VGB VT0 QI = -Cox(VGB ­ VT0) log |QI| QI -exp(VGB

  7. The impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse: filament formation and magnetic field amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Peters; Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Ralf S. Klessen; Robi Banerjee; Christoph Federrath; Rowan J. Smith; Sharanya Sur

    2012-09-26

    Stars form by the gravitational collapse of interstellar gas. The thermodynamic response of the gas can be characterized by an effective equation of state. It determines how gas heats up or cools as it gets compressed, and hence plays a key role in regulating the process of stellar birth on virtually all scales, ranging from individual star clusters up to the galaxy as a whole. We present a systematic study of the impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse in the context of high-redshift star formation, but argue that our findings are also relevant for present-day star formation in molecular clouds. We consider a polytropic equation of state, P = k rho^Gamma, with both sub-isothermal exponents Gamma 1. We find significant differences between these two cases. For Gamma > 1, pressure gradients slow down the contraction and lead to the formation of a virialized, turbulent core. Weak magnetic fields are strongly tangled and efficiently amplified via the small-scale turbulent dynamo on timescales corresponding to the eddy-turnover time at the viscous scale. For Gamma < 1, on the other hand, pressure support is not sufficient for the formation of such a core. Gravitational contraction proceeds much more rapidly and the flow develops very strong shocks, creating a network of intersecting sheets and extended filaments. The resulting magnetic field lines are very coherent and exhibit a considerable degree of order. Nevertheless, even under these conditions we still find exponential growth of the magnetic energy density in the kinematic regime.

  8. Energy-Momentum and Angular Momentum Carried by Gravitational Waves in Extended New General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisaku Sakane; Toshiharu Kawai

    2002-09-30

    In an extended, new form of general relativity, which is a teleparallel theory of gravity, we examine the energy-momentum and angular momentum carried by gravitational wave radiated from Newtonian point masses in a weak-field approximation. The resulting wave form is identical to the corresponding wave form in general relativity, which is consistent with previous results in teleparallel theory. The expression for the dynamical energy-momentum density is identical to that for the canonical energy-momentum density in general relativity up to leading order terms on the boundary of a large sphere including the gravitational source, and the loss of dynamical energy-momentum, which is the generator of \\emph{internal} translations, is the same as that of the canonical energy-momentum in general relativity. Under certain asymptotic conditions for a non-dynamical Higgs-type field $\\psi^{k}$, the loss of ``spin'' angular momentum, which is the generator of \\emph{internal} $SL(2,C)$ transformations, is the same as that of angular momentum in general relativity, and the losses of canonical energy-momentum and orbital angular momentum, which constitute the generator of Poincar\\'{e} \\emph{coordinate} transformations, are vanishing. The results indicate that our definitions of the dynamical energy-momentum and angular momentum densities in this extended new general relativity work well for gravitational wave radiations, and the extended new general relativity accounts for the Hulse-Taylor measurement of the pulsar PSR1913+16.

  9. Statistical mechanics of gravitating systems: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    2009-02-16

    I review several issues related to statistical description of gravitating systems in both static and expanding backgrounds. After briefly reviewing the results for the static background, I concentrate on gravitational clustering of collisionless particles in an expanding universe. In particular, I describe (a) how the non linear mode-mode coupling transfers power from one scale to another in the Fourier space if the initial power spectrum is sharply peaked at a given scale and (b) the asymptotic characteristics of gravitational clustering which are independent of the initial conditions. Numerical simulations as well as analytic work shows that power transfer leads to a universal power spectrum at late times, somewhat reminiscent of the existence of Kolmogorov spectrum in fluid turbulence.

  10. The gravitational wave symphony of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Sathyaprakash

    2002-07-10

    The new millennium will see the upcoming of several ground-based interferometric gravitational wave antennas. Within the next decade a space-based antenna may also begin to observe the distant Universe. These gravitational wave detectors will together operate as a network taking data continuously for several years, watching the transient and continuous phenomena occurring in the deep cores of astronomical objects and dense environs of the early Universe where gravity was extremely strong and highly non-linear. The network will listen to the waves from rapidly spinning non-axisymmetric neutron stars, normal modes of black holes, binary black hole inspiral and merger, phase transitions in the early Universe, quantum fluctuations resulting in a characteristic background in the early Universe. The gravitational wave antennas will open a new window to observe the dark Universe unreachable via other channels of astronomical observations.

  11. Bubble Universes With Different Gravitational Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-ichi Takamizu; Kei-ichi Maeda

    2015-04-21

    We argue a scenario motivated by the context of string landscape, where our universe is produced by a new vacuum bubble embedded in an old bubble and these bubble universes have not only different cosmological constants, but also their own different gravitational constants. We study these effects on the primordial curvature perturbations. In order to construct a model of varying gravitational constants, we use the Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) theory where different expectation values of scalar fields produce difference of constants. In this system, we investigate the nucleation of bubble universe and dynamics of the wall separating two spacetimes. In particular, the primordial curvature perturbation on superhorizon scales can be affected by the wall trajectory as the boundary effect. We show the effect of gravitational constant in the exterior bubble universe can provide a peak like a bump feature at a large scale in a modulation of power spectrum.

  12. Bubble Universes With Different Gravitational Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takamizu, Yu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We argue a scenario motivated by the context of string landscape, where our universe is produced by a new vacuum bubble embedded in an old bubble and these bubble universes have not only different cosmological constants, but also their own different gravitational constants. We study these effects on the primordial curvature perturbations. In order to construct a model of varying gravitational constants, we use the Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) theory where different expectation values of scalar fields produce difference of constants. In this system, we investigate the nucleation of bubble universe and dynamics of the wall separating two spacetimes. In particular, the primordial curvature perturbation on superhorizon scales can be affected by the wall trajectory as the boundary effect. We show the effect of gravitational constant in the exterior bubble universe can provide a peak like a bump feature at a large scale in a modulation of power spectrum.

  13. Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

    2012-05-11

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

  14. On the Bel radiative gravitational fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joan Josep Ferrando; Juan Antonio Sáez

    2012-04-18

    We analyze the concept of intrinsic radiative gravitational fields defined by Bel and we show that the three radiative types, N, III and II, correspond with the three following different physical situations: {\\it pure radiation}, {\\it asymptotic pure radiation} and {\\it generic} (non pure, non asymptotic pure) {\\it radiation}. We introduce the concept of {\\em observer at rest} with respect to the gravitational field and that of {\\em proper super-energy} of the gravitational field and we show that, for non radiative fields, the minimum value of the relative super-energy density is the proper super-energy density, which is acquired by the observers at rest with respect to the field. Several {\\it super-energy inequalities} are also examined.

  15. Clusters of Galaxies as Self-Gravitating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florence Durret; Ricardo Demarco; Frederic Magnard; Daniel Gerbal

    2001-05-29

    Self-gravitating systems such as elliptical galaxies appear to have a constant specific entropy and obey a scaling law relating their potential energy to their mass. These properties can be interpreted as due to the physical processes involved in the formation of these structures. Dark matter haloes obtained through numerical simulations have also been found to obey a scaling law relating their potential energy to their mass with the same slope as ellipticals. Since the X-ray gas in clusters is weakly dissipative, we have checked the hypothesis that it might verify similar properties. We have analyzed ROSAT-PSPC images of 24 clusters, and also found that: 1) the S\\'ersic law parameters (intensity, shape and scale) describing the X-ray gas emission are correlated two by two; 2) the hot gas in all these clusters roughly has the same specific entropy; 3) a scaling law linking the cluster potential energy to the mass of the X-ray gas is observed, with the same slope as for elliptical galaxies and dark matter haloes.

  16. A "Lorentz-Poincare"-Type Interpretation of Relativistic Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan; Broekaert

    2005-10-05

    The nature of 'time', 'space' and 'reality' are to large extent dependent on our interpretation of Special (SRT) and General Relativity Theory (GRT). In SRT essentially two distinct interpretations exist; the "geometrical" interpretation by Einstein based on the Principle of Relativity and the Invariance of the velocity of light and, the "physical" Lorentz-Poincar\\'e interpretation with underpinning by rod contractions, clock slowing and light synchronization, see e.g. (Bohm 1965, Bell 1987). It can be questioned whether the "Lorentz-Poincar\\'e"-interpretation of SRT can be continued into GRT. We have shown that till first Post-Newtonian order this is indeed possible (Broekaert 2004). This requires the introduction of gravitationally modified Lorentz transformations, with an intrinsical spatially-variable speed of light $c(r)$, a scalar scaling field $\\Phi$ and induced velocity field $w$. Still the invariance of the locally observed velocity of light is maintained (Broekaert 2005). The Hamiltonian description of particles and photons recovers the 1-PN approximation of GRT. At present we show the model does obey the Weak Equivalence Principle from a fixed perspective, and that the implied acceleration transformations are equivalent with those of GRT.

  17. Broadband detuned Sagnac interferometer for future generation gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Voronchev; S. P. Tarabrin; S. L. Danilishin

    2015-03-05

    Broadband suppression of quantum noise below the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL) becomes a top-priority problem for the future generation of large-scale terrestrial detectors of gravitational waves, as the interferometers of the Advanced LIGO project, predesigned to be quantum-noise-limited in the almost entire detection band, are phased in. To this end, among various proposed methods of quantum noise suppression or signal amplification, the most elaborate approach implies a so-called *xylophone* configuration of two Michelson interferometers, each optimised for its own frequency band, with a combined broadband sensitivity well below the SQL. Albeit ingenious, it is a rather costly solution. We demonstrate that changing the optical scheme to a Sagnac interferometer with weak detuned signal recycling and frequency dependent input squeezing can do almost as good a job, as the xylophone for significantly lower spend. We also show that the Sagnac interferometer is more robust to optical loss in filter cavity, used for frequency dependent squeezed vacuum injection, than an analogous Michelson interferometer, thereby reducing building cost even more.

  18. Quantum effects in many-body gravitating systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Golovko

    2015-04-07

    A hierarchy of equations for equilibrium reduced density matrices obtained earlier is used to consider systems of spinless bosons bound by forces of gravity alone. The systems are assumed to be at absolute zero of temperature under conditions of Bose condensation. In this case, a peculiar interplay of quantum effects and of very weak gravitational interaction between microparticles occurs. As a result, there can form spatially-bounded equilibrium structures macroscopic in size, both immobile and rotating. The size of a structure is inversely related to the number of particles in the structure. When the number of particles is relatively small the size can be enormous, whereas if this numbder equals Avogadro's number the radius of the structure is about 30 cm in the case that the structure consists of hydrogen atoms. The rotating objects have the form of rings and exhibit superfluidity. An atmosphere that can be captured by tiny celestial bodies from the ambient medium is considered too. The thickness of the atmosphere decreases as its mass increases. If short-range intermolecular forces are taken into account, the results obtained hold for excited states whose lifetime can however be very long. The results of the paper can be utilized for explaining the first stage of formation of celestial bodies from interstellar and even intergalactic gases.

  19. Quantum effects in many-body gravitating systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovko, V A

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchy of equations for equilibrium reduced density matrices obtained earlier is used to consider systems of spinless bosons bound by forces of gravity alone. The systems are assumed to be at absolute zero of temperature under conditions of Bose condensation. In this case, a peculiar interplay of quantum effects and of very weak gravitational interaction between microparticles occurs. As a result, there can form spatially-bounded equilibrium structures macroscopic in size, both immobile and rotating. The size of a structure is inversely related to the number of particles in the structure. When the number of particles is relatively small the size can be enormous, whereas if this numbder equals Avogadro's number the radius of the structure is about 30 cm in the case that the structure consists of hydrogen atoms. The rotating objects have the form of rings and exhibit superfluidity. An atmosphere that can be captured by tiny celestial bodies from the ambient medium is considered too. The thickness of the at...

  20. Environmental Effects for Gravitational-wave Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Barausse; Vitor Cardoso; Paolo Pani

    2015-01-07

    The upcoming detection of gravitational waves by terrestrial interferometers will usher in the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. This will be particularly true when space-based detectors will come of age and measure the mass and spin of massive black holes with exquisite precision and up to very high redshifts, thus allowing for better understanding of the symbiotic evolution of black holes with galaxies, and for high-precision tests of General Relativity in strong-field, highly dynamical regimes. Such ambitious goals require that astrophysical environmental pollution of gravitational-wave signals be constrained to negligible levels, so that neither detection nor estimation of the source parameters are significantly affected. Here, we consider the main sources for space-based detectors -- the inspiral, merger and ringdown of massive black-hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspirals -- and account for various effects on their gravitational waveforms, including electromagnetic fields, cosmological evolution, accretion disks, dark matter, "firewalls" and possible deviations from General Relativity. We discover that the black-hole quasinormal modes are sharply different in the presence of matter, but the ringdown signal observed by interferometers is typically unaffected. The effect of accretion disks and dark matter depends critically on their geometry and density profile, but is negligible for most sources, except for few special extreme mass-ratio inspirals. Electromagnetic fields and cosmological effects are always negligible. We finally explore the implications of our findings for proposed tests of General Relativity with gravitational waves, and conclude that environmental effects will not prevent the development of precision gravitational-wave astronomy.

  1. Quasi-classical Gravity effect on neutrino oscillations in a gravitational field of an heavy astrophysical object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Miller; Roman Pasechnik

    2015-10-02

    In the framework of quantum field theory, a graviton interacts locally with a quantum state having definite mass, i.e. the gravitational mass eigenstate, while a weak boson interacts with a state having definite flavor, i.e. the flavor eigenstate. An interaction of a neutrino with an energetic graviton may trigger the collapse of the neutrino to a definite mass eigenstate with probability expressed in terms of PMNS mixing matrix elements. Thus, gravitons would induce quantum decoherence of a coherent neutrino flavor state similarly to how weak bosons induce quantum decoherence of a neutrino in a definite mass state. We demonstrate that such an essentially quantum gravity effect may have strong consequences for neutrino oscillation phenomena in astrophysics due to relatively large scattering cross sections of relativistic neutrinos undergoing large-angle radiation of energetic gravitons in gravitational field of a classical massive source (i.e. the quasi-classical case of gravitational Bethe-Heitler scattering). This graviton-induced {\\it decoherence} is compared to {\\it decoherence} due to propagation in the presence of the Earth matter effect. Based on this study, we propose a new technique for the indirect detection of energetic gravitons by measuring the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos.

  2. Electromagnetic waves, gravitational coupling and duality analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. M. C. Abreu; C. Pinheiro; S. A. Diniz; F. C. Khanna

    2005-10-27

    In this letter we introduce a particular solution for parallel electric and magnetic fields, in a gravitational background, which satisfy free-wave equations and the phenomenology suggested by astrophysical plasma physics. These free-wave equations are computed such that the electric field does not induce the magnetic field and vice-versa. In a gravitational field, we analyze the Maxwell equations and the corresponding electromagnetic waves. A continuity equation is presented. A commutative and noncommutative analysis of the electromagnetic duality is described.

  3. ngravs: Distinct gravitational interactions in GADGET-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croker, K A S

    2015-01-01

    We discuss an extension of the massively parallel cosmological simulation code GADGET-2, which enables investigation of distinct gravitational force laws between particle species. In addition to simplifying investigations of a universally modified force law, the ngravs extension allows state-of-the-art collisionless cosmological simulations of quite exotic gravitational scenarios. We briefly review the algorithms used by GADGET-2, and present our extension to multiple gravities, highlighting additional features that facilitate consideration of exotic force laws. We discuss the accuracy and performance of the ngravs extension, both internally and with an unaltered GADGET-2, under all relevant operational modes. The ngravs extension is publicly released to the research community.

  4. Gravitational waves induced by spinor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Kaixi

    2015-01-01

    In realistic model-building, spinor fields with various masses are present. During inflation, spinor field may induce gravitational waves as a second order effect. In this paper, we calculate the contribution of single massive spinor field to the power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave by using retarded Green propagator. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $H^4/M_P^4$ for arbitrary spinor mass $m_{\\psi}$. Additionally, we also observe that when $m_\\psi \\gtrsim H$, the dependence of correction on $m_\\psi/H$ is nontrivial.

  5. Gravitational waves induced by spinor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaixi Feng; Yun-Song Piao

    2015-09-03

    In realistic model-building, spinor fields with various masses are present. During inflation, spinor field may induce gravitational waves as a second order effect. In this paper, we calculate the contribution of single massive spinor field to the power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave by using retarded Green propagator. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $H^4/M_P^4$ for arbitrary spinor mass $m_{\\psi}$. Additionally, we also observe that when $m_\\psi \\gtrsim H$, the dependence of correction on $m_\\psi/H$ is nontrivial.

  6. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  7. Phenomenology of MOND and gravitational polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Blanchet; Laura Bernard

    2014-03-24

    The phenomenology of MOND (flat rotation curves of galaxies, baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, etc.) is a basic set of phenomena relevant to galaxy dynamics and dark matter distribution at galaxy scales. Still unexplained today, it enjoys a remarkable property, known as the dielectric analogy, which could have far-reaching implications. In the present paper we discuss this analogy in the framework of simple non-relativistic models. We show how a specific form of dark matter, made of two different species of particles coupled to different Newtonian gravitational potentials, could permit to interpret in the most natural way the dielectric analogy of MOND by a mechanism of gravitational polarization.

  8. Energy Transport in Weakly Anharmonic Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenichiro Aoki; Jani Lukkarinen; Herbert Spohn

    2006-02-05

    We investigate the energy transport in a one-dimensional lattice of oscillators with a harmonic nearest neighbor coupling and a harmonic plus quartic on-site potential. As numerically observed for particular coupling parameters before, and confirmed by our study, such chains satisfy Fourier's law: a chain of length N coupled to thermal reservoirs at both ends has an average steady state energy current proportional to 1/N. On the theoretical level we employ the Peierls transport equation for phonons and note that beyond a mere exchange of labels it admits nondegenerate phonon collisions. These collisions are responsible for a finite heat conductivity. The predictions of kinetic theory are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. In the range of weak anharmonicity, respectively low temperatures, reasonable agreement is observed.

  9. Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib Ammari; Thomas Boulier; Josselin Garnier

    2013-03-06

    In this paper, we provide a mathematical model for the electrolocation in weakly electric fishes. We first investigate the forward complex conductivity problem and derive the approximate boundary conditions on the skin of the fish. Then we provide a dipole approximation for small targets away from the fish. Based on this approximation, we obtain a non-iterative location search algorithm using multi-frequency measurements. We present numerical experiments to illustrate the performance and the stability of the proposed multi-frequency location search algorithm. Finally, in the case of disk- and ellipse-shaped targets, we provide a method to reconstruct separately the conductivity, the permittivity, and the size of the targets from multi-frequency measurements.

  10. Analysing weak orbital signals in Gaia data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucy, L B

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous orbits are found when minimum-chi^{2} estimation is applied to synthetic Gaia data for weak orbital signals - i.e., orbits whose astrometric signatures are comparable to the single-scan measurement error (Pourbaix 2002). These orbits are nearly parabolic, edge-on, and their major axes align with the line-of-sight to the observer. Such orbits violate the Copernican principle (CPr) and as such could be rejected. However, the preferred alternative is to develop a statistical technique that incorporates the CPr as a fundamental postulate. This can be achieved in the context of Bayesian estimation by defining a Copernican prior. With this development, Pourbaix's anomalous orbits no longer arise. Instead, orbits with a somewhat higher chi^{2} but which do not violate the CPr are selected. Other areas of astronomy where the investigator must analyse data from 'imperfect experiments' might similarly benefit from appropriately- defined Copernican priors.

  11. Stochastic semiclassical equations for weakly inhomogeneous cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Campos; Enric Verdaguer

    1995-11-28

    Semiclassical Einstein-Langevin equations for arbitrary small metric perturbations conformally coupled to a massless quantum scalar field in a spatially flat cosmological background are derived. Use is made of the fact that for this problem the in-in or closed time path effective action is simply related to the Feynman and Vernon influence functional which describes the effect of the ``environment'', the quantum field which is coarse grained here, on the ``system'', the gravitational field which is the field of interest. This leads to identify the dissipation and noise kernels in the in-in effective action, and to derive a fluctuation-dissipation relation. A tensorial Gaussian stochastic source which couples to the Weyl tensor of the spacetime metric is seen to modify the usual semiclassical equations which can be viewed now as mean field equations. As a simple application we derive the correlation functions of the stochastic metric fluctuations produced in a flat spacetime with small metric perturbations due to the quantum fluctuations of the matter field coupled to these perturbations.

  12. Gravitational lens modeling with basis sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birrer, Simon; Refregier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    We present a strong lensing modeling technique based on versatile basis sets for the lens and source planes. Our method uses high performance Monte Carlo algorithms, allows for an adaptive build up of complexity and bridges the gap between parametric and pixel based reconstruction methods. We apply our method to a HST image of the strong lens system RXJ1131-1231 and show that our method finds a reliable solution and is able to detect substructure in the lens and source planes simultaneously. Using mock data we show that our method is sensitive to sub-clumps with masses four orders of magnitude smaller than the main lens, which corresponds to about $10^8 M_{\\odot}$, without prior knowledge on the position and mass of the sub-clump. The modelling approach is flexible and maximises automation to facilitate the analysis of the large number of strong lensing systems expected in upcoming wide field surveys. The resulting search for dark sub-clumps in these systems, without mass-to-light priors, offers promise for p...

  13. Measuring Stellar Limb Darkening by Gravitational Microlensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Heyrovsky

    2003-05-19

    Observations of microlensing transit events can be used to measure the limb darkening of the lensed star. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several microlensing light curve inversion methods. The method of choice in this work is inversion by means of decomposition of the stellar surface brightness profile. We construct an ideal basis by principal component analysis of brightness profiles obtained from model atmosphere calculations. Limb darkening approximations using such a basis are superior to those using standard power-law limb darkening laws. We perform a full analysis of simulated single-lens microlensing transit events including a detailed error analysis of the method. In realistic events with a low impact parameter the brightness profile of the source can be recovered with a relative accuracy of 2% from the center of the source disk to 0.9 of the disk radius. We show that in the particular case of the observed MACHO Alert 95-30 event the intrinsic complex variability of the lensed red giant hinders efforts to recover its surface features.

  14. SHARP - III: First Use Of Adaptive Optics Imaging To Constrain Cosmology With Gravitational Lens Time Delays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Geoff C F; Wong, Kenneth C; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Chiueh, Tzihong; Halkola, Aleksi; Hu, I Shing; Auger, Matthew W; Koopmans, Leon V E; Lagattuta, David J; McKean, John P; Vegetti, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of the Hubble constant are critical for testing our current standard cosmological model and revealing possibly new physics. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, each strong gravitational lens system with measured time delays can allow one to determine the Hubble constant with an uncertainty of $\\sim 7\\%$. Since HST will not last forever, we explore adaptive-optics (AO) imaging as an alternative that can provide higher angular resolution than HST imaging but has a less stable point spread function (PSF) due to atmospheric distortion. To make AO imaging useful for time-delay-lens cosmography, we develop a method to extract the unknown PSF directly from the imaging of strongly lensed quasars. In a blind test with two mock data sets created with different PSFs, we are able to recover the important cosmological parameters (time-delay distance, external shear, lens mass profile slope, and total Einstein radius). Our analysis of the Keck AO image of the strong lens system RXJ1...

  15. Geometric phase shift for detection of gravitational radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N V Mitskievich; A I Nesterov

    2004-03-09

    An effect of geometrical phase shift is predicted for a light beam propagating in the field of a gravitational wave. Gravitational radiation detection experiments are proposed using this new effect, the corresponding estimates being given.

  16. The Q_weak Experimental Apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qweak Collaboration; T. Allison; M. Anderson; D. Androic; D. S. Armstrong; A. Asaturyan; T. D. Averett; R. Averill; J. Balewski; J. Beaufait; R. S. Beminiwattha; J. Benesch; F. Benmokhtar; J. Bessuille; J. Birchall; E. Bonnell; J. Bowman; P. Brindza; D. B. Brown; R. D. Carlini; G. D. Cates; B. Cavness; G. Clark; J. C. Cornejo; S. Covrig Dusa; M. M. Dalton; C. A. Davis; D. C. Dean; W. Deconinck; J. Diefenbach; K. Dow; J. F. Dowd; J. A. Dunne; D. Dutta; W. S. Duvall; J. R. Echols; M. Elaasar; W. R. Falk; K. D. Finelli; J. M. Finn; D. Gaskell; M. T. W. Gericke; J. Grames; V. M. Gray; K. Grimm; F. Guo; J. Hansknecht; D. J. Harrison; E. Henderson; J. R. Hoskins; E. Ihloff; K. Johnston; D. Jones; M. Jones; R. Jones; M. Kargiantoulakis; J. Kelsey; N. Khan; P. M. King; E. Korkmaz; S. Kowalski; A. Kubera; J. Leacock; J. P. Leckey; A. R. Lee; J. H. Lee; L. Lee; Y. Liang; S. MacEwan; D. Mack; J. A. Magee; R. Mahurin; J. Mammei; J. W. Martin; A. McCreary; M. H. McDonald; M. J. McHugh; P. Medeiros; D. Meekins; J. Mei; R. Michaels; A. Micherdzinska; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; N. Morgan; J. Musson; K. E. Mesick; A. Narayan; L. Z. Ndukum; V. Nelyubin; Nuruzzaman; W. T. H. van Oers; A. K. Opper; S. A. Page; J. Pan; K. D. Paschke; S. K. Phillips; M. L. Pitt; M. Poelker; J. F. Rajotte; W. D. Ramsay; W. R. Roberts; J. Roche; P. W. Rose; B. Sawatzky; T. Seva; M. H. Shabestari; R. Silwal; N. Simicevic; G. R. Smith; S. Sobczynski; P. Solvignon; D. T. Spayde; B. Stokes; D. W. Storey; A. Subedi; R. Subedi; R. Suleiman; V. Tadevosyan; W. A. Tobias; V. Tvaskis; E. Urban; B. Waidyawansa; P. Wang; S. P. Wells; S. A. Wood; S. Yang; S. Zhamkochyan; R. B. Zielinski

    2015-01-06

    The Jefferson Lab Q_weak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized liquid hydrogen target at small momentum transfer. A custom apparatus was designed for this experiment to meet the technical challenges presented by the smallest and most precise ${\\vec{e}}$p asymmetry ever measured. Technical milestones were achieved at Jefferson Lab in target power, beam current, beam helicity reversal rate, polarimetry, detected rates, and control of helicity-correlated beam properties. The experiment employed 180 microA of 89% longitudinally polarized electrons whose helicity was reversed 960 times per second. The electrons were accelerated to 1.16 GeV and directed to a beamline with extensive instrumentation to measure helicity-correlated beam properties that can induce false asymmetries. Moller and Compton polarimetry were used to measure the electron beam polarization to better than 1%. The electron beam was incident on a 34.4 cm liquid hydrogen target. After passing through a triple collimator system, scattered electrons between 5.8 degrees and 11.6 degrees were bent in the toroidal magnetic field of a resistive copper-coil magnet. The electrons inside this acceptance were focused onto eight fused silica Cerenkov detectors arrayed symmetrically around the beam axis. A total scattered electron rate of about 7 GHz was incident on the detector array. The detectors were read out in integrating mode by custom-built low-noise pre-amplifiers and 18-bit sampling ADC modules. The momentum transfer Q^2 = 0.025 GeV^2 was determined using dedicated low-current (~100 pA) measurements with a set of drift chambers before (and a set of drift chambers and trigger scintillation counters after) the toroidal magnet.

  17. Stresses, energy flow and energy density of gravitational nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Loinger

    2001-05-03

    Two arguments which show the validity of the concept of gravitational energy put forward by Lorentz and Levi-Civita.

  18. Core and filament formation in magnetized, self-gravitating isothermal layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Loo, Sven; Keto, Eric; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-07-01

    We examine the role of the gravitational instability in an isothermal, self-gravitating layer threaded by magnetic fields on the formation of filaments and dense cores. Using a numerical simulation, we follow the non-linear evolution of a perturbed equilibrium layer. The linear evolution of such a layer is described in the analytic work of Nagai et al. We find that filaments and dense cores form simultaneously. Depending on the initial magnetic field, the resulting filaments form either a spiderweb-like network (for weak magnetic fields) or a network of parallel filaments aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field lines (for strong magnetic fields). Although the filaments are radially collapsing, the density profile of their central region (up to the thermal scale height) can be approximated by a hydrodynamical equilibrium density structure. Thus, the magnetic field does not play a significant role in setting the density distribution of the filaments. The density distribution outside of the central region deviates from the equilibrium. The radial column density distribution is then flatter than the expected power law of r {sup –4} and similar to filament profiles observed with Herschel. Our results do not explain the near constant filament width of ?0.1pc. However, our model does not include turbulent motions. It is expected that the accretion-driven amplification of these turbulent motions provides additional support within the filaments against gravitational collapse. Finally, we interpret the filamentary network of the massive star forming complex G14.225-0.506 in terms of the gravitational instability model and find that the properties of the complex are consistent with being formed out of an unstable layer threaded by a strong, parallel magnetic field.

  19. Relic gravitational waves and the generalized second law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    German Izquierdo; Diego Pavon

    2005-01-12

    The generalized second law of gravitational thermodynamics is applied to the present era of accelerated expansion of the Universe. In spite of the fact that the entropy of matter and relic gravitational waves inside the event horizon diminish, the mentioned law is fulfilled provided that the expression for the entropy density of the gravitational waves satisfies a certain condition.

  20. INVERSE-SQUARE LAW TESTS 1 TESTS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    INVERSE-SQUARE LAW TESTS 1 TESTS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL INVERSE-SQUARE LAW E.G.Adelberger, B-1560 KEYWORDS: gravitation, experimental tests of inverse-square law, quantum gravity, extra dimensions ABSTRACT: We review recent experimental tests of the gravitational inverse-square law, and the wide variety

  1. SEARCHING FOR COOLING SIGNATURES IN STRONG LENSING GALAXY CLUSTERS: EVIDENCE AGAINST BARYONS SHAPING THE MATTER DISTRIBUTION IN CLUSTER CORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchard, Peter K.

    The process by which the mass density profile of certain galaxy clusters becomes centrally concentrated enough to produce high strong lensing (SL) cross-sections is not well understood. It has been suggested that the ...

  2. Tunable-Focus Cylindrical Liquid Crystal Lenses Yi-Hsin LIN, Hongwen REN, Kuan-Hsu FAN-CHIANG1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    that the proposed devices can have different focal lengths even if they have the same aperture size. A good.1­8) Among such lenses, those with slit electrodes are partic- ularly interesting due

  3. Evidence for Hydro-Gravitational Structure Formation Theory versus Cold-Dark-Matter, Hierarchical-Clustering, and Jeans 1902

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson; Rudy Schild

    2003-07-01

    Observations are compared to conflicting predictions about self-gravitational structure formation by the hydro-gravitational theory (HGT) of Gibson 1996-2003 versus cold-dark-matter hierarchical-clustering-cosmology (CDMHCC) and the Jeans 1902 criterion. According to HGT, gravitational structures form immediately after mass-energy equality by plasma fragmentation at 30,000 years when viscous and weak turbulence forces first balance gravitational forces within the horizon L_H = ct < L_J = c/[3\\rho G]^1/2, contrary to the Jeans 1902 criterion. Buoyancy forces fossilize the 10^-12 s^-1 rate-of-strain and the 10^-17 kg m^-3 baryonic density. The non-baryonic dark matter (NBDM) diffuses into the voids rather than forming cold-dark-matter (CDM) halos required by CDMHCC. From HGT, supercluster-mass to galaxy-mass fragments exist at the plasma to gas transition, and these fragment further to form proto-globular-star clusters (PGCs) and planetary-mass primordial-fog-particles (PFPs): the baryonic dark matter of the interstellar-medium and inner-galaxy-dark-matter-halos, from which all planets and stars are formed by accretion (Gibson 1996, Schild 1996). From HGT and a rich cluster mass profile (Tyson and Fischer 1995), D_NBDM = 6 x10^28 m^2 s^-1, m_NBDM <= 10^-33 kg, and the NBDM forms outer-galaxy halos after 300,000 years.

  4. On the Vacuum Propagation of Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Liu

    2007-06-05

    We show that, for any local, causal quantum field theory which couples covariantly to gravity, and which admits Minkowski spacetime vacuum(a) invariant under the inhomogeneous proper orthochronous Lorentz group, plane gravitational waves propagating in such Minkowski vacuum(a) do not dissipate energy or momentum via quantum field theoretic effects.

  5. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  6. Gravitational repulsion in the Schwarzschild field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGruder, C.H. III

    1982-06-15

    To the distant observer, who uses measuring instruments not affected by gravity, gravitational repulsion can occur anywhere in the Schwarzschild field. It depends on the relationship between the transverse and radial Schwarzschild velocities. On the other hand, local observers, whose measuring instruments are affected by gravity, can not detect a positive value for the acceleration of gravity.

  7. Gravitational wave diagnosis of a circumbinary disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimitake Hayasaki; Kent Yagi; Takahiro Tanaka; Shin Mineshige

    2012-01-13

    When binary black holes are embedded in a gaseous environment, a rotating disk surrounding them, the so-called circumbinary disk, will be formed. The binary exerts a gravitational torque on the circumbinary disk and thereby the orbital angular momentum is transferred to it, while the angular momentum of the circumbinary disk is transferred to the binary through the mass accretion. The binary undergoes an orbital decay due to both the gravitational wave emission and the binary-disk interaction. This causes the phase evolution of the gravitational wave signal. The precise measurement of the gravitational wave phase thus may provide information regarding the circumbinary disk. In this paper, we assess the detectability of the signature of the binary-disk interaction using the future space-borne gravitational wave detectors such as DECIGO and BBO by the standard matched filtering analysis. We find that the effect of the circumbinary disk around binary black holes in the mass range $6M_sun\\le{M}\\lesssim3\\times10^3M_sun$ is detectable at a statistically significant level in five year observation, provided that gas accretes onto the binary at a rate greater than $\\dot{M}\\sim1.4\\times10^{17} [gs^{-1}] j^{-1}(M/10M_sun)^{33/23}$ with 10% mass-to-energy conversion efficiency, where j represents the efficiency of the angular momentum transfer from the binary to the circumbinary disk. We show that $O(0.1)$ coalescence events are expected to occur in sufficiently dense molecular clouds in five year observation. We also point out that the circumbinary disk is detectable, even if its mass at around the inner edge is by over 10 orders of magnitude less than the binary mass.

  8. Cosmological inference using gravitational wave observations alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Messenger

    2015-06-22

    Gravitational waves emitted during the coalescence of binary neutron star systems are self-calibrating signals. As such they can provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance to a source without the need for a cosmic distance scale ladder. In general, however, the corresponding redshift measurement needs to be obtained electromagnetically since it is totally degenerate with the total mass of the system. Nevertheless, recent Fisher matrix studies has shown that if information about the equation of state of the neutron stars is available, it is indeed possible to extract redshift information from the gravitational wave signal alone. Therefore, measuring the cosmological parameters in pure gravitational wave fashion is possible. Furthermore, the huge number of sources potentially observable by the Einstein Telescope has led to speculations that the gravitational wave measurement is potentially competitive with traditional methods. The Einstein telescope is a conceptual study for a third generation gravitational wave detector which is designed to yield detections of $10^3-10^7$ binary neutron star systems per year. This study presents the first Bayesian investigation of the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters can be measured using observations of binary neutron star systems by the Einstein Telescope with the one year of observations. We find by direct simulation of $10^3$ detections of binary neutron stars that, within our simplifying assumptions, $H_0,\\Omega_m,\\Omega_\\Lambda,w_0$ and $w_1$ can be measured at the $95\\%$ level with an accuracy of $\\sim 8\\%,65\\%,39\\%,80\\%$ and $90\\%$, respectively. We also find, by extrapolation, that a measurement accuracy comparable with current measurements by Planck is reached for a number of observed events $O(10^{6-7})$

  9. Possible violation of Newtonian gravitational law at small distances and constraints on it from the Casimir effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Mostepanenko; M. Novello

    2000-08-03

    The recent ideas that the gravitational and gauge interactions become united at the weak scale lead to Yukawa-type corrections to the Newtonian gravitational law at small distances. We briefly summarize the best constraints on these corrections obtained recently from the experiments on the measurement of the Casimir force. The new constraints on the Yukawa-type interaction are derived from the latest Casimir force measurement between a large gold coated sphere and flat disk using an atomic force microscope. The obtained constraints are stronger up to 19 times comparing the previous experiment with aluminum surfaces and up to 4500 times comparing the Casimir force measurements between dielectrics. The application range of constraints obtained by means of an atomic force microscope is extended.

  10. The mass distribution of the strong lensing cluster SDSS J1531+3414

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon, Keren; Johnson, Traci L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gladders, Michael D. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rigby, Jane R. [Observational Cosmology Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wuyts, Eva [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Bayliss, Matthew B. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Florian, Michael K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Dahle, Håkon, E-mail: kerens@umich.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-11-01

    We present the mass distribution at the core of SDSS J1531+3414, a strong-lensing cluster at z = 0.335. We find that the mass distribution is well described by two cluster-scale halos with a contribution from cluster-member galaxies. New Hubble Space Telescope observations of SDSS J1531+3414 reveal a signature of ongoing star formation associated with the two central galaxies at the core of the cluster, in the form of a chain of star forming regions at the center of the cluster. Using the lens model presented here, we place upper limits on the contribution of a possible lensed image to the flux at the central region, and rule out that this emission is coming from a background source.

  11. The Solar Lense-Thirring effect: perspectives for a future measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The predicted Lense-Thirring perihelion precession of Mercury induced by the Sun's angular momentum through its general relativistic gravitomagnetic field amounts to 2 milliarcseconds per century. It turned out to be compatible with the latest experimental determinations of the supplementary perihelion precession of Mercury with the INPOP15a ephemerides, whose accuracy level has nowadays reached the magnitude of the predicted relativistic effect itself thanks to the analysis of some years of tracking data of the MESSENGER spacecraft, which orbited Mercury from 2011 to 2015. A dedicated analysis of three years of MESSENGER data with the DE ephemerides allowed for a $25\\%$ determination of the Sun's angular momentum by means of the Lense-Thirring effect, which turned out to be highly correlated with the signature due to the Solar quadrupole mass moment $J_2^{\\odot}$.

  12. Optical transport and manipulation of an ultracold atomic cloud using focus-tunable lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Léonard; Moonjoo Lee; Andrea Morales; Thomas M. Karg; Tilman Esslinger; Tobias Donner

    2014-09-25

    We present an optical setup with focus-tunable lenses to dynamically control the waist and focus position of a laser beam, in which we transport a trapped ultracold cloud of 87-Rb over a distance of 28 cm. The scheme allows us to shift the focus position at constant waist, providing uniform trapping conditions over the full transport length. The fraction of atoms that are transported over the entire distance comes near to unity, while the heating of the cloud is in the range of a few microkelvin. We characterize the position stability of the focus and show that residual drift rates in focus position can be compensated for by counteracting with the tunable lenses. Beyond being a compact and robust scheme to transport ultracold atoms, the reported control of laser beams makes dynamic tailoring of trapping potentials possible. As an example, we steer the size of the atomic cloud by changing the waist size of the dipole beam.

  13. Polarizable vacuum analysis of the gravitational metric tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing-Hao Ye

    2009-03-21

    The gravitational metric tensor implies a variable dielectric tensor of vacuum around gravitational matter. The curved spacetime in general relativity is then associated with a polarizable vacuum. It is found that the number density of the virtual dipoles in vacuum decreases with the distance from the gravitational centre. This result offers a polarizable vacuum interpretation of the gravitational force. Also, the anisotropy of vacuum polarization is briefly discussed, which appeals for observational proof of anisotropic light propagation in a vacuum altered by gravitational or electromagnetic field.

  14. Connecting Numerical Relativity and Data Analysis of Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deirdre Shoemaker; Karan Jani; Lionel London; Larne Pekowsky

    2015-03-09

    Gravitational waves deliver information in exquisite detail about astrophysical phenomena, among them the collision of two black holes, a system completely invisible to the eyes of electromagnetic telescopes. Models that predict gravitational wave signals from likely sources are crucial for the success of this endeavor. Modeling binary black hole sources of gravitational radiation requires solving the Eintein equations of General Relativity using powerful computer hardware and sophisticated numerical algorithms. This proceeding presents where we are in understanding ground-based gravitational waves resulting from the merger of black holes and the implications of these sources for the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  15. Gravitational waves from cosmological first order phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David

    2015-01-01

    First order phase transitions in the early Universe generate gravitational waves, which may be observable in future space-based gravitational wave observatiories, e.g. the European eLISA satellite constellation. The gravitational waves provide an unprecedented direct view of the Universe at the time of their creation. We study the generation of the gravitational waves during a first order phase transition using large-scale simulations of a model consisting of relativistic fluid and an order parameter field. We observe that the dominant source of gravitational waves is the sound generated by the transition, resulting in considerably stronger radiation than earlier calculations have indicated.

  16. Gravitational waves from cosmological first order phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Hindmarsh; Stephan Huber; Kari Rummukainen; David Weir

    2015-11-14

    First order phase transitions in the early Universe generate gravitational waves, which may be observable in future space-based gravitational wave observatiories, e.g. the European eLISA satellite constellation. The gravitational waves provide an unprecedented direct view of the Universe at the time of their creation. We study the generation of the gravitational waves during a first order phase transition using large-scale simulations of a model consisting of relativistic fluid and an order parameter field. We observe that the dominant source of gravitational waves is the sound generated by the transition, resulting in considerably stronger radiation than earlier calculations have indicated.

  17. Weak nuclear forces cause the strong nuclear force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Koschmieder

    2007-12-11

    We determine the strength of the weak nuclear force which holds the lattices of the elementary particles together. We also determine the strength of the strong nuclear force which emanates from the sides of the nuclear lattices. The strong force is the sum of the unsaturated weak forces at the surface of the nuclear lattices. The strong force is then about ten to the power of 6 times stronger than the weak force between two lattice points.

  18. Graphene transparency in weak magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Valenzuela; Saúl Hernández-Ortiz; Marcelo Loewe; Alfredo Raya

    2014-10-20

    We carry out an explicit calculation of the vacuum polarization tensor for an effective low-energy model of monolayer graphene in the presence of a weak magnetic field of intensity $B$ perpendicularly aligned to the membrane. By expanding the quasiparticle propagator in the Schwinger proper time representation up to order $(eB)^2$, where $e$ is the unit charge, we find an explicitly transverse tensor, consistent with gauge invariance. Furthermore, assuming that graphene is radiated with monochromatic light of frequency $\\omega$ along the external field direction, from the modified Maxwell's equations we derive the intensity of transmitted light and the angle of polarization rotation in terms of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_{xx}$) and transverse ($\\sigma_{xy}$) conductivities. Corrections to these quantities, both calculated and measured, are of order $(eB)^2/\\omega^4$. Our findings generalize and complement previously known results reported in literature regarding the light absorption problem in graphene from the experimental and theoretical points of view, with and without external magnetic fields.

  19. Optics solutions for pp operation with electron lenses at 100 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2014-07-12

    Electron lenses for head-on compensation are currently under commissioning and foreseen to be operational for the 2015 polarized proton run. These devices will provide a partial compensation of head-on beam-beam effects and allow to double the RHIC proton luminosity. This note reviews the optics constraints related to beam-beam compensation and summarizes the current lattice options for proton operation at 100 GeV.

  20. Semianalytic model of electron pulse propagation: Magnetic lenses and rf pulse compression cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Joel A.; Schroeder, W. Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor (M/C 273), Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The analytical Gaussian electron pulse propagation model of Michalik and Sipe [J. Appl. Phys. 99, 054908 (2006)] is extended to include the action of external forces on the pulse. The resultant ability to simulate efficiently the effect of electron optical elements (e.g., magnetic lenses and radio-frequency cavities) allows for the rapid assessment of electron pulse delivery systems in time-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy experiments.

  1. Perturbations of Weakly Resonant Power System Electromechanical Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Perturbations of Weakly Resonant Power System Electromechanical Modes Ian Dobson, Senior Member. The possible perturbations are illustrated with interactions between electromechanical modes in a 4 bus power

  2. Comparisons between isothermal and NFW mass profiles for strong-lensing galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Chenggang; Bartelmann, Matthias; Comerford, Julia M; Huang, J -S; Mellier, Yannick

    2008-01-01

    While both isothermal and NFW-based mass models for galaxy clusters are widely adopted in strong-lensing studies, they cannot easily be distinguished based solely on observed positions of arcs and arclets. We compare the magnifications predicted for giant arcs obtained from isothermal and NFW profiles, taking axially-symmetric and asymmetric mass distributions into account. We find that arc magnifications can differ strongly between the two types of density profiles even if the image morphology is well reproduced. Magnifications by lenses with NFW density profiles are usually larger than those for lenses with singular or nearly singular isothermal density profiles, unless the latter have large cores. Asymmetries play an important role. We illustrate our results with the two well-studied clusters MS 2137 and A~370. We confirm earlier results showing that both isothermal and NFW mass models can very well reproduce the observed arcs, radial arcs and other arclets. While the mass model for MS 2137 is not very wel...

  3. Radio Wave 'Messengers' of Periodic Gravitational Radiation and the Problem of Gravitationally Induced Nonlinearity in Electrodynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balakin; Z. G. Murzakhanov; G. V. Kisun'ko

    2005-11-10

    We discuss a gravitationally induced nonlinearity in hierarchic systems. We consider the generation of extremely low-frequency radio waves with a frequency of the periodic gravitational radiation; the generation is due to an induced nonlinear self-action of electromagnetic radiation in the vicinity of the gravitational-radiation source. These radio waves are a fundamentally new type of response of an electrodynamic system to gravitational radiation. That is why we here use an unconventional term: radio-wave messengers of periodic gravitational radiation.

  4. REVISTA MEXICANA DE FISICA S 54 (2) 7481 NOVIEMBRE 2008 Focusing of acoustic waves by flat lenses made from negatively refracting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    REVISTA MEXICANA DE F´ISICA S 54 (2) 74­81 NOVIEMBRE 2008 Focusing of acoustic waves by flat lenses

  5. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  6. A Connection between Gravitation and Electromagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Snyder

    2000-02-16

    It is argued that there is a connection between the fundamental forces of electromagnetism and gravitation. This connection occurs because of: 1) the fundamental significance of the finite and invariant velocity of light in inertial reference frames in the special theory, and 2) the reliance of the general theory of relativity upon the special theory of relativity locally in spacetime. The connection between the fundamental forces of electromagnetism and gravitation follows immediately from these two points. A brief review is provided of: 1) the role of the finite and invariant velocity of light in inertial reference frames in the special theory, and 2) certain fundamental concepts of the general theory, including its reliance on the special theory locally.

  7. Gravitation Wave Emission from Radio Pulsars Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Regimbau; J. A. de Freitas Pacheco

    2000-05-02

    We report a new pulsar population synthesis based on Monte Carlo techniques, aiming to estimate the contribution of galactic radio pulsars to the continuous gravitational wave emission. Assuming that the rotation periods of pulsars at birth have a Gaussian distribution, we find that the average initial period is 290 ms. The number of objects with periods equal to or less than 0.4 s, and therefore capable of being detected by an interferometric gravitational antenna like VIRGO, is of the order of 5100-7800. With integration times lasting between 2 and 3 yr, our simulations suggest that about two detections should be possible, if the mean equatorial ellipticity of the pulsars is $\\epsilon$ =10$^{-6}$. A mean ellipticity an order of magnitude higher increases the expected number of detections to 12-18, whereas for $\\epsilon < 10^{-6}$, no detections are expected

  8. Use of spheroidal models in gravitational tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sizikov, Valery

    2015-01-01

    The direct gravimetry problem is solved using the subdivision of each body of a deposit into a set of vertical adjoining bars, and in the inverse problem each body of a deposit is modeled by a uniform ellipsoid of revolution (spheroid). Well-known formulas for z-component of gravitational intensity of a spheroid are transformed to a convenient form. Parameters of a spheroid are determined by minimizing the Tikhonov smoothing functional using constraints on the parameters. This makes the ill-posed inverse problem by unique and stable. The Bulakh algorithm for initial estimating the depth and mass of a deposit is modified. The technique is illustrated by numerical model examples of deposits in the form of two and five bodies. The inverse gravimetry problem is interpreted as a gravitational tomography problem or the intravision of the Earth's crust and mantle.

  9. Prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of gravitational field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukushima, Toshio, E-mail: Toshio.Fukushima@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory, Ohsawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    As a modification of the oblate spheroidal case, a recursive method is developed to compute the point value and a few low-order derivatives of the prolate spheroidal harmonics of the second kind, Q{sub nm} (y), namely the unnormalized associated Legendre function (ALF) of the second kind with its argument in the domain, 1 < y < ?. They are required in evaluating the prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of the gravitational field in addition to the point value and the low-order derivatives of P-bar {sub nm}(t), the 4? fully normalized ALF of the first kind with its argument in the domain, |t| ? 1. The new method will be useful in the gravitational field computation of elongated celestial objects.

  10. Interferometer Techniques for Gravitational-Wave Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlotte Bond; Daniel Brown; Andreas Freise; Kenneth Strain

    2015-12-04

    Several km-scale gravitational-wave detectors have been constructed world wide. These instruments combine a number of advanced technologies to push the limits of precision length measurement. The core devices are laser interferometers of a new kind; developed from the classical Michelson topology these interferometers integrate additional optical elements, which significantly change the properties of the optical system. Much of the design and analysis of these laser interferometers can be performed using well-known classical optical techniques; however, the complex optical layouts provide a new challenge. In this review we give a textbook-style introduction to the optical science required for the understanding of modern gravitational wave detectors, as well as other high-precision laser interferometers. In addition, we provide a number of examples for a freely available interferometer simulation software and encourage the reader to use these examples to gain hands-on experience with the discussed optical methods.

  11. Some Wave Equations for Electromagnetism and Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-Hua Weng

    2010-08-11

    The paper studies the inferences of wave equations for electromagnetic fields when there are gravitational fields at the same time. In the description with the algebra of octonions, the inferences of wave equations are identical with that in conventional electromagnetic theory with vector terminology. By means of the octonion exponential function, we can draw out that the electromagnetic waves are transverse waves in a vacuum, and rephrase the law of reflection, Snell's law, Fresnel formula, and total internal reflection etc. The study claims that the theoretical results of wave equations for electromagnetic strength keep unchanged in the case for coexistence of gravitational and electromagnetic fields. Meanwhile the electric and magnetic components of electromagnetic waves can not be determined simultaneously in electromagnetic fields.

  12. The COS Stream Ciphers are Extremely Weak Steve Babbage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The COS Stream Ciphers are Extremely Weak Steve Babbage Vodafone Group R&D, Newbury, UK steve.babbage@vodafone.com Abstract: A new family of very fast stream ciphers called COS (for "crossing over system") has been. In this note we show that the COS ciphers are very weak indeed -- it requires negligible effort to reconstruct

  13. The COS Stream Ciphers are Extremely Weak Steve Babbage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The COS Stream Ciphers are Extremely Weak Steve Babbage Vodafone Group R&D, Newbury, UK steve.babbage@vodafone.com Abstract: A new family of very fast stream ciphers called COS (for ``crossing over system'') has been. In this note we show that the COS ciphers are very weak indeed --- it requires negligible effort to reconstruct

  14. Higgs Production via Gluon-Induced Weak Boson Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Vollinga

    2008-09-22

    We present a calculation that allows for an estimation of the NNLO contributions to the Higgs production in the weak boson fusion channel. A possible deterioration of this important channel for the Higgs discoveries at the LHC can be ruled out by this calculation due to the small remaining cross section after the weak boson cuts.

  15. On Principle of Universality of Gravitational Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Pestov

    2001-12-19

    In this work, the experiment is discussed on the verification of the principle of universality of gravitational interactions and some related problems of gravity theory and physics of elementary particles. The meaning of this proposal lies in the fact that the self-consistency of General Relativity, as it turns out, presuppose the existence of the nongravitating form of energy. Theory predicts that electrons are particles that transfer the nongravitating form of energy.

  16. Kinks, extra dimensions, and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth, E-mail: r.a.w.gregory@durham.ac.uk [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology and Centre for Particle Theory, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    We investigate in detail the gravitational wave signal from kinks on cosmic (super)strings, including the kinematical effects from the internal extra dimensions. We find that the signal is suppressed, however, the effect is less significant that that for cusps. Combined with the greater incidence of kinks on (super)strings, it is likely that the kink signal offers the better chance for detection of cosmic (super)strings.

  17. Energy-momentum Density of Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir M. Abbassi; Saeed Mirshekari

    2014-11-29

    In this paper, we elaborate the problem of energy-momentum in general relativity by energy-momentum prescriptions theory. Our aim is to calculate energy and momentum densities for the general form of gravitational waves. In this connection, we have extended the previous works by using the prescriptions of Bergmann and Tolman. It is shown that they are finite and reasonable. In addition, using Tolman prescription, exactly, leads to same results that have been obtained by Einstein and Papapetrou prescriptions.

  18. LIGO and the Search for Gravitational Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Norna A.

    2006-10-16

    Gravitational waves, predicted to exist by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity but as yet undetected, are expected to be emitted during violent astrophysical events such as supernovae, black hole interactions and the coalescence of compact binary systems. Their detection and study should lead to a new branch of astronomy. However the experimental challenge is formidable: ground-based detection relies on sensing displacements of order 10{sup -18} m over a frequency range of tens of hertz to a few kHz. There is currently a large international effort to commission and operate long baseline interferometric detectors including those that comprise LIGO - the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory - in the USA. In this talk I will give an introduction to the topic of gravitational wave detection and in particular review the status of the LIGO project which is currently taking data at its design sensitivity. I will also look to the future to consider planned improvements in sensitivity for such detectors, focusing on Advanced LIGO, the proposed upgrade to the LIGO project.

  19. Nuclear and gravitational energies in stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meynet, Georges; Ekström, Sylvia [Astronomical Observatory of Geneva University (Switzerland); Courvoisier, Thierry [ISDC, Astronomical Observatory of Geneva University (Switzerland)

    2014-05-09

    The force that governs the evolution of stars is gravity. Indeed this force drives star formation, imposes thermal and density gradients into stars at hydrostatic equilibrium and finally plays the key role in the last phases of their evolution. Nuclear power in stars governs their lifetimes and of course the stellar nucleosynthesis. The nuclear reactions are at the heart of the changes of composition of the baryonic matter in the Universe. This change of composition, in its turn, has profound consequences on the evolution of stars and galaxies. The energy extracted from the gravitational, respectively nuclear reservoirs during the lifetimes of stars of different masses are estimated. It is shown that low and intermediate mass stars (M < 8 M{sub ?}) extract roughly 90 times more energy from their nuclear reservoir than from their gravitational one, while massive stars (M > 8 M{sub ?}), which explode in a supernova explosion, extract more than 5 times more energy from the gravitational reservoir than from the nuclear one. We conclude by discussing a few important nuclear reactions and their link to topical astrophysical questions.

  20. New analytical methods for gravitational radiation and reaction in binaries with arbitrary mass ratio and relative velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chad R. Galley; Bei-Lok Hu

    2009-06-04

    We present a new analytical framework for describing the dynamics of a gravitational binary system with unequal masses moving with arbitrary relative velocity, taking into account the backreaction from both compact objects in the form of tidal deformation, gravitational waves and self forces. Allowing all dynamical variables to interact with each other in a self-consistent manner this formalism ensures that all the dynamical quantities involved are conserved on the background spacetime and obey the gauge invariance under general coordinate transformations that preserve the background geometry. Because it is based on a generalized perturbation theory and the important new emphasis is on the self-consistency of all the dynamical variables involved we call it a gravitational perturbation theory with self-consistent backreaction (GP-SCB). As an illustration of how this formalism is implemented we construct perturbatively a self-consistent set of equations of motion for an inspiraling gravitational binary, which does not require extra assumptions such as slow motion, weak-field or small mass ratio for its formulation. This case should encompass the inspiral and possibly the plunge and merger phases of binaries with otherwise general parameters (e.g., mass ratio and relative velocity) though more investigation is needed to substantiate it. In the second part, we discuss how the mass ratio can be treated as a perturbation parameter in the post-Newtonian effective field theory (PN-EFT) approach, thus extending the work of Goldberger and Rothstein for equal mass binaries to variable mass ratios. We provide rough estimates for the higher post-Newtonian orders needed to determine the number of gravitational wave cycles, with a specified precision, that fall into a detector's bandwidth.