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1

P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from local earthquake...

2

Variation of seismic-wave velocities in westerly granite under stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wave Results. S-wave Results. SUMMARY. REFERENCES. . . . :. 10 . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . 17 . . . . . 21 . . . . . 24 . . . . . 24 . . . . . 28 . . . . . 35 . . . . . . . 36 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE la. Compressional-wave velocities, Vp.... . 17 Figure 7 Crosscorrelation between two P-wave traces along one direction at two different pressure levels to determine the relative time delays. . . . . 20 Figure 8. (a, b and c). P-wave traces measured at the center of the faces along x-, y...

Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz Muhareb

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

Yoo, S. J. Ben

4

A comparison of light and velocity variations in Semiregular variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIR velocity variations are compared with simultaneous visual light curves for a sample of late-type semiregular variables (SRV). Precise radial velocity measurements are also presented for the SRV V450 Aql. Our aim is to investigate the nature of the irregular light changes found in these variables. Light and velocity variations are correlated in all stars of our sample. Based on these results we discuss several possibilities to explain the observed behavior. We find that pulsation is responsible for large amplitude variations. In a recent paper Lebzelter (1999) invoked large convective cells to understand observed velocity variations. This possibility is discussed with respect to the observed correlation between light and velocity changes. In the light of these results we investigate the origin of the semiregular variations.

T. Lebzelter; L. L. Kiss; K. H. Hinkle

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

5

Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

6

Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran were estimated by applying the conventional travel time-distance relation method to arrival times of well located earthquakes recorded at a few stations. The average uppermost mantle P wave velocity under Turkey is estimated from two stations of the World Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN), Istanbul and Tabriz. The data are consistent with a crust of uniform, but poorly determined, thickness and an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 7.73 +- 0.08 km/s. This velocity is very similar to that for the Aegean Sea and suggests that its structure could be closely related to that beneath Turkey. For Iran, the results calculated from travel times to three WWSSN stations, Meshed, Shiraz, and Tabriz, can be explained by a crust dipping toward the south-southeast at about 1/sup 0/ with an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 8.0 +- 0.1 km/s. If the crustal thickness were 34 km in the north it would reach about 49 km in the south. Based on these uppermost mantle velocities, the temperature at Moho beneath Turkey is probably close to the melting temperature of peridotite but that beneath Iran is probably lower.

Chen, C.; Chen, W.; Molnar, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Impact of Phase Transitions on P Wave Velocities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In regions where a high pressure phase is in equilibrium with a low pressure phase, the bulk modulus defined by the P-V relationship is greatly reduced. Here we evaluate the effect of such transitions on the P wave velocity. A model, where cation diffusion is the rate limiting factor, is used to project laboratory data to the conditions of a seismic wave propagating in the two-phase region. We demonstrate that for the minimum expected effect there is a significant reduction of the seismic velocity, as large as 10% over a narrow depth range.

D Weidner; L Li

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Effects of neutral interactions on velocity-shear-driven plasma waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a laboratory experiment, we demonstrate the substantial effects that collisions between charged and neutral particles have on low-frequency (?{sub i}????????{sub e}) shear-driven electrostatic lower hybrid waves in a plasma. We establish a strong (up to 2.5?kV/m) highly localized electric field with a length scale shorter than the ion gyroradius, so that the ions in the plasma, unlike the electrons, do not develop the full E?×?B drift velocity. The resulting shear in the particle velocities initiates the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, and we observe the formation of strong waves in the vicinity of the shear with variations in plasma densities of 10% or greater. Our experimental configuration allows us to vary the neutral background density by more than a factor of two while holding the charged particle density effectively constant. Not surprisingly, increasing the neutral density decreases the growth rate/saturation amplitude of the waves and increases the threshold electric field necessary for wave formation, but the presence of neutrals affects the dominant wave frequency as well. We show that a 50% increase in the neutral density decreases the wave frequency by 20% while also suppressing the electric field dependence of the frequency that is observed when fewer neutrals are present. The majority of these effects, as well as the values of the frequencies we observe, closely match the predictions of previously developed linear EIH instability theory, for which we present the results of a numerical solution.

Enloe, C. L. [Physics Department, US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80840 (United States); Tejero, E. M.; Amatucci, W. E.; Crabtree, C.; Ganguli, G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Sotnikov, V. [Sensors Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Variational Formulation of Kinematic Waves 1 A VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Variational Formulation of Kinematic Waves 1 A VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF KINEMATIC WAVES proposes two algorithms that, based on a variational version of kinematic wave (KW) theory (Daganzo, 2003, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA ABSTRACT It has been recently shown that all kinematic

Daganzo, Carlos F.

11

Velocity bunching in travelling wave accelerator with low acceleration gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the analytical and simulated results concerning the influences of the acceleration gradient in the velocity bunching process, which is a bunch compression scheme that uses a traveling wave accelerating structure as a compressor. Our study shows that the bunch compression application with low acceleration gradient is more tolerant to phase jitter and more successful to obtain compressed electron beam with symmetrical longitudinal distribution and low energy spread. We also present a transverse emittance compensation scheme to compensate the emittance growth caused by the increasing of the space charge force in the compressing process that is easy to be adjusted for different compressing factors.

Huang, Rui-Xuan; Li, Wei-Wei; Jia, Qi-Ka

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, and B. A. Shadwick  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities C. B. Schroeder, E, collisionless plasma is developed to analyze nonlinear plasma waves excited by intense drive beams. The maximum amplitude and wavelength are calculated for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures and arbitrary plasma wave

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

13

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference...

14

Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C. [CEA, LIST, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire d'Acoustique de l'Universite du Maine (LAUM), UMR CNRS 6613, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

Orthogonal-Phase-Velocity Propagation of Electromagnetic Plane Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In an isotropic, homogeneous, nondissipative, dielectric-magnetic medium that is simply moving with respect to an inertial reference frame, planewave solutions of the Maxwell curl postulates can be such that the phase velocity and the time-averaged Poynting vector are mutually orthogonal. Orthogonal-phase-velocity propagation thus adds to the conventional positive-phase-velocity propagation and the recently discovered negative-phase-velocity propagation that is associated with the phenomenon of negative refraction.

Tom G. Mackay; Akhlesh Lakhtakia

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Solitary Waves of the MRLW Equation by Variational Iteration Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a recent publication, Soliman solved numerically the modified regularized long wave (MRLW) equation by using the variational iteration method (VIM). In this paper, corrected numerical results have been computed, plotted, tabulated, and compared with not only the exact analytical solutions but also the Adomian decomposition method results. Solitary wave solutions of the MRLW equation are exactly obtained as a convergent series with easily computable components. Propagation of single solitary wave, interaction of two and three waves, and also birth of solitons have been discussed. Three invariants of motion have been evaluated to determine the conservation properties of the problem.

Hassan, Saleh M. [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Mathematics, College of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia 11566, Cairo (Egypt); Alamery, D. G. [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

17

Shear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table earthquake site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 6 Summary of seismic refraction/reflection methodsShear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table ­ earthquake site response measurements for Valley County, Idaho Lee M. Liberty and Gabriel M. Gribler, Boise State University Center

Barrash, Warren

18

Wave Packet for Massless Fermions and its Implication to the Superluminal Velocity Statistics of Neutrino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-dispersive wave packet for massless fermions is formulated on the basis of squeezed coherent states that are put in a form of common eigenfunction for the Hamiltonian and the helicity operator, starting from the Dirac equation. The wave packet thus constructed is demonstrated to propagate at a constant velocity as that of light. This explicit expression of wave packet for the massless fermions can facilitate theoretical analysis of problems where a wave packet is of formal significance. Furthermore, extensive wave packet may result in a superluminal velocity statistics if determined from the time-of-flight measurement, as recently done on muon neutrinos, when a threshold particle flux or energy transfer, which is eventually referred to the propagation of wave packet, to invoke a detection event is assumed.

Kelin Wang; Zexian Cao

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

19

Measurement of shear wave velocity of heavy oil De-hua Han, Jiajin Liu, University of Houston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for measurement of fluid velocity is to measure the travel time of the transmission wave and then the velocity can water, has been used and is good for P-wave measurement for a lot of fluid samples. But the transmission the principle of this method. The shear wave transducer is coupled with a buffer made of some kind of plastic

20

Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Measurements in Unlithified Sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with an average S-wave velocity of 600 ft/sec in the top 30 meters as having a relatively high risk for amplifying destructive earthquake waves (Hunter et al., 2010). S-wave studies have also been used to identify subsidence and liquefaction risks for wind-turbine... the method is more challenging geometrically (Kanli, 2008). In fact, it has become common practice to run geological core samples through CAT scans to help determine composition and image bedforms for oil exploration (Stewart, 1991). Medical...

Rickards, Benjamin Thomas

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A New Global Rayleigh and Love Wave Group Velocity Dataset For Constraining Lithosphere Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Global Rayleigh and Love Wave Group Velocity Dataset For Constraining Lithosphere Properties features and fit our data very well. This dataset will be used to constrain lithospheric structure globally the global datasets used in Ritzwoller et al. (2002) already consist of more than 100,000 paths, the nature

Laske, Gabi

22

Increase of shear wave velocity before the 1998 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increase of shear wave velocity before the 1998 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia) U. Wegler,1 of the edifice of Merapi volcano (Java, Indonesia) before its eruption in 1998 by analyzing multiply scattered eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia), Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L09303, doi:10.1029/2006GL025928. 1

Snieder, Roel

23

Standard practice for measuring the ultrasonic velocity in polyethylene tank walls using lateral longitudinal (LCR) waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice covers a procedure for measuring the ultrasonic velocities in the outer wall of polyethylene storage tanks. An angle beam lateral longitudinal (LCR) wave is excited with wedges along a circumferential chord of the tank wall. A digital ultrasonic flaw detector is used with sending-receiving search units in through transmission mode. The observed velocity is temperature corrected and compared to the expected velocity for a new, unexposed sample of material which is the same as the material being evaluated. The difference between the observed and temperature corrected velocities determines the degree of UV exposure of the tank. 1.2 The practice is intended for application to the outer surfaces of the wall of polyethylene tanks. Degradation typically occurs in an outer layer approximately 3.2-mm (0.125-in.) thick. Since the technique does not interrogate the inside wall of the tank, wall thickness is not a consideration other than to be aware of possible guided (Lamb) wave effects or reflection...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Generation of lower hybrid and whistler waves by an ion velocity ring distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using fully kinetic simulations in two and three spatial dimensions, we consider the generation and nonlinear evolution of lower hybrid waves produced by a cold ion ring velocity distribution in a low beta plasma. We show that the initial development of the instability is very similar in two and three dimensions and not significantly modified by electromagnetic effects, consistent with linear theory. At saturation, the level of electric field fluctuations is a small fraction of the background thermal energy; the electric field and corresponding density fluctuations consist of long, field-aligned striations. Energy extracted from the ring goes primarily into heating the background ions and the electrons at comparable rates. The initial growth and saturation of the magnetic components of the lower hybrid waves are related to the electric field components, consistent with linear theory. As the growing electric field fluctuations saturate, parallel propagating whistler waves develop by the interaction of two lower hybrid waves. At later times, these whistlers are replaced by longer wavelength, parallel propagating whistlers that grow through the decay of the lower hybrid fluctuations. Wave matching conditions demonstrate these conversion processes of lower hybrid waves to whistler waves. The conversion efficiency (=ratio of the whistler wave energy to the energy in the saturated lower hybrid waves) is computed and found to be significant ({approx}15%) for the parameters of the three-dimensional simulation (and even larger in the two-dimensional simulation), although when normalized in terms of the initial kinetic energy in the ring ions the overall efficiency is very small (<10{sup -4}). The results are compared with relevant linear and nonlinear theory.

Winske, D.; Daughton, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with inclusion of the beam velocity spread  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) with an initially straight electron beam is developed. The evolution equation of the nonlinear beam electron energy is derived. The numerical studies of the slow-wave ECM efficiency with inclusion of Gaussian beam velocity spread are presented. It is shown that the velocity spread reduces the interaction efficiency. -- Highlights: •The theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers is considered. •The calculation of efficiency under the resonance condition is presented. •The efficiency under Gaussian velocity spreads has been obtained.

Kong, Ling-Bao, E-mail: konglingbao@gmail.com [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Hong-Yu [School of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China)] [School of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Hou, Zhi-Ling, E-mail: houzl@mail.buct.edu.cn [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jin, Hai-Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Du, Chao-Hai [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure 1 Victor C. Tsai and Sarun Atiganyanun* 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure 1 and Green's functions have been well established 14 for many decades. However, or Green's function surface displacement. We address this gap in the 19 literature

27

Upper mantle structure of South America from joint inversion of waveforms and fundamental mode group velocities of Rayleigh waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper mantle structure of South America from joint inversion of waveforms and fundamental mode tomographic S wave velocity model for the upper mantle beneath South America is presented. We developed three-dimensional (3-D) upper mantle S velocity model and a Moho depth model for South America, which

van der Lee, Suzan

28

Variation in rectal temperature, respiratory rate, and pulse rate of cattle as related to variations in solar radiation, air temperature, wind velocity, and vapor pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIATION IN RECTAL TEMPERATURE, RESPIRATORY RATE, AND PULSE RATE GF CATTLE AS RELATED TO VARIATIONS IN SOLAR RADIATION, AIR TEMPERATURE, WIND VELOCITY, AND VAPOR PRESSURE A Dissertation By Mohammad Fazlur Rahim Quazi Approved as to style... Dissertation By Mohammad Fazlur Rahim tyiazi Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1955 Major Subject: Genetics ? ?4...

Quazi, Mohammad Fazlur Rahim

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Measurements of Spatially Resolved Velocity Variations in Shock Compressed Heterogeneous Materials Using a Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relatively straightforward changes in the optical design of a conventional optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) can be used to produce a line-imaging velocity interferometer wherein both temporal and spatial resolution can be adjusted over a wide range. As a result line-imaging ORVIS can be tailored to a variety of specific applications involving dynamic deformation of heterogeneous materials as required by the characteristic length scale of these materials (ranging from a few {micro}m for ferroelectric ceramics to a few mm for concrete). A line-imaging ORVIS has been successfully interfaced to the target chamber of a compressed gas gun driver and fielded on numerous tests in combination with simultaneous measurements using a dual delay-leg, ''push-pull'' VISAR system. These tests include shock loading of glass-reinforced polyester composites, foam reverberation experiments (measurements at the free surface of a thin aluminum plate impacted by foam), and measurements of dispersive velocity in a shock-loaded explosive simulant (sugar). Comparison of detailed spatially-resolved material response to the spatially averaged VISAR measurements will be discussed.

ASAY,JAMES R.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; TROTT,WAYNE M.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously.

Benjamin, R.F.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ion Bernstein waves in a plasma with a kappa velocity distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a Vlasov-Poisson model, a numerical investigation of the dispersion relation for ion Bernstein waves in a kappa-distributed plasma has been carried out. The dispersion relation is found to depend significantly on the spectral index of the ions, ?{sub i}, the parameter whose smallness is a measure of the departure from thermal equilibrium of the distribution function. Over all cyclotron harmonics, the typical Bernstein wave curves are shifted to higher wavenumbers (k) if ?{sub i} is reduced. For waves whose frequency lies above the lower hybrid frequency, ?{sub LH}, an increasing excess of superthermal particles (decreasing ?{sub i}) reduces the frequency, ?{sub peak}, of the characteristic peak at which the group velocity vanishes, while the associated k{sub peak} is increased. As the ratio of ion plasma to cyclotron frequency (?{sub pi}/?{sub ci}) is increased, the fall-off of ? at large k is smaller for lower ?{sub i} and curves are shifted towards larger wavenumbers. In the lower hybrid frequency band and harmonic bands above it, the frequency in a low-?{sub i} plasma spans only a part of the intraharmonic space, unlike the Maxwellian case, thus exhibiting considerably less coupling between adjacent bands for low ?{sub i}. It is suggested that the presence of the ensuing stopbands may be a useful diagnostic for the velocity distribution characteristics. The model is applied to the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer in which waves propagating perpendicularly to the ambient magnetic field at frequencies between harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency are frequently observed.

Nsengiyumva, F.; Mace, R. L.; Hellberg, M. A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)] [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vehicle Trajectory Reconstruction for Signalized Intersections Using Variational Formulation of Kinematic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Kinematic Waves Zhanbo Sun Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Rensselaer Polytechnic trajectories are considered. The method is5 based on the Variational Formulation of kinematic wave theory; Kinematic Wave Theory; Shortest Path Search17 #12;2 1. Introduction and Motivation18 Current traffic

Ban, Xuegang "Jeff"

34

MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

PETERSON SW

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

35

Study on creating hydraulic tomography for crystalline rock using frequency dependent elastic wave velocity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to establish a technique to obtain hydraulic conductivity distribution in granite rock masses using seismic tomography. We apply the characteristic that elastic wave velocity disperses in fully saturated porous media on frequency and this velocity dispersion is governed by the hydraulic conductivity - this characteristic has been confirmed in laboratory experiments. The feasibility and design of the field experiment was demonstrated in a first step with numerical simulations. In a second step we applied the technique to the fractured granite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. The emphasis of the field campaign was on the evaluation of the range of applicability of this technique. The field campaign was structured in three steps, each one corresponding to a larger spatial scale. First, the seismic tomography was applied to a small area - the two boreholes were located at a distance of 1.5 m. In the following step, we selected a larger area, in which the distance of the boreholes amounts to 10 m and the field corresponds to a more complex geology. Finally we applied the testing to a field where the borehole distance was of the order of 75 m. We also drilled a borehole to confirm hydraulic characteristic and reviewed hydraulic model in the 1.5 m cross-hole location area. The results from the field campaign are presented and their application to the various fields are discussed and evaluated. (authors)

Yoshimura, K.; Sakashita, S. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ando, K.; Bruines, P. [Civil Engineering Technical Division, Obayashi Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Blechschmidt, I. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); Kickmaier, W. [University of Applied Sciences, Northern Switzerland, Brugg (Switzerland); Onishi, Y.; Nishiyama, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Approximate analytical method and its use for calculation of phase velocities of acoustic plane waves in crystals for example LiNbO3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of the offered analytical method the determinant relation for a phase velocities of elastic waves for an arbitrary propagation directions in a piezoelectric crystal are received. The phase velocities of three normal elastic waves for the crystal of LiNbO3 are calculated. Results of this calculation for each of waves are presented graphically in the form of the cards allowing easily to define phase velocities in any given direction in crystal.

A. A. Golubeva

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Red Algae Respond to Waves: Morphological and Mechanical Variation in Mastocarpus papillatus Along  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Red Algae Respond to Waves: Morphological and Mechanical Variation in Mastocarpus papillatus Along Grove, California, 93950 Abstract. Intertidal algae are exposed to the potentially severe drag forces generated by crashing waves, and several species of brown algae respond, in part, by varying the strength

Denny, Mark

38

Diffractive Nonlinear Geometrical Optics for Variational Wave Equations and the Einstein Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive an asymptotic solution of the vacuum Einstein equations that describes the propagation and diffraction of a localized, large-amplitude, rapidly-varying gravitational wave. We compare and contrast the resulting theory of strongly nonlinear geometrical optics for the Einstein equations with nonlinear geometrical optics theories for variational wave equations.

Giuseppe Ali; John K. Hunter

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

39

Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure by Victor C. Tsai and Sarun Atiganyanun*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Note Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure by Victor C. Tsai displacement/stress eigenfunctions and Green's functions have been well established for many decades. However on frequency, or Green's function surface displacement. We address this gap in the liter- ature and here

40

Estimating near-surface shear wave velocities in Japan by applying seismic interferometry to KiK-net data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating near-surface shear wave velocities in Japan by applying seismic interferometry to KiK-net throughout Japan by applying seismic interferometry to the data recorded with KiK-net, a strong motion network in Japan. Each KiK-net station has two receivers; one receiver on the surface and the other

Cerveny, Vlastislav

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave velocity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

43.30.Ft, 43... short range was deemed desirable for isolating the effects of shallow water internal waves on acoustic... internal waves are not un- usual and it was ......

44

On the relationship of the 27-day variations of the solar wind velocity and galactic cosmic ray intensity in minimum epoch of solar activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the relationship of the 27-day variation of the galactic cosmic ray intensity with similar changes of the solar wind velocity and the interplanetary magnetic field based on the experimental data for the Bartels rotation period 2379 of 23 November 2007-19 December 2007. We develop a three dimensional (3-D) model of the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity based on the heliolongitudinally dependent solar wind velocity. A consistent, divergence-free interplanetary magnetic field is derived by solving Maxwells equations with a heliolongitudinally dependent 27-day variation of the solar wind velocity reproducing in situ observations. We consider two types of 3-D models of the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity - (1) with a plane heliospheric neutral sheet, and (2)- with the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field. The theoretical calculation shows that the sector structure does not influence significantly on the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity as...

Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet at sea surface is studied both analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet, in connection with the problem of oceanic rogue waves. In the framework of Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2D) hyperbolic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived, which determines the evolution of coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description for the process of nonlinear spatio-temporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system is integrated in quadratures, which fact allows us to understand qualitative differences between the linear and nonlinear regimes of the focusing of wave packet. Comparison of the Gaussian model predictions with results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-cres...

Ruban, V P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Seasonal variation of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric equatorial waves over the tropical Pacific  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric wind data spanning 31 years from 1964 to 1994 were analyzed at rawinsonde stations in the central/western Pacific. Traditional spectral and cross-spectral analysis led to the conclusion that there is a significant signal with periods between 3 and 4.5 days, which the authors link with the dominant antisymmetric waves predicted by theory to have these periods, mixed Rossby-gravity waves, and equatorial Rossby waves. Then the authors applied the seasonally varying spectral analysis method developed by Madden to study the average seasonal variation of these waves. The seasonally varying analysis suggested that there are significant twice-yearly maxima in equatorial wave activity throughout the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, with peaks occurring in late winter-spring and in late summer-fall. The twice-yearly signal was most prominent at the 70-hPa and 100-hPa levels. Similar and consistent results were also shown by an autoregressive cyclic spectral analysis. The cyclic spectral analysis suggested that the frequency characteristics of the v-wind wave power are different during the two maxima at some stations. In addition, the seasonally varying squared coherence between the u and v winds and the associated phase implied that there is horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves and that the sign of the flux is different during the two maxima. The differences in wave characteristics during the maxima periods may be related to different wave modes, seasonal variation of the basic zonal state, or possibly to different equatorial wave forcing mechanisms (i.e., convective versus lateral excitations). 52 refs., 12 figs.

Wikle, C.K.; Tsing-Chang Chen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Madden, R.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Autoresonant excitation and evolution of nonlinear waves: The variational approach L. Friedland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evolves by being phase locked with the pump wave in an extended region of space and/or time despite the variation of system's parameters. This automatic phase locking autoresonance yields a possibility of shaping known as a persisting phase lock- ing between resonantly driven nonlinear oscillators and driv- ing

Friedland, Lazar

48

The seasonal variation of the zonal velocity of the Atlantic Equatorial Undercurrent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements and. the possibility of considerable nonseasonal variation. The zonal current speed. at, the sea surface near the equator 0 0 east of 35 -30 W appears to have maximums in February-Nay and September-Octo'her and minimums in June... ~ ~ 22 23 'I 25 26 27 at at 30 31 e ~ 34 m/s ~ ~ ~ 35 37 Depth of the core (m) 0 cm/s isotach depth directly above the coze (m) 20 cm/s isotaoh depth directly below the core (m) 0 cm/s isotach depth diz'ectly below the core (m) Thickness...

Olling, Charles Randolph

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

50

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty,2.8247524°,is alocal

52

Laboratory measurements of the temporal and cross-shore variation of the wave-induced bed stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed laboratory measurements of horizontal velocity above a rough, fixed, impermeable slope were made to determine the effect of varying wave conditions on the shear stress in the swash zone. The research involved the design, construction...

Sukumaran, Ashok

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for wood-based panel products. In the forest products industry, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology, Ross and Pellerin 1994). One NDE technique, which uses stress-wave propagation characteristics, has received considerable atten- tion. Stress-wave-based NDE techniques have been investi- gated extensively

54

Coherent molecular transistor: Control through variation of the gate wave function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor.

Ernzerhof, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.Ernzerhof@UMontreal.ca [Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succursale A, Montréal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)] [Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succursale A, Montréal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Statistics of amplitude and fluid velocity of large and rare waves in the ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The understanding of large and rare waves in the ocean is becoming more important as these rare events are turning into more common observances. In order to design a marine structure or vehicle to withstand such a potentially ...

Suh, Il Ho

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases and wave velocities for increasing number of moments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases is characterized by two hierarchies of equations for moments of a suitable distribution function in which the internal degrees of freedom of a molecule is taken into account. On the basis of physical relevance the truncation orders of the two hierarchies are proven to be not independent on each other, and the closure procedures based on the maximum entropy principle (MEP) and on the entropy principle (EP) are proven to be equivalent. The characteristic velocities of the emerging hyperbolic system of differential equations are compared to those obtained for monatomic gases and the lower bound estimate for the maximum equilibrium characteristic velocity established for monatomic gases (characterized by only one hierarchy for moments with truncation order of moments N) by Boillat and Ruggeri (1997) (?{sub (N)}{sup E,max})/(c{sub 0}) ??(6/5 (N?1/2 )),(c{sub 0}=?(5/3 k/m T)) is proven to hold also for rarefied polyatomic gases independently from the degrees of freedom of a molecule. -- Highlights: •Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases is studied. •The relation between two hierarchies of equations for moments is derived. •The equivalence of maximum entropy principle and entropy principle is proven. •The characteristic velocities are compared to those of monatomic gases. •The lower bound of the maximum characteristic velocity is estimated.

Arima, Takashi, E-mail: tks@stat.nitech.ac.jp [Center for Social Contribution and Collaboration, Nagoya Institute of Technology (Japan); Mentrelli, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.mentrelli@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics and Research Center of Applied Mathematics (CIRAM), University of Bologna (Italy); Ruggeri, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.ruggeri@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics and Research Center of Applied Mathematics (CIRAM), University of Bologna (Italy)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

QUASI-PERIODIC PROPAGATING SIGNALS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: THE SIGNATURE OF MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OR HIGH-VELOCITY UPFLOWS?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the discovery of quasi-periodic propagating oscillations with periods of order 3-10 minutes in coronal loops with TRACE and SOHO/EIT (and later with STEREO/EUVI and Hinode/EIS), they have been almost universally interpreted as evidence for propagating slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves in the low plasma {beta} coronal environment. Here we show that this interpretation is not unique, and that for coronal loops associated with plage regions (as opposed to sunspots), the presence of magnetoacoustic waves may not be the only cause for the observed quasi-periodicities. We focus instead on the ubiquitous, faint upflows at 50-150 km s{sup -1} that were recently discovered as blueward asymmetries of spectral line profiles in footpoint regions of coronal loops, and as faint disturbances propagating along coronal loops in EUV/X-ray imaging time series. These faint upflows are most likely driven from below and have been associated with chromospheric jets that are (partially) rapidly heated to coronal temperatures at low heights. These two scenarios (waves versus flows) are difficult to differentiate using only imaging data, but careful analysis of spectral line profiles indicates that faint upflows are likely responsible for some of the observed quasi-periodic oscillatory signals in the corona. We show that recent EIS measurements of intensity and velocity oscillations of coronal lines (which had previously been interpreted as direct evidence for propagating waves) are actually accompanied by significant oscillations in the line width that are driven by a quasi-periodically varying component of emission in the blue wing of the line. This faint additional component of blue-shifted emission quasi-periodically modulates the peak intensity and line centroid of a single Gaussian fit to the spectral profile with the same small amplitudes (respectively a few percent of background intensity and a few km s{sup -1}) that were previously used to infer the presence of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Our results indicate that it is possible that a significant fraction of the quasi-periodicities observed with coronal imagers and spectrographs that have previously been interpreted as propagating magnetoacoustic waves are instead caused by these upflows. The different physical cause for coronal oscillations would significantly impact the prospects of successful coronal seismology using propagating disturbances in coronal loops.

De Pontieu, Bart [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); McIntosh, Scott W., E-mail: bdp@lmsal.co, E-mail: mscott@ucar.ed [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. I. Variational formulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unified theoretical framework is presented for analyzing various branches of drift Alfvén waves and describing their linear and nonlinear behaviors, covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Nonlinear gyrokinetic quasineutrality condition and vorticity equation, derived for drift Alfvén waves excited by energetic particles in fusion plasmas, are cast in integral form, which is generally variational in the linear limit; and the corresponding gyrokinetic energy principle is obtained. Well known forms of the kinetic energy principle are readily recovered from this general formulation. Furthermore, it is possible to demonstrate that the general fishbone like dispersion relation, obtained within the present theoretical framework, provides a unified description of drift Alfvén waves excited by energetic particles as either Alfvén eigenmodes or energetic particle modes. The advantage of the present approach stands in its capability of extracting underlying linear and nonlinear physics as well as spatial and temporal scales of the considered fluctuation spectrum. For these reasons, this unified theoretical framework can help understanding experimental observations as well as numerical simulation and analytic results with different levels of approximation. Examples and applications are given in Paper II [F. Zonca and L. Chen, “Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. II. The general fishbone-like dispersion relation,” Phys. Plasmas 21, 072121 (2014)].

Zonca, Fulvio, E-mail: fulvio.zonca@enea.it [ENEA C. R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, CP 65-00044 Frascati (Italy); Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen, Liu [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Variational integrators for the dynamics of thermo-elastic solids with finite speed thermal waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper formulates variational integrators for finite element discretizations of deformable bodies with heat conduction in the form of finite speed thermal waves. The cornerstone of the construction consists in taking advantage of the fact that the Green-Naghdi theory of type II for thermo-elastic solids has a Hamiltonian structure. Thus, standard techniques to construct variational integrators can be applied to finite element discretizations of the problem. The resulting discrete-in-time trajectories are then consistent with the laws of thermodynamics for these systems: for an isolated system, they exactly conserve the total entropy, and nearly exactly conserve the total energy over exponentially long periods of time. Moreover, linear and angular momenta are also exactly conserved whenever the exact system does. For definiteness, we construct an explicit second-order accurate algorithm for affine tetrahedral elements in two and three-dimensions, and demonstrate its performance with numerical examples.

Pablo Mata A; Adrian J Lew

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (?) of a 500?nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E?=?25?±?1?GPa and ?=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C., E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory for Acoustics and Thermal Physics, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Center for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 23, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vanstreels, K. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

12A.4 VERTICAL VELOCITY AND BUOYANCY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO PLUMES DETECTED BY AN AIRBORNE MM-WAVE RADAR IN THE CONVECTIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12A.4 VERTICAL VELOCITY AND BUOYANCY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO PLUMES DETECTED BY AN AIRBORNE MM-WAVE, is the availability of in situ thermodynamic and kinematic observations, and the direct observation of horizontal, as part of IHOP_02 (The International Water Vapor Project, Weckwerth et al 2003). The key radar

Geerts, Bart

62

Fluid Statics When the fluid velocity is zero, called the hydrostatic condition, the pressure variation is due only to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and zdirections can be calculated. The total net force vector, due to pressure, is: Notice that the termFluid Statics When the fluid velocity is zero, called the hydrostatic condition, the pressure the element is at rest, summation of all forces must equal zero. 0 0 1 2 From geometry, . After

Bahrami, Majid

63

Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

Redpath, Bruce B.

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

64

Relation of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvatures of the slowness and ray{velocity surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relation of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvatures of the slowness and ray The contravariant components of the wave{propagation metric tensor equal half the second{order partial derivatives. The relations of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvature matrix and Gaussian curvature

Cerveny, Vlastislav

65

Heteroclinic standing waves in defocussing DNLS equations -- Variational approach via energy minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study heteroclinic standing waves (dark solitons) in discrete nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equations with defocussing nonlinearity. Our main result is a quite elementary existence proof for waves with monotone and odd profile, and relies on minimizing an appropriately defined energy functional. We also study the continuum limit and the numerical approximation of standing waves.

Michael Herrmann

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

The ear converts the pressure amplitude variations of sound waves into sensations that we can perceive. The central point to be gleaned from this description is that the ear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ear The ear converts the pressure amplitude variations of sound waves into sensations that we of the processes involved in hearing. 1. Sound waves enter the auditory canal and the pulsating pressure variations wave. 3. The fluid in the cochlea is vibrated with the frequencies of the incoming sound wave

Robertson, William

67

A study of gravity wave induced pressure variations in the presence of a submerged cylinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 5 Recorder Calibration For A Water Depth of 28 Inches 13 6 Sample Oscillograph Record 16 7 Comparison of Wave Pressure for Three Wave Lengths 23 8 Comparison of Wave Pressure at Different Cylinder Depths 24-25 9 Comparison of Wave Pressure... of sufficiently small height A p = P ft ? 2.9 With no cylinder present, it follows from 2*6 that ( A p ) ^ = p Ao* cosh k(y + d) sin (kx - crt) ? 2*10 In view of relation 2*14 below, relation 2*11 as applied at the bottom (y = - d) reduces to ( A p...

Ellis, Roy

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves Hiu Ning Chan (1 waves; Long-short resonance PACS Classification: 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg #12;2 ABSTRACT A resonance between long and short waves will occur if the phase velocity of the long wave matches the group velocity

69

In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand the differences between transverse and longitudinal waves. APPARATUS: Buzzer board with string, meter stick

Glashausser, Charles

71

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Gravity Waves Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;14/03/2014 6 H L H L L Phase & Group Velocity #12;14/03/2014 7 Doppler Effect #12;14/03/2014 8 Shock Waves #12;14/03/2014 14 Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Supernova blast waves #12;14/03/2014 15 Tycho's Remnant (SN 1572AD A SNR flythrough Theory of Supernova Blast Waves Supernovae: Type Ia Subsonic deflagration wave turning

Weijgaert, Rien van de

73

Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities. 3 figs.

Wood, C.B.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

The various manifestations of collisionless dissipation in wave propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of an electrostatic wave packet inside a collisionless and initially Maxwellian plasma is always dissipative because of the irreversible acceleration of the electrons by the wave. Then, in the linear regime, the wave packet is Landau damped, so that in the reference frame moving at the group velocity, the wave amplitude decays exponentially with time. In the nonlinear regime, once phase mixing has occurred and when the electron motion is nearly adiabatic, the damping rate is strongly reduced compared to the Landau one, so that the wave amplitude remains nearly constant along the characteristics. Yet, we show here that the electrons are still globally accelerated by the wave packet, and in one dimension, this leads to a non local amplitude dependence of the group velocity. As a result, a freely propagating wave packet would shrink, and therefore, so would its total energy. In more than one dimension, not only does the magnitude of the group velocity nonlinearly vary, but also its direction. In the weakly nonlinear regime, when the collisionless damping rate is still significant compared to its linear value, the group velocity is directed towards the outside of the wave packet and tends to increase its transverse extent, while the opposite is true once the wave is essentially undamped. The impact of the nonlinear variation of the group velocity on the transverse size of the wave packet is quantified, and compared to that induced by the self-focussing due to wave front bowing.

Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

High-pressure sound velocities and elasticity of aluminous MgSiO3 perovskite to 45 GPa: Implications for lateral heterogeneity in Earth's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-pressure sound velocities and elasticity of aluminous MgSiO3 perovskite to 45 GPa lateral variations of seismic wave speeds in Earth's lower mantle are due at least in part to a chemical, J. M., J. Zhang, J. Shu, S. V. Sinogeikin, and J. D. Bass (2005), High-pressure sound velocities

Jackson, Jennifer M.

76

Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

78

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

80

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered S-wave records of lower horizontal receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, respectively, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered S-wave signals of lower horizontal receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, respectively, Section 10: Expanded and filtered S-wave signals of lower horizontal receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower horizontal receiver signals, respectively.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

82

Impacts of Beam Broadening and Earth Curvature on Storm-Scale 3D Variational Data Assimilation of Radial Velocity with Two Doppler Radars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. They can be used to determine the physical location of each radar measurement and to properly map by simplifications vary with the distance between the analyzed storm and the radar. For single time level wind of Radial Velocity with Two Doppler Radars GUOQING GE Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms

Gao, Jidong

83

Ring diagram analysis of velocity fields within the solar convection zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ring diagram analysis of solar oscillation power spectra obtained from MDI data is performed to study the velocity fields within the solar convection zone. The three dimensional power spectra are fitted to a model with a Lorentzian profile in frequency and includes the advection of the wave front by horizontal flows to obtain the two horizontal components of flows as a function of the horizontal wave number and radial order of the oscillation modes. This information is then inverted using the OLA and RLS techniques to infer the variation in flow velocity with depth. The resulting velocity fields yield the mean rotation velocity at different latitudes which agrees reasonably with helioseismic estimates. The zonal flow inferred in the outermost layers also appears to be in agreement with other measurements. A meridional flow from equator polewards is found to have an amplitude of about 25 m/s near the surface and the amplitude appears to increase with depth.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia; S. C. Tripathy

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

Lithospheric Velocity Structure of the Anatolain plateau-Caucasus-Caspian Regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anatolian Plateau-Caucasus-Caspian region is an area of complex structure accompanied by large variations in seismic wave velocities. Despite the complexity of the region little is known about the detailed lithospheric structure. Using data from 29 new broadband seismic stations in the region, a unified velocity structure is developed using teleseismic receiver functions and surface waves. Love and Rayleigh surface waves dispersion curves have been derived from event-based analysis and ambient-noise correlation. We jointly inverted the receiver functions with the surface wave dispersion curves to determine absolute shear wave velocity and important discontinuities such as sedimentary layer, Moho, lithospheric-asthenospheric boundary. We combined these new station results with Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment results (29 stations). Caspian Sea and Kura basin underlained by one of the thickest sediments in the world. Therefore, short-period surface waves are observed to be very slow. The strong crustal multiples in receiver functions and the slow velocities in upper crust indicate the presence of thick sedimentary unit (up to 20 km). Crustal thickness varies from 34 to 52 km in the region. The thickest crust is in Lesser Caucasus and the thinnest is in the Arabian Plate. The lithospheric mantle in the Greater Caucasus and the Kura depression is faster than the Anatolian Plateau and Lesser Caucasus. This possibly indicates the presence of cold lithosphere. The lower crust is slowest in the northeastern part of the Anatolian Plateau where Holocene volcanoes are located.

Gok, R; Mellors, R J; Sandvol, E; Pasyanos, M; Hauk, T; Yetirmishli, G; Teoman, U; Turkelli, N; Godoladze, T; Javakishvirli, Z

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Nonlinear Pulse Propagation and Phase Velocity of Laser-Driven Plasma Waves C. B. Schroeder, C. Benedetti, E. Esarey, and W. P. Leemans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of high-quality GeV electron beams in centimeter-scale plasmas [2], the dynamics of the acceler- ated- ing length (distance for a relativistic particle to move out of an accelerating phase) and, hence=cm2 , or a0 * 1, to drive large ampli- tude plasma waves for particle acceleration. In the nonlinear

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

86

WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

case, the electrons have negative wave energy for 2w ne w wave energy for 2w .w > 0 nl Hence, unstable waves with negative phase velocity,

Cary, John R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Local Energy Velocity of Classical Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is proposed to apply a recently developed concept of local wave velocities to the dynamical field characteristics, especially for the canonical field energy density. It is shown that local energy velocities can be derived from the lagrangian directly. The local velocities of zero- and first- order for energy propagation has been obtained for special cases of scalar and vector fields. Some important special cases of these results are discussed.

I. V. Drozdov; A. A. Stahlhofen

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Resonant Absorption between Moving Atoms due to Doppler Frequency Shift and Quantum Energy Variation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By taking both the Doppler frequency shift for electromagnetic wave and the quantum energy variation of matter wave into consideration, a resonant-absorption condition based on the local-ether wave equation is presented to account for a variety of phenomena consistently, including the Ives-Stilwell experiment, the output frequency from ammonia masers, and the M\\"{o}ssbauer rotor experiment. It is found that in the resonant-absorption condition, the major term associated with the laboratory velocity is a dot-product term between this velocity and that of the emitting or absorbing atom. This term appears both in the Doppler frequency shift and the transition frequency variation and then cancels out. Thereby, the experimental results can be independent of the laboratory velocity and hence comply with Galilean relativity, despite the restriction that the involved velocities are referred specifically to the local-ether frame. However, by examining the resonant-absorption condition in the M\\"{o}ssbauer rotor experiment to a higher order, it is found that Galilean relativity breaks down.

Ching-Chuan Su

2002-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

Horton, W. [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States) [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Aix-Marseille University, 58, Bd Charles Livon, 13284 Marseille (France); Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France)] [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Velocity Distributions from Nonextensive Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is no accepted mechanism that explains the equilibrium structures that form in collisionless cosmological N-body simulations. Recent work has identified nonextensive thermodynamics as an innovative approach to the problem. The distribution function that results from adopting this framework has the same form as for polytropes, but the polytropic index is now related to the degree of nonextensiveness. In particular, the nonextensive approach can mimic the equilibrium structure of dark matter density profiles found in simulations. We extend the investigation of this approach to the velocity structures expected from nonextensive thermodynamics. We find that the nonextensive and simulated N-body rms-velocity distributions do not match one another. The nonextensive rms-velocity profile is either monotonically decreasing or displays little radial variation, each of which disagrees with the rms-velocity distributions seen in simulations. We conclude that the currently discussed nonextensive models require further modifications in order to corroborate dark matter halo simulations. (adapted from TeX)

Eric I. Barnes; Liliya L. R. Williams; Arif Babul; Julianne J. Dalcanton

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

Ao, Tommy

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Studies of the velocity fields near a submerged rectangular object  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the time periodic waves past a submerged rectangular object. For sotne wave conditions, large energy dissipation occurred at the submerged object due to vortex generation. The amount of energy dissipation was examined by comparing incident wave energy... object. A two component laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) was used to obtain detailed measurements of the instantaneous velocity field and flow visualization was conducted to study the vortex structure around the submerged object. The measured wave...

Kim, Young-Ki

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Localized parallel parametric generation of spin waves in a Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} waveguide by spatial variation of the pumping field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the experimental observation of localized parallel parametric generation of spin waves in a transversally in-plane magnetized Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} magnonic waveguide. The localization is realized by combining the threshold character of parametric generation with a spatially confined enhancement of the amplifying microwave field. The latter is achieved by modulating the width of the microstrip transmission line which is used to provide the pumping field. By employing microfocussed Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy, we analyze the spatial distribution of the generated spin waves and compare it with numerical calculations of the field distribution along the Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} waveguide. This provides a local spin-wave excitation in transversally in-plane magnetized waveguides for a wide wave-vector range which is not restricted by the size of the generation area.

Brächer, T. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, Gottlieb-Daimler-Strasse 47, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Pirro, P.; Heussner, F.; Serga, A. A.; Hillebrands, B. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

Okamoto, Takenori J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

Ryu, Yong Uk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient...

99

Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank S. Ryu and the resulting kinematics. In the present paper, the variation of wave amplitude and wave length and minimize wave reflections from the down- stream wall. Nonlinear wave kinematics as a result of nonlinear

Lynett, Patrick

100

Autoresonant beat-wave generation R. R. Lindberg,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

means for the ponderomotive excitation of nonlinear Langmuir waves by phase-locking of the plasma wave to resonantly excite a large- amplitude, high-phase-velocity Langmuir wave suitable for particle acceleration p-1 E0, where p 1-vp 2 /c2 -1/2 . Here, vp is the phase-velocity of the excited plasma wave

Wurtele, Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient transverse velocity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Radially Anisotropic Crustal Velocity Structure of NW Canada with Ambient-Noise Tomography M. E. Daigle1; C... -component records and Love waves on the transverse components....

102

GPS velocity field for the Tien Shan and surrounding regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements at ?400 campaign-style GPS points and another 14 continuously recording stations in central Asia define variations in their velocities both along and across the Kyrgyz and neighboring parts of Tien Shan. They ...

Zubovich, Alexander V.

103

Directed Relativistic Blast Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

Andrei Gruzinov

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hysteresis of ionization waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H. [Institut fuer Physik, E.-M.-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Wilke, C. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung und Technologie, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Traveling-wave photodetector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Modified definition of group velocity and electromagnetic energy conservation equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The classical definition of group velocity has two flaws: (a) the group velocity can be greater than the phase velocity in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; (b) the definition is not consistent with the principle of relativity for a plane wave in a moving isotropic uniform medium. To remove the flaws, a modified definition is proposed. A criterion is set up to identify the justification of group velocity definition. A "superluminal power flow" is constructed to show that the electromagnetic energy conservation equation cannot uniquely define the power flow if the principle of Fermat is not taken into account.

Changbiao Wang

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

108

Developing de Broglie Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

2006-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Are "EIT Waves" Fast-Mode MHD Waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the nature of large-scale, coronal, propagating wave fronts (``EIT waves'') and find they are incongruous with solutions using fast-mode MHD plane-wave theory. Specifically, we consider the following properties: non-dispersive single pulse manifestions, observed velocities below the local Alfven speed, and different pulses which travel at any number of constant velocities, rather than at the ``predicted'' fast-mode speed. We discuss the possibility of a soliton-like explanation for these phenomena, and show how it is consistent with the above-mentioned aspects.

M. J. Wills-Davey; C. E. DeForest; J. O. Stenflo

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

116

Visualizing the kinematics of relativistic wave packets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article investigates some solutions of the time-dependent free Dirac equation. Visualizations of these solutions immediately reveal strange phenomena that are caused by the interference of positive- and negative-energy waves. The effects discussed here include the Zitterbewegung, the opposite direction of momentum and velocity in negative-energy wave packets, and the superluminal propagation of the wave packet's local maxima.

Bernd Thaller

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

New wave generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (2007). This mechanism, which involves a tunable source comprised of oscillating plates, has so far been used for a few fundamental studies of internal waves, but its full potential has yet to be realized. Our studies reveal that this approach is capable of producing a wide variety of two-dimensional wave fields, including plane waves, wave beams and discrete vertical modes in finite-depth stratifications. The effects of discretization by a finite number of plates, forcing amplitude and angle of propagation are investigated, and it is found that the method is remarkably efficient at generating a complete wave field despite forcing only one velocity component in a controllable manner. We furthermore find that the nature of the radiated wave field is well predicted using Fourier transforms of the spatial structure of the wave generator.

Mercier, Matthieu J; Mathur, Manikandan; Gostiaux, Louis; Peacock, Thomas; Dauxois, Thierry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark Jump to: navigation,TelluricTODO: Would be nice496939°,using

120

Slow waves in fractures filled with viscous fluid Valeri Korneev1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow waves in fractures filled with viscous fluid Valeri Korneev1 ABSTRACT Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves; therefore, their properties, a simple dispersion equa- tion for wave-propagation velocity is obtained. This velocity is much smaller

Korneev, Valeri A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Radial disk heating by more than one spiral density wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a differentially rotating, 2D stellar disk perturbed by two steady state spiral density waves moving at different patterns speeds. Our investigation is based on direct numerical integration of initially circular test-particle orbits. We examine a range of spiral strengths and spiral speeds and show that stars in this time dependent gravitational field can be heated (their random motions increased). This is particularly noticeable in the simultaneous propagation of a 2-armed spiral density wave near the corotation resonance (CR), and a weak 4-armed one near the inner and outer 4:1 Lindblad resonances. In simulations with 2 spiral waves moving at different pattern speeds we find: (1) the variance of the radial velocity, sigma_R^2, exceeds the sum of the variances measured from simulations with each individual pattern; (2) sigma_R^2 can grow with time throughout the entire simulation; (3) sigma_R^2 is increased over a wider range of radii compared to that seen with one spiral pattern; (4) particles diffuse radially in real space whereas they don't when only one spiral density wave is present. Near the CR with the stronger, 2-armed pattern, test particles are observed to migrate radially. These effects take place at or near resonances of both spirals so we interpret them as the result of stochastic motions. This provides a possible new mechanism for increasing the stellar velocity dispersion in galactic disks. If multiple spiral patterns are present in the Galaxy we predict that there should be large variations in the stellar velocity dispersion as a function of radius.

I. Minchev; A. C. Quillen

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Vertical velocity in oceanic convection off tropical Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . v Vl Vl I I 1 3 6 10 Description of the Data Data Processing . . Event Criteria 10 15 21 III RESULTS . . . 26 Cores. Environment 26 34 IV COMPARISON WITH OTHER STUDIES . . . . . 40 Cores... Variations with altitude of median and strongest 10'/o-level statistics of (a) average vertical velocity, (b) maximum vertical velocity, (c) mass flux per unit length normal to the flight track and (d) diameter 32 Figure Page Reconstructed temperature...

Lucas, Christopher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD FROM ANALYSES OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

125

Noncommutative quantum mechanics of a harmonic oscillator under linearized gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the quantum dynamics of a harmonic oscillator in noncommutative space under the influence of linearized gravitational waves (GW) in the long wave-length and low-velocity limit. Following the prescription in \\cite{ncgw1} we quantize the system. The Hamiltonian of the system is solved by using standard algebraic iterative methods. The solution shows signatures of the coordinate noncommutativity via alterations in the oscillation frequency of the harmonic oscillator system from its commutative counterpart. Moreover, it is found that the response of the harmonic oscillator to periodic GW, when their frequencies match, will oscillate with a time scale imposed by the NC parameter. We expect this noncommutative signature to show up as some noise source in the GW detection experiments since the recent phenomenological upper-bounds set on spatial noncommutative parameter implies a length-scale comparable to the length-variations due to the passage of gravitational waves, detectable in the present day GW detectors.

Anirban Saha; Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Swarup Saha

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nonlinear three-wave interaction in marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear interaction of three acoustic waves in a sandy sediment is studied in the frequency range where there is a considerable wave velocity dispersion. The possibility of an experimental observation of the generation of a sound wave by two pump waves propagating at an angle to each other is estimated.

N. I. Pushkina

2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

127

Collective behavior of stabilized reaction-diffusion waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stabilized wave segments in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction are directionally controlled with intensity gradients in the applied illumination. The constant-velocity waves behave like self-propelled particles, and multiple waves interact via an applied interaction potential. Alignment arises from the intrinsic properties of the interacting waves, leading to processional and rotational behavior.

Steele, Aaron J.; Tinsley, Mark; Showalter, Kenneth [Department of Chemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6045 (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Velocity centroids as tracers of the turbulent velocity statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the results of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to emulate spectroscopic observations and use maps of centroids to study their statistics. In order to assess under which circumstances the scaling properties of the velocity field can be retrieved from velocity centroids, we compare two point statistics (structure functions and power-spectra) of velocity centroids with those of the underlying velocity field and analytic predictions presented in a previous paper (Lazarian & Esquivel 2003). We tested a criterion for recovering velocity spectral index from velocity centroids derived in our previous work, and propose an approximation of the early criterion using only the variances of ``unnormalized'' velocity centroids and column density maps. It was found that both criteria are necessary, however not sufficient to determine if the centroids recover velocity statistics. Both criteria are well fulfilled for subsonic turbulence. We find that for supersonic turbulence with sonic Mach numbers > 2.5 centroids fail to trace the spectral index of velocity. Asymptotically, however, we claim that recovery of velocity statistics is always possible provided that the density spectrum is steep and the observed inertial range is sufficiently extended. In addition, we show that velocity centroids are useful for anisotropy studies and determining the direction of magnetic field, even if the turbulence is highly supersonic, but only if it is sub-Alfvenic. This provides a tool for mapping the magnetic field direction, and testing whether the turbulence is sub-Alfvenic or super-Alfvenic.

A. Esquivel; A. Lazarian

2005-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

Statistics of Velocity from Spectral Data: Modified Velocity Centroids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the problem of studying interstellar turbulence using spectral line data. We find a criterion when the velocity centroids may provide trustworthy velocity statistics. To enhance the scope of centroids applications, we construct a measure that we term ``modified velocity centroids'' (MVCs) and derive an analytical solution that relates the 2D spectra of the modified centroids with the underlying 3D velocity spectrum. We test our results using synthetic maps constructed with data obtained through simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence. We show that the modified velocity centroids (MVCs) are complementary to the the Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) technique. Employed together, they make determining of the velocity spectral index more reliable and for wider variety of astrophysical situations.

A. Lazarian; A. Esquivel

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Synthetic observations of wave propagation in a sunspot umbra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectropolarimetric temporal series from Fe I $\\lambda$ 6301.5 \\AA\\ and Ca II infrared triplet lines are obtained by applying the Stokes synthesis code NICOLE to a numerical simulation of wave propagation in a sunspot umbra from MANCHA code. The analysis of the phase difference between Doppler velocity and intensity core oscillations of the Fe I $\\lambda$ 6301.5 \\AA\\ line reveals that variations in the intensity are produced by opacity fluctuations rather than intrinsic temperature oscillations, except for frequencies between 5 and 6.5 mHz. On the other hand, the photospheric magnetic field retrieved from the weak field approximation provides the intrinsic magnetic field oscillations associated to wave propagation. Our results suggest that this is due to the low magnetic field gradient of our sunspot model. The Stokes parameters of the chromospheric Ca II infrared triplet lines show striking variations as shock waves travel through the formation height of the lines, including emission self-reversals in the li...

Felipe, T; Khomenko, E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

White light velocity interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

White light velocity interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

Erskine, D.J.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

133

White light velocity interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

White light velocity interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

Erskine, D.J.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE) In Tuesday's interrupted lecture we derived the Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE) for a density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE) In Tuesday's interrupted lecture we derived the Kinematic Wave refer to partial derivatives. Kinematic waves occur when we take Q = Q(), in which case t + c()x = 0 (2) where the propagation velocity is c() = dQ/d. (2) is called the Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE). We wish

Gibbon, J. D.

136

Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times. We obtained {approx}1500 absolute P and S arrival times and {approx}3200 P and S wave arrival time differences. Event locations do not change greatly when 3D velocity structure is included. Three-dimensional velocity structure, where resolvable, does not differ greatly from our optimized 1D model, indicating that the improved 1D model is adequate for routine event location. Finally, we calculated moment magnitudes, MW, for nearly 155 events using the coda magnitude technique of Mayeda et al., (2003). The fact that most of the relocated events occur below the known sedimentary structures extending to 7 km suggests that they are tectonic in origin. Shallow events within the sedimentary crust in the (southern) Minagish region may be related to oil field activities, although the current study cannot unambiguously determine the source of current seismicity in Kuwait. The improved velocity model reduces the scatter of travel time residuals relative to the locations reported in the KNSN bulletin and may be used for ground motion prediction and hazard estimate studies in Kuwait.

Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

McIntyre, T.J.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Reconsideration of Matter Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matter waves were discovered in the early 20th century from their wavelength, predicted by DeBroglie, Planck's constant divided by the particle's momentum, that is, lmw = h/mv. But, the failure to obtain a reasonable theory for the matter wave frequency resulted somewhat in loss of further interest. It was expected that the frequency of the matter wave should correspond to the particle kinetic energy, that is, fmw = 1/2mv^2/h but the resulting velocity of the matter of the particle, v = fmw x lmw, is that the matter wave moves at one half the speed of the particle, obviously absurd as the particle and its wave must move together. If relativistic mass is used (as it should in any case) the problem remains, the same mass appearing in numerator and denominator and canceling. It is no help to hypothesize that the total energy, not just the kinetic energy, yields the matter wave. That attributes a matter wave to a particle at rest. It also gives the resulting velocity as c^2/v, the wave racing ahead of its particle. A reinterpretation of Einstein's derivation of relativistic kinetic energy (which produced his famous E = mc^2) leads to a valid matter wave frequency and a new understanding of particle kinetics and of the atom's stable orbits.

Roger Ellman

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

139

Propagation of gravitational waves in the nonperturbative spinor vacuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The propagation of gravitational waves on the background of a nonperturbative vacuum of a spinor field is considered. It is shown that there are several distinctive features in comparison with the propagation of plane gravitational waves through empty space: there exists the fixed phase difference between the $h_{yy,zz}$ and $h_{yz}$ components of the wave; the phase and group velocities of gravitational waves are not equal to the velocity of light; the group velocity is always less than the velocity of light; under some conditions the gravitational waves are either damped or absent; for given frequency, there exist two waves with different wave vectors. We also discuss the possibility of experimental verification of the obtained effects as a tool to investigate nonperurbative quantum field theories.

Vladimir Dzhunushaliev; Vladimir Folomeev

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

140

SHORT TIMESCALE VARIATIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF ANTARES A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze three years of high-resolution spectroscopic data and find radial velocity variations with a characteristic timescale of 100 ± 6 days that are nearly sinusoidal. Simultaneous variations in line-depth ratios imply temperature variations of up to 100 K. No photometric variation is seen on a 100 day timescale. The timescale of the variation and its resonant nature suggest solar-like oscillations driven by large-scale convection.

Pugh, T.; Gray, David F., E-mail: tpugh@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, London, ON (Canada)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are the primary cause of P-wave, S-wave, and density anomalies in the mantle.

Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L; Grand, S P

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Autoresonance of coupled nonlinear waves L. Friedland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave train solutions of the decoupled problem. At the same time, the waves are globally phase locked, allowing the continuation of the phase locking between the waves despite the variation of system's param and sustaining this multidimensional autoresonance are the internal reso- nant excitation of one of the coupled

Friedland, Lazar

143

Alfv'en Wave Solitons and Solar Intermediate Drift Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

propagate at velocities of the order of the Alfv'en veloc­ ity in a direction inclined to the magnetic field, the solar wind, and possibly accretion disks, and extra­ galactic jets. In such magnetized plasmas Alfv'en waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v

Guedel, Manuel

144

Comparison of P-wave and S-wave data in a fractured reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

communication, 1993) Figure 8 A closeup map of the elevation on the Base Austin Chalk in the study area. Map compiled by A. Davidoff (personal communication, 1993). . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Figure 9 Flow chart of conventional data pxocessing procedures... INTRODUCTION In recent years, researchers have combined P-wave and S-wave seismic data to study subsurface lithology and porosity. Experimental studies have shown that the velocity ratio of the P waves and S waves (VPIVs) decreases about 10% to 20% when gas...

Al-Mustafa, Husam Mustafa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electrochemical Waves on Patterned Surfaces: Propagation through Narrow Gaps and Konstantin Agladze, Stephanie Thouvenel-Romans, and Oliver Steinbock*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical Waves on Patterned Surfaces: Propagation through Narrow Gaps and Channels propagation through narrow gaps and long channels. In channels, the wave velocity decreases with decreasing dynamically similar phenomena such as propagating fronts, target patterns, and rotating spiral waves. Pattern

Steinbock, Oliver

146

Measurement of fast-changing low velocities by photonic Doppler velocimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the increasing popularity of photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) in shock wave experiments, its capability of capturing low particle velocities while changing rapidly is still questionable. The paper discusses the performance of short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in processing fringe signals of fast-changing low velocities measured by PDV. Two typical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance. In the laser shock peening test, the CWT gives a better interpretation to the free surface velocity history, where the elastic precursor, main plastic wave, and elastic release wave can be clearly identified. The velocities of stress waves, Hugoniot elastic limit, and the amplitude of shock pressure induced by laser can be obtained from the measurement. In the Kolsky-bar based tests, both methods show validity of processing the longitudinal velocity signal of incident bar, whereas CWT improperly interprets the radial velocity of the shocked sample at the beginning period, indicating the sensitiveness of the CWT to the background noise. STFT is relatively robust in extracting waveforms of low signal-to-noise ratio. Data processing method greatly affects the temporal resolution and velocity resolution of a given fringe signal, usually CWT demonstrates a better local temporal resolution and velocity resolution, due to its adaptability to the local frequency, also due to the finer time-frequency product according to the uncertainty principle.

Song Hongwei; Wu Xianqian; Huang Chenguang; Wei Yangpeng; Wang Xi [Key Laboratory for Hydrodynamics and Ocean Engineering, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sound velocities of ferropericlase in the Earth's lower mantle Jung-Fu Lin,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction [2] The speed of seismic waves in the Earth's lower mantle is governed by the elastic properties a dramatic increase in the isothermal bulk modulus (KT) and bulk sound velocity (VF) at the electronic spinSound velocities of ferropericlase in the Earth's lower mantle Jung-Fu Lin,1 Steven D. Jacobsen,2

Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

148

Converted wave imaging in anisotropic media using sea-floor seismic data   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

velocity ratio is derived conventionally by event matching in the P-wave and converted wave stacks. I present an attempt to use well-log derived velocity ratios to avoid this interpretative step. The velocity ratio derived from 4C seismic data is about 30...

Mancini, Fabio

149

Mach reflection of spherical detonation waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When two detonation waves collide, the shape of the wave front at their intersection can be used to categorize the flow as regular or irregular reflection. In the case of regular reflection, the intersection of the waves forms a cusp. In the case of irregular reflection, the cusp is replaced by a leading shock locus that bridges the incident waves. Many workers have studied irregular or Mach reflection of detonation waves, but most of the their experimental work has focused on the interaction of plane detonation waves. Reflection of spherical detonation waves has received less attention. This study also differs from previous work in that the focus is to measure the relationship between the detonation velocity and the local wave curvatue for irregular reflection of spherical detonation waves. Two explosives with different detonation properties, PBX 9501 and PBX 9502, are compared.

Hull, L.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Kinematics measurements of regular, irregular, and rogue waves by PIV/LDV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waves. A series of experiments were conducted in a 2-D wave tank at Texas A&M University to measure wave velocities and accelerations using LDV and PIV systems. The wave crests of regular and rogue waves are the focus of this study. With the measured...

Choi, Hae-Jin

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch15. Mechanical Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch15. Mechanical Waves #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 2 15-1. Introduction Source: disturbance + cohesive force between adjacent pieces A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space Mechanical wave: needs a medium to propagate Wave pulse #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 3 Distinctions Wave velocity vs

Yoo, S. J. Ben

152

Wave propagation in a seven-story reinforced concrete building I. Theoretical modelsq  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave propagation in a seven-story reinforced concrete building I. Theoretical modelsq M natural to use wave propagation methods. In this paper (Part I), we review several two-dimensional wave/s and bx/bz 1 for EW vibrations. The velocity of shear waves propagating through the slabs is estimated

Southern California, University of

153

Velocity-Space Diffusion in a Perpendicularly Propagating Electrostatic Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-@ax(k_~y-wt) in con- midered. When o)Qi and ul 2w/kL, the e q u a t hofmotion may be reduced to r net of dillerence in Fig. 1. Expanding the trajectory about the raumance point, we find that the magnitude of the impulses

Karney, Charles

154

Longshore sediment transport rate calculated incorporating wave orbital velocity fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

Smith, Ernest Ray

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Genetic Adaptive­surface models from seismic travel­time data. Given a sub­surface model, the physics of wave propagation through refractive media can be used to compute travel times for seismic waves. How­ ever, in practice, we have

Louis, Sushil J.

156

Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Variables and units in Ocean 420 u zonal velocity (east-west) m/s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speed m/s Cg group velocity m/s k wave number 1/m frequency 1/s wavelength m T period s kinematic mixed-layer and water below C E Energy density in surface gravity wave J/m 2 #12;Some constants k Von surface height m g gravitational constant m/s 2 a amplitude of wave in sea surface height m f Coriolis

Thompson, LuAnne

158

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves C.F. Driscoll, F. Anderegg, D 92093 USA Abstract. Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance is observed over a broad range. Laser Induced

California at San Diego, University of

159

GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

Richards, John Alfred

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Penetration and scattering of lower hybrid waves by density fluctuations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower Hybrid [LH] ray propagation in toroidal plasma is controlled by a combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched from the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the density fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial RF wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the turbulence. The electron temperature gradient [ETG] spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and parallel phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current density giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH-driven plasma currents. The scattered LH spectrum is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with a diffusivity proportional to the fluctuations. The LH ray diffusivity is large giving transport in the poloidal and radial wavenumber spectrum in one - or a few passes - of the rays through the core plasma.

Horton, W. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin (United States); Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Simultaneous wave and current forces on a cylinder near the bottom boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ing Program and Professor R. O. Raid for their review of this thesis. Special thanks are due to Mrs. Lori Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Ron Watanabe and Mr, Kenneth Kim for their co-operation in the preparation of the manuscript. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter... Potential of Combined Wave and Current = Velocity Potential of Wave = Velocity Potential of Current Surface Density Spectrum = Velocity Density Spectrum Acceleration Density Spectrum p Density of Fluid v ~ Kinematic Viscosity &o Wave Prequency &uq...

Knoll, David Alex

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - augmented wave method Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbulent velocities The method to calculate wave energy fluxes carried by longitudinal tube... frequency points n. Another computational parameter, which affects our method of...

163

Ultrasonic guided waves in eccentric annular pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper studies the feasibility of using ultrasonic guided waves to rapidly inspect tubes and pipes for possible eccentricity. While guided waves are well established in the long range inspection of structures such as pipes and plates, studies for more complex cross sections are limited and analytical solutions are often difficult to obtain. Recent developments have made the Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method widely accessible for researchers to study guided wave properties in complex structures. Here the SAFE method is used to study the effect of eccentricity on the modal structures and velocities of lower order guided wave modes in thin pipes of diameters typically of interest to the industry. Results are validated using experiments. The paper demonstrates that even a small eccentricity in the pipe can strongly affect guided wave mode structures and velocities and hence shows potential for pipe eccentricity inspection.

Pattanayak, Roson Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu [Centre for NDE, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras Chennai 600036, T. N. (India)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

Quantitative imaging of the air-water flow fields formed by unsteady breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental method for simultaneously measuring the velocity fields on the air and water side of unsteady breaking waves is presented. The method is applied to breaking waves to investigate the physics of the air and ...

Belden, Jesse (Jesse Levi)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Dynamics of excitation pulses with attractive interaction: Kinematic analysis and chemical wave experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of excitation pulses with attractive interaction: Kinematic analysis and chemical wave present a theoretical analysis of stacking and destacking wave trains in excitable reaction-diffusion systems with anomalous velocity-wavelength dependence. For linearized dispersion relations, kinematic

Steinbock, Oliver

166

Velocity requirements for causality violation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

Giovanni Modanese

2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

J. Cabaret; P. Béquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control de...

Cabaret, J; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Seismic velocity structure and microearthquake source properties at The Geysers, California, geothermal area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The method of progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion has been extended to incorporate S-wave arrival time data and to estimate S-wave velocities in addition to P-wave velocities. S-wave data to progressive inversion does not completely eliminate hypocenter-velocity tradeoffs, but they are substantially reduced. Results of a P and S-wave progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion at The Geysers show that the top of the steam reservoir is clearly defined by a large decrease of V/sub p//V/sub s/ at the condensation zone-production zone contact. The depth interval of maximum steam production coincides with minimum observed V/sub p//V/sub s/, and V/sub p//V/sub s/ increses below the shallow primary production zone suggesting that reservoir rock becomes more fluid saturated. The moment tensor inversion method was applied to three microearthquakes at The Geysers. Estimated principal stress orientations were comparable to those estimated using P-wave firstmotions as constraints. Well constrained principal stress orientations were obtained for one event for which the 17 P-first motions could not distinguish between normal-slip and strike-slip mechanisms. The moment tensor estimates of principal stress orientations were obtained using far fewer stations than required for first-motion focal mechanism solutions. The three focal mechanisms obtained here support the hypothesis that focal mechanisms are a function of depth at The Geysers. Progressive inversion as developed here and the moment tensor inversion method provide a complete approach for determining earthquake locations, P and S-wave velocity structure, and earthquake source mechanisms.

O'Connell, D.R.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Torsional waves propagation in an initially stressed dissipative cylinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper has been framed to show the effect of damping on the propagation of torsional waves in an initially stressed, dissipative, incompressible cylinder of infinite length. A governing equation has been formulated on Biot's incremental deformation theory. The velocities of torsional waves are obtained as complex ones, in which real part gives the phase velocity of propagation and corresponding imaginary part gives the damping. The study reveals that the damping of the medium has strong effect in the propagation of torsional wave. Since every medium has damping so it is more realistic to use the damped wave equation instead of the undamped wave equation. The study also shows that the velocity of propagation of such waves depend on the presence of initial stress. The influences of damping and initial stresses are shown separately.

M. M. Selim

2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Propagation of transverse zero sound in He3and of spin waves in He3-He II solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propagation of transverse zero sound in He3and of spin waves in He3-He II solutions E. P. Bashkin absorption may dominate if the wave propagation velocity is close to the Fermi value. It is shown that the propagation of transverse zero sound in He3 is possible even if the wave velocity is somewhat smaller than

Meyerovich, Alex

172

APRIL 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APRIL 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM1 , J. M. KLYMAK2. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear internal waves. Unlike linear internal waves, the pressure-velocity energy flux up includes important

173

SEPTEMBER 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEPTEMBER 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM1 , J. M of coastline. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear internal waves. Unlike linear internal waves, the pressure-velocity energy flux up includes

174

Low-frequency fluid waves in fractures and pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-frequency analytical solutions have been obtained for phase velocities of symmetrical fluid waves within both an infinite fracture and a pipe filled with a viscous fluid. Three different fluid wave regimes can exist in such objects, depending on the various combinations of parameters, such as fluid density, fluid viscosity, walls shear modulus, channel thickness, and frequency. Equations for velocities of all these regimes have explicit forms and are verified by comparisons with the exact solutions. The dominant role of fractures in rock permeability at field scales and the strong amplitude and frequency effects of Stoneley guided waves suggest the importance of including these wave effects into poroelastic theories.

Korneev, Valeri

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Site-Specific Velocity and Density Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the work conducted under the SBP to develop a shear wave and compressional wave velocity and density model specific to the WTP site. Section 2 provides detailed background information on the WTP site and its underlying geology as well as on the Seismic Boreholes Project activities leading up to the Vs and Vp measurements. In Section 3, methods employed and results obtained are documented for measurements of Vs and Vp velocities in basalts and interbeds. Section 4 provides details on velocity measurements in the sediments underlying the WTP. Borehole gravity measurements of density of the subsurface basalt and sediments are described in Section 5. Section 6 describes the analysis of data presented in section 3-5, and presents the overall velocity and density model for the WTP site.

Rohay, Alan C.; Brouns, Thomas M.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

176

Vacuum Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

Paul S. Wesson

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

A note on the effects of nonuniform spreading velocity of submarine slumps and slides on the near-eld tsunami amplitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A note on the effects of nonuniform spreading velocity of submarine slumps and slides on the near Accepted 9 February 2002 Abstract The effects of variable speeds of spreading of submarine slides slides and slumps must consider time variations in the spreading velocities, when these velocities

Southern California, University of

178

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 65, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2000); P. 232246, 11 FIGS., 2 TABLES. Inversion of azimuthally dependent NMO velocity in transversely  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or crack systems. P-wave kinematic signatures in TTI media are controlled by the velocity VP0 kinematic signatures, can be found only from the moveout of shear waves. Using the exact NMO equation, we ) of the symmetry axis. Here, we show that all five parameters can be obtained from az- imuthally varying P-wave NMO

Tsvankin, Ilya

179

Nonlinear effects on interfacial wave growth into slug flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is known that when two fluids flow through a horizontal channel, depending on the relative velocity between the two fluids, two different instability mechanisms can create initial wave disturbances on the interface: the ...

Campbell, Bryce K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Acoustic wave propagation in two-phase heterogeneous porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The propagation of an acoustic wave through two-phase porous media with spatial variation in porosity is studied. The evolutionary wave equation is derived, and the propagation of an acoustic wave is numerically analyzed in application to marine sediments with various physical parameters.

J. I. Osypik; N. I. Pushkina; Ya. M. Zhileikin

2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BENCAP, LLC: CAPSULE VELOCITY TEST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ben Cap, LLC, has a technology that utilizes bebtonite to plug wells. The bentonite is encapsulated in a cardboard capsule, droped down to the bottom of the well where it is allowed to hydrate, causing the bentonite to expand and plug the well. This method of plugging a well is accepted in some, but not all states. This technology can save a significant amount of money when compared to cementing methods currently used to plug and abandon wells. The test objective was to obtain the terminal velocity of the capsule delivery system as it drops through a column of water in a wellbore. Once the terminal velocity is known, the bentonite swelling action can be timed not to begin swelling until it reaches the bottom of the well bore. The results of the test showed that an average speed of 8.93 plus or minus 0.12 ft/sec was achieved by the capsule as it was falling through a column of water. Plotting the data revealed a very linear function with the capsules achieving terminal velocity shortly after being released. The interference of the capsule impacting the casing was not readily apparent in any of the runs, but a siginal sampling anomaly was present in one run. Because the anomaly was so brief and not present in any of the other runs, no solid conclusions could be drawn. Additional testing would be required to determine the effects of capsules impacting a fluid level that is not at surface.

Meidinger, Brian

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Wave-particle interaction and Hamiltonian dynamics investigated in a traveling wave tube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For wave-particle interaction studies, the one-dimensional (1-D) beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT). This led us to a detailed experimental analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and a small either cold or warm beam. More recently, a test electron beam has been used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s). The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is investigated with a trochoidal energy analyzer that records the beam energy distribution at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave responsible for Landau damping is observed. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is also observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap leading to a typical 'devil's staircase' behavior. A new strategy for the control of chaos is tested.

Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe Turbulence Plasma, Case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Compressional-wave and shear-wave velocities from long-spaced sonic waveforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-SPACED SONIC TOOL UT LTF R L TNR 3' Lr TN R LrTFR LT 10' C FR NR 8' D I FRI (( 'I ll NrR ) ( rt I ll ))8. I ) 8 I I I I ) I I I l I I I-I Ii& I ? ? +) ? +l ?? I I~ I lk ) I LT I ? I I 10' A LT Figure 2. Configuration... REFERENCES 56 VITA 58 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Input parameters for synthetic sonic waveforms. 23 2 Synthetic waveform computed slowness error ? 9"-diameter borehole. . . . 25 3 Synthetic waveform computed slowness error ? 4"-diameter borehole...

Lake, Leonard Cornelius

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

Horine, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); James, Jr., Forrest B. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

The critical velocity in the BEC-BCS crossover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We map out the critical velocity in the crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluidity with ultracold $^{6}$Li gases. A small attractive potential is dragged along lines of constant column density. The rate of the induced heating increases steeply above a critical velocity $v_c$. In the same samples, we measure the speed of sound $v_s$ by exciting density waves and compare the results to the measured values of $v_c$. We perform numerical simulations in the BEC regime and find very good agreement, validating the approach. In the strongly correlated regime, where theoretical predictions only exist for the speed of sound, our measurements of $v_c$ provide a testing ground for theoretical approaches.

Wolf Weimer; Kai Morgener; Vijay Pal Singh; Jonas Siegl; Klaus Hueck; Niclas Luick; Ludwig Mathey; Henning Moritz

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

A model of the near-surface seismic velocity: southern San Joaqin Valley, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, representative hydrograph for the central valley Figure 1. (a. ) Sea-level correctional velocity the from preliminary study estimated for the 1980's. Page 3 3 3. Preliminary test data plotted for the model of constant velocity above and below the water... variations, a major problem is to determine the static corrections for seismic data which were surveyed during the last 20 years. Because of the limited number of traveltime measurements, it would be desirable to use all ot the measurements which were...

Ferry, James Gerard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wilks, Scott C. (Santa Monica, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Lagrangian kinematics of steep waves up to the inception of a spilling breaker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizontal Lagrangian velocities and accelerations at the surface of steep water-waves are studied by Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) for gradually increasing crest heights up to the inception of a spilling breaker. Localized steep waves are excited using wavemaker-generated Peregrine breather-type wave trains. Actual crest and phase velocities are estimated from video recorded sequences of the instantaneous wave shape as well as from surface elevation measurements by wave gauges. Effects of nonlinearity and spectral width on phase velocity, as well as relation between the phase velocity and crest propagation speed are discussed. The inception of a spilling breaker is associated with the horizontal velocity of water particles at the crest attaining that of the crest, thus confirming the kinematic criterion for inception of breaking.

Shemer, Lev

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Stochastic Quantum Trajectories without a Wave Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After summarizing three versions of trajectory-based quantum mechanics, it is argued that only the original formulation due to Bohm, which uses the Schr\\"odinger wave function to guide the particles, can be readily extended to particles with spin. To extend the two wave function-free formulations, it is argued that necessarily particle trajectories not only determine location, but also spin. Since spin values are discrete, it is natural to revert to a variation of Bohm's pilot wave formulation due originally to Bell. It is shown that within this formulation with stochastic quantum trajectories, a wave function free formulation can be obtained.

Jeroen C. Vink

2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

190

A variational principle in optics Jacob Rubinstein and Gershon Wolansky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A variational principle in optics Jacob Rubinstein and Gershon Wolansky Department of Mathematics a new variational principle in optics. We first formulate the principle for paraxial waves principle to the problem of phase reconstruction from intensity measurements. © 2004 Optical Society

Wolansky, Gershon

191

PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Jaffe, Daniel T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, R.L. Moore Hall, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Beichman, Charles A., E-mail: crockett@lowell.edu, E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu, E-mail: naved@rice.edu, E-mail: cmj@rice.edu, E-mail: dtj@astro.as.utexas.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Templeton, Dennise

193

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Templeton, Dennise

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

196

Slow Waves in Fractures Filled with Viscous Fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves, and therefore, their properties need to be incorporated in more realistic models. In this study, a fracture is modeled as an infinite layer of viscous fluid bounded by two elastic half-spaces with identical parameters. For small fracture thickness, I obtain a simple dispersion equation for wave-propagation velocity. This velocity is much smaller than the velocity of a fluid wave in a Biot-type solution, in which fracture walls are assumed to be rigid. At seismic prospecting frequencies and realistic fracture thicknesses, the Stoneley guided wave has wavelengths on the order of several meters and an attenuation Q factor exceeding 10, which indicates the possibility of resonance excitation in fluid-bearing rocks. The velocity and attenuation of Stoneley guided waves are distinctly different at low frequencies for water and oil. The predominant role of fractures in fluid flow at field scales is supported by permeability data showing an increase of several orders of magnitude when compared to values obtained at laboratory scales. These data suggest that Stoneley guided waves should be taken into account in theories describing seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated rocks.

Korneev, Valeri

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nonlinear acoustic wave generation in a three-phase seabed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of an acoustic wave by two pump sound waves is studied in a three-phase marine sediment that consists of a solid frame and the pore water with air bubbles in it. To avoid shock-wave formation the interaction is considered in the frequency range where there is a significant amount of sound velocity dispersion. Nonlinear equations are obtained to describe the interaction of acoustic waves in the presence of air bubbles. An expression for the amplitude of the generated wave is obtained and numerical analysis of its dependence on distance and on the resonance frequency of bubbles is performed.

Kukarkin, A B; Zhileikin, Ya M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nonlinear acoustic wave generation in a three-phase seabed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of an acoustic wave by two pump sound waves is studied in a three-phase marine sediment that consists of a solid frame and the pore water with air bubbles in it. To avoid shock-wave formation the interaction is considered in the frequency range where there is a significant amount of sound velocity dispersion. Nonlinear equations are obtained to describe the interaction of acoustic waves in the presence of air bubbles. An expression for the amplitude of the generated wave is obtained and numerical analysis of its dependence on distance and on the resonance frequency of bubbles is performed.

A. B. Kukarkin; N. I. Pushkina; Ya. M. Zhileikin

2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

Acoustic waves in a Biot-type porous snow model: The fast slow wave in light snow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave velocities, attenuation and reflection coefficients in snow can not be explained by the widely used elastic or viscoelastic models for wave propagation. Instead, Biot's model of wave propagation in porous materials should be used. However, the application of Biot's model is difficult due to the large property space of the underlying porous material. Here we use the properties of ice and air as well as empirical relationships to define the properties of snow as a function of porosity. This reduction allows to predict phase velocities and attenuation of the shear- and compressional-waves as functions of porosity or density. For light snow the peculiarity was found that the velocity of the compressional wave of the first kind is lower than the compressional wave of the second kind that is commonly referred to as the "slow" wave. The reversal of the velocities comes with an increase of attenuation for the first compressional wave. This is in line with the common observation that sound is strongly absorbed af...

Sidler, Rolf

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Measurements of elastic modulus using laser-induced surface waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In general, the mechanical testing methods that are utilized for alloys and polymers, e.g., dogbone, rheovibron, etc., are not applicable to thin film structures. We wish to report noncontacting measurements of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity and the elastic modulus applicable to thin films of moderate thickness. An accompanying paper extends this technique to smaller film dimensions. A 15 ns pulsed YAG laser was used as the energy source to thermoelastically excite surface waves. The propagation of the waves was then observed by a second, independent He-Ne laser at a distance from the excitation spot. using the knife edge/beam deflection technique. A cylindrical lens was used to reduce the energy loading of the YAG laser on the sample to avoid damaging the surface of the specimen. The Rayleigh wave velocity is calculated from measurements of the arrival time of the surface wave as a function of distance from the ND:YAG laser spot. The shear modulus, G, can be determined from the measured speed of the surface waves, V, the specimen density, p, and Poisson`s ratio, v, according to the following relationship: V = R(v){sm_bullet}(G/p){sup {1/2}} where R(v), expressed as (0.862 + 1.14v)/(l + v), is the ratio of the Rayleigh wave velocity to the shear wave velocity and ranges from 0.86 to 0.95 Table below lists the measured surface wave velocities and the calculated shear modulus for our experimental results and the published values. Excellent agreement is observed. The depth of the SAW is approximately equal to the SAW wavelength which is approximately the laser spot size. Typically 30 {mu}m spot sizes can be readily achieved. In conclusion, SAW velocities and the modulus of elasticity of various materials have been measured. We have demonstrated that this non-contacting method can be used to characterize moderately thin films.

Chang, D.J.; Amimoto, S.T.; Gross, R.W.F. [Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Glenn, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electron dynamics in surface acoustic wave devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional nanostructures one can create a series of dynamic quantum dots corresponding to the minima of the travelling electric wave, and each dot carries a single electron at the SAW velocity (? 2800 m/s). These devices may be of use in developing future quantum...

Thorn, Adam Leslie

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

202

Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Satish Pullammanappallil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Satish to compute travel times for seismic waves. However, in practice, we have to solve the inverse problem: travel synthetic seismic models shows that large population sizes are crit- ical to generating good seismic

Louis, Sushil J.

203

Group-velocity tomography of South America and the surrounding oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group-velocity tomography of South America and the surrounding oceans Oleg Vdovin,1 Jose¨ A. Rial,2 propagating across South America and the surrounding oceans. Broad-band waveform data from about 765 events and show that the average resolution across South America is about 60^80 for Rayleigh waves and 70

Ritzwolle, Mike

204

Constraints on Neutrino Velocities Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With a minimally modified dispersion relation for neutrinos, we reconsider the constraints on superluminal neutrino velocities from bremsstrahlung effects in the laboratory frame. Employing both the direct calculation approach and the virtual Z-boson approach, we obtain the generic decay width and energy loss rate of a superluminal neutrino with general energy. The Cohen-Glashow's analytical results for neutrinos with a relatively low energy are confirmed in both approaches. We employ the survival probability instead of the terminal energy to assess whether a neutrino with a given energy is observable or not in the OPERA experiment. Moreover, using our general results we perform systematical analyses on the constraints arising from the Super-Kamiokande and IceCube experiments.

Yunjie Huo; Tianjun Li; Yi Liao; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Yonghui Qi

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Cold Plasma Wave Analysis in Magneto-Rotational Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to investigate the cold plasma wave properties. The analysis has been restricted to the neighborhood of the pair production region of the Kerr magnetosphere. The Fourier analyzed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations are dealt under special circumstances and dispersion relations are obtained. We find the $x$-component of the complex wave vector numerically. The corresponding components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. The direction and dispersion of waves are investigated.

M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electromagnetic waves with nonlinear dispersion law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Last year physicists in Europe have measured the velocity of the neutrinos particles. They found the neutrinos moving faster than the speed of light in vacuum. This result means that Einstein's relativity principle and its consequences in modern physics need a global additional renovation. In present paper the part of this problem is considered in terms of basic Maxwell's method only. By means of introduction a diffusion like displacement current the new super wave equation was derived, which permits of its solution be described the electromagnetic waves moving some faster than the conventional speed of light in vacuum especially in a gamma ray of a very short wave length region. The unique properties of these waves are that they undergo nonlinear dispersion law, uppermost limit of which is restricted. Discussion of further experimental problems and a number of estimations are given for the macro physic super wave equations also.

Pavel Mednis

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

207

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A. Sethian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. We derive a relation between the true seismic velocities and the routinely

Sethian, James A.

208

Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia [Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai. Johor (Malaysia); Saad, Rosli [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

Vortices in Brain waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003). Vortices in Brain Waves 62. M. E. Raichle, ScienceVORTICES IN BRAIN WAVES WALTER J. FREEMAN Department ofthat is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG).

Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Large-amplitude circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider large-amplitude circularly polarized (LACP) waves propagating in a magnetized plasma. It is well-known that the dispersion relation for such waves coincides with the dispersion relation given by the linear theory. We develop the model of LACP wave containing a finite population of Cerenkov resonant particles. We find that the current of resonant particles modifies the linear dispersion relation. Dispersion curves of low-frequency (i.e., whistler and magnetosonic) waves are shifted toward larger values of the wave vector, i.e., waves with arbitrarily large wavelengths do not exist in this case. Dispersion curves of high-frequency waves are modified so that the wave phase velocity becomes smaller than the speed of light.

Vasko, I. Y., E-mail: vaskoiy@gmail.com; Artemyev, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Backward wave propagation in left-handed media with isotropic and anisotropic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Backward wave propagation in left-handed media with isotropic and anisotropic permittivity tensors medium is investigated from a purely wave propagation point of view. The functional form for the index-velocity vectors are antiparallel. It is shown that, in the case considered, the backward-wave propagation can

Mojahedi, Mohammad

212

Head-on-collision of modulated dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The derivative expansion perturbation method is applied to a strongly coupled dusty plasma system consisting of negatively charged dust grains, electrons, and ions. The basic equations are reduced to a nonlinear Schroedinger type equation appropriate for describing the modulated dust acoustic (DA) waves. We have examined the modulation (in) stability and the dependence of the system physical parameters (angular frequency and group velocity) on the polarization force variation. Finally, the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo technique is employed to investigate the head-on collision (HoC) between two DA dark solitons. The analytical phase shifts and the trajectories of these dark solitons after the collision are derived. The numerical illustrations show that the polarization effect has strong influence on the nature of the phase shifts and the trajectories of the two DA dark solitons after collision.

El-Labany, S. K.; El-Depsy, A.; Zedan, N. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); El-Taibany, W. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, P.O. 960, Abha (Saudi Arabia); El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Moreton Waves and EIT Waves Related to the Flare Events of June 3, 2012 and July 6, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present geometrical and kinematical analysis of Moreton waves and EIT waves observed on June 3, 2012 and Moreton waves observed on July 6, 2012. The Moreton waves were recorded in H$\\alpha$ images of Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) archive and EIT waves obtained from SDO/AIA observations, especially in 193 nm channel. The observed wave of June 3 has angular span of about $70^{\\circ}$ with a broad wave front associated to NOAA active region 11496. It was found that the speed of the wave that started propagating at 17.53 UT is between 950 to 1500 km/s. Related to this wave occurrence, there was solar type II and III radio bursts. The speed of the EIT in this respect about 247 km/sec. On the other hand, the wave of July 6 may be associated to X1.1 class flare that occurred at 23.01 UT around the 11514 active region. From the kinematical analysis, the wave propagated with the initial velocity of about 1180 km/s which is in agreement with coronal shock velocity derived from type II radio burst observati...

Admiranto, A G; Yus'an, U; Puspitaningrum, E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

Snieder, Roel

216

Effects of ion abundances on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave growth rate in the vicinity of the plasmapause  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in multi-ion species plasmas propagate in branches. Except for the branch corresponding to the heaviest ion species, which has only a resonance at its gyrofrequency, these branches are bounded below by a cutoff frequency and above by a resonant gyrofrequency. The condition for wave growth is determined by the thermal anisotropies of each ion species, j, which sets an upper bound, ?{sub j}{sup ?}, on the wave frequency below which that ion species contributes positively to the growth rate. It follows that the relative positions of the cutoffs and the critical frequencies ?{sub j}{sup ?} play a crucial role in determining whether a particular wave branch will be unstable. The effect of the magnetospheric ion abundances on the growth rate of each branch of the EMIC instability in a model where all the ion species have kappa velocity distributions is investigated by appealing to the above ideas. Using the variation of the cutoff frequencies predicted by cold plasma theory as a guide, optimal ion abundances that maximise the EMIC instability growth rate are sought. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of H{sup +} ions, all branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the proton branch having the maximum growth rate. When the O{sup +} ion abundance in the ring current is increased, a decrease in the growth rate of the proton branch and cyclotron damping of the helium branch are observed. The oxygen branch, on the other hand, experiences an increase in the maximum growth rate with an increase in the O{sup +} ion abundance. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of He{sup +} ions, only the helium and oxygen branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the helium branch having the maximum growth rate.

Henning, F. D., E-mail: farranalfonso@gmail.com; Mace, R. L., E-mail: macer@ukzn.ac.za [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Kink waves in solar spicules: observation and modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Height series of Doppler observation at the solar limb (covering 3800 - 8700 km distance above the photosphere) in $H_{\\alpha}$ spectral line obtained by big coronagraph of Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory \\citep{khu} show the periodic spatial distribution of Doppler velocities in spicules. We suggest that the periodic spatial distribution is caused by propagating kink waves in spicule. The wave length is found to be $\\sim$ 3500 km. Numerical modelling of kink wave propagation from the photosphere to observed heights gives the wave length of kink waves at the photosphere to be $\\sim$ 1000 km, which indicates to the granular origin of the waves. The period of waves is estimated to be in the range of 35-70 s.

V. Kukhianidze; T. V. Zaqarashvili; E. Khutsishvili

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

Field comparison of the point velocity probe with other groundwater velocity measurement methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field testing of a new tool for measuring groundwater velocities at the centimeter scale, the point velocity probe (PVP), was undertaken at Canadian Forces Base, Borden, Ontario, Canada. The measurements were performed in ...

Labaky, W.; Devlin, J. F.; Gillham, R. W.

2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wave Properties of Isothermal Magneto-Rotational Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, the isothermal plasma wave properties in the neighborhood of the pair production region for the Kerr black hole magnetosphere are discussed. We have considered the Fourier analyzed form of the perturbed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations whose determinant leads to a dispersion relation. For the special scenario, the $x$-component of the complex wave vectors are numerically calculated. Respective components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. We have particularly investigated the existence of a Veselago medium and wave behavior (modes of waves dispersion

M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of Three-dimensional Breaking Waves on B. Biausser, S.T. Grilli, P. Frauni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of Three-dimensional Breaking Waves/Navier-Stokes solver. Analysis of wave profiles and kinematics (velocity, vorticity, pressure) are carried out. Keyword the breaking and post-breaking in a three- dimensional numerical wave tank of a solitary wave over a sloping

Grilli, Stéphan T.

222

Influence of orographic and canopy conditions on friction velocities observed during frontal events using Doppler sodar observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodar friction velocities, obtained during frontal events traversing areas characterized by different orographic and canopy conditions (flat, bare ground, small hills and valleys with agricultural crops and trees, agricultural crops and forest on a flat ground, bare ground on the side of a mountain), are compared in order to identify the influence of topography on this parameter. For some case studies, sounding and sodar data are combined in order to provide a relation between the friction velocity and the low-level jet presence. For the cases analyzed in this paper, the following results are obtained: the frontal passage is associated with a decrease of the horizontal wind speed (about 50% in magnitude) in the surface layer, and an increase of the friction velocity before the frontal passage followed by a decrease just at the time of the frontal passage or with a little delay. Friction velocity is more intense in the cold side of the low-level jet and its maximum represents 2% of the low-level jet maximum magnitude. As it concerns the influence of the terrain conditions on friction velocity, mountain effects yield to more intense friction-velocity values and to a superposition of an oscillating behavior on the time variation of friction velocity, while forest effects induce a shift of the frontal signature on the time variation of friction velocity at higher height levels. 25 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

Kotroni, V.; Amory-Mazaudier, C. (CRPE, Saint-Maur des Fosses (France))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Dependence of synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave and electron cyclotron wave on the frequency and parallel refractive index of electron cyclotron wave for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical mechanism of the synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW) in tokamaks is investigated using theoretical analysis and simulation methods in the present paper. Research shows that the synergy relationship between the two waves in velocity space strongly depends on the frequency ? and parallel refractive index N{sub //} of ECW. For a given spectrum of LHW, the parameter range of ECW, in which the synergy current exists, can be predicted by theoretical analysis, and these results are consistent with the simulation results. It is shown that the synergy effect is mainly caused by the electrons accelerated by both ECW and LHW, and the acceleration of these electrons requires that there is overlap of the resonance regions of the two waves in velocity space.

Huang, J.; Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China) [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Variational symmetries, conserved quantities and identities for several equations of mathematical physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We find variational symmetries, conserved quantities and identities for several equations: envelope equation, Böcher equation, the propagation of sound waves with losses, flow of a gas with losses, and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with losses or gains, and an electro-magnetic interaction. Most of these equations do not have a variational description with the classical variational principle and we find such a description with the generalized variational principle of Herglotz.

Donchev, Veliko, E-mail: velikod@ie.bas.bg [Laboratory “Physical Problems of Electron and Ion Technologies,” Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko shosse, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)] [Laboratory “Physical Problems of Electron and Ion Technologies,” Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko shosse, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

The jump-off velocity of an impulsively loaded spherical shell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider a constant temperature spherical shell of isotropic, homogeneous, linearly elastic material with density {rho} and Lame coefficients {lambda} and {mu}. The inner and outer radii of the shell are r{sub i} and r{sub o}, respectively. We assume that the inside of the shell is a void. On the outside of the shell, we apply a uniform, time-varying pressure p(t). We also assume that the shell is initially at rest. We want to compute the jump-off time and velocity of the pressure wave, which are the first time after t = 0 at which the pressure wave from the outer surface reaches the inner surface. This analysis computes the jump-off velocity and time for both compressible and incompressible materials. This differs substantially from [3], where only incompressible materials are considered. We will consider the behavior of an impulsively loaded, exponentially decaying pressure wave p(t) = P{sub 0{sup e}}{sup -{alpha}t}, where {alpha} {ge} 0. We notice that a constant pressure wave P(t) = P{sub 0} is a special case ({alpha} = 0) of a decaying pressure wave. Both of these boundary conditions are considered in [3].

Chabaud, Brandon M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Jerry S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Plane waves Lumped systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems S x y z Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · open tube #12;2 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · closed tube Impedance · Cylindrical waves z x y r #12;3 Impedance · Cylindrical waves ­ Circumferential part n=0 n=1 n=2 n=3 Impedance · Cylindrical

Berlin,Technische Universität

228

Wave Propagation in Lipid Monolayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound waves are excited on lipid monolayers using a set of planar electrodes aligned in parallel with the excitable medium. By measuring the frequency dependent change in the lateral pressure we are able to extract the sound velocity for the entire monolayer phase diagram. We demonstrate that this velocity can also be directly derived from the lipid monolayer compressibility and consequently displays a minimum in the phase transition regime. This minimum decreases from v0=170m/s for one component lipid monolayers down to vm=50m/s for lipid mixtures. No significant attenuation can be detected confirming an adiabatic phenomenon. Finally our data propose a relative lateral density oscillation of \\Delta\\rho/\\rho ~ 2% implying a change in all area dependent physical properties. Order of magnitude estimates from static couplings therefore predict propagating changes in surface potential of 1-50mV, 1 unit in pH (electrochemical potential) and 0.01{\\deg}K in temperature and fall within the same order of magnitude as physical changes measured during nerve pulse propagation. These results therefore strongly support the idea of propagating adiabatic sound waves along nerves as first thoroughly described by Kaufmann in 1989 and recently by Heimburg and Jackson, but claimed by Wilke already in 1912.

J. Griesbauer; A. Wixforth; M. F. Schneider

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Explicit dispersion relations for elastic waves in extremely deformed soft matter with application to nearly incompressible and auxetic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the propagation of elastic waves in soft materials subjected to finite deformations. We derive explicit dispersion relations, and apply these results to study elastic wave propagation in (i) nearly incompressible materials such as biological tissues and polymers, and (ii) negative Poisson's ratio or auxetic materials. We find that for nearly incompressible materials transverse wave velocities exhibit strong dependence on direction of propagation and initial strain state, whereas the longitudinal component is not affected significantly until extreme levels of deformations are attained. For highly compressible materials, we show that both pressure and shear wave velocities depend strongly on initial deformation and direction of propagation. When compression is applied, longitudinal wave velocity decreases in positive bulk modulus materials, and increases for negative bulk modulus materials; this is regardless the direction of wave prorogation. We demonstrate that finite deformations influence elastic wave propagation through combinations of induced effective compressibility and stiffness.

Pavel Galich; Stephan Rudykh

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Slow wave structures using twisted waveguides for charged particle applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapidly twisted electromagnetic accelerating structure includes a waveguide body having a central axis, one or more helical channels defined by the body and disposed around a substantially linear central axial channel, with central portions of the helical channels merging with the linear central axial channel. The structure propagates electromagnetic waves in the helical channels which support particle beam acceleration in the central axial channel at a phase velocity equal to or slower than the speed of light in free space. Since there is no variation in the shape of the transversal cross-section along the axis of the structure, inexpensive mechanical fabrication processes can be used to form the structure, such as extrusion, casting or injection molding. Also, because the field and frequency of the resonant mode depend on the whole structure rather than on dimensional tolerances of individual cells, no tuning of individual cells is needed. Accordingly, the overall operating frequency may be varied with a tuning/phase shifting device located outside the resonant waveguide structure.

Kang, Yoon W.; Fathy, Aly E.; Wilson, Joshua L.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

Robust Autoresonant Excitation in the Plasma Beat-Wave Accelerator R. R. Lindberg,* A. E. Charman, and J. S. Wurtele  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scheme is proposed, based on autoresonant phase locking of the Langmuir wave to the slowly chirped beat ponderomotively on the plasma to resonantly excite a large-amplitude, high-phase-velocity plasma wave suitableRobust Autoresonant Excitation in the Plasma Beat-Wave Accelerator R. R. Lindberg,* A. E. Charman

Friedland, Lazar

232

Geophys. J. Znt. (1991) 107, 531-543 Effects of point singularities on shear-wave propagation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geophys. J. Znt. (1991) 107, 531-543 Effects of point singularities on shear-wave propagation In most directions of propagation in anisotropic solids, seismic shear waves split in regular small to cause conventional cusps on the group-velocity wave surfaces. The effects of propagation near

Edinburgh, University of

233

Modeling velocity dispersion In Gypsy site, Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrepancies in interval velocities estimated from vertical well measurements made with different source central frequencies at Gypsy site could be primarily explained in terms of intrinsic attenuation. Four intervals ...

Alsaadan, Sami Ibrahim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Observations and modeling of wave-acceleration-induced sediment transport in the surfzone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Onshore sediment transport and sandbar migration are important to the morphological evolution of beaches, but are not understood well. Here, a new model that accounts for accelerations of wave-orbital velocities predicts ...

Hoefel, Fernanda Gemael, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Modeling fault-zone guided waves of microearthquakes in a geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the identification and modeling of such guided waves is an effective tool to locate fracture-induced, low-velocity fault-zone structures in geothermal fields. Authors Lou, M.;...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - averaged teleseismic p-wave Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Zone: A joint teleseismic and local P tomographic study Summary: because the unconsolidated sediment layer has a very low P wave velocity (1.8 kmsec) Chiu et al., 1992......

237

Turbulent combined wave-current boundary layer model for application in coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurately predicting transport processes, including sediment transport, in the coastal environment is impossible without correct current velocity and shear stress information. A combined wave-current boundary layer theory ...

Humbyrd, Chelsea Joy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Surfatron acceleration of protons by an electromagnetic wave at the heliosphere periphery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trapping and subsequent efficient surfatron acceleration of weakly relativistic protons by an electromagnetic wave propagating across an external magnetic field in plasma at the heliosphere periphery is considered. The problem is reduced to analysis of a second-order time-dependent nonlinear equation for the wave phase on the particle trajectory. The conditions of proton trapping by the wave, the dynamics of the components of the particle momentum and velocity, the structure of the phase plane, the particle trajectories, and the dependence of the acceleration rate on initial parameters of the problem are analyzed. The asymptotic behavior of the characteristics of accelerated particles for the heliosphere parameters is investigated. The optimum conditions for surfatron acceleration of protons by an electromagnetic wave are discussed. It is demonstrated that the experimentally observed deviation of the spectra of cosmic-ray protons from standard power-law dependences can be caused by the surfatron mechanism. It is shown that protons with initial energies of several GeV can be additionally accelerated in the heliosphere (the region located between the shock front of the solar wind and the heliopause at distances of about 100 astronomical units (a.u.) from the Sun) up to energies on the order of several thousands of GeV. In order to explain the proton spectra in the energy range of ?20–500 GeV, a two-component phenomenological model is proposed. The first component corresponds to the constant (in this energy range) galactic contribution, while the second (variable) component corresponds to the heliospheric contribution, which appears due to the additional acceleration of soft cosmic-ray protons at the heliosphere periphery. Variations in the proton spectra measured on different time scales between 1992 and 2008 in the energy range from several tens to several hundred GeV, as well as the dependence of these spectra on the heliospheric weather, can be explained by surfatron acceleration of protons in the heliosphere.

Loznikov, V. M., E-mail: loznikov@yandex.ru; Erokhin, N. S.; Zol’nikova, N. N.; Mikhailovskaya, L. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Smooth sandwich gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves which are smooth and contain two asymptotically flat regions are constructed from the homogeneous pp-waves vacuum solution. Motion of free test particles is calculated explicitly and the limit to an impulsive wave is also considered.

J. Podolsky

1998-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Resonant excitation and control of high order dispersive nonlinear waves L. Friedland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the pump and the daughter waves stay phase locked in an extended region of space­time despite the variation autoresonance in the system. In the autoresonance the daughter and the pump waves are phase locked andResonant excitation and control of high order dispersive nonlinear waves L. Friedland Racah

Friedland, Lazar

242

Investigation of Spatial Variation of Sea States Offshore of Humboldt Bay CA Using a Hindcast Model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial variability of sea states is an important consideration when performing wave resource assessments and wave resource characterization studies for wave energy converter (WEC) test sites and commercial WEC deployments. This report examines the spatial variation of sea states offshore of Humboldt Bay, CA, using the wave model SWAN . The effect of depth and shoaling on bulk wave parameters is well resolved using the model SWAN with a 200 m grid. At this site, the degree of spatial variation of these bulk wave parameters, with shoaling generally perpendicular to the depth contours, is found to depend on the season. The variation in wave height , for example, was higher in the summer due to the wind and wave sheltering from the protruding land on the coastline north of the model domain. Ho wever, the spatial variation within an area of a potential Tier 1 WEC test site at 45 m depth and 1 square nautical mile is almost negligible; at most about 0.1 m in both winter and summer. The six wave characterization parameters recommended by the IEC 6 2600 - 101 TS were compared at several points along a line perpendicular to shore from the WEC test site . As expected, these parameters varied based on depth , but showed very similar seasonal trends.

Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Tidal waves as yrast states in transitional nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The yrast states of transitional nuclei are described as quadrupole waves running over the nuclear surface, which we call tidal waves. In contrast to a rotor, which generates angular momentum by increasing the angular velocity at approximately constant deformation, a tidal wave generates angular momentum by increasing the deformation at approximately constant angular velocity. The properties of the tidal waves are calculated by means of the cranking model in a microscopic way. The calculated energies and E2 transition probabilities of the yrast states in the transitional nuclides with $Z$= 44, 46, 48 and $N=56, 58, ..., 66$ reproduce the experiment in detail. The nonlinear response of the nucleonic orbitals results in a strong coupling between shape and single particle degrees of freedom.

S. Frauendorf; Y. Gu; J. Sun

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

The dispersive Alfven wave in the time-stationary limit with a focus on collisional and warm-plasma effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nonlinear, collisional, two-fluid model of uniform plasma convection across a field-aligned current (FAC) sheet, describing the stationary Alfven (StA) wave, is presented. In a previous work, Knudsen showed that, for cold, collisionless plasma [D. J. Knudsen, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 10761 (1996)], the stationary inertial Alfven (StIA) wave can accelerate electrons parallel to a background magnetic field and cause large, time-independent plasma-density variations having spatial periodicity in the direction of the convective flow over a broad range of spatial scales and energies. Knudsen suggested that these fundamental properties of the StIA wave may play a role in the formation of discrete auroral arcs. Here, Knudsen's model has been generalized for warm, collisional plasma. From this generalization, it is shown that nonzero ion-neutral and electron-ion collisional resistivity significantly alters the perpendicular ac and dc structure of magnetic-field-aligned electron drift, and can either dissipate or enhance the field-aligned electron energy depending on the initial value of field-aligned electron drift velocity. It is also shown that nonzero values of plasma pressure increase the dominant Fourier component of perpendicular wavenumber.

Finnegan, S. M.; Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Knudsen, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most studies on dusty plasmas have assumed that electrons and ions follow Maxwellian distributions. However, in the presence of energetic ions, the distribution of ions tends to be non-Maxwellian. It is shown here that the existence of non-thermal ions would increase the phase velocity of a dust-acoustic wave. It is also found that the change in the phase velocity profoundly affects the characteristics of a dust-acoustic solitary wave.

Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Studies of laser-driven radiative blast waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed two sets of experiments looking at laser-driven radiating blast waves. In one set of experiments the effect of a drive laser's passage through a background gas on the hydrodynamical evolution of blast waves was examined. It was found that the laser's passage heats a channel in the gas, creating a region where a portion of the blast wave front had an increased velocity, leading to the formation of a bump-like protrusion on the blast wave. The second set of experiments involved the use of regularly spaced wire arrays to induce perturbations on a blast wave surface. The decay of these perturbations as a function of time was measured for various wave number perturbations and found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

Edwards, M J; Hansen, J; Edens, A; Ditmire, T; Adams, R; Rambo, P; Ruggles, L; Smith, I; Porter, J

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: Wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field can suppress packet splitting for some atoms whose specific velocities are in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. We also demonstrate that the modulated field can not only trap but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensemble having wide initial velocity and energy distributions. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while the trapped atoms have a narrow energy distribution.

Argonov, V. Yu., E-mail: argonov@poi.dvo.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pacific Oceanological Institute (Russian Federation)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Topological Aspects of Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of wave propagation on a manifold X, the characteristic functions are real valued functions on cotangent bundle of X that specify the allowable phase velocities of the waves. For certain classes of differential operators (e.g Maxwell's Equations) the associated characteristic functions have singularities. These singularities account for phenomena like conical refraction and the transformation of longitudinal waves into transversal ones (or viceversa). For a specific class of differential operators on surface, we prove that the singularities of the characteristic functions can be accounted from purely topological considerations. We also prove that there is a natural way to desingularsize the characteristic functions, and observe that this fact and Morse Theory establishes a specific connection between singularities and critical points of these functions. The relation between characteristic functions and differential operators is obtained through what is known as the symbol of the operator. We establish a connection between these symbols and holomorphic vector fields, which will provide us with symbols whose characteristic functions have interesting singularity sets.

Carlos Valero

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Calculus of Variations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calc. Var. 15, 451–491 (2002). Calculus of Variations. Donatella Danielli ..... u ? W1,p loc (Rn) such that for every ? ? W1,p o. (Rn) with compact support. (2.14).

Katharina Steingraeber Heidelberg 1107 1997 Oct 17 14:59:21

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties. 13 refs.

Allen, M.G.; Davis, S.J.; Kessler, W.J.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. (Physical Sciences, Inc., Andover, MA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Electromagnetic waves destabilized by runaway electrons in near-critical electric fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Runaway electron distributions are strongly anisotropic in velocity space. This anisotropy is a source of free energy that may destabilize electromagnetic waves through a resonant interaction between the waves and the energetic electrons. In this work, we investigate the high-frequency electromagnetic waves that are destabilized by runaway electron beams when the electric field is close to the critical field for runaway acceleration. Using a runaway electron distribution appropriate for the near-critical case, we calculate the linear instability growth rate of these waves and conclude that the obliquely propagating whistler waves are most unstable. We show that the frequencies, wave numbers, and propagation angles of the most unstable waves depend strongly on the magnetic field. Taking into account collisional and convective damping of the waves, we determine the number density of runaways that is required to destabilize the waves and show its parametric dependences.

Komar, A.; Pokol, G. I. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Fueloep, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology and Euratom-VR Association, Goeteborg (Sweden)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Non-diffracting chirped Bessel waves in optical antiguides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chirped Bessel waves are introduced as stable (non-diffracting) solutions of the paraxial wave equation in optical antiguides with a power-law radial variation in their index of refraction. Through numerical simulations, we investigate the propagation of apodized (finite-energy) versions of such waves, with or without vorticity, in antiguides with practical parameters. The new waves exhibit a remarkable resistance against the defocusing effect of the unstable index potentials, outperforming standard Gaussians with the same full width at half maximum. The chirped profile persists even under conditions of eccentric launching or antiguide bending and is also capable of self-healing like standard diffraction-free beams in free space.

Chremmos, Ioannis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Deep Vs Profiling Along the Top of Yucca Mountain Using a Vibroseis Source and Surface Waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was approved as the site for development of the geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy has been conducting studies to characterize the site and assess its future performance as a geologic repository. As part of these studies, a program of deep seismic profiling, to depths of 200 m, was conducted along the top of Yucca Mountain to evaluate the shear-wave velocity (V{sub s}) structure of the repository block. The resulting V{sub s} data were used as input into the development of ground motions for the preclosure seismic design of the repository and for postclosure performance assessment. The noninvasive spectral-analysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) method was employed in the deep profiling. Field measurements involved the use of a modified Vibroseis as the seismic source. The modifications allowed the Vibroseis to be controlled by a signal analyzer so that slow frequency sweeps could be performed while simultaneous narrow-band filtering was performed on the receiver outputs. This process optimized input energy from the source and signal analysis of the receiver outputs. Six deep V{sub s} profiles and five intermediate-depth (about 100 m) profiles were performed along the top of Yucca Mountain over a distance of about 5 km. In addition, eleven shallower profiles (averaging about 45-m deep) were measured using a bulldozer source. The shallower profiles were used to augment the deeper profiles and to evaluate further the near-surface velocity structure. The V{sub s} profiles exhibit a strong velocity gradient within 5 m of the surface, with the mean V{sub s} value more than doubling. Below this depth, V{sub s} gradually increases from a mean value of about 900 to 1000 m/s at a depth of 150 m. Between the depths of 150 and 210 m, V{sub s} increases more rapidly to about 1350 m/s, but this trend is based on limited data. At depths less than 50 m, anisotropy in V{sub s} was measured for surveys conducted parallel and perpendicular to the mountain crest, with the velocity parallel to the crest about 200 m/s higher. In the 5- to 50-m depth range, the average coefficient of variation (COV) of all data is about 0.25. Below 75 m, where the data set is smaller and includes measurements only parallel to the crest, the average COV decreases to a value of about 0.11.

K. Stokoe; B. Rosenblad; I. Wong; J. Bay; P. Thomas; W. Silva

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

RESEARCH PAPER Semiannual velocity variations around the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: seismichc@163.com H. Chen Á H. Ge Á F. Niu Unconventional Natural Gas Institute, China University: 30 April 2014 / Accepted: 23 May 2014 � The Seismological Society of China, Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014 Abstract We continuously

Niu, Fenglin

256

The variation of efficiency with angle of expansion, exit area, and velocity in a square diffuser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tapered seotices. Ths ezit tapered section is called the diffuser. The purpose of the diffaser 1s to decelerate the fluid snd raise its statio precede. The difference in pressure betseen the inlet and the azit of the venturi uhieh is a measure... increases ar as ths aLse of the vsnturi tube is in- creased, If the speed of flow through a venturi is gradually increased to an abnormally high value~ the ov~ pressure drop will increase very rapidly after a definite speed has been attained. If...

Weber, Hugh Conrad

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Wave turbulence served up on a plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate is experimentally investigated. By using a Fourier transform profilometry technique, the deformation field of the plate surface is measured simultaneously in time and space. This enables us to compute the wavevector-frequency Fourier ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) spectrum of the full space-time deformation velocity. In the 3D ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) space, we show that the energy of the motion is concentrated on a 2D surface that represents a nonlinear dispersion relation. This nonlinear dispersion relation is close to the linear dispersion relation. This validates the usual wavenumber-frequency change of variables used in many experimental studies of wave turbulence. The deviation from the linear dispersion, which increases with the input power of the forcing, is attributed to weak non linear effects. Our technique opens the way for many new extensive quantitative comparisons between theory and experiments of wave turbulence.

Pablo Cobelli; Philippe Petitjeans; Agnes Maurel; Vincent Pagneux; Nicolas Mordant

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Water Waves Roger Grimshaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

259

VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, Morse Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh., E-mail: joe.hollweg@unh.edu, E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, A Verisk Analytics Company, 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Models of OH Maser Variations in U Her  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arecibo spectra of the mainline OH maser emission from U Her over more than a decade show variations of the OH emission over these time scales. These observations are combined with high spatial resolution VLBA maps to investigate the causes of the variations in the velocities of the maser components. Global properties of the dust shell, such as accelerations, variations in the pump and shell-wide magnetic field changes are examined as possibilities, and eliminated. A possible solution to the problem involving plasma turbulence and the local magnetic field is introduced, and the relevant time scales of the turbulence are calculated. The turbulent velocity field yields time scales of the turbulence are calculated. The turbulent velocity field yields time scales that are too long (of order centuries), while the turbulent magnetic field produces variations on appropriate time scales of a few years. A line-of-sight model of the turbulence is developed and investigated. The complete exploration of this solution requires extensive theoretical and observational work. Possible avenues of investigation of the plasma turbulence model are presented.

Stacy Palen; John D. Fix

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

High-velocity clouds: a diverse phenomenon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this contribution the current state of knowledge about the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) is summarized. Recent progress has shown that the HVCs are a diverse phenomenon. The intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are likely to be part of a Galactic Fountain. The Magellanic Stream is a tidal remnant. HVC complex C (possibly complexes A and GCN) are low-metallicity clouds near the Galaxy; they could be remnants of the formation of the Galaxy or old tidal streams extracted from nearby dwarf galaxies. Having a substantial number of HI HVCs dispersed throughout the Local Group seems incompatible with the observed HI mass function of galaxies. Finally, FUSE finds high-velocity OVI, some of which is clearly associated with HI HVCs, but some which is not.

B. P. Wakker

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ecoclimate: Variations, Interactions, and Teleconnections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the covariance of vertical wind speed and concentration tothat the mean vertical velocity wind speed is zero on time

Swann, Abigail Lynn Segal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solar cycle variations of large scale flows in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we study the large-scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone using the ring diagram technique. We use observations from four different times to study possible temporal variations in flow velocity. We find definite changes in both the zonal and meridional components of the flows. The amplitude of the zonal flow appears to increase with solar activity and the flow pattern also shifts towards lower latitude with time.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Lagrangian reconstruction of cosmic velocity fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a Lagrangian reconstruction method of the velocity field from galaxy redshift catalog that takes its root in the Euler equation. This results in a ``functional'' of the velocity field which must be minimized. This is helped by an algorithm solving the minimization of cost-flow problems. The results obtained by applying this method to cosmological problems are shown and boundary effects happening in real observational cases are then discussed. Finally, a statistical model of the errors made by the reconstruction method is proposed.

G. Lavaux

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sound velocity bound and neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by $\\sqrt{3}$. Simple arguments support this bound in non-relativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

Paulo F. Bedaque; Andrew W. Steiner

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines D of observations of such shell type distributions having positive slope in velocity space at low energies, about 10´cre´au (2006), Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines

California at Berkeley, University of

267

Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma column with near-Maxwellian velocity distributions. We focus on the z-independent component#12;Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin Department of Physics April 2013; published online 25 April 2013) A kinetic theory of linear electrostatic plasma waves

California at San Diego, University of

268

Two-dimensional elastic wave propagation in a duraluminum sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MENTAL PROCEDURE Experimental Design Data Acquisition Data Correction III. DATA PROCESSING 12 12 12 15 16 Wiener Filter Theory Construction of Desired. Wavelet 23 25 Wiener Filter Results 27 Bandpass Filter IV. TRAVELTIME ANALYSIS Wave... perpendicular to strike 2, Duraluminum model used in experiments 1 and 2 Relations between the Rayleigh-, P-, and S-wave velocities in an infinite medium for Poisson's ratio, o-, ranging from 0. 0 to 0. 5 Square root of energy ratios for reflected P- and S-waves...

Cefola, David Paul

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electron Climbing a 'Devil's Staircase' in Wave-Particle Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous nonlinear driven systems display spectacular responses to forcing, including chaos and complex phase-locking plateaus characterized by 'devil's staircase', Arnold tongues, and Farey trees. In the universality class of Hamiltonian systems, a paradigm is the motion of a charged particle in two waves, which inspired a renormalization group method for its description. Here we report the observation of the underlying 'devil's staircase' by recording the beam velocity distribution function at the outlet of a traveling wave tube versus the amplitude of two externally induced waves.

Macor, Alessandro; Doveil, Fabrice; Elskens, Yves [Physique des interactions ioniques et moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe turbulence plasma, case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Josephson oscillations of charge density waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of charge density waves in solids was originally proposed as a possible mechanism for superconductivity by Froehlich. Although the experimentally discovered materials with charge density waves (CDW)s are found to have finite resistivity as a result of impurity pinning, they nevertheless reveal many interesting features including motion which is analogous to a resistively shunted Josephson junction of superconductors. The noise spectrum of CDW systems is reviewed with particular emphasis on interactions with normal as well as magnetic impurities. Future prospects for observing an amplitude variation of the noise signals induced by a magnetic field are proposed.

Ruvalds, J.; Tua, P.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

Winokur, Michael

272

Lorentz violation and red shift of gravitational waves in brane-worlds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the speed of gravitational waves in a brane world scenario and show that if the extra dimension is space-like, the speed of the propagation of such waves is greater in the bulk than that on the brane. Therefore, the 4D Lorentz invariance is broken in the gravitational sector. A comparison is also made between the red shift of such waves and those of the electromagnetic waves on the brane. Such a comparison is essential for extracting the signature of the extra dimension and thus clarifying the question of maximal velocity of gravitational waves in the bulk.

Fatemeh Ahmadi; Jafar Khodagholizadeh; H. R. Sepangi

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP By NATHAN ANDREW WEBER PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP Thesis Approved: _______________________________________ Thesis Advisor the air speed transducer mount and the Plexiglas model of the heat pump. Ipseng Iu and myself worked side

274

Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

Stanton, Philip L. (Bernalillo County, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Crump, Jr., O. B. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

The propagation of waves in Einstein's unified field theory as shown by two exact solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The propagation of waves in two space dimensions exhibited by two exact solutions to the field equations of Einstein's unified field theory is investigated under the assumption that the metric s_{ik} is the one already chosen by Kursunoglu and by H\\'ely in the years 1952-1954. It is shown that, for both exact solutions, with this choice of the metric the propagation of the waves occurs in the wave zone with the fundamental velocity (ds^2=0).

Salvatore Antoci

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Imaging the lithosphere beneath NE Tibet: teleseismic P and S body wave tomography incorporating surface wave starting models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Priestley&Tilmann 2009). In the absence of any prior information about the distribution of wave velocities in the crust, investigators generally use either station corrections de- rived from average residuals (e.g. Frederiksen et al. 1998; Graeber et al...

Nunn, Ceri; Roecker, Steven W.; Tilmann, Frederik J.; Priestley, Keith F.; Heyburn, Ross; Sandvol, Eric A.; Ni, James F.; Chen, Yongshun John; Zhao, Wenjin; INDEPTH IV Team

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

Mahmood, S. [Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, RS, Porto Alegre 915051-970 (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Haas, F. [Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, RS, Porto Alegre 915051-970 (Brazil)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Accessibility for lower hybrid waves in PBX-M  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the wave damping mechanism in the presence of a `spectral gap` is an important issue for the current profile control using Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The authors examine a traditional explanation based upon upshifting of the wave parallel refractive index (n{sub {parallel}}) and find that there can be an upper bound in the n{sub {parallel}} upshift. The amount of upshift is not sufficient to bridge the spectral gap completely under some PBX-M LHCD conditions. There is experimental evidence, however, that current was driven even under such conditions. Another mechanism is also considered, based upon the 2-D velocity space dynamics coupled with a compound wave spectrum, here consisting of forward- and backward-running waves. The runaway critical speed relative to the phase speeds of these waves plays an important role in this model.

Takahashi, H.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Chance, M.; Chu, T.K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Greenough, N.; Hatcher, R.; Ignat, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.; Perkins, F.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Sun, Y.; Tighe, W.; Valeo, E.; von Goeler, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (US). Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S.; Levinton, F. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (US); Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Harris, J.; Hirshman, S.; Isler, R.; Post-Zwicker, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Jones, S.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (US); Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Wu, Zhengwei, E-mail: wuzw@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Low Temperature Plasma Application, Yunnan Aerospace Industry Company, Kunming, 650229 Yunnan (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Interaction of two walkers: Wave-mediated energy and force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bouncing droplet, self-propelled by its interaction with the waves it generates, forms a classical wave-particle association called a "walker." Previous works have demonstrated that the dynamics of a single walker is driven by its global surface wave field that retains information on its past trajectory. Here, we investigate the energy stored in this wave field for two coupled walkers and how it conveys an interaction between them. For this purpose, we characterize experimentally the "promenade modes" where two walkers are bound, and propagate together. Their possible binding distances take discrete values, and the velocity of the pair depends on their mutual binding. The mean parallel motion can be either rectilinear or oscillating. The experimental results are recovered analytically with a simple theoretical framework. A relation between the kinetic energy of the droplets and the total energy of the standing waves is established.

Borghesi, Christian; Labousse, Matthieu; Eddi, Antonin; Fort, Emmanuel; Couder, Yves

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ion-beam driven lower hybrid waves in a magnetized dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ion beam drives lower hybrid waves to instability in a magnetized dusty plasma via Cerenkov interaction. A dispersion relation and the growth rate of the lower hybrid waves have been derived taking into account the dust charge fluctuations. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave instability increase with relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The lower hybrid modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. Moreover, the growth rate of the instability increases with beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density.

Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110 068 (India)] [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110 068 (India); Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi 110 042 (India)] [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi 110 042 (India); Gupta, Ruby [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi 110 036 (India)] [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi 110 036 (India)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Photon wave function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, the photon wave function exists as long as it can be precisely defined and made useful.

Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

283

DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Observation of negative-frequency waves in a water tank: A classical analogue to the Hawking effect?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conversion of positive-frequency waves into negative-frequency waves at the event horizon is the mechanism at the heart of the Hawking radiation of black holes. In black-hole analogues, horizons are formed for waves propagating in a medium against the current when and where the flow exceeds the wave velocity. We report on the first direct observation of negative-frequency waves converted from positive-frequency waves in a moving medium. The measured degree of mode conversion is significantly higher than expected from theory.

Germain Rousseaux; Christian Mathis; Philippe Maissa; Thomas G. Philbin; Ulf Leonhardt

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nonlinear Hydromagnetic Wave Support of a Stratified Molecular Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform numerical simulations of nonlinear MHD waves in a gravitationally stratified molecular cloud that is bounded by a hot and tenuous external medium. We study the relation between the strength of the turbulence and various global properties of a molecular cloud, within a 1.5-dimensional approximation. Under the influence of a driving source of Alfvenic disturbances, the cloud is lifted up by the pressure of MHD waves and reaches a steady-state characterized by oscillations about a new time-averaged equilibrium state. The nonlinear effect results in the generation of longitudinal motions and many shock waves; however, the wave kinetic energy remains predominantly in transverse, rather than longitudinal, motions. There is an approximate equipartition of energy between the transverse velocity and fluctuating magnetic field (aspredicted by small-amplitude theory) in the region of the stratified cloud which contains most of the mass; however, this relation breaks down in the outer regions, particularly near the cloud surface, where the motions have a standing-wave character. This means that the Chandrasekhar-Fermi formula applied to molecular clouds must be significantly modified in such regions. Models of an ensemble of clouds show that, for various strengths of the input energy, the velocity dispersion in the cloud $\\sigma \\propto Z^{0.5}$, where $Z$ is a characteristic size of the cloud.Furthermore, $\\sigma$ is always comparable to the mean Alfven velocity of the cloud, consistent with observational results.

T. Kudoh; S. Basu

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Turbulence Spectra from Spectral Lines: Tests of the Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence is a key element of the dynamics of astrophysical fluids, including those of interstellar medium, clusters of galaxies and circumstellar regions. Turbulent motions induce Doppler shifts of observable emission and absorption lines and this motivates studies of turbulence using precision spectroscopy. We provide high resolution numerical testing of the two promising techniques, namely, Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum. We obtain an expression for the shot noise that the discretization of the numerical data entails and successfully test it. We show that numerical resolution required for recovering the underlying turbulent spectrum from observations depend on the spectral index of velocity fluctuations. Thus the low resolution testing may be misleading.

A. Chepurnov; A. Lazarian

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Variational transition state theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

Truhlar, D.G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Wave-induced chaos in a continuously fed unstirred reactor John H. Merkin,"Valery Petrov,bStephen K. Scottc*and Kenneth Showalterb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave-induced chaos in a continuously fed unstirred reactor John H. Merkin,"Valery Petrov,bStephen K of a constant-velocity constant-form reaction wave that traverses the reaction domain, leaving behind, allowing further wave events to be initiated, which then propagate into the `recovered' region. The chaotic

Showalter, Kenneth

289

3D REGULARIZED VELOCITY FROM 3D DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D REGULARIZED VELOCITY FROM 3D DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer Dept, Ontario, M3H 5T4 Paul.Joe@ec.gc.ca ABSTRACT The recent availability of sequences of 3D Doppler radial velocity datasets provides sufficient information to estimate the 3D velocity of Doppler storms. We present

Barron, John

290

AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

New wave generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

Mercier, Matthieu J.

293

Velocity coordinate spectrum: geometrical aspects of observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze a technique of obtaining turbulence power spectrum using spectral line data along the velocity coordinate, which we refer to as Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS). We formalize geometrical aspects of observation through a single factor, "geometric term". We find that all variety of particular observational configurations can be described using correspondent variants of this term, which we explicitly calculate. This allows us to obtain asymptotics for both parallel lines of sight and crossing lines of sight. The latter case is especially important for studies of turbulence within diffuse ISM in Milky Way. For verification of our results, we use direct calculation of VCS spectra, while the numerical simulations are presented in a companion paper.

A. Chepurnov; A. Lazarian

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

"Nonrelativistic" kinematics: Particles or waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The kinematics of particles refer to events and tangent vectors, while that of waves refer to dual gradient planes. Special relativity [1-3] applies to both objects alike. Here we show that spacetime exchange symmetry [7] implicit in the SIdefinition of length based on the universal constant c has profound consequences at low velocities. Galilean physics, exact in the limit c \\to \\infty, is mirrored by a dual so-called Carrollian superluminal kinematics [4-6] exact in the limit c \\to 0. Several new results follow. The Galilean limit explains mass conservation in Newtonian mechanics, while the dual limit is a kinematical prerequisite for wavelike tachyonic motion [8, 9]. As an example, the Land\\'e paradox [19, 20] of waveparticle duality has a natural resolution within special relativity in terms of superluminal, particlelike waves. It is emphasized that internal particle energy mc^2 can not be ignored, while kinetic energy leads to an extended Galilei group. We also demonstrate that Maxwell's equations have magnetic and electric limits covariant under Galilean and Carrollian symmetry.

Jens Madsen Houlrik; Germain Rousseaux

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Observation of propagating edge spin waves modes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broadband magnetization response of equilateral triangular 1000 nm Permalloy dots has been studied under an in-plane magnetic field, applied parallel (buckle state), and perpendicular (Y state) to the triangles base. Micromagnetic simulations identify edge spin waves (E-SWs) in the buckle state as SWs propagating along the two adjacent edges. These quasi one-dimensional spin waves emitted by the vertex magnetic charges gradually transform from propagating to standing due to interference and are weakly affected by dipolar interdot interaction and variation of the aspect ratio. Spin waves in the Y state have a two dimensional character. These findings open perspectives for implementation of the E-SWs in magnonic crystals and thin films.

Lara, A.; Aliev, F. G., E-mail: farkhad.aliev@uam.es [Dpto. Física de la Materia Condensada C-III, Instituto Nicolas Cabrera (INC) and Condensed Matter Physics Institute (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Metlushko, V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains.

J. I. Arana; L. L. Bonilla; H. T. Grahn

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Heating of ions by high frequency electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heating of ions by high frequency electrostatic waves in magnetically confined plasmas has been a paradigm for studying nonlinear wave-particle interactions. The frequency of the waves is assumed to be much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency and the waves are taken to propagate across the magnetic field. In fusion type plasmas, electrostatic waves, like the lower hybrid wave, cannot access the core of the plasma. That is a domain for high harmonic fast waves or electron cyclotron waves—these are primarily electromagnetic waves. Previous studies on heating of ions by two or more electrostatic waves are extended to two electromagnetic waves that propagate directly across the confining magnetic field. While the ratio of the frequency of each wave to the ion cyclotron frequency is large, the frequency difference is assumed to be near the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear wave-particle interaction is studied analytically using a two time-scale canonical perturbation theory. The theory elucidates the effects of various parameters on the gain in energy by the ions—parameters such as the amplitudes and polarizations of the waves, the ratio of the wave frequencies to the cyclotron frequency, the difference in the frequency of the two waves, and the wave numbers associated with the waves. For example, the ratio of the phase velocity of the envelope formed by the two waves to the phase velocity of the carrier wave is important for energization of ions. For a positive ratio, the energy range is much larger than for a negative ratio. So waves like the lower hybrid waves will impart very little energy to ions. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with numerical simulations of the exact dynamical equations. The analytical results are used to construct mapping equations, simplifying the derivation of the motion of ions, which are, subsequently, used to follow the evolution of an ion distribution function. The heating of ions can then be properly quantified in terms of the wave parameters and can be conveniently used to find ideal conditions needed to heat ions by high frequency electromagnetic waves.

Zestanakis, P. A.; Kominis, Y.; Hizanidis, K. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, Zographou GR-15773 (Greece)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, Zographou GR-15773 (Greece); Ram, A. K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

299

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

Merlino, Robert L.

300

Nonlinear theory of ionic sound waves in a hot quantum-degenerate electron-positron-ion plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A collisionless nonmagnetized e-p-i plasma consisting of quantum-degenerate gases of ions, electrons, and positrons at nonzero temperatures is considered. The dispersion equation for isothermal ionic sound waves is derived and analyzed, and an exact expression is obtained for the linear velocity of ionic sound. Analysis of the dispersion equation has made it possible to determine the ranges of parameters in which nonlinear solutions in the form of solitons should be sought. A nonlinear theory of isothermal ionic sound waves is developed and used for obtaining and analyzing the exact solution to the system of initial equations. Analysis has been carried out by the method of the Bernoulli pseudopotential. The ranges of phase velocities of periodic ionic sound waves and soliton velocities are determined. It is shown that in the plasma under investigation, these ranges do not overlap and that the soliton velocity cannot be lower than the linear velocity of ionic sound. The profiles of physical quantities in a periodic wave and in a soliton are constructed, as well as the dependences of the velocity of sound and the critical velocity on the ionic concentration in the plasma. It is shown that these velocities increase with the ion concentration.

Dubinov, A. E., E-mail: dubinov-ae@yandex.ru; Sazonkin, M. A., E-mail: figma@mail.r [Sarov State Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Analysis of PS-converted wave seismic data in the presence of azimuthal anisotropy   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shear-wave splitting and azimuthal variations of seismic attributes are two major anisotropic effects induced by vertically-aligned fractures. They both have influences on seismic data processing and interpretation, and ...

Liu, Weining

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluation of the Structure of Levee Transitions on Wave Runup and Overtopping by Physical Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

traditional overtopping techniques have predicted. The runup values and floodwall wave heights tend to show potential problematic areas and mimic the variation of overtopping along the levee transition. Under the design conditions tested, extreme overtopping...

Oaks, Drake Benjamin

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

303

Anisotropic wave propagation in nematic liquid crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the fact that quantitative experimental data have been available for more than forty years now, nematoacoustics still poses intriguing theoretical and experimental problems. In this paper, we prove that the main observed features of acoustic wave propagation through a nematic liquid crystal cell -- namely, the anisotropy of sound velocity and its frequency dependence -- may be plausibly explained by a first-gradient continuum theory characterized by a hyperelastic anisotropic response from an evolving relaxed configuration. We compare and contrast our proposal with a competing theory where the liquid crystal is modeled as an isotropically compressible, anisotropic second-gradient fluid.

Paolo Biscari; Antonio DiCarlo; Stefano S. Turzi

2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

On the Velocity and Intensity Line Asymmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that, if solar 5 min. oscillations are excited by convection in the upper layers of the convective envelope, it is impossible to explain the opposite line asymmetries observed in the velocity and intensity spectra with assumptions on the dissipations which reduce the problem to a second order one. The interpretation of that observation requires to solve the full non-adiabatic problem which is of the fourth or sixth order. We also analyze the causes of line asymmetries in the frame of the general problem and we show that to locate the source, it is better to study line asymmetries not too far from line centers.

M. Gabriel

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A comparison between matter wave and light wave interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate and compare the response of light wave interferometers and matter wave interferometers to gravitational waves. We find that metric matter wave interferometers will not challenge kilometric light wave interferometers such as Virgo or LIGO, but could be a good candidate for the detection of very low frequency gravitational waves.

Pacôme Delva; Marie-Christine Angonin; Philippe Tourrenc

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHALLOW WATER WAVES: LINEAR ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a linear analysis of inviscid, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shallow water systems. In spherical geometry, a generic property of such systems is the existence of five wave modes. Three of them (two magneto-Poincare modes and one magneto-Rossby mode) are previously known. The other two wave modes are strongly influenced by the magnetic field and rotation, and have substantially lower angular frequencies; as such, we term them 'magnetostrophic modes'. We obtain analytical functions for the velocity, height, and magnetic field perturbations in the limit that the magnitude of the MHD analogue of Lamb's parameter is large. On a sphere, the magnetostrophic modes reside near the poles, while the other modes are equatorially confined. Magnetostrophic modes may be an ingredient in explaining the frequency drifts observed in Type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars.

Heng, Kevin [Institute for Advanced Study, School of Natural Sciences, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Spitkovsky, Anatoly, E-mail: heng@ias.ed, E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.ed [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sound Wave in Vortex with Sink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Komar's definition, we give expressions for the mass and angular momentum of a rotating acoustic black hole. We show that the mass and angular momentum so defined, obey the equilibrium version of the first law of Black Hole thermodynamics. We also show that when a phonon passes by a vortex with a sink, its trajectory is bent. The angle of bending of the sound wave to leading order is quadratic in $A/cb$ and $B/cb$, where $b$ is the impact parameter and $A$ and $B$ are the parameters in the velocity of the fluid flow. The time delay in the propagation of sound wave which to first order depends only on $B/c^2$ and is independent of $A$.

Soumen Basak

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mother templates for gravitational wave chirps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Templates used in a search for binary black holes and neutron stars in gravitational wave interferometer data will have to be computed on-line since the computational storage and retrieval costs for the template bank are too expensive. The conventional dimensionless variable $T=(c^3/Gm)t,$ where $m$ is the total mass of a binary, in the time-domain and a not-so-conventional velocity-like variable $v=(\\pi Gm f)^{1/3}$ in the Fourier-domain, render the phasing of the waves independent of the total mass of the system enabling the construction of {\\it mother templates} that depend only on the mass ratio of a black hole binary. Use of such mother templates in a template bank will bring about a reduction in computational costs up to a factor of 10 and a saving on storage by a factor of 100.

B. S. Sathyaprakash

2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

THE VELOCITY CENTROID PERIODICITY OF L2 PUPPIS' SiO MASER EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first short term velocity centroid (VC) periodicity derived from SiO maser emission. L2 Puppis, a semi-regular AGB star, was observed using the Mopra radio telescope of the Australia Telescope National Facility in the SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 and v = 1, J = 2-1 transitions. It exhibits a 139 day period in its SiO maser VC based on a period folding analysis and a Lomb Scargle analysis. L2 Pup's SiO maser emission has an unusually large velocity range and an unusual three-peaked spectrum. To create the change in VC the entire spectrum does not shift in velocity, but changes in the relative emission of the peaks generate the variation. The changes in the VC may be due to differential illumination, an asymmetric circumstellar distribution of material, or a mixture of causes. The unusual velocity structure, similar to that observed in Orion source 1, may be due to revolution of the circumstellar material or asymmetries in the circumstellar environment.

McIntosh, Gordon C. [Division of Science and Mathematics, University of Minnesota, Morris, Morris, MN 56267 (United States); Indermuehle, Balthasar [Australia Telescope National Facility, Locked Bag 194, Narrabri, NSW 2390 (Australia)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A study of velocity fields in the transition region of Epsilon Eri (K2 V)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analyses of the widths and shifts of optically thin emission lines in the ultraviolet spectrum of the active dwarf Epsilon Eri (K2 V) are presented. The spectra were obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. The line widths are used to find the non-thermal energy density and its variation with temperature from the chromosphere to the upper transition region. The energy fluxes that could be carried by Alfven and acoustic waves are investigated, to test their possible roles in coronal heating. Acoustic waves do not appear to be a viable means of coronal heating. There is, in principle, ample flux in Alfven waves, but detailed calculations of wave propagation are required before definite conclusions can be drawn about their viability. The high sensitivity and spectral resolution of the above instruments have allowed two-component Gaussian fits to be made to the profiles of the stronger transition region lines. The broad and narrow components which result share some similarities with those observed in the Sun, but in Epsilon Eri the broad component is redshifted relative to the narrow component and contributes more to the total line flux. The possible origins of the two components and the energy fluxes implied are discussed. On balance our results support the conclusion of Wood, Linsky & Ayres, that the narrow component is related to Alfven waves reaching to the corona, but the origin of the broad component is not clear.

S. A. Sim; C. Jordan

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Systemic Velocity of Eta Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution spectra of molecular hydrogen in the Homunculus nebula allow for the first direct measurement of the systemic velocity of Eta Carinae. Near-infrared long-slit data for H2 1-0 S(1) lambda 21218 obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer on the Gemini South telescope give Vsys=-8.1pm1 km/s (heliocentric), or VLSR=-19.7pm1 km/s, from the average of the near and far sides of the Homunculus. This measurement considerably improves the precision for the value of -7pm10 km/s inferred from neighboring O-type stars in the Carina nebula. New near-infrared spectra also provide a high-resolution line profile of [Fe II] lambda 16435 emission from gas condensations known as the Weigelt objects without contamination from the central star, revealing a line shape with complex kinematic structure. Previously, uncertainty in the Weigelt knots' kinematics was dominated by the adopted systemic velocity of Eta Car.

Nathan Smith

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structures of the Coso geothermal area, California, from microseismic travel time data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic pulse-wave velocity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CDF 2006 Summary: . Priaux (Eds) TU Delft, Delft The Netherland, 2006 THE INFLUENCE OF ASYMMETRIC INFLOW IN ABDOMINAL AORTIC... the hemodynamics in...

316

Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)Crowley County, Colorado: Energy ResourcesCrucialCrump'sNew

317

Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978) |Thrall, Texas: EnergyThree RiversOpenarea,

318

On plane waves in diluted relativistic cold plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We briefly report on some exact results [G. Fiore, arXiv:1312.4665 preprint, to appear in J. Phys. A] regarding plane waves in a relativistic cold plasma. If the plasma, initially at rest, is reached by a transverse plane electromagnetic travelling-wave, then its motion has a very simple dependence on this wave in the limit of zero density, otherwise can be determined by an iterative procedure whose accuracy decreases with time or the plasma density. Thus one can describe in particular the impact of a very intense and short laser pulse onto a plasma and determine conditions for the "slingshot effect" [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. De Angelis, arXiv:1309.1400 preprint] to occur. The motion in vacuum of a charged test particle subject to a wave of the same kind is also determined, for any initial velocity.

Gaetano Fiore

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

On the fully nonlinear acoustic waves in a plasma with positrons beam impact and superthermal electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions, superthermal electrons, and positrons beam are reported. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to an energy-balance like equation. The latter is numerically analyzed to examine the existence regions for solitary and shock waves. It is found that only solitary waves can propagate, however, the model cannot support shocks. The effects of superthermality and beam parameters (via, positrons concentration and streaming velocity) on the existence region, as well as solitary wave profile have been discussed.

Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan) [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hypersonic wave propagation in the triton X-100 2014 water gelation system as studied by Brillouin spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1211 Hypersonic wave propagation in the triton X-100 2014 water gelation system as studied, quelle que soit la concentration de triton X-100. Abstract 2014 The hypersonic velocity and absorption refractometer. Analysis of the results show that in the gel phase hypersonic waves propagate effectively through

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

Cameron, Maria Kourkina

322

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

Boyer, Edmond

323

On Approximating the Translational Velocity of Vortex Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from this configuration and the system scaling. Here, the accuracy of this approximation is presented orifice in a flat plate contain a converging radial component of velocity. For both configurations. By this definition, the piston velocity is the average jet velocity passing through the orifice independent

Mohseni, Kamran

324

Nonlinear spherical Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an one-dimensional numerical study of Alfven waves propagating along a radial magnetic field. Neglecting losses, any spherical Alfven wave, no matter how small its initial amplitude is, becomes nonlinear at sufficiently large radii. From previous simulations of Alfven waves in plane parallel atmospheres we did expect the waves to steepen and produce current sheets in the nonlinear regime, which was confirmed by our new calculations. On the other hand we did find that even the least nonlinear waves were damped out almost completely before 10 solar radii. A damping of that kind is required by models of Alfven wave-driven winds from old low-mass stars as these winds are mainly accelerated within a few stellar radii.

Ulf Torkelsson; G. Christopher Boynton

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W. [Astronomy Department, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meyer, B. S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

Berlin,Technische Universität

327

Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived #12;66 2. Wave Propagation Theory quantities of the quiescent (time independent) medium are identified perturbations is much smaller than the speed of sound. 2.1.1 The Nonlinear Wave Equation Retaining higher

328

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

US Army Corps of Engineers

329

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer of the Subject II. Introduction­Historical Perspective III. Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations IV. Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics V. Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions VI

Hereman, Willy A.M.

330

Force-velocity relations for multiple molecular motor transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A transition rate model of cargo transportation by N effective molecular motors is proposed. Under the assumption of steady state, the force-velocity curve of multi-motor system can be derived from the force-velocity curve of single motor. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor number, which is dependent on the single motor force-velocity curve. And most commonly, the velocity decreases. This gives a possible explanation to some recent experimental observations.

Wang, Ziqing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Force-velocity relations for multiple-molecular-motor transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A transition rate model of cargo transport by $N$ molecular motors is proposed. Under the assumption of steady state, the force-velocity curve of multi-motor system can be derived from the force-velocity curve of single motor. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor number, which is dependent on the single motor force-velocity curve. And most commonly, the velocity decreases. This gives a possible explanation to some recent

Ziqing Wang; Ming Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Autoresonant Dynamics of Optical Guided Waves Assaf Barak,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Autoresonance offers a different way to maintain phase locking even when the system is excited deeply phase locking and amplification to predetermined amplitudes. This constitutes the first observation resonance, remaining phase locked with driving oscillations (or waves) despite variations in the system

Friedland, Lazar

333

Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Peculiarity of convergence of shock wave generated by underwater electrical explosion of ring-shaped wire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanosecond timescale underwater electrical wire explosions of ring-shaped Cu wires were investigated using a pulsed generator with a current amplitude up to 50 kA. It was shown that this type of wire explosion results in the generation of a toroidal shock wave (SW). Time- and space-resolved optical diagnostics were used to determine azimuthal uniformity of the shock wave front and its velocity. It was found that the shock wave preserves its circular front shape in the range of radii 50?mwave propagates with a constant velocity of v{sub sw}=1.2M, where M is the Mach number. The dynamics of the leading part of the shock wave, based on the oblique shock wave theory, is presented, explaining the constant velocity of the shock wave.

Shafer, D.; Toker, G. R.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Gleizer, S.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS OF AN EIT WAVE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS AND SDO/AIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present plasma diagnostics of an Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave observed with high cadence in Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) sit-and-stare spectroscopy and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imagery obtained during the HOP-180 observing campaign on 2011 February 16. At the propagating EIT wave front, we observe downward plasma flows in the EIS Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XVI spectral lines (log T Almost-Equal-To 6.1-6.4) with line-of-sight (LOS) velocities up to 20 km s{sup -1}. These redshifts are followed by blueshifts with upward velocities up to -5 km s{sup -1} indicating relaxation of the plasma behind the wave front. During the wave evolution, the downward velocity pulse steepens from a few km s{sup -1} up to 20 km s{sup -1} and subsequently decays, correlated with the relative changes of the line intensities. The expected increase of the plasma densities at the EIT wave front estimated from the observed intensity increase lies within the noise level of our density diagnostics from EIS Fe XIII 202/203 A line ratios. No significant LOS plasma motions are observed in the He II line, suggesting that the wave pulse was not strong enough to perturb the underlying chromosphere. This is consistent with the finding that no H{alpha} Moreton wave was associated with the event. The EIT wave propagating along the EIS slit reveals a strong deceleration of a Almost-Equal-To -540 m s{sup -2} and a start velocity of v{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 590 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the passage of a coronal fast-mode MHD wave, pushing the plasma downward and compressing it at the coronal base.

Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Muhr, N.; Temmer, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Goemoery, P. [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Kaciceva 26, 1000 Zagreb (Croatia); Warren, H. P., E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

336

Wave induced forces on a partially exposed circular cylinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyzed to give a dimensionless force which was related to the wave parameters H/L and d/L. Other methods of analysis were also used for the derivation of drag, inertia, and lift coefficients for use with various forms of the Norison Equation. RCKHOI... = Fluid Density A = Area of Hodel u = Horizontal Hater Particle Velocity x In a study conducted by Chakrabarti (9), the data presented by Shank and Herbich were analyzed by a different method, namely a closed form expression for the wave forces. Only...

Parker, Michael Edward

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Theory of steady-state plane tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of band-to-band and trap-assisted tunneling on the properties of steady-state plane ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} structures is theoretically analyzed. It is shown that such tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves do not differ in a qualitative sense from ordinary impact ionization waves propagating due to the avalanche multiplication of uniformly distributed seed electrons and holes. The quantitative differences of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves from impact ionization waves are reduced to a slightly different relation between the wave velocity u and the maximum field strength E{sub M} at the front. It is shown that disregarding impact ionization does not exclude the possibility of the existence of tunneling-assisted ionization waves; however, their structure radically changes, and their velocity strongly decreases for the same E{sub M}. A comparison of the dependences u(E{sub M}) for various ionization-wave types makes it possible to determine the conditions under which one of them is dominant. In conclusion, unresolved problems concerning the theory of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves are discussed and the directions of further studies are outlined.

Kyuregyan, A. S., E-mail: ask@vei.ru [Lenin All-Russian Electrical-Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis...

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

343

Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

344

Focused acoustic beam imaging of grain structure and local Young's modulus with Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of a focused acoustic beam with materials generates Rayleigh surface waves (RSW) and surface skimming longitudinal waves (SSLW). Acoustic microscopic investigations have used the RSW amplitude and the velocity measurements, extensively for grain structure analysis. Although, the presence of SSLW has been recognized, it is rarely used in acoustic imaging. This paper presents an approach to perform microstructure imaging and local elastic modulus measurements by combining both RSW and SSLW. The acoustic imaging of grain structure was performed by measuring the amplitude of RSW and SSLW signal. The microstructure images obtained on the same region of the samples with RSW and SSLW are compared and the difference in the contrast observed is discussed based on the propagation characteristics of the individual surface waves. The velocity measurements are determined by two point defocus method. The surface wave velocities of RSW and SSLW of the same regions of the sample are combined and presented as average Young's modulus image.

Martin, R. W.; Sathish, S. [University of Dayton Research Institute, Structural Integrity Division 300 College Park Drive, Dayton, OH, 45469 (United States); Blodgett, M. P. [Air Force Research Lab, RXCA, Wright Patterson AFB, OH, 45433 (United States)

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

345

Integrated campaign to study the stationary inertial Alfvn wave in the laboratory and space This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introduction The stationary inertial Alfv´en (StIA) wave [1 of StIA waves is magnetic-field-aligned (s-direction in figure 1) electron drift energy that overcomes of the effective phase velocity vector, as shown, and is approximately zero. The StIA wave vector is approximately

California at Berkeley, University of

346

IJOPE Paper No JC-343AB-final 9/26/04 Biausser Page number 1 Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of 3D Breaking Waves on Slopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinematics and Dynamics of 3D Breaking Waves on Slopes Benjamin Biausser1 , Stéphan T. Grilli2 , Philippe and internal kinematics (velocity, vorticity, pressure) are presented. KEY WORDS: breaking ocean waves years, our understanding of wave breaking dynamics and kinematics is still quite incomplete. Due

Grilli, Stéphan T.

347

An alpha particle diagnostic based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that the one-dimensional alpha particle velocity distribution function can be determined from the fluctuation- dissipation theorem based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations in an equilibrium plasma. This method uses collective Thomson scattering data with large signal-to-noise ratio, but it is applicable only when the alpha particles have an isotropic velocity distribution. 16 refs., 1 fig.

Wong, K.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Secondary dust density waves excited by nonlinear dust acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary dust density waves were observed in conjunction with high amplitude (n{sub d}/n{sub d0}>2) dust acoustic waves (DAW) that were spontaneously excited in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma in the moderately coupled, {Gamma}{approx}1, state. The high amplitude dust acoustic waves produced large dust particle oscillations, displacements, and trapping. Secondary dust density waves were excited in the wave troughs of the high amplitude DAWs. The waveforms, amplitudes, wavelengths, and wave speeds of the primary DAWs and the secondary waves were measured. A dust-dust streaming instability is discussed as a possible mechanism for the production of the secondary waves.

Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus and efficiency of seismic processing algorithms, especially for application to regions of structural complexity

350

Rainbow trapping of guided waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rainbow trapping of guided waves Javier Polanco and Rosa M.the propagation of a wave packet that is a superpositionof three s-polarized guided waves with different frequencies

Polanco, Javier; Fitzgerald, Rosa M; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

352

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print The inherently high surface area of bimetallic nanoparticles makes them especially attractive materials for heterogeneous...

353

A Monte Carlo simulation for kinetic chemotaxis models: an application to the traveling population wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Monte Carlo simulation for the chemotactic bacteria is developed on the basis of the kinetic modeling, i.e., the Boltzmann transport equation, and applied to the one-dimensional traveling population wave in a micro channel.In this method, the Monte Carlo method, which calculates the run-and-tumble motions of bacteria, is coupled with a finite volume method to solve the macroscopic transport of the chemical cues in the field. The simulation method can successfully reproduce the traveling population wave of bacteria which was observed experimentally. The microscopic dynamics of bacteria, e.g., the velocity autocorrelation function and velocity distribution function of bacteria, are also investigated. It is found that the bacteria which form the traveling population wave create quasi-periodic motions as well as a migratory movement along with the traveling population wave. Simulations are also performed with changing the sensitivity and modulation parameters in the response function of bacteria. It is found th...

Yasuda, Shugo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ofman, Leon, E-mail: weiliu@lmsal.com [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washingtom, DC 20064 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An insitu borescopic quantitative imaging profiler for the measurement of high concentration sediment velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of high concentration sediment velocity Edwin A. Cowen •instantaneous velocity in high sediment concentration ?ows,point reveals the sheet ?ow sediment velocities to be highly

Cowen, Edwin A.; Dudley, Russell D.; Liao, Qian; Variano, Evan A.; Liu, Philip L.-F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Diagonalization of pp-waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

B. V. Ivanov

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period ? is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods ? between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

Hayrapetyan, A.G., E-mail: armen@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G. [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Fritzsche, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany) [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Brodeur, Pierre H. (Smyrna, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

True Masses of Radial-Velocity Exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the science power of space telescopes used to estimate the true masses of known radial-velocity exoplanets by means of astrometry on direct images. We translate a desired mass accuracy (+/10% in our example) into a minimum goal for the signal-to-noise ratio, which implies a minimum exposure time. When the planet is near a node, the mass measurement becomes difficult if not impossible, because the apparent separation becomes decoupled from the inclination angle of the orbit. The combination of this nodal effect with considerations of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, and image blurring due to orbital motion, severely limits the observing opportunities, often to only brief intervals in a five-year mission. We compare the science power of four missions, two with external star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, and two with internal coronagraphs, EXO-C and WFIRST-C. The star shades out-perform the coronagraph in this science program by about a factor of th...

Brown, Robert A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Quantum mechanics of a charged particle in a background magnetic field interacting with linearized gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the dynamics of a charged particle interacting with background electromagnetic field under the influence of linearized gravitational waves in the long wave-length and low-velocity limit. Following the prescription in \\cite{speli}, the system is quantized and the Hamiltonian is then solved by using standard algebraic iterative methods. The solution is in conformity with the classical analysis and shows the possibility of tuning the frequency by changing the magnetic field to set up resonance.

Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Anirban Saha

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

363

Detection of azimuthal anisotropy from 3-D p-wave seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the equation; (II ? 1) for u(z) = V t(z) is wave slowness. Velocity estimation using reflections and the tau-p approach was first suggested by Schultz and Claerbout (1978), They showed that velocity analysis can be done in a ' similar manner... to conventional analysis by looking for maximum coherency over each ' trajectory of ellipses in r-p domain instead of a hyperbola in conventional analysis. Schultz (1982) also suggested a method of layer-stripping for velocity estimation in the r-p domain...

Yildizel, Ali

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A novel photonic Doppler velocimetry for transverse velocity measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fiber interferometry for transverse velocity measurement has been developed. This diagnostic is similar to photonic Doppler velocimetry in the way in which laser propagates and couples. The interferometer mainly consists of a fiber coupler, an emitting probe, and two receiving probes. A pair of scattered laser beams mix in the coupler and generates fringes with frequency proportional to transverse velocity. Measurement of transverse velocity is independent of longitudinal velocity. The feasibility of the technique has been verified by rotating wheel experiment and shock loading experiment.

Chen Guanghua; Wang Detian; Liu Jun; Meng Jianhua; Liu Shouxian; Yang Qingguo [Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-109, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption. Abstract: We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on...

366

Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

368

Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface Geologic and Hydrologic Structure Within the Coso...

369

Effective velocities in fractured media: a numerical study using the ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and precise numerical study of effective velocities in fractured structures. ... In this paper, we ..... A final result is that our numerical simulations of P-, SV- and.

2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

370

Wave Propagation at Oblique Shocks: How Did Tycho Get Its Stripes?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a new model for the "stripes" of synchrotron radiation seen in the remnant of Tycho's supernova. In our picture, cosmic rays streaming ahead of the forward shock generate parallel (with respect to the local magnetic field direction) circularly polarized Alfven waves that are almost free of dissipation, and due to being circularly polarized exhibit no spatial variation of magnetic field strength. Following interaction with the SNR shock with nonzero obliquity, these parallel waves become obliquely propagating, due the the wave refraction (different in principle for the different plane wave components), and dissipation sets in. The magnetosonic polarization decays faster, due to transit time damping, leaving only the Alfven mode. This surviving mode now exhibits a spatial variation of the magnetic field, leading to local maxima and minima in the synchrotron emission, i.e. the stripes. We attribute the initial wave generation to the Bell instability, which in contrast to the resonant generation of up...

Laming, J Martin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks J. C. Wright , P. T. Bonoli , C hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron

Wright, John C.

372

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

373

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

374

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli MIT E .J. Porkolab Sherwood/Spring APS Denver May 2009 #12; 2 Participants in the Center for Simulation of Wave hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance

Wright, John C.

375

On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nonlinear peculiar-velocity analysis and PCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We allow for nonlinear effects in the likelihood analysis of peculiar velocities, and obtain {approximately}35%-lower values for the cosmological density parameter and for the amplitude of mass-density fluctuations. The power spectrum in the linear regime is assumed to be of the flat {Lambda}CDM model (h = 0:65, n = 1) with only {Omega}{sub m} free. Since the likelihood is driven by the nonlinear regime, we break the power spectrum at k{sub b} {approximately} 0.2 (h{sup {minus}1} Mpc){sup {minus}1} and fit a two-parameter power-law at k > k{sub b} . This allows for an unbiased fit in the linear regime. Tests using improved mock catalogs demonstrate a reduced bias and a better fit. We find for the Mark III and SFI data {Omega}{sub m} = 0.35 {+-} 0.09 with {sigma}{sub 8}{Omega}P{sub m}{sup 0.6} = 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (90% errors). When allowing deviations from {Lambda}CDM, we find an indication for a wiggle in the power spectrum in the form of an excess near k {approximately} 0.05 and a deficiency at k {approximately} 0.1 (h{sup {minus}1} Mpc){sup {minus}1}--a cold flow which may be related to a feature indicated from redshift surveys and the second peak in the CMB anisotropy. A {chi}{sup 2} test applied to principal modes demonstrates that the nonlinear procedure improves the goodness of fit. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) helps identifying spatial features of the data and fine-tuning the theoretical and error models. We address the potential for optimal data compression using PCA.

Dekel, A. [and others

2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Surface wave interferometry   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

Halliday, David Fraser

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università della Calabria, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università della Calabria, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave...

380

Estimation of scalar moments from explosion-generated surface waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rayleigh waves from underground nuclear explosions are used to estimate scaler moments for 40 Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions and 18 explosions at the Soviet East Kazakh test site. The Rayleigh wave spectrum is written as a product of functions that depend on the elastic structure of the travel path, the elastic structure of the source region and the Q structure of the path. Results are used to examine the worldwide variability of each factor and the resulting variability of surface wave amplitudes. The path elastic structure and Q structure are found by inversion of Rayleigh wave phase and group velocities and spectral amplitudes. The Green's function derived from this structure is used to estimate the moments of explosions observed along the same path. This procedure produces more consistent amplitude estimates than conventional magnitude measurements. Network scatter in log moment is typically 0.1. In contrast with time-domain amplitudes, the elastic structure of the travel path causes little variability in spectral amplitudes. When the mantle Q is constrained to a value of approximately 100 at depths greater than 120 km, the inversion for Q and moment produces moments that remain constant with distance. Based on the best models available, surface waves from NTS explosions should be larger than surface waves from East Kazakh explosions with the same moment. Estimated scaler moments for the largest East Kazakh explosions since 1976 are smaller than the estimated moments for the largest NTS explosions for the same time period.

Stevens, J.L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ENERGY CONTENT AND PROPAGATION IN TRANSVERSE SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC WAVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, a significant amount of transverse wave energy has been estimated propagating along solar atmospheric magnetic fields. However, these estimates have been made with the classic bulk Alfven wave model which assumes a homogeneous plasma. In this paper, the kinetic, magnetic, and total energy densities and the flux of energy are computed for transverse MHD waves in one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube models with a piecewise constant or continuous radial density profile. There are fundamental deviations from the properties for classic bulk Alfven waves. (1) There is no local equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy. (2) The flux of energy and the velocity of energy transfer have, in addition to a component parallel to the magnetic field, components in the planes normal to the magnetic field. (3) The energy densities and the flux of energy vary spatially, contrary to the case of classic bulk Alfven waves. This last property has the important consequence that the energy flux computed with the well known expression for bulk Alfven waves could overestimate the real flux by a factor in the range 10-50, depending on the flux tube equilibrium properties.

Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Soler, R. [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: tom.vandoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

Fisher, E.S.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors: Modeling and Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

Fisher, Edward S. (Wheaton, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Mathematical Caricature of Large Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kadomtsev-Petviiashvili equation is considered as a mathematical caricature of large and rogue waves.

Mikhail Kovalyov

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

Clustering of floaters by waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study experimentally how waves affect distribution of particles that float on a water surface. We show that clustering of small particles in a standing wave is a nonlinear effect with the clustering time decreasing as the square of the wave amplitude. In a set of random waves, we show that small floaters concentrate on a multi-fractal set.

P. Denissenko; G. Falkovich; S. Lukaschuk

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES Tuning Wave Dispersion in Resonant Networks Eyal Feigenbaum with meta-atoms. Resonant guided wave networks (RGWNs) are a new class of artificial photonic material,5 distinct from photonic crystals and metamateri- als, in which localized waves resonate in closed paths

Atwater, Harry

388

Autoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wave, the pump and the wave will phase lock at very low wave amplitude. When the pump reachesAutoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves J. Fajans E. Gilson U.C. Berkeley L. Friedland Hebrew of phase with the oscillator, and the os- cillator's amplitude will decrease, eventually reaching zero

Wurtele, Jonathan

389

Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical or intrinsic physical property sensor is described comprising: (a) a substrate; (b) an interaction region of said substrate where the presence of a chemical or physical stimulus causes a detectable change in the velocity and/or an attenuation of an acoustic wave traversing said region; and (c) a plurality of paired input and output interdigitated electrodes patterned on the surface of said substrate where each of said paired electrodes has a distinct periodicity, where each of said paired electrodes is comprised of an input and an output electrode; (d) an input signal generation means for transmitting an input signal having a distinct frequency to a specified input interdigitated electrode of said plurality so that each input electrode receives a unique input signal, whereby said electrode responds to said input signal by generating an acoustic wave of a specified frequency, thus, said plurality responds by generating a plurality of acoustic waves of different frequencies; (e) an output signal receiving means for determining an acoustic wave velocity and an amplitude of said acoustic waves at several frequencies after said waves transverses said interaction region and comparing these values to an input acoustic wave velocity and an input acoustic wave amplitude to produce values for perturbations in acoustic wave velocities and for acoustic wave attenuation as a function of frequency, where said output receiving means is individually coupled to each of said output interdigitated electrode; (f) a computer means for analyzing a data stream comprising information from said output receiving means and from said input signal generation means to differentiate a specified response due to a perturbation from a subsequent specified response due to a subsequent perturbation to determine the chemical or intrinsic physical properties desired.

Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Selection Rules for the Nonlinear Interactions of Internal Gravity Waves and Inertia-Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Gravity Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.1 Twodimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . . . . .Three dimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . .

Jiang, Chung-Hsiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

Comparing Glider Observed Velocities and Geostrophic Currents Regina Yopak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offshore and brings cold, deep water to fill it's place. The upwelling regime creates a unique coastal. This project endeavors to compare calculated geostrophic velocities to the water velocities measured which the net vertical volume of water is transferred 90° to the right which forces warm, surface waters

Kurapov, Alexander

393

Determination of hydrogen cluster velocities and comparison with numerical calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of powerful hydrogen cluster jet targets in storage ring experiments led to the need of precise data on the mean cluster velocity as function of the stagnation temperature and pressure for the determination of the volume density of the target beams. For this purpose a large data set of hydrogen cluster velocity distributions and mean velocities was measured at a high density hydrogen cluster jet target using a trumpet shaped nozzle. The measurements have been performed at pressures above and below the critical pressure and for a broad range of temperatures relevant for target operation, e.g., at storage ring experiments. The used experimental method is described which allows for the velocity measurement of single clusters using a time-of-flight technique. Since this method is rather time-consuming and these measurements are typically interfering negatively with storage ring experiments, a method for a precise calculation of these mean velocities was needed. For this, the determined mean cluster velocities are compared with model calculations based on an isentropic one-dimensional van der Waals gas. Based on the obtained data and the presented numerical calculations, a new method has been developed which allows to predict the mean cluster velocities with an accuracy of about 5%. For this two cut-off parameters defining positions inside the nozzle are introduced, which can be determined for a given nozzle by only two velocity measurements.

Täschner, A.; Köhler, E.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Khoukaz, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

A laser Doppler method for noninvasive measurement of flow velocity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Doppler velocimetry is a powerful optical technique for noninvasively obtaining experimental flow-velocity data. This paper describes the principle of operation and various optical configurations of the laser Doppler velocimeter. As a sample application, we describe an experimental apparatus for measuring the velocity flow field around a cylinder, and give our experimental results.

Biggs, G.L.

1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Tsallis Entropy Based Velocity Distribution in Open Channel Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................. 94 32 Dimensionless velocity distribution and parameter M ............................... 96 33 um/ umax versus various M ........................................................................... 99 34 Upper Tiber River basin with location... velocity distribution with different m ... 68 9 Computation of M, ?1 and ?V based on um and umax measured on the Po river (Italy) for different verticals at Pontelagoscuro gauged section during flood event that occurred on February 2, 1985...

Luo, Hao

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Projected Constraints on Lorentz-Violating Gravity with Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves are excellent tools to probe the foundations of General Relativity in the strongly dynamical and non-linear regime. One such foundation is Lorentz symmetry, which can be broken in the gravitational sector by the existence of a preferred time direction, and thus, a preferred frame at each spacetime point. This leads to a modification in the orbital decay rate of binary systems, and also in the generation and chirping of their associated gravitational waves. We here study whether waves emitted in the late, quasi-circular inspiral of non-spinning, neutron star binaries can place competitive constraints on two proxies of gravitational Lorentz-violation: Einstein-\\AE{}ther theory and khronometric gravity. We model the waves in the small-coupling (or decoupling) limit and in the post-Newtonian approximation, by perturbatively solving the field equations in small deformations from General Relativity and in the small-velocity/weak-gravity approximation. We assume a gravitational wave consistent with General Relativity has been detected with second- and third-generation, ground-based detectors, and with the proposed space-based mission, DECIGO, with and without coincident electromagnetic counterparts. Without a counterpart, a detection consistent with General Relativity of neutron star binaries can only place competitive constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation when using future, third-generation or space-based instruments. On the other hand, a single counterpart is enough to place constraints that are 10 orders of magnitude more stringent than current binary pulsar bounds, even when using second-generation detectors. This is because Lorentz violation forces the group velocity of gravitational waves to be different from that of light, and this difference can be very accurately constrained with coincident observations.

Devin Hansen; Nicolas Yunes; Kent Yagi

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

397

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves P. Junga: a subexcitable photosensitive Belousov­Zhabotinsky reaction, hippocampal slices of rat brains, and astrocyte of such a behavior for calcium wave net- works in interconnected brain cells. I. INTRODUCTION Since the early days

Showalter, Kenneth

398

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C8, supplement au nll, tome 40 novembve 1979, page c8-53 THE DIFFUSIVITY OF NONLINEAR WAVE PROPAGATION IN PIPES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DIFFUSIVITY OF NONLINEAR WAVE PROPAGATION IN PIPES. Cornelius C. SHIH Meehanieal Engineering Department rugosité relative. Abstract. - Temporal and spacial velocity distributions along the pipes of 7.62 cm and 2!"tics of the wave propagation. Data were analyzed for the relationship between the energy flux ration and pipe

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

Observation and Control of Hamiltonian Chaos in Wave-particle Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wave-particle interactions are central in plasma physics. The paradigm beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a traveling wave tube (TWT) to allow their study in a much less noisy environment. This led to detailed analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and an either cold or warm electron beam. More recently a test cold beam has been used to observe its interaction with externally excited wave(s). This allowed observing the main features of Hamiltonian chaos and testing a new method to efficiently channel chaotic transport in phase space. To simulate accurately and efficiently the particle dynamics in the TWT and other 1D particle-wave systems, a new symplectic, symmetric, second order numerical algorithm is developed, using particle position as the independent variable, with a fixed spatial step.This contribution reviews: presentation of the TWT and its connection to plasma physics, resonant interaction of a charged particle in electrostatic waves, observation of particle trapping and transition to chaos, test of control of chaos, and description of the simulation algorithm.The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the 4m long helix of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave, responsible for Landau damping, is observed. We explore the resonant velocity domain associated with a single wave as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a devil's staircase behavior when increasing the excitation level in agreement with numerical simulation.A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport in phase space as well as its robustness is successfully tested. The underlying concepts extend far beyond the field of electron devices and plasma physics.

Doveil, F.; Ruzzon, A. [Turbulence Plasma, PIIM, UMR6633 CNRS/Universite de Provence, case 321, Centre universitaire de Saint Jerome, FR-13397 Marseilles cedex 20 (France); Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, IT-35127 Padova (Italy); Elskens, Y. [Turbulence Plasma, PIIM, UMR6633 CNRS/Universite de Provence, case 321, Centre universitaire de Saint Jerome, FR-13397 Marseilles cedex 20 (France)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Guided wave propagation in 0.67Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2/3...O30.33PbTiO3 single crystal plate poled along 001c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guided wave propagation in 0.67Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2/3...O3­0.33PbTiO3 single crystal plate poled along 001c relations of Lamb waves and shear horizontal SH waves propagating in the 100 and 110 directions of 0.67Pb Mg, respectively, for waves propagating along 100 and 110 directions. These limiting velocities

Cao, Wenwu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

HOMOLOGOUS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVES IN THE EMERGING FLUX REGION OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations, we present four homologous extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves within 3 hr on 2010 November 11. All EUV waves emanated from the same emerging flux region (EFR), propagated in the same direction, and were accompanied by surges, weak flares, and faint coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The waves had the basically same appearance in all EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO. The waves propagated at constant velocities in the range of 280-500 km s{sup -1}, with little angular dependence, which indicated that the homologous waves could be likely interpreted as fast-mode waves. The waves are supposed to likely involve more than one driving mechanism, and it was most probable that the waves were driven by the surges, due to their close timing and location relations. We also propose that the homologous waves were intimately associated with the continuous emergence and cancellation of magnetic flux in the EFR, which could supply sufficient energy and trigger the onsets of the waves.

Zheng Ruisheng; Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Hong Junchao; Yang, B.; Yang Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We carried out a series of particle simulations to study electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves generated by an electron ring distribution. The electron ring distribution leads to excitations of X-mode waves mainly in the perpendicular direction, Z-mode waves in the perpendicular and parallel directions, and whistler-mode waves mainly in the parallel direction. The parallel Z- and whistler-mode waves can lead to an effective acceleration of ring electrons. The electron acceleration is mainly determined by the wave amplitude and phase velocity, which in turn is affected by the ratio of electron plasma to cyclotron frequencies. For the initial kinetic energy ranging from 100 to 500 keV, the peak energy of the accelerated electrons is found to reach 2–8 times the initial kinetic energy. We further study the acceleration process by test-particle calculations in which electrons interact with one, two, or four waves. The electron trajectories in the one-wave case are simple diffusion curves. In the multi-wave cases, electrons are accelerated simultaneously by counter-propagating waves and can have a higher final energy.

Lee, K. H. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Omura, Y. [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)] [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Lee, L. C. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Nonlinear Shear Wave in a Non Newtonian Visco-elastic Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of nonlinear transverse shear wave has been carried out on non-Newtonian viscoelastic liquid using generalized hydrodynamic(GH) model. The nonlinear viscoelastic behavior is introduced through velocity shear dependence of viscosity coefficient by well known Carreau -Bird model. The dynamical feature of this shear wave leads to the celebrated Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) problem. Numerical solution has been obtained which shows that initial periodic solutions reoccur after passing through several patterns of periodic waves. A possible explanation for this periodic solution is given by constructing modified Korteweg de Vries (mKdV) equation. This model has application from laboratory to astrophysical plasmas as well as biological systems.

Janaki, D Banerjee M S; Chaudhuri, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ion beam driven ion-acoustic waves in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ion beam propagating through a magnetized potassium plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives electrostatic ion-acoustic waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The phase velocity of sound wave increases with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase, with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales as one-third power of the beam density. The real part of frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales as almost the one-half power of the beam energy.

Sharma, Suresh C.; Walia, Ritu [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, PSP Area Plot No.-1, Sector-22, Rohini, Delhi 110 086 (India); Sharma, Kavita [Department of Physics, Bhagwan Parshuram Institute of Technology, Sector-17, Rohini, New Delhi 110 089 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Propagation of cylindrical lower hybrid drift solitary wave in an inhomogeneous plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear cylindrical lower hybrid drift solitary wave in an inhomogeneous, magnetized plasma with the combined effects of electron density inhomogeneity and electron temperature inhomogeneity is investigated in a two-fluid model. The amplitude and width of the solitary wave are found to decrease as the electronic density inhomogeneity increases. When the electron temperature inhomogeneity grows, the amplitude of the soliton decays and the width never changes. It is noted that the decrease of diamagnetic drift velocity will strengthen the cylindrical lower hybrid drift solitary wave height and width.

Liu Haifeng; Wang Shiqing; Fazhan Yang [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China); Li Kehua; Wang Zhanhe; Zhang Weibing; Wang Zhilong; Qiangxiang; Kaihuang; Yaoliu; Silili; Lanchang [Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION A Thesis Presented. Shore Approved by Adviser Civil Engineering Graduate Program #12;#12;ABSTRACT A recent decline in water used to estimate the wave climate over the entire lake. Shallow water effects were approxi- mated

Foster, Diane

407

Novel variational approach for photonic crystal slab mode calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new method based on variational principle for analysis of photonic crystal (PC) slabs. Most of the methods used today treat PC slab as a three-dimensional (3D) crystal and this makes them very time and/or memory consuming. In this method we use Bloch theorem to expand the field on infinite plane waves which their amplitudes depend on the component perpendicular to the slab surface. By approximating these amplitudes with appropriate functions, we can find modes of PC slabs almost as fast as we can find modes of a two-dimensional (2D) crystal. Besides this advantage, we can also calculate radiation modes with this method which is not feasible with 3D Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method.

Aram, Mohammad Hasan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of the Caribbean-South American boundary region American continental lithosphere, the Venezuelan archipelago, and the Caribbean oceanic lithosphere

Niu, Fenglin

409

Vortices and Rossby waves in cylinder wakes on a parabolic -plane observed by altimetric imaging velocimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, geostrophic and gradient wind velocity, and potential vorticity fields with very high spatial resolutionVortices and Rossby waves in cylinder wakes on a parabolic -plane observed by altimetric imaging in the wake of a circular cylinder are investigated in a rotating parabolic polar -plane fluid. This system

Afanassiev, Iakov

410

ROBUST AUTORESONANT EXCITATION IN THE PLASMA BEAT-WAVE ACCELERATOR: A THEORETICAL STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Plasma Beat-Wave Accel- erator scheme is presented, which is based on autoreso- nant phase-locking. The modulated en- velope resulting from the laser beat resonantly excites a large-amplitude, high phase velocity scheme sometimes fails to produce appreciable phase-locking. Informed by more recent results, we

Wurtele, Jonathan

411

Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma column with near-Maxwellian velocity distributions. We focus on the z-independent componentCyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin Citation: Phys. Plasmas 20. Additional information on Phys. Plasmas Journal Homepage: http://pop.aip.org/ Journal Information: http

California at San Diego, University of

412

Cyclotron Waves in a Nonneutral Plasma Column Daniel H.E. Dubin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma column with near-Maxwellian velocity distributions. We focus on the z-independent componentCyclotron Waves in a Nonneutral Plasma Column Daniel H.E. Dubin Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (Dated: February 22, 2013 [submitted to Phys. Plasmas

California at San Diego, University of

413

Study of Kinematics of Extreme Waves Impacting Offshore and Coastal Structures by Non Intrusive Measurement Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from G3 appears to induce a large inundation depth in the flow along the opening. Next, green water velocities and dynamic impacts of the extreme ocean waves on a fixed offshore deck structure are investigated. The experiments focused on the impacting...

Song, Youn Kyung

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection and movement/saturation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a geological formation will cause changes in seismic velocities. We investigate the capability of coda-wave interferometry technique for estimating CO2-induced seismic velocity changes using time-lapse synthetic vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data and the field VSP datasets acquired for monitoring injected CO2 in a brine aquifer in Texas, USA. Synthetic VSP data are calculated using a finite-difference elastic-wave equation scheme and a layered model based on the elastic Marmousi model. A possible leakage scenario is simulated by introducing seismic velocity changes in a layer above the CO2 injection layer. We find that the leakage can be detected by the detection of a difference in seismograms recorded after the injection compared to those recorded before the injection at an earlier time in the seismogram than would be expected if there was no leakage. The absolute values of estimated mean velocity changes, from both synthetic and field VSP data, increase significantly for receiver positions approaching the top of a CO2 reservoir. Our results from field data suggest that the velocity changes caused by CO2 injection could be more than 10% and are consistent with results from a crosswell tomogram study. This study demonstrates that time-lapse VSP with coda-wave interferometry analysis can reliably and effectively monitor geological carbon sequestration.

Zhou, R.; Huang, L.; Rutledge, J.T.; Fehler, M.; Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Primordial Gravitational Waves Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconsider the enhancement of primordial gravitational waves that arises from a quantum gravitational model of inflation. A distinctive feature of this model is that the end of inflation witnesses a brief phase during which the Hubble parameter oscillates in sign, changing the usual Hubble friction to anti-friction. An earlier analysis of this model was based on numerically evolving the graviton mode functions after guessing their initial conditions near the end of inflation. The current study is based on an equation which directly evolves the normalized square of the magnitude. We are also able to make a very reliable estimate for the initial condition using a rapidly converging expansion for the sub-horizon regime. Results are obtained for the energy density per logarithmic wave number as a fraction of the critical density. These results exhibit how the enhanced signal depends upon the number of oscillatory periods; they also show the resonant effects associated with particular wave numbers.

Maria G. Romania; N. C. Tsamis; R. P. Woodard

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

IR Hot Wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

Graham, T. B.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

419

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Density waves in the Calogero model - revisited  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Calogero model bears, in the continuum limit, collective excitations in the form of density waves and solitary modulations of the density of particles. This sector of the spectrum of the model was investigated, mostly within the framework of collective-field theory, by several authors, over the past 15 years or so. In this work we shall concentrate on periodic solutions of the collective BPS-equation (also known as 'finite amplitude density waves'), as well as on periodic solutions of the full static variational equations which vanish periodically (also known as 'large amplitude density waves'). While these solutions are not new, we feel that our analysis and presentation add to the existing literature, as we explain in the text. In addition, we show that these solutions also occur in a certain two-family generalization of the Calogero model, at special points in parameter space. A compendium of useful identities associated with Hilbert transforms, including our own proofs of these identities, appears in Appendix A. In Appendix B we also elucidate in the present paper some fine points having to do with manipulating Hilbert-transforms, which appear ubiquitously in the collective field formalism. Finally, in order to make this paper self-contained, we briefly summarize in Appendix C basic facts about the collective field formulation of the Calogero model.

Bardek, V. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: bardek@irb.hr; Feinberg, J. [Department of Physics, University of Haifa at Oranim, Tivon 36006 (Israel); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Inst. of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); KITP, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States)], E-mail: joshua@physics.technion.ac.il; Meljanac, S. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: meljanac@irb.hr

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave velocity variations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Simultaneous sensing of light and sound velocities of fluids in a two-dimensional phoXonic crystal with defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We theoretically investigate the potentiality of dual phononic-photonic (the so-called phoxonic) crystals for liquid sensing applications. We study the transmission through a two-dimensional (2D) crystal made of infinite cylindrical holes in a silicon substrate, where one row of holes oriented perpendicular to the propagation direction is filled with a liquid. The infiltrated holes may have a different radius than the regular holes. We show, in the defect structure, the existence of well-defined features (peaks or dips) in the transmission spectra of acoustic and optical waves and estimate their sensitivity to the sound and light velocity of the analyte. Some of the geometrical requirements behave in opposite directions when searching for an efficient sensing of either sound or light velocities. Hence, a compromise in the choice of the parameters may become necessary in making the phoxonic sensor.

Amoudache, Samira [Institut d'Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Université de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri, B.P. 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Pennec, Yan, E-mail: yan.pennec@univ-lille1.fr; Djafari Rouhani, Bahram [Institut d'Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Université de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Khater, Antoine [Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans UMR 6283 CNRS, Université du Maine, 72085 Le Mans (France); Lucklum, Ralf [Institute of Micro and Sensor Systems (IMOS), Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany); Tigrine, Rachid [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri, B.P. 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

SDO/AIA AND HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS OF INTERACTION BETWEEN AN EUV WAVE AND ACTIVE REGION LOOPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present detailed analysis of an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave and its interaction with active region (AR) loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). This wave was initiated from AR 11261 on 2011 August 4 and propagated at velocities of 430-910 km s{sup –1}. It was observed to traverse another AR and cross over a filament channel on its path. The EUV wave perturbed neighboring AR loops and excited a disturbance that propagated toward the footpoints of these loops. EIS observations of AR loops revealed that at the time of the wave transit, the original redshift increased by about 3 km s{sup –1}, while the original blueshift decreased slightly. After the wave transit, these changes were reversed. When the EUV wave arrived at the boundary of a polar coronal hole, two reflected waves were successively produced and part of them propagated above the solar limb. The first reflected wave above the solar limb encountered a large-scale loop system on its path, and a secondary wave rapidly emerged 144 Mm ahead of it at a higher speed. These findings can be explained in the framework of a fast-mode magnetosonic wave interpretation for EUV waves, in which observed EUV waves are generated by expanding coronal mass ejections.

Yang, Liheng; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu, Wei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Shen, Yuandeng, E-mail: yangliheng@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: zjun@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: liting@bao.ac.cn [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Measuring Oscillatory Velocity Fields Due to Swimming Algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this fluid dynamics video, we present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga C. reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The measured velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, and scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields and peaks at 15 fW. The dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require.

Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

On the Representation of Intermediate States in the Velocity Basis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unstable state furnishes a semigroup irreducible representation of the Poincar\\'e group. The state vector is represented by a superposition of energy eigenkets. As a consequence of this superposition, the state vector can be transformed into the rest frame through {\\it a} Lorentz transformation only when the eigenkets are labeled by velocity variable, but not momentum variable. We also clarify the meaning of the velocity variable in the state vector with respect to the velocity derived from kinematical consideration of the scattering process.

B. A. Tay; S. Wickramasekara

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

426

Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

Qin, Hong [PPPL; Davidson, Ronald C. [PPPL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Stellar Velocity Dispersion of the Leo A Dwarf Galaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the first stellar velocity dispersion of the Leo A dwarf galaxy, \\sigma = 9.3 +- 1.3 km/s. We derive the velocity dispersion from the radial velocities of ten young B supergiants and two HII regions in the central region of Leo A. We estimate a projected mass of 8 +- 2.7 x10^7 solar masses within a radius of 2 arcmin, and a mass to light ratio of at least 20 +- 6 M_sun/L_sun. These results imply Leo A is at least ~80% dark matter by mass.

Warren R. Brown; Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Michael J. Kurtz

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation in Mouse. Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation in Mouse. Abstract: The relationships between...

430

Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

Uchava, E. S. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Nodia Institute of Geophysics, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Shergelashvili, B. M. [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); CODeS, KU Leuven Campus Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, 8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Tevzadze, A. G. [Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Center (LMCC), KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

Yuksel, Cem

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. II. LAGRANGIAN CONSTRAINED ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speed of sound greatly exceeds typical flow velocities in many stellar and planetary interiors. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof models attempt to remove fast acoustic waves while retaining stratified convection and buoyancy dynamics. In astrophysics, anelastic models typically receive the most attention in the class of sound-filtered stratified models. Generally, anelastic models remain valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may break down in strongly sub-adiabatic, stably stratified layers common in stellar radiative zones. However, studying stellar rotation, circulation, and dynamos requires understanding the complex coupling between convection and radiative zones, and this requires robust equations valid in both regimes. Here we extend the analysis of equation sets begun in Brown et al., which studied anelastic models, to two types of pseudo-incompressible models. This class of models has received attention in atmospheric applications, and more recently in studies of white-dwarf supernova progenitors. We demonstrate that one model conserves energy but the other does not. We use Lagrangian variational methods to extend the energy conserving model to a general equation of state, and dub the resulting equation set the generalized pseudo-incompressible (GPI) model. We show that the GPI equations suitably capture low-frequency phenomena in both convection and radiative zones in stars and other stratified systems, and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number codes to this equation set.

Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Lecoanet, Daniel [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Wood, Toby S., E-mail: vasil@cita.utoronto.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

433

mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. (2005) “Modeling guided wave propagation with applicationMultiple Guided Ultrasonic Wave Features,” ASME Journal ofto-spar joints using guided waves and macro fiber composite

Bartoli, Ivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Propagation of seismic waves through liquefied soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mechanisms of wave propagation and ARTICLE IN PRESS M.Numerical analysis Wave propagation Earthquake Liquefactionenergy during any wave propagation. This paper summarizes

Taiebat, Mahdi; Jeremic, Boris; Dafalias, Yannis; Kaynia, Amir; Cheng, Zhao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

Walsh, Donald Eugene

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Spectral anti-broadening due to four-wave mixing in optical fibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the four-wave mixing can restrict spectral broadening. This is a general physical phenomenon that occurs in one-dimensional systems of four wave packets that resonantly interact "2-to-2": $ \\omega_1+\\omega_2=\\omega_3+\\omega_4,\\; k_1+k_2=k_3+k_4$, when an annihilation of one pair of waves results in the creation of another pair. In addition, for this phenomenon to occur, the group velocities $C_1,C_2,C_3,C_4$ of the packets should be in a certain order: The extreme value (max or min) of the four group velocities should be in the same pair with the middle value of the remaining three, e.g. $C_1energy, momentum, and Manley-Rowe relations.

Alexander M. Balk

2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Spectral anti-broadening due to four-wave mixing in optical fibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the four-wave mixing can restrict spectral broadening. This is a general physical phenomenon that occurs in one-dimensional systems of four wave packets that resonantly interact "2-to-2": $ \\omega_1+\\omega_2=\\omega_3+\\omega_4,\\; k_1+k_2=k_3+k_4$, when an annihilation of one pair of waves results in the creation of another pair. In addition, for this phenomenon to occur, the group velocities $C_1,C_2,C_3,C_4$ of the packets should be in a certain order: The extreme value (max or min) of the four group velocities should be in the same pair with the middle value of the remaining three, e.g. $C_1energy, momentum, and Manley-Rowe relations.

Balk, Alexander M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

Wang, Chenju; Yan, Xiaozhen [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Xiang, Shikai, E-mail: skxiang@caep.ac.cn; Chen, Haiyan [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Gu, Jianbing; Yu, Yin [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Kuang, Xiaoyu [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); International Centre for Materials Physics, Academia Sinica, Shenyang 110016 (China)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

Whitfield, A. J., E-mail: ashley.whitfield.12@ucl.ac.uk; Johnson, E. R., E-mail: e.johnson@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

artery peak velocity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The time series analysis of Doppler velocity maps show enhanced power in the sunspot umbra at higher frequencies and in the penumbra at lower frequencies. We find that the peak...

444

CO and IRAS detection of an intermediate-velocity cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the course of a radio survey of high-Galactic-latitude clouds, CO emission was detected at the position l = 210.8 deg and b = 63.1 deg with an LSR velocity of -39 km/sec. This molecular cloud constitutes the third one with an unusually large absolute velocity at these latitudes, as compared with the 5.4-km/sec cloud-to-cloud velocity dispersion of the high-latitude molecular clouds. The position is coincident with an H I intermediate-velocity cloud (GHL 11, Verschuur H, OLM 268) and the IR-excess cloud 306 in the list by Desert et al. (1988). This cloud is clearly detected at all four IRAS wavelengths and has warmer colors than the local ISM. 27 refs.

Desert, F.X.; Bazell, D.; Blitz, L. (Paris Observatoire, Meudon (France) Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA) Maryland Univ., College Park (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid jetting is a well stimulation technique that is used in carbonate reservoirs. It typically involves injecting acid down hole at high flow rates through small orifices which cause high velocities of acid to strike the borehole wall...

Holland, Christopher

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Superluminal Velocity of Photons in a Gravitational Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of radiative corrections on the photon propagation in a gravitational background is investigated without the low-frequency approximation $\\omega \\ll m$. The conclusion is made in this way that the velocity of light can exceed unity.

I. B. Khriplovich

1994-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

James, L. Allan

449

Turbulence Spectra from Doppler-broadened Spectral Lines: Tests of the Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulent motions induce Doppler shifts of observable emission and absorption lines motivating studies of turbulence using precision spectroscopy. We provide the numerical testing of the two most promising techniques, Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS). We obtain an expression for the shot noise that the discretization of the numerical data entails and successfully test it. We show that the numerical resolution required for recovering the underlying turbulent spectrum from observations depend on the spectral index of velocity fluctuations, which makes low resolution testing misleading. We demonstrate numerically that, dealing with absorption lines, sampling of turbulence along just a dozen directions provides a high quality spectrum with the VCS technique.

A. Chrupnov; A. Lazarian

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

451

Zonal flow and field generation by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zonal flow and field generation by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves P. N magnetic fields by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves is presented. The analysis by electrostatic drift waves to finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves. The drift wave driven

Rubloff, Gary W.

452

Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VELOCITY OF SOUND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1968 Ma)or Sub)ect: Physics VELOCITY OF SOVND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Approved as to style and content by& (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departsmnt) (Mem er (Member) May 1968...

Whitehead, John Martin

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Temperature and velocity effects in naphthenic acid corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of temperature and velocity were studied with respect to alloy selection for corrosion resistant service. The amount of molybdenum in the austenitic stainless steel alloys is critical in conferring corrosion resistance on the alloy as the temperature of the environment increases. Velocity effects have been studied in a closed loop hot oil circuit where the stream impinges on the target specimen. Film breakdown is prevented by increasing the molybdenum content.

Craig, H.L. Jr. [Corrosion Prevention and Control, Richmond, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Interrelationships between air velocity and globe thermometer response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERRELATIONSHIPS BE~ AIR VELOCITY ANIl GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis JANES ROBERT THORNTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARAN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE... August 197$ Najor Subject: Industrial Hygiene INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEZ AIR VELOCITY AND GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis JAMES ROBERT THORNTON Approved as to style and content by: h z. an o ommmt ee ad o partmen Me er August 1$7$ ABSTRACT...

Thornton, James Robert

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Direct observation of a "devil's staircase'' in wave-particle interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the experimental observation of a "devil's staircase'' in a time dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large scale chaos in the universality class of hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a Travelling Wave Tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a "devil's staircase'' behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

Fabrice Doveil; Alessandro Macor; Yves Elskens

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

456

Direct observation of a 'devil's staircase' in wave-particle interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the experimental observation of a 'devil's staircase' in a time-dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large-scale chaos in the universality class of Hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a traveling wave tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a 'devil's staircase' behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro; Elskens, Yves [Physique des interactions ioniques et moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe turbulence plasma, case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Influence of the outer-magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide on the reflection of hydromagnetic waves from a shear flow at the magnetopause  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coefficient of reflection of a fast magnetosonic wave incident on the magnetosphere from the solar wind is studied analytically in the framework of a plane-stratified model of the medium with allowance for the transverse inhomogeneity of the magnetosphere and a jump of the plasma parameters at the magnetopause. Three factors decisively affecting the properties of reflection are taken into account: the shear flow of the solar wind plasma relative to the magnetosphere; the presence of a magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide caused by the transverse plasma inhomogeneity; and the presence of an Alfvén resonance deep in the magnetosphere, where the oscillation energy dissipates. If the solar wind velocity exceeds the wave phase velocity along the magnetopause, then the wave energy in the solar wind is negative and such a wave experiences overreflection. In the opposite case, the wave energy is positive and the wave is reflected only partially. The wave reflection has a pronounced resonant character: the reflection coefficient has deep narrow minima or high narrow maxima at the eigenfrequencies of the magnetospheric waveguide. For other frequencies, the reflection coefficient only slightly differs from unity. The wave energy influx into the magnetosphere is positive for waves with both positive and negative energies. For waves with a negative energy, this is a consequence of their overreflection, because the flux of negative energy carried away by the reflected wave exceeds the incident flux of negative energy.

Mazur, V. A., E-mail: ninesmartcats@yahoo.com; Chuiko, D. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

California at Davis, University of

459

7B.1 A 3-D VARIATIONAL METHOD FOR SINGLE-DOPPLER VELOCITY RETRIEVAL APPLIED TO A SUPERCELL STORM CASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in inaccurate directions is avoided. The other terms in the cost function are defined as follows: 2 2 21.g., Qiu and Xu 1992; Gao et al 2001) and those based on full model adjoint, this scheme avoids the time attempts to minimize a cost function J defined as the sum of squared errors due to the misfit between

Xue, Ming

460

Noise pair velocity and range echo location system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution is disclosed. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna. 46 figs.

Erskine, D.J.

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Supersonic relative velocity effect on the baryonic acoustic oscillation measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of supersonic relative velocities between baryons and dark matter, recently shown to arise generically at high redshift, on baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at low redshift. The amplitude of the relative velocity effect at low redshift is model-dependent, but can be parameterized by using an unknown bias. We find that if unaccounted, the relative velocity effect can shift the BAO peak position and bias estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state due to its non-smooth, out-of-phase oscillation structure around the BAO scale. Fortunately, the relative velocity effect can be easily modeled in constraining cosmological parameters without substantially inflating the error budget. We also demonstrate that the presence of the relative velocity effect gives rise to a unique signature in the galaxy bispectrum, which can be utilized to isolate this effect. Future dark energy surveys can accurately measure the relative velocity effect and subtract it from the power spectrum analysis to constrain dark energy models with high precision.

Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uroš [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zürich, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Dalal, Neal, E-mail: jyoo@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: neal@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: seljak@physik.uzh.ch [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Energy flux of Alfven waves in weakly ionized plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overshooting convective motions in the solar photosphere are frequently proposed as the source for the excitation of Alfv\\'en waves. However, the photosphere is a) very weakly ionized, and, b) the dynamics of the plasma particles in this region is heavily influenced by the plasma-neutral collisions. The purpose of this work is to check the consequences of these two facts on the above scenario and their effects on the electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the ions and electrons in the photosphere are both un-magnetized; their collision frequency with neutrals is much larger than the gyro-frequency. This implies that eventual Alfv\\'en-type electromagnetic perturbations must involve the neutrals as well. This has the following serious consequences: i) in the presence of perturbations, the whole fluid (plasma + neutrals) moves; ii) the Alfv\\'en velocity includes the total (plasma + neutrals) density and is thus considerably smaller compared to the collision-less case; iii) the perturbed velocity of a unit volume, which now includes both plasma and neutrals, becomes much smaller compared to the ideal (collision-less) case; and iv) the corresponding wave energy flux for the given parameters becomes much smaller compared to the ideal case.

J. Vranjes; S. Poedts; B. P. Pandey; B. De Pontieu

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

464

Spherical waves r Legendre polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Spherical waves r er e e Impedance · Legendre polynomials P0(x) = 1 P1(x) = x P2(x · Spherical waves ­ Spherical Hankel functions hn (2)(kr)=jn(kr)-iyn(kr) Impedance · Spherical waves Order: 0 1 4 Circumferential And azimuthal: 0,0 1,1 3,2 #12;3 Impedance · Spherical waves ­ Arbitrary

Berlin,Technische Universität

465

Suppression of Faraday waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of an optical lattice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the formation of Faraday waves in an elongated Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of a one-dimensional optical lattice. The waves are parametrically excited by modulating the radial confinement of the condensate close to a transverse breathing mode of the system. For very shallow optical lattices, phonons with a well-defined wave vector propagate along the condensate, as in the absence of the lattice, and we observe the formation of a Faraday pattern. We find that by increasing the potential depth the local sound velocity decreases, and when it equals the condensate local phase velocity, the condensate develops an incoherent superposition of several modes and the parametric excitation of Faraday waves is suppressed.

Capuzzi, Pablo [Departamento de Fisica, FCEN Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Buenos Aires-CONICET (Argentina); Gattobigio, Mario; Vignolo, Patrizia [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Institut non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, F-06560 Valbonne (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Time propagation of constrained coupled Gaussian wave packets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of quantum systems can be approximated by the time propagation of Gaussian wave packets. Applying a time dependent variational principle, the time evolution of the parameters of the coupled Gaussian wave packets can be calculated from a set of ordinary differential equations. Unfortunately, the set of equations is ill-behaved in most practical applications, depending on the number of propagated Gaussian wave packets, and methods for regularization are needed. We present a general method for regularization based on applying adequate nonholonomic inequality constraints to the evolution of the parameters, keeping the equations of motion well-behaved. The power of the method is demonstrated for a non-integrable system with two degrees of freedom.

T. Fabcic; J. Main; G. Wunner

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

467

2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NHESSD 2, 7017­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

468

2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker, meterstick, sound tube apparatus, thermometer, microphone INTRODUCTION traveling wave of sinusoidal shape

Glashausser, Charles

469

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

470

Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number characteristics 14 3.5. Characteristics of the primary pressure wave 21 3.6. Pressure propagation over a hard

471

Experimental Study on Wave Transformation and Nearshore Circulation on a Variable Bathymetry in Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by vegetation. The presence of the mounds induced an important de- crease in the wave height, in addition to the damping of the waves by the vegetation stems. The variation in spatial coverage of the wetland model has been shown to highly a ect the ow... local coordinate system. All distances measured in meters. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 192 57 List and classi cation of discarded time series for Test 101. Npts = number of points in the truncated time series. L = Lost, NR...

Truong, Melanie Khanh Phuong

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

472

Geometric Phase Of The Faraday Rotation Of Electromagnetic Waves In Magnetized Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geometric phase of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation,