National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wave travel time

  1. Time domain analysis of a gyrotron traveling wave amplifier with misaligned electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiushi Peng, Shuyuan; Luo, Jirun

    2014-08-15

    This article develops a time-domain theory to study the beam-wave interaction in gyrotron traveling wave amplifier (gyro-TWA) with a misaligned electron beam. The effects of beam misalignment on the TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWA operating at the fundamental are discussed. Numerical results show that the effect of misalignment is less obvious when the input power is larger, and the influences of misalignment on the stable gain and the stable time are basically opposite.

  2. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  3. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  4. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  5. Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yi-Chiuan; Chen, Shyan-Shiou; Yuan, Juan-Ming

    2014-04-15

    Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

  6. Enabling time travel for the scholarly web

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling time travel for the scholarly web Enabling time travel for the scholarly web An international team of information scientists has begun a study to investigate how web links ...

  7. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  8. Code for Calculating Regional Seismic Travel Time

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-07-10

    The RSTT software computes predictions of the travel time of seismic energy traveling from a source to a receiver through 2.5D models of the seismic velocity distribution within the Earth. The two primary applications for the RSTT library are tomographic inversion studies and seismic event location calculations. In tomographic inversions studies, a seismologist begins with number of source-receiver travel time observations and an initial starting model of the velocity distribution within the Earth. A forwardmore » travel time calculator, such as the RSTT library, is used to compute predictions of each observed travel time and all of the residuals (observed minus predicted travel time) are calculated. The Earth model is then modified in some systematic way with the goal of minimizing the residuals. The Earth model obtained in this way is assumed to be a better model than the starting model if it has lower residuals. The other major application for the RSTT library is seismic event location. Given an Earth model, an initial estimate of the location of a seismic event, and some number of observations of seismic travel time thought to have originated from that event, location codes systematically modify the estimate of the location of the event with the goal of minimizing the difference between the observed and predicted travel times. The second application, seismic event location, is routinely implemented by the military as part of its effort to monitor the Earth for nuclear tests conducted by foreign countries.« less

  9. Dual variational principles for nonlinear traveling waves in multifluid plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.; Mace, R. L.; Ko, C. M.; Zank, G. P.

    2007-08-15

    A Hamiltonian description of nonlinear, obliquely propagating traveling waves in a charge neutral, electron-proton, multifluid plasma is developed. The governing equations are written as a dual spatial Hamiltonian system. In the first formulation, the Hamiltonian is identified with the longitudinal, x-momentum flux integral P{sub x}=const, in which the energy integral {epsilon}={epsilon}{sub 0} acts as a constraint, and the Hamiltonian evolution operator is d/dx, where x is the position coordinate in the wave frame. In the second Hamiltonian formulation, the Hamiltonian is proportional to the conserved energy integral {epsilon}, in which the momentum integral P{sub x}=const acts as a constraint, and the Hamiltonian evolution operator d/d{tau}=u{sub x}d/dx is the Lagrangian time derivative where u{sub x} is the x component of the electron and proton fluids. The analysis is facilitated by using the de Hoffman-Teller frame of magnetohydrodynamic shock theory to simplify the transverse electron and proton momentum equations. The system is exactly integrable in cases in which the total transverse momentum fluxes of the system are zero in the de Hoffman-Teller frame. The implications of this constraint for the Alfven Mach number of the traveling wave are discussed. The physical conditions for the formation of whistler oscillitons based on the whistler dispersion equation are discussed.

  10. Traveling wave device for combining or splitting symmetric and asymmetric waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mbius, Arnold (Eggenstein, DE); Ives, Robert Lawrence (Saratoga, CA)

    2005-07-19

    A traveling wave device for the combining or splitting of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy includes a feed waveguide for traveling wave energy, the feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for coupling wave energy between the feed waveguide and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of wave energy to or from the reflector. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which includes a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which includes a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  11. Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel Questions and answers on issues that supplement the final regulations on compensatory time for travel issued by the Office of Personnel Management. In addition, a sample worksheet is attached to assist travelers in determining and documenting their travel time that may be credited for compensatory time for travel. This information will be

  12. Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

  13. Tuning gain and bandwidth of traveling wave tubes using metamaterial beam-wave interaction structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, Robert Polizzi, Anthony

    2014-10-14

    We employ metamaterial beam-wave interaction structures for tuning the gain and bandwidth of short traveling wave tubes. The interaction structures are made from metal rings of uniform cross section, which are periodically deployed along the length of the traveling wave tube. The aspect ratio of the ring cross sections is adjusted to control both gain and bandwidth. The frequency of operation is controlled by the filling fraction of the ring cross section with respect to the size of the period cell.

  14. Apparatus and method for measuring and imaging traveling waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for imaging traveling waves in a medium. The apparatus includes a vibration excitation source configured to impart traveling waves within a medium. An emitter is configured to produce two or more wavefronts, at least one wavefront modulated by a vibrating medium. A modulator is configured to modulate another wavefront in synchronization with the vibrating medium. A sensing media is configured to receive in combination the modulated one wavefront and the another wavefront and having a detection resolution within a limited bandwidth. The another wavefront is modulated at a frequency such that a difference frequency between the one wavefront and the another wavefront is within a response range of the sensing media. Such modulation produces an image of the vibrating medium having an output intensity that is substantially linear with small physical variations within the vibrating medium for all vibration frequencies above the sensing media's response bandwidth. A detector is configured to detect an image of traveling waves in the vibrating medium resulting from interference between the modulated one wavefront and the another wavefront when combined in association with the sensing media. The traveling wave can be used to characterize certain material properties of the medium. Furthermore, a method is provided for imaging and characterizing material properties according to the apparatus.

  15. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudson, C.L.; Spector, J.

    1994-12-27

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure is disclosed having a serpentine signal conductor within a channel groove. The channel groove is formed by a serpentine channel in a trough plate and a ground plane. The serpentine signal conductor is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors. A beam interaction trough intersects the channel groove to form a plurality of beam interaction regions wherein an electron beam may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor. 4 figures.

  16. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudson, Charles L. (Santa Barbara, CA); Spector, Jerome (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure (10) having a serpene signal conductor (12) within a channel groove (46). The channel groove (46) is formed by a serpentine channel (20) in a trough plate (18) and a ground plane (14). The serpentine signal conductor (12) is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors 28. A beam interaction trough (22) intersects the channel groove (46) to form a plurality of beam interaction regions (56) wherein an electron beam (54) may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor (12).

  17. Traveling waves and their tails in locally resonant granular systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, H.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Stefanov, A.

    2015-04-22

    In the present study, we revisit the theme of wave propagation in locally resonant granular crystal systems, also referred to as mass-in-mass systems. We use three distinct approaches to identify relevant traveling waves. In addition, the first consists of a direct solution of the traveling wave problem. The second one consists of the solution of the Fourier tranformed variant of the problem, or, more precisely, of its convolution reformulation (upon an inverse Fourier transform) in real space. Finally, our third approach will restrict considerations to a finite domain, utilizing the notion of Fourier series for important technical reasons, namely themore » avoidance of resonances, which will be discussed in detail. All three approaches can be utilized in either the displacement or the strain formulation. Typical resulting computations in finite domains result in the solitary waves bearing symmetric non-vanishing tails at both ends of the computational domain. Importantly, however, a countably infinite set of anti-resonance conditions is identified for which solutions with genuinely rapidly decaying tails arise.« less

  18. Three-cell traveling wave superconducting test structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; /Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Kazakov, Sergey; Solyak, Nikolay; Wu, Genfa; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell rather than a standing wave structure may provide a significant increase of the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing wave cavities. The STWA allows also longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed, manufactured and successfully tested demonstrating the possibility of a proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. These results open way to take the next step of the TW SC cavity development: to build and test a travelingwave three-cell cavity with a feedback waveguide. The latest results of the single-cell cavity tests are discussed as well as the design of the test 3-cell TW cavity.

  19. Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travel time (GWTT-95)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Ho, C.K.; McKenna, S.A.; Eaton, R.R.

    1996-09-01

    In 1983, high-level radioactive waste repository performance requirements related to groundwater travel time were defined by NRC subsystem regulation 10 CFR 60.113. Although DOE is not presently attempting to demonstrate compliance with that regulation, understanding of the prevalence of fast paths in the groundwater flow system remains a critical element of any safety analyses for a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Therefore, this analysis was performed to allow comparison of fast-path flow against the criteria set forth in the regulation. Models developed to describe the conditions for initiation, propagation, and sustainability of rapid groundwater movement in both the unsaturated and saturated zones will form part of the technical basis for total- system analyses to assess site viability and site licensability. One of the most significant findings is that the fastest travel times in both unsaturated and saturated zones are in the southern portion of the potential repository, so it is recommended that site characterization studies concentrate on this area. Results support the assumptions regarding the importance of an appropriate conceptual model of groundwater flow and the incorporation of heterogeneous material properties into the analyses. Groundwater travel times are sensitive to variation/uncertainty in hydrologic parameters and in infiltration flux at upper boundary of the problem domain. Simulated travel times are also sensitive to poorly constrained parameters of the interaction between flow in fractures and in the matrix.

  20. SENSITIVITY OF HELIOSEISMIC TRAVEL TIMES TO THE IMPOSITION OF A LORENTZ FORCE LIMITER IN COMPUTATIONAL HELIOSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, Hamed; Cally, Paul S.

    2014-02-20

    The rapid exponential increase in the Alfvn wave speed with height above the solar surface presents a serious challenge to physical modeling of the effects of magnetic fields on solar oscillations, as it introduces a significant Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy time-step constraint for explicit numerical codes. A common approach adopted in computational helioseismology, where long simulations in excess of 10 hr (hundreds of wave periods) are often required, is to cap the Alfvn wave speed by artificially modifying the momentum equation when the ratio between the Lorentz and hydrodynamic forces becomes too large. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Alfvn wave speed plays a critical role in the MHD mode conversion process, particularly in determining the reflection height of the upwardly propagating helioseismic fast wave. Using numerical simulations of helioseismic wave propagation in constant inclined (relative to the vertical) magnetic fields we demonstrate that the imposition of such artificial limiters significantly affects time-distance travel times unless the Alfvn wave-speed cap is chosen comfortably in excess of the horizontal phase speeds under investigation.

  1. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R.

    2013-07-01

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  2. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norris, N.J.; Hudson, C.L.

    1992-12-15

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse. 13 figs.

  3. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norris, Neil J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Hudson, Charles L. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse.

  4. One-dimensional kinetic description of nonlinear traveling-pulse and traveling-wave disturbances in long coasting charged particle beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2015-09-21

    This paper makes use of a one-dimensional kinetic model to investigate the nonlinear longitudinal dynamics of a long coasting beam propagating through a perfectly conducting circular pipe with radius r w . The average axial electric field is expressed as z >=(?/?z)=ebg???b/?z ebg2r2w?3?b/?z3, where g0 and g2 are constant geometric factors, ?b(z,t)=?dpz Fb (z,pz,t) is the line density of beam particles, and F b (z,pz,t) satisfies the 1D Vlasov equation. Detailed nonlinear properties of traveling-wave and traveling-pulse (soliton) solutions with time-stationary waveform are examined for a wide range of system parameters extending from moderate-amplitudes to large-amplitude modulations ofmorethe beam charge density. Two classes of solutions for the beam distribution function are considered, corresponding to: (i) the nonlinear waterbag distribution, where Fb = const in a bounded region of pz-space; and (ii) nonlinear Bernstein-Green-Kruskal (BGK)-like solutions, allowing for both trapped and untrapped particle distributions to interact with the self-generated electric field.less

  5. Verification of the helioseismology travel-time measurement technique and the inversion procedure for sound speed using artificial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parchevsky, K. V.; Zhao, J.; Hartlep, T.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-04-10

    We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations of the solar surface acoustic wave field for the quiet Sun and for three models with different localized sound-speed perturbations in the interior with deep, shallow, and two-layer structures. We used the simulated data generated by two solar acoustics codes that employ the same standard solar model as a background model, but utilize different integration techniques and different models of stochastic wave excitation. Acoustic travel times were measured using a time-distance helioseismology technique, and compared with predictions from ray theory frequently used for helioseismic travel-time inversions. It is found that the measured travel-time shifts agree well with the helioseismic theory for sound-speed perturbations, and for the measurement procedure with and without phase-speed filtering of the oscillation signals. This testing verifies the whole measuring-filtering-inversion procedure for static sound-speed anomalies with small amplitude inside the Sun outside regions of strong magnetic field. It is shown that the phase-speed filtering, frequently used to extract specific wave packets and improve the signal-to-noise ratio, does not introduce significant systematic errors. Results of the sound-speed inversion procedure show good agreement with the perturbation models in all cases. Due to its smoothing nature, the inversion procedure may overestimate sound-speed variations in regions with sharp gradients of the sound-speed profile.

  6. Simulation studies on the standing and traveling wave thermoacoustic prime movers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaria, Mathew; Rasheed, K. K. Abdul; Shafi, K. A.; Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, Upendra

    2014-01-29

    Thermoacoustic systems have been a focus of recent research due to its structural simplicity, high reliability due to absence of moving parts, and can be driven by low grade energy such as fuel, gas, solar energy, waste heat etc. There has been extensive research on both standing wave and traveling wave systems. Towards the development of such systems, simulations can be carried out by several methods such as (a) solving the energy equation, (b) enthalpy flow model, (c) DeltaEC, a free software available from LANL, USA (d) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) etc. We present here the simulation studies of standing wave and traveling wave thermoacoustic prime movers using CFD and DeltaEC. The CFD analysis is carried out using Fluent 6.3.26, incorporating the necessary boundary conditions with different working fluids at different operating pressures. The results obtained by CFD are compared with those obtained using DeltaEC. Also, the CFD simulation of the thermoacoustically driven refrigerator is presented.

  7. Integrating a Traveling Wave Tube into an AECR-U ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covo, Michel Kireeff; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Ratti, Alessandro; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2011-07-01

    An RF system of 500W - 10.75 to 12.75 GHz was designed and integrated into the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance - Upgrade (AECR-U) ion source of the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The AECR-U produces ion beams for the Cyclotron giving large flexibility of ion species and charge states. The broadband frequency of a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) allows modifying the volume that couples and heats the plasma. The TWT system design and integration with the AECR-U ion source and results from commissioning are presented.

  8. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the development and characterization of a new traveling wave-based Structure for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses a parallel array of RF electrodes for ion confinement, spaced by an array of short DC electrodes to which a TW can be applied to drive ion motion. The ability of the TW-SLIM for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different RF and TW parameters is reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to allow transfers a wide mass range of ions (200-2500 Da) utilizing a confining RF waveform (1 MHz and 300 Vp-p), and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Also, the short module achieved an ion mobility peak capacity of 24 and a peak generation rate of 1014 s-1 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of RF and DC voltage parameters, and demonstrated robust performance. The combined attributes of flexible design and low voltage requirements for traveling wave IMS, provide a basis for SLIM devices incorporating extended series of ion manipulations.

  9. A nonlinear analysis of the terahertz serpentine waveguide traveling-wave amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke Cao, Miaomiao; Liu, Wenxin Wang, Yong

    2015-04-15

    A nonlinear model for the numerical simulation of terahertz serpentine waveguide traveling-wave tube (SW-TWT) is described. In this model, the electromagnetic wave transmission in the SW is represented as an infinite set of space harmonics to interact with an electron beam. Analytical expressions for axial electric fields in axisymmetric interaction gaps of SW-TWTs are derived and compared with the results from CST simulation. The continuous beam is treated as discrete macro-particles with different initial phases. The beam-tunnel field equations, space-charge field equations, and motion equations are combined to solve the beam-wave interaction. The influence of backward wave and relativistic effect is also considered in the series of equations. The nonlinear model is used to design a 340 GHz SW-TWT. Several favorable comparisons of model predictions with results from a 3-D Particle-in-cell simulation code CHIPIC are presented, in which the output power versus beam voltage and interaction periods are illustrated. The relative error of the predicted output power is less than 15% in the 3 dB bandwidth and the relative error of the saturated length is less than 8%.The results show that the 1-D nonlinear analysis model is appropriate to solve the terahertz SW-TWT operation characteristics.

  10. Traveling wave parametric amplifier with Josephson junctions using minimal resonator phase matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T. C.; Mutus, J. Y.; Hoi, I.-C.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Martinis, John M.; Megrant, A.; Chaudhuri, S.; and others

    2015-06-15

    Josephson parametric amplifiers have become a critical tool in superconducting device physics due to their high gain and quantum-limited noise. Traveling wave parametric amplifiers (TWPAs) promise similar noise performance, while allowing for significant increases in both bandwidth and dynamic range. We present a TWPA device based on an LC-ladder transmission line of Josephson junctions and parallel plate capacitors using low-loss amorphous silicon dielectric. Crucially, we have inserted ?/4 resonators at regular intervals along the transmission line in order to maintain the phase matching condition between pump, signal, and idler and increase gain. We achieve an average gain of 12?dB across a 4?GHz span, along with an average saturation power of ?92 dBm with noise approaching the quantum limit.

  11. Preliminary performance of the MKII 17 GHz traveling wave relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Stowell, G.; Kreischer, K. E.; Mastovsky, I. [Haimson Research Corporation, 3350 Scott Blvd., Building 60, Santa Clara, California 95054-3104 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4294 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    Initial test results are presented of an upgraded RF source developed for high peak power 17 GHz linear accelerator applications. The objectives of this upgrade program were (a) to increase the output capability of the existing vacuum demountable prototype tube so that RF power could also be supplied to a future 2 MeV photoinjector system without appreciable loss of input power to the 17 GHz linac and (b) to investigate the performance of a new design traveling wave output circuit incorporating a racetrack shaped dual output coupler with 5% bandwidth high peak power ceramic RF windows. These recently installed devices are presently being conditioned and tested at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center.

  12. Preliminary performance of the MKII 17 GHz traveling wave relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Stowell, G. [Haimson Research Corporation, 3350 Scott Blvd., Building 60, Santa Clara, California 95054-3104 (United States); Kreischer, K.E.; Mastovsky, I. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4294 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Initial test results are presented of an upgraded RF source developed for high peak power 17 GHz linear accelerator applications. The objectives of this upgrade program were (a) to increase the output capability of the existing vacuum demountable prototype tube so that RF power could also be supplied to a future 2 MeV photoinjector system without appreciable loss of input power to the 17 GHz linac and (b) to investigate the performance of a new design traveling wave output circuit incorporating a racetrack shaped dual output coupler with 5{percent} bandwidth high peak power ceramic RF windows. These recently installed devices are presently being conditioned and tested at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sher, Mark H. (Los Altos, CA); Macklin, John J. (Stanford, CA); Harris, Stephen E. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-09-26

    A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

  14. A traveling-wave forward coupler design for a new accelerating mode in a silicon woodpile accelerator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Ziran; Lee, Chunghun H.; Wootton, Kent P.; Ng, Cho -Kuen; Qi, Minghao H.; England, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon woodpile photonic crystals provide a base structure that can be used to build a three-dimensional dielectric waveguide system for high-gradient laser driven acceleration. A new woodpile waveguide design that hosts a phase synchronous, centrally confined accelerating mode is proposed. Comparing with previously discovered silicon woodpile accelerating modes, this mode shows advantages in terms of better electron beam loading and higher achievable acceleration gradient. Several traveling-wave coupler design schemes developed for multi-cell RF cavity accelerators are adapted to the woodpile power coupler design for this new accelerating mode. Design of a forward coupled, highly efficient silicon woodpile accelerator is achieved.more » Simulation shows high efficiency of over 75% of the drive laser power coupled to this fundamental accelerating mode, with less than 15% backward wave scattering. The estimated acceleration gradient, when the coupler structure is driven at the damage threshold fluence of silicon at its operating 1.506 μm wavelength, can reach 185 MV/m. Lastly, a 17-layer woodpile waveguide structure was successfully fabricated, and the measured bandgap is in excellent agreement with simulation.« less

  15. Multi-time wave functions for quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrat, Sren; Tumulka, Roderich

    2014-06-15

    Multi-time wave functions such as ?(t{sub 1},x{sub 1},,t{sub N},x{sub N}) have one time variable t{sub j} for each particle. This type of wave function arises as a relativistic generalization of the wave function ?(t,x{sub 1},,x{sub N}) of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. We show here how a quantum field theory can be formulated in terms of multi-time wave functions. We mainly consider a particular quantum field theory that features particle creation and annihilation. Starting from the particleposition representation of state vectors in Fock space, we introduce multi-time wave functions with a variable number of time variables, set up multi-time evolution equations, and show that they are consistent. Moreover, we discuss the relation of the multi-time wave function to two other representations, the TomonagaSchwinger representation and the Heisenberg picture in terms of operator-valued fields on spacetime. In a certain sense and under natural assumptions, we find that all three representations are equivalent; yet, we point out that the multi-time formulation has several technical and conceptual advantages. -- Highlights: Multi-time wave functions are manifestly Lorentz-covariant objects. We develop consistent multi-time equations with interaction for quantum field theory. We discuss in detail a particular model with particle creation and annihilation. We show how multi-time wave functions are related to the TomonagaSchwinger approach. We show that they have a simple representation in terms of operator valued fields.

  16. Guest Travel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guest Travel Guest Travel Travel reimbursement process information for official Laboratory guests Contact Travel Office (505) 667-4138 Guest travel reimbursements Guest travel reimbursements are calculated based on federal travel regulations and LANL travel reimbursement policy. For special circumstances, government employee reimbursements, and other questions, call the Laboratory's Travel Office at (505) 667-4138. Before guest departs Sponsor completes necessary forms including relevant guest

  17. Relocation Travel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relocation Travel Relocation Travel Travel reimbursement process information for relocations including new regular hires, term assignment hires, post-doctoral or advance study...

  18. Design and performance of the traveling-wave beam chopper for the SSRL injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borland, M.; Weaver, J.N.; Baltay, M.; Emery, L.; Fisher, A.S.; Golceff, P.; Hettel, R.; Morales, H.; Sebek, J.; Wiedemann, H.; Youngman, B. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Anderson, R. ); Miller, R.H. )

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed, split-parallel plate chopper has been designed built, and installed as part of the preinjector of the SSRL Injector. Its function is to allow the linear accelerator three consecutive S-band bunches from the long bunch train provided by a RF gun. A permanent magnet deflector (PMD) at the chopper entrance deflects the beam into an absorber when the chopper pulse is off. The beam is swept across a pair of slits at the beam output end when a 7 kV, 10-ns rise-time pulse passes in the opposite direction through the 75 {Omega} stripline formed by the deflecting plates. Bunches exiting the slits have their trajectories corrected by another PMD, and enter the linac. Beam tests demonstrate that the chopper functions as expected. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Interview Travel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interview Travel Interview Travel Travel preapproval and reimbursement process information for invited Laboratory job interviewees. Contact Travel Reservations (505) 667-1692 Email Student Travel (505) 667-5859 Interview travel process Interview travel will be reimbursed only when a Laboratory organization has invited a candidate to come to the Laboratory to interview for a specific job and the following process is used. Eligible expenses are paid post-interview only. Before beginning, review

  20. Travel Reimbursement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Reimbursement /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Travel Reimbursement Travel preapproval and reimbursement process information for interviewees, students, and relocations including new regular hires, term assignment hires, post-doctoral or advance study employees, and long-term visiting staff members. Interview Travel» Graduate, Undergraduate Travel» Relocation Travel» Guest Travel» TOP STORIES - highlights of our science, people, technologies close Grape Growers Association enlivens

  1. Cooling by Time Reversal of Atomic Matter Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.; Georgeot, B.; Shepelyansky, D. L. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Toulouse III, CNRS, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2008-02-01

    We propose an experimental scheme which allows us to realized approximate time reversal of matter waves for ultracold atoms in the regime of quantum chaos. We show that a significant fraction of the atoms return back to their original state, being at the same time cooled down by several orders of magnitude. We give a theoretical description of this effect supported by extensive numerical simulations. The proposed scheme can be implemented with existing experimental setups.

  2. Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data Time series analysis techniques are applied to wave-front sensor telemetry data from the Lick Adaptive Optics System. For 28 fully-illuminated subapertures, telemetry data of 4096 consecutive slope estimates for each subaperture are available. The primary problem is

  3. Wave function for harmonically confined electrons in time-dependent electric and magnetostatic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Chen, Jin-Wang; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

    2014-01-14

    We derive via the interaction representation the many-body wave function for harmonically confined electrons in the presence of a magnetostatic field and perturbed by a spatially homogeneous time-dependent electric fieldthe Generalized Kohn Theorem (GKT) wave function. In the absence of the harmonic confinement the uniform electron gas the GKT wave function reduces to the Kohn Theorem wave function. Without the magnetostatic field, the GKT wave function is the Harmonic Potential Theorem wave function. We further prove the validity of the connection between the GKT wave function derived and the system in an accelerated frame of reference. Finally, we provide examples of the application of the GKT wave function.

  4. Travel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Travel Travel The Office of Travel Management serves as the Department's POC for the following services: Headquarters Travel Management Center (TMC) Official Travel, Domestic and Foreign Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) Official Travel Regulations and Guidelines U.S. Passports and Visa Services (Official and Diplomatic) Non-Refundable Airfare Guidance International Insurance for DOE Officials (MEDEX) Car Rental Hotel Reservations Travel FAQs For questions about Travel Services or the

  5. Foreign Travel | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign Travel The Department of Energy has established requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees to ensure that the Department's official foreign travel activities are consistent with its mission and objectives as well as with prudent business practice. These requirements apply to: Anyone whose salary is paid, in full or in part, by Ames Laboratory at the time of the trip (in order for this NOT to apply, arrangements must be made

  6. Making Travel Arrangements | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Making Travel Arrangements

  7. Travel | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel The Travel Services Office provides travel authorization and honorarium processing services for the Ames Laboratory. If you have questions regarding how to book a trip, please contact the Travel Office at 4-4488 or 4-1780. The Travel Office website has many resources to assist travelers with planning a trip, reserving and booking a trip, along with answers for frequently asked questions. Making Arrangements - Provides instructions for requesting travel authorization and completing

  8. Graduate, Undergraduate Student Travel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduate, Undergraduate Travel Graduate, Undergraduate Student Travel Travel reimbursement process information for participants in the Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) and Undergraduate Student (UGS) programs Contact Travel Reservations (505) 667-1692 Email Student Travel (505) 667-5859 Email Graduate, undergraduate student travel process Travel by employees who participate in the Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) and Undergraduate Student (UGS) programs will be reimbursed only when the

  9. Real-time fracture monitoring in Engineered Geothermal Systems with seismic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jose A. Rial; Jonathan Lees

    2009-03-31

    As proposed, the main effort in this project is the development of software capable of performing real-time monitoring of micro-seismic activity recorded by an array of sensors deployed around an EGS. The main milestones are defined by the development of software to perform the following tasks: • Real-time micro-earthquake detection and location • Real-time detection of shear-wave splitting • Delayed-time inversion of shear-wave splitting These algorithms, which are discussed in detail in this report, make possible the automatic and real-time monitoring of subsurface fracture systems in geothermal fields from data collected by an array of seismic sensors. Shear wave splitting (SWS) is parameterized in terms of the polarization of the fast shear wave and the time delay between the fast and slow shear waves, which are automatically measured and stored. The measured parameters are then combined with previously measured SWS parameters at the same station and used to invert for the orientation (strike and dip) and intensity of cracks under that station. In addition, this grant allowed the collection of seismic data from several geothermal regions in the US (Coso) and Iceland (Hengill) to use in the development and testing of the software.

  10. Time- and power-dependent operation of a parametric spin-wave amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brcher, T.; Heussner, F.; Pirro, P.; Fischer, T.; Geilen, M.; Heinz, B.; Lgel, B.; Serga, A. A.; Hillebrands, B.

    2014-12-08

    We present the experimental observation of the localized amplification of externally excited, propagating spin waves in a transversely in-plane magnetized Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} magnonic waveguide by means of parallel pumping. By employing microfocussed Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy, we analyze the dependency of the amplification on the applied pumping power and on the delay between the input spin-wave packet and the pumping pulse. We show that there are two different operation regimes: At large pumping powers, the spin-wave packet needs to enter the amplifier before the pumping is switched on in order to be amplified while at low powers the spin-wave packet can arrive at any time during the pumping pulse.

  11. Time delay of wave packets during their tunnelling through a quantum diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, N A; Skalozub, V V

    2014-04-28

    A modified saddle-point method is used to investigate the process of propagation of a wave packet through a quantum diode. A scattering matrix is constructed for the structure in question. The case of tunnelling of a packet with a Gaussian envelope through the diode is considered in detail. The time delay and the shape of the wave packet transmitted are calculated. The dependence of the delay time on the characteristics of the input packet and the internal characteristics of the quantum diode is studied. Possible applications of the results obtained are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Travel Requirements - ITER (June 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Administrative Coordinator (TAC), via email: name of traveler as it appears on passport; e-mail address of traveler; dates of travel; purpose of travel; business city; date...

  13. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

    1998-04-14

    Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

  14. Statistical Evaluation of Travel Time Estimation Based on Data from Freeze-Branded Chinook Salmon on the Snake River, 1982-1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Skalski, J.R.; Giorgi, Albert E.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to assess the strengths and limitations of existing freeze brand recapture data in describing the migratory dynamics of juvenile salmonids in the mainstream, impounded sections of the Snake and Columbia Rivers. With the increased concern over the threatened status of spring and summer chinook salmon in the Snake River drainage, we used representative stocks for these races as our study populations. However, statistical considerations resultant from these analyses apply to other species and drainages as well. This report describes analyses we conducted using information derived from freeze-branded groups. We examined both index production groups released from hatcheries upstream from Lower Granite Dam (1982--1990) and freeze-branded groups used as controls in smolt transportation evaluations conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (1986, 1989). The scope of our analysis was limited to describing travel time estimates and derived relationships, as well as reach survival estimates through the mainstem Snake River from Lower Granite to McNary Dam.

  15. Travel Policy | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy Travel Policy Travel Policy for Contractor Personnel Travel Policy Changes October 1, 2009 Per Diem Adjustments for Meals Memo or EXAMPLE

  16. Travel Policy and Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-17

    The Order supplements the Federal Travel Regulation as principal source of policy for Federal employee travel and relocation and establishes DOE M 552.1-1A, U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual, dated 2-17-06, as the DOE repository for supplementary travel requirements information. Cancels DOE O 552.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 552.1A Admin Chg 1.

  17. Travel Policy and Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-04

    To supplement the Federal Travel Regulation (41 CFR, Parts 300-304), the principal source of policy for Federal employee travel and relocation matters, and to establish DOE M 552.1-1, U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual, dated 09-04-02, as the repository for supplementary travel requirements information for the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 1500.2A and DOE 1500.4A. Canceled by DOE O 552.1A.

  18. Travel Policy and Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-17

    The Order supplements the Federal Travel Regulation as principal source of policy for Federal employee travel and relocation and establishes DOE M 552.1-1A, U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual, dated 2-17-06, as the repository for supplementary travel requirements information. Supersedes DOE O 552.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 10-1-08, supersedes DOE O 552.1A.

  19. Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23/2012 Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope These regulations apply to the reimbursement of round-trip travel expenses incurred by interviewees. These regulations do not apply to applicants who live within a 50-mile radius of Los Alamos based on the Rand McNally Standard Highway Mileage Guide. Reimbursement With the exception of airfare, interviewees will be reimbursed for travel expenses according to Federal travel regulations. For interviewees, airfare reimbursement is limited to the lesser

  20. Exact Time-Dependent Nonlinear Dispersive Wave Solutions in Compressible Magnetized Plasmas Exhibiting Collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Maity, Chandan; Schamel, Hans

    2011-04-08

    Compressional waves in a magnetized plasma of arbitrary resistivity are treated with the Lagrangian fluid approach. An exact nonlinear solution with a nontrivial space and time dependence is obtained with boundary conditions as in Harris' current sheet. The solution shows competition among hydrodynamic convection, magnetic field diffusion, and dispersion. This results in a collapse of density and the magnetic field in the absence of dispersion. The dispersion effects arrest the collapse of density but not of the magnetic field. A possible application is in the early stage of magnetic star formation.

  1. Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-11-08

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees. The Page Change 1 to the CRD issued 11-8-02, will expand the requirements for country clearance for contractors to include all official foreign travel, including travel to nonsensitive countries. Cancels DOE O 551.1. Canceled by DOE O 551.1B.

  2. Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-24

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees. Cancels DOE O 551.1B.

  3. Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-04-12

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees. Cancels DOE O 551.1C.

  4. Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-04-02

    The order establishes DOE requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees. The Pg Chg removes the requirement to surrender official passports and replaces it with a process that requires travelers be responsible for safeguarding theirown official passports. Supersedes DOE O 551.1D, dated 4-12-12.

  5. Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-08-25

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees. Cancels DOE O 551.1. Canceled by DOE O 551.1B.

  6. Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-08-19

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees. Cancels DOE O 551.1A. Canceled by DOE O 551.1C.

  7. Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-01-31

    Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contract employees. Cancels DOE O 1500.3. Canceled by DOE O 551.1A.

  8. Numerical solution of the time dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations for mixed (d + s)-wave superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonalves, W. C.; Sardella, E.; UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, IPMet-Instituto de Pesquisas Meteorolgicas, CEP 17048-699 Bauru, SP ; Becerra, V. F.; Miloevi?, M. V.; Peeters, F. M.; Departamento de Fsica, Universidade Federal do Cear, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Cear

    2014-04-15

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau formalism for (d + s)-wave superconductors and their representation using auxiliary fields is investigated. By using the link variable method, we then develop suitable discretization of these equations. Numerical simulations are carried out for a mesoscopic superconductor in a homogeneous perpendicular magnetic field which revealed peculiar vortex states.

  9. Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wave-front sensing algorithms. Using direct comparison of data in open loop and closed-loop trials, we analyze algorithm performance in terms of gain, noise and residual power. ...

  10. Reporting Unofficial Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-15

    Establishes requirements for the reporting of unofficial travel to foreign countries by DOE and DOE contractor employees that hold an access authorization (personnel security clearances). DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extended this directive until 12/31/01.

  11. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.; Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S.

    2014-01-29

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  12. Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1983-10-18

    An apparatus for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously.

  13. Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Robert F. (315 Rover Blvd., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously.

  14. Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is disclosed for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously. 3 figs.

  15. Travel Resources | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Airline Baggage Policies Amtrak Argonne Guest House Association of Corporate Travel Executives Database of hotels that meet fire safety code GSA Per Diem Rates Iowa Road Work ISU - Office Procedure Guide - Travel Policies Map Quest Atlas National Business Travel Association Weather Channel Web Flyer

  16. travel-demand-modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Demand Modeling for a Small sized MPO Using TRANSIMS Mohammad Sharif Ullah Champaign County Regional Planning Commission 1776 E Washington Street, Urbana, IL 61802 Phone: 217 328 3313 Ext 124 Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ================ Mohammad Sharif Ullah, Senior Transportation Engineer, CCRPC, Urbana, IL Asadur Rahman, PhD student, IIT, Chicago, IL Rita Morocoima-Black, Planning & Comm.

  17. A coherent method for the detection and parameter estimation of continuous gravitational wave signals using a pulsar timing array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D.; Jenet, Fredrick A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, 1 West University Boulevard, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The use of a high precision pulsar timing array is a promising approach to detecting gravitational waves in the very low frequency regime (10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} Hz) that is complementary to ground-based efforts (e.g., LIGO, Virgo) at high frequencies (?10-10{sup 3} Hz) and space-based ones (e.g., LISA) at low frequencies (10{sup 4}-10{sup 1} Hz). One of the target sources for pulsar timing arrays is individual supermassive black hole binaries which are expected to form in galactic mergers. In this paper, a likelihood-based method for detection and parameter estimation is presented for a monochromatic continuous gravitational wave signal emitted by such a source. The so-called pulsar terms in the signal that arise due to the breakdown of the long-wavelength approximation are explicitly taken into account in this method. In addition, the method accounts for equality and inequality constraints involved in the semi-analytical maximization of the likelihood over a subset of the parameters. The remaining parameters are maximized over numerically using Particle Swarm Optimization. Thus, the method presented here solves the monochromatic continuous wave detection and parameter estimation problem without invoking some of the approximations that have been used in earlier studies.

  18. Local timespace mesh refinement for simulation of elastic wave propagation in multi-scale media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, Victor; Lisitsa, Vadim; Reshetova, Galina; Tcheverda, Vladimir

    2015-01-15

    This paper presents an original approach to local timespace grid refinement for the numerical simulation of wave propagation in models with localized clusters of micro-heterogeneities. The main features of the algorithm are the application of temporal and spatial refinement on two different surfaces; the use of the embedded-stencil technique for the refinement of grid step with respect to time; the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)-based interpolation to couple variables for spatial mesh refinement. The latter makes it possible to perform filtration of high spatial frequencies, which provides stability in the proposed finite-difference schemes. In the present work, the technique is implemented for the finite-difference simulation of seismic wave propagation and the interaction of such waves with fluid-filled fractures and cavities of carbonate reservoirs. However, this approach is easy to adapt and/or combine with other numerical techniques, such as finite elements, discontinuous Galerkin method, or finite volumes used for approximation of various types of linear and nonlinear hyperbolic equations.

  19. P- and S-body wave tomography of the state of Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Leiph

    2010-04-01

    P- and S-body wave travel times collected from stations in and near the state of Nevada were inverted for P-wave velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio. These waves consist of Pn, Pg, Sn and Sg, but only the first arriving P and S waves were used in the inversion. Travel times were picked by University of Nevada Reno colleagues and were culled for inclusion in the tomographic inversion. The resulting tomographic model covers the entire state of Nevada to a depth of {approx}90 km; however, only the upper 40 km indicate relatively good resolution. Several features of interest are imaged including the Sierra Nevada, basin structures, and low velocities at depth below Yucca Mountain. These velocity structure images provide valuable information to aide in the interpretation of geothermal resource areas throughout the state on Nevada.

  20. PIA - Travel Manager | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Travel Manager PIA - Travel Manager PIA - Travel Manager PDF icon PIA - Travel Manager More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline

  1. Time-fractional Gardner equation for ion-acoustic waves in negative-ion-beam plasma with negative ions and nonthermal nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shimin Mei, Liquan; Zhang, Zhengqiang

    2015-05-15

    Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a one-dimensional, unmagnetized plasma consisting of positive ions, negative ions, and nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution that is penetrated by a negative-ion-beam. The classical Gardner equation is derived to describe nonlinear behavior of ion-acoustic waves in the considered plasma system via reductive perturbation technique. We convert the classical Gardner equation into the time-fractional Gardner equation by Agrawal's method, where the time-fractional term is under the sense of Riesz fractional derivative. Employing variational iteration method, we construct solitary wave solutions of the time-fractional Gardner equation with initial condition which depends on the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients. The effect of the plasma parameters on the compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic solitary waves is also discussed in detail.

  2. On-Line Travel Reservations through "Concur Travel" | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On-Line Travel Reservations through "Concur Travel" What is Concur Travel (formerly known as Cliqbook)? Concur Travel is an on-line booking tool. Concur Travel is independent of Travel and Transport and it is a software that Travel and Transport has a software license with as a part of the Travel contract with Iowa State University. Concur Travel uses the GDS (Global Distribution Systems). Concur Travel should provide a more extensive flight search than other similar on-line travel

  3. ORISE: Travelers' Health Campaign | How ORISE is Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travelers' Health Campaign Travelers' Health Campaign takes critical messages worldwide Travelers' Health Campaign poster Click image to enlarge Traveling can be a dangerous...

  4. Chapter 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled Chapter 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled Vehicle-miles traveled--the number of miles that residential vehicles are driven--is probably the most important...

  5. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION RECORDS (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION RECORDS (Revision 2) This schedule covers records documenting the ...

  6. Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Foreign Travel Checklist MEDEX Plus Travel Information from the Office of Management Related Links World Health Organization Centers for Disease Control & Prevention Department of ...

  7. Influence of autoignition delay time characteristics of different fuels on pressure waves and knock in reciprocating engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.; Kalghatgi, G.T.

    2009-12-15

    The functional relationship of autoignition delay time with temperature and pressure is employed to derive the propagation velocities of autoignitive reaction fronts for particular reactivity gradients, once autoignition has been initiated. In the present study of a variety of premixtures, with different functional relationships, such gradients comprise fixed initial temperature gradients. The smaller is the ratio of the acoustic speed through the mixture to the localised velocity of the autoignitive front, the greater are the amplitude and frequency of the induced pressure wave. This might lead to damaging engine knock. At higher values of the ratio, the autoignition can be benign with only small over-pressures. This approach to the effects of autoignition is confirmed by its application to a variety of experimental studies involving: (i)Imposed temperature gradients in a rapid compression and expansion machine. (ii)Onset of knock in an engine with advancing spark timing. (iii)Development of autoignition at a single hot spot in an engine. (iv)Autoignition fronts initiated by several hot spots. There is much diversity in the effects that can be produced by different fuels in different ranges of temperature and pressure. Higher values of autoignitive propagation speeds lead to increasingly severe engine knock. Such effects cannot always be predicted from the Research and Motor octane numbers. (author)

  8. QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Ofman, Leon

    2012-07-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  9. Effect of trapped electron on the dust ion acoustic waves in dusty plasma using time fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazari-Golshan, A.; Nourazar, S. S.; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran

    2013-10-15

    The time fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries (TFMKdV) equation is solved to study the nonlinear propagation of small but finite amplitude dust ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary waves in un-magnetized dusty plasma with trapped electrons. The plasma is composed of a cold ion fluid, stationary dust grains, and hot electrons obeying a trapped electron distribution. The TFMKdV equation is derived by using the semi-inverse and Agrawal's methods and then solved by the Laplace Adomian decomposition method. Our results show that the amplitude of the DIA solitary waves increases with the increase of time fractional order ?, the wave velocity v{sub 0}, and the population of the background free electrons ?. However, it is vice-versa for the deviation from isothermality parameter b, which is in agreement with the result obtained previously.

  10. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme optimized in the timespace domain for modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-11-01

    For modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems using finite-difference schemes, optimizing the coefficients of the finite-difference operators can reduce numerical dispersion. Most optimized finite-difference schemes for modeling seismic-wave propagation suppress only spatial but not temporal dispersion errors. We develop a novel optimized finite-difference scheme for numerical scalar-wave modeling to control dispersion errors not only in space but also in time. Our optimized scheme is based on a new stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. We design an objective function for minimizing relative errors of phase velocities of waves propagating in all directions within a given range of wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis and numerical examples demonstrate that our optimized finite-difference scheme is computationally up to 2.5 times faster than the optimized schemes using the standard stencil to achieve the similar modeling accuracy for a given 2D or 3D problem. Compared with the high-order finite-difference scheme using the same new stencil, our optimized scheme reduces 50 percent of the computational cost to achieve the similar modeling accuracy. This new optimized finite-difference scheme is particularly useful for large-scale 3D scalar-wave modeling and inversion.

  11. Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1991-01-01

    A continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal is controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p.sub.c =p.sub.g -p.sub.m where p.sub.c is the desired pressure in the caster, p.sub.g is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p.sub.m is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristics of the metal being cast.

  12. 2001 New York State NHTS: Travel Patterns of Special Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S; Reuscher, Tim

    2010-03-01

    Policymakers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and accommodate future demands; to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-alleviating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel was not part of the survey. New York State participated in the 2001 NHTS by procuring additional 12,000 sample households. These additional sample households allowed New York State to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas that are significantly smaller than what the national NHTS data allowed. The final sample size for New York State was 13,423 usable households. In this report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identifies and analyzes differences, if any, in travel patterns that are attributable to demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, age, race and ethnicity), household characteristics (e.g., low income households, zero and one car households), modal characteristics and geographic location. Travel patterns of those who work at home are examined and compared to those of conventional workers, as well as those who do not work. Focus is given to trip frequency, travel by time of day, trip purpose, and mode choice. For example, included in this analysis is the mobility of the elderly population in New York State. The American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a greater percentage of older individuals in the population. In addition to demographic changes, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort did a decade ago. Cohort differences in driving are particularly apparent - not only are more of today's elderly population licensed to drive than their age cohort two decades ago, they also drive more. Equally important are the increase in immigration and in racial and cultural diversity. This report also discusses vehicle availability, socioeconomic characteristics, travel trends (e.g., miles travelled, distance driven, commute patterns), and the transportation accessibility of these populations. Specifically, this report addresses in detail the travel behavior of the following special populations: (1) the elderly, defined as those who were 65 years old or older, (2) low-income households, (3) ethnic groups and immigrants, and (4) those who worked at home.

  13. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2014-07-21

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7?GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along (101{sup }2) planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More broadly, the present work demonstrates the potential of shock wave propagation along low-symmetry directions to examine, and discriminate between, different inelastic deformation mechanisms in crystalline solids.

  14. Quantifying the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C sub-Coulomb fusion with the time-dependent wave-packet method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis; Wiescher, Michael

    2012-10-20

    This contribution provides a preliminary study of the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C sub-Coulomb fusion reaction using the time-dependent wave-packet method within a nuclear molecular picture. The theoretical sub-Coulomb fusion resonances seem to correspond well with observations. The present method might be a more suitable tool for expanding the cross-section predictions towards lower energies than the commonly used potential-model approximation.

  15. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the western half of the study area (Eurasia and the Middle East) and (ii) identify well located seismic events with event-station paths isolated to individual tectonic provinces within the study area and collect broadband waveforms and source parameters for the selected events. The 1D models obtained from the joint inversion will then be combined with published geologic terrain maps to produce regionalized models for distinctive tectonic areas within the study area, and the models will be validated through full waveform modeling of well-located seismic events recorded at local and regional distances.

  16. Traveling-Wave Thermoacoustic Engines With Internal Combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiland, Nathan Thomas (Blacksburg, VA); Zinn, Ben T. (Atlanta, GA); Swift, Gregory William (Sante Fe, NM)

    2004-05-11

    Thermoacoustic devices are disclosed wherein, for some embodiments, a combustion zone provides heat to a regenerator using a mean flow of compressible fluid. In other embodiments, burning of a combustible mixture within the combustion zone is pulsed in phase with the acoustic pressure oscillations to increase acoustic power output. In an example embodiment, the combustion zone and the regenerator are thermally insulated from other components within the thermoacoustic device.

  17. Time-periodic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrose , D.M.; Wilkening, Jon

    2008-04-01

    We present a spectrally accurate numerical method for finding non-trivial time-periodic solutions of non-linear partial differential equations. The method is based on minimizing a functional (of the initial condition and the period) that is positive unless the solution is periodic, in which case it is zero. We solve an adjoint PDE to compute the gradient of this functional with respect to the initial condition. We include additional terms in the functional to specify the free parameters, which, in the case of the Benjamin-Ono equation, are the mean, a spatial phase, a temporal phase and the real part of one of the Fourier modes at t = 0. We use our method to study global paths of non-trivial time-periodic solutions connecting stationary and traveling waves of the Benjamin-Ono equation. As a starting guess for each path, we compute periodic solutions of the linearized problem by solving an infinite dimensional eigenvalue problem in closed form. We then use our numerical method to continue these solutions beyond the realm of linear theory until another traveling wave is reached (or until the solution blows up). By experimentation with data fitting, we identify the analytical form of the solutions on the path connecting the one-hump stationary solution to the two-hump traveling wave. We then derive exact formulas for these solutions by explicitly solving the system of ODE's governing the evolution of solitons using the ansatz suggested by the numerical simulations.

  18. MHK Technologies/Seatricity wave energy converter | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In the simplest terms, a float travels up and down with the waves and operates a pump to pressurise sea water which is piped ashore. Many individual pumps are connected...

  19. Fermilab | Tevatron | Tevatron Symposium | Travel and Lodging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel and Lodging Directions to Fermilab Local Accommodations Map of Local Hotels Transportation Visa Information Wifi Access at Fermilab Other Useful Links

  20. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Publications ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION RECORDS (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 6: ACCOUNTABLE OFFICERS' ACCOUNTS RECORDS ADM 6 PDF...

  1. Photochemistry of the water dimer: Time-dependent quantum wave-packet description of the dynamics at the S{sub 1}-S{sub 0} conical intersection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmura, Bartosz; Rode, Michal F.; Sobolewski, Andrzej L.; Lan Zhenggang

    2009-10-07

    The photoinduced electron-driven proton-transfer dynamics of the water-dimer system has been investigated by time-dependent quantum wave-packet calculations. The main nuclear degrees of freedom driving the system from the Frank-Condon region to the S{sub 0}-S{sub 1} conical intersection are the distance between the oxygen atoms and the displacement of the hydrogen atom from the oxygen-oxygen bond center. Two important coupling modes have been investigated: Rotation of the H-donating water dangling proton and asymmetric stretching of the H-accepting water dangling protons'O{sub a}H bonds. Potential energy surfaces of the ground and lowest excited electronic states have been constructed on the basis of ab initio calculations. The time-dependent quantum wave-packet propagation has been employed within the (2 + 1)-dimensional systems for the description of the nonadiabatic dynamics of water dimer. The effects of the initial vibrational state of the system on the electronic population transfer and dissociation dynamics are presented. To approximate the photochemical behavior of water dimer in bulk water, we add a boundary condition into the (2 + 1)-dimensional systems to simulate the existence of water bulk. The results provide insight into the mechanisms of excited state deactivation of the water-dimer system in gas phase and in bulk water through the electron-driven proton-transfer process.

  2. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Bakulin, Andrey

    2009-10-13

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  3. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  4. NEUP Foreign Travel Request Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Foreign Travel Request Form NEUP Foreign Travel Request Form NEUP Foreign Travel Request Form File NEUP Foreign Travel Form 07_31_12.docx More Documents & Publications DOE F 551.1 NEUP Student Travel Request Form HQ FNVA Questionnaire

  5. NEUP Student Travel Request Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Student Travel Request Form NEUP Student Travel Request Form NEUP Fellowship Travel Request Form PDF icon Student Travel Request Form.pdf More Documents & Publications Investing in the next generation: The Office of Nuclear Energy Issues Requests for Scholarship and Fellowship Applications. NEUP Foreign Travel Request Form NEUP Fellowship Information Packet

  6. Positioner with long travel in two dimensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trumper, David L. (Plaistow, NH); Williams, Mark E. (Pelham, NH)

    1997-12-23

    A precision positioning system is provided which provides long travel in two of the linear dimensions, while using non-contact bearings for both a first subassembly which provides long travel in one of the linear dimension and a second subassembly which provides long travel in the second linear dimension. The first or upper subassembly is preferably a magnetic subassembly which, in addition to providing long travel, also compensates or positions in three rotary dimensions and in the third linear dimension. The second subassembly is preferably either an air bearing or magnetic subassembly and is normally used only to provide long travel. Angled surfaces may be provided for magnetic bearings and capacitive or other gap sensing probes may be mounted to the stage and ground flush with the bearing actuators to provide more precise gap measurements.

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Travel to the Future with Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy

  8. Better World Club Travel Cool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    World Club Travel Cool Jump to: navigation, search Name: Better World Club Travel Cool Place: Portland, Oregon Zip: 97209 Product: Travel Cool is the eNewsletter of the Better...

  9. Venue and Travel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Venue and Travel Venue and Travel Venue and Travel Hilton Anaheim 777 W Convention Way Anaheim, California, 92802 USA TEL: 1-714-750-4321 FAX: 1-714-740-4460 Reserving Your Room For your convenience, a limited room block has been set up at the group rate of $133 per night (plus applicable taxes). Space is limited and will sell out fast. Reservations can be made via the call center 1-877-776-4932 using the group code: SGE or you can book online: SunShot Grand Challenge Summit Room Block.

  10. Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial and IAEA General Conference Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial and IAEA ...

  11. ORISE: CDC Travelers' Health Mobile App, Designed by ORISE, Gains...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    choices while traveling internationally and tasked ORISE with designing iPhone and Android versions. "Nothing is more important to us than the health and safety of travelers,...

  12. Energy Secretary Bodman Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Energy and Nuclear Security Energy Secretary Bodman Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Energy and Nuclear Security May 20, 2005 - ...

  13. A real-time laser feedback control method for the three-wave laser source used in the polarimeter-interferometer diagnostic on Joint-TEXT tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, C. Y.; Chen, J. Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.

    2014-12-15

    A three-wave laser polarimeter-interferometer, equipped with three independent far-infrared laser sources, has been developed on Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) tokamak. The diagnostic system is capable of high-resolution temporal and phase measurement of the Faraday angle and line-integrated density. However, for long-term operation (>10 min), the free-running lasers can lead to large drifts of the intermediate frequencies (∼100–∼500 kHz/10 min) and decay of laser power (∼10%–∼20%/10 min), which act to degrade diagnostic performance. In addition, these effects lead to increased maintenance cost and limit measurement applicability to long pulse/steady state experiments. To solve this problem, a real-time feedback control method of the laser source is proposed. By accurately controlling the length of each laser cavity, both the intermediate frequencies and laser power can be simultaneously controlled: the intermediate frequencies are controlled according to the pre-set values, while the laser powers are maintained at an optimal level. Based on this approach, a real-time feedback control system has been developed and applied on J-TEXT polarimeter-interferometer. Long-term (theoretically no time limit) feedback of intermediate frequencies (maximum change less than ±12 kHz) and laser powers (maximum relative power change less than ±7%) has been successfully achieved.

  14. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  15. Hotel and Travel Information for the Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development is being held in the Cottonwoods Pavillion at the Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort and Spa. Here registrants can find summit hotel and travel...

  16. Microsoft Word - Travel Checklist.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      T T r r a a v v e e l l C C h h e e c c k k l l i i s s t t  A A I I R R L L I I N N E E T T R R A A V V E E L L Book all travel through nu travel services, regardless of whether airfare can be found more cheaply elsewhere. This will ensure that you do not end up holding the tab for expensive airfare (NU travel charges airfare to the chartstring that funds you): HTTP://WWW.NORTHWESTERN.EDU/USERVICES/TRAVEL/ Boarding passes and proof of purchase must be provided International airline

  17. Quantifying the Effect of Fast Charger Deployments on Electric Vehicle Utility and Travel Patterns via Advanced Simulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Burton, E.

    2015-02-01

    The disparate characteristics between conventional (CVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in terms of driving range, refill/recharge time, and availability of refuel/recharge infrastructure inherently limit the relative utility of BEVs when benchmarked against traditional driver travel patterns. However, given a high penetration of high-power public charging combined with driver tolerance for rerouting travel to facilitate charging on long-distance trips, the difference in utility between CVs and BEVs could be marginalized. We quantify the relationships between BEV utility, the deployment of fast chargers, and driver tolerance for rerouting travel and extending travel durations by simulating BEVs operated over real-world travel patterns using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles (BLAST-V). With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, BLAST-V has been developed to include algorithms for estimating the available range of BEVs prior to the start of trips, for rerouting baseline travel to utilize public charging infrastructure when necessary, and for making driver travel decisions for those trips in the presence of available public charging infrastructure, all while conducting advanced vehicle simulations that account for battery electrical, thermal, and degradation response. Results from BLAST-V simulations on vehicle utility, frequency of inserted stops, duration of charging events, and additional time and distance necessary for rerouting travel are presented to illustrate how BEV utility and travel patterns can be affected by various fast charge deployments.

  18. Rebound 2007: Analysis of U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Travel Statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    U.S. national time series data on vehicle travel by passenger cars and light trucks covering the period 1966 2007 are used to test for the existence, size and stability of the rebound effect for motor vehicle fuel efficiency on vehicle travel. The data show a statistically significant effect of gasoline price on vehicle travel but do not support the existence of a direct impact of fuel efficiency on vehicle travel. Additional tests indicate that fuel price effects have not been constant over time, although the hypothesis of symmetry with respect to price increases and decreases is not rejected. Small and Van Dender (2007) model of a declining rebound effect with income is tested and similar results are obtained.

  19. PIA - Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Travel Management System (FTMS) PIA - Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) PIA - Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) PDF icon PIA - Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) More Documents & Publications PIA - INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE

  20. Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S; Reuscher, Tim; Schmoyer, Richard L; Chin, Shih-Miao

    2007-05-01

    Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific), MSA size, and the availability of rail. Extrapolating NHTS data within small geographic areas could risk developing and subsequently using unreliable estimates. For example, if a planning agency in City X of State Y estimates travel rates and other travel characteristics based on survey data collected from NHTS sample households that were located in City X of State Y, then the agency could risk developing and using unreliable estimates for their planning process. Typically, this limitation significantly increases as the size of an area decreases. That said, the NHTS contains a wealth of information that could allow statistical inferences about small geographic areas, with a pre-determined level of statistical certainty. The question then becomes whether a method can be developed that integrates the NHTS data and other data to estimate key travel characteristics for small geographic areas such as Census tract and transportation analysis zone, and whether this method can outperform other, competing methods.

  1. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Demand, Demographics, and Travel Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For EIA Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Trisha Hutchins, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Light-duty vehicle energy demand, demographics, and travel behavior Examining changes in light-duty vehicle travel trends 2 EIA Conference: Light-duty vehicle energy demand, demographics, and travel behavior July 15, 2014 * Recent data indicate possible structural shift in travel behavior, measured as vehicle miles traveled (VMT) - VMT per licensed driver, vehicles per

  2. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  3. Regional Seismic Travel Time Node Get and Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-10-24

    RSTT_NOGS allows users to easily get and set seismic velocity vs. depth profiles at specified model tessellation nodes. RSTT_NOGS uses the Sandia Seismic Location Baseline Model code that was released under BSD license in 2009.

  4. The detection of upwardly propagating waves channeling energy from the chromosphere to the low corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freij, N.; Nelson, C. J.; Mumford, S.; Erdlyi, R.; Scullion, E. M.; Wedemeyer, S.

    2014-08-10

    There have been ubiquitous observations of wave-like motions in the solar atmosphere for decades. Recent improvements to space- and ground-based observatories have allowed the focus to shift to smaller magnetic structures on the solar surface. In this paper, high-resolution ground-based data taken using the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope is combined with co-spatial and co-temporal data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite to analyze running penumbral waves (RPWs). RPWs have always been thought to be radial wave propagation that occurs within sunspots. Recent research has suggested that they are in fact upwardly propagating field-aligned waves (UPWs). Here, RPWs within a solar pore are observed for the first time and are interpreted as UPWs due to the lack of a penumbra that is required to support RPWs. These UPWs are also observed co-spatially and co-temporally within several SDO/AIA elemental lines that sample the transition region and low corona. The observed UPWs are traveling at a horizontal velocity of around 17 0.5 km s{sup 1} and a minimum vertical velocity of 42 21 km s{sup 1}. The estimated energy of the waves is around 150 W m{sup 2}, which is on the lower bound required to heat the quiet-Sun corona. This is a new, yet unconsidered source of wave energy within the solar chromosphere and low corona.

  5. New Hire Relocation Travel Information Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Hire Relocation Travel Information Guide This information guide is provided by the CFO Travel Relocation Office to assist you in planning your relocation to Los Alamos. Please contact the Relocation Office at least two to four weeks prior to your relocation to discuss your relocation plans. You can contact the Relocation Office at (505) 665-4484 or by e-mail at relocation@lanl.gov. You must have met all contingencies, if any, of your hire as well as have proper work authorization before the

  6. Emerging Trends in US Vehicle Travel Demand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trends in US Vehicle Travel Demand www.travelbehavior.us 2014 EIA Energy Conference Nancy McGuckin Travel Behavior Analyst * Historic pattern of VMT per capita * Differences in changes since 2007 by State * Private and Commercial VMT in context * Why Millenials? www.travelbehavior.us 8,000 8,500 9,000 9,500 10,000 10,500 VMT/Capita per Year www.travelbehavior.us VMT per capita: an unprecedented change: Source: McGuckin's analysis of Census Population (Jul 1) and HPMS Historic VM-1 Tables

  7. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  8. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  9. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. A neural network for real-time retrievals of PWV and LWP from Arctic millimeter-wave ground-based observations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadeddu, M. P.; Turner, D. D.; Liljegren, J. C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a new neural network (NN) algorithm for real-time retrievals of low amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) and integrated liquid water from millimeter-wave ground-based observations. Measurements are collected by the 183.3-GHz G-band vapor radiometer (GVR) operating at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility, Barrow, AK. The NN provides the means to explore the nonlinear regime of the measurements and investigate the physical boundaries of the operability of the instrument. A methodology to compute individual error bars associated with the NN output is developed, and a detailed error analysis of the network output is provided. Through the error analysis, it is possible to isolate several components contributing to the overall retrieval errors and to analyze the dependence of the errors on the inputs. The network outputs and associated errors are then compared with results from a physical retrieval and with the ARM two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) statistical retrieval. When the NN is trained with a seasonal training data set, the retrievals of water vapor yield results that are comparable to those obtained from a traditional physical retrieval, with a retrieval error percentage of {approx}5% when the PWV is between 2 and 10 mm, but with the advantages that the NN algorithm does not require vertical profiles of temperature and humidity as input and is significantly faster computationally. Liquid water path (LWP) retrievals from the NN have a significantly improved clear-sky bias (mean of {approx}2.4 g/m{sup 2}) and a retrieval error varying from 1 to about 10 g/m{sup 2} when the PWV amount is between 1 and 10 mm. As an independent validation of the LWP retrieval, the longwave downwelling surface flux was computed and compared with observations. The comparison shows a significant improvement with respect to the MWR statistical retrievals, particularly for LWP amounts of less than 60 g/m{sup 2}.

  11. DOE Energy Taxation Forum - Travel Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Travel Fact Sheet DOE Energy Taxation Forum - Travel Fact Sheet PDF icon TFS Tax Forum New Orleans 02272012.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Energy Taxation Forum - Registration Form

  12. ORISE: Travelers' Health Campaign | How ORISE is Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travelers' Health Campaign Travelers' Health Campaign takes critical messages worldwide Travelers' Health Campaign poster Click image to enlarge Traveling can be a dangerous transmitter of germs, bacteria and viruses such as H1N1. That makes airports, ship docks, train stations and bus depots among the most important places to spread the word about healthy practices and precautions. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has played a key role in preparing to get the

  13. Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Benefits » Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information » Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas Before the Trip A written confirmation from an appropriate manager, i.e., a Travel Authorization or memorandum, that identifies the employee and country(ies) that will be visited should be provided the medical support staff 4-8 weeks prior to the trip or, if less than 4 weeks, as soon as management or the

  14. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION RECORDS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Revision 2) | Department of Energy 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION RECORDS (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION RECORDS (Revision 2) This schedule covers records documenting the movement of goods and persons under Government orders. PDF icon ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION RECORDS (Revision 2) More Documents & Publications ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 9: TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION RECORDS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 6:

  15. NNSA Administrator D'Agostino's 2010 Nonproliferation Travel...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    10 Nonproliferation Travel Blog | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

  16. Novel type of chimera spiral waves arising from decoupling of a diffusible

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    component (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Novel type of chimera spiral waves arising from decoupling of a diffusible component Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel type of chimera spiral waves arising from decoupling of a diffusible component Spiral waves composed of coherent traveling waves surrounding a core containing stochastically distributed stationary areas are found in numerical simulations of a three-variable reaction-diffusion system with one diffusible species. In

  17. Travel Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA

  18. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center - Travel Accommodations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Accommodations While visiting or working at JLab there are many options for living accommodations. These options vary depending upon the expected length of stay, transportation available and money allotted for housing expenses. The following information has been compiled to assist in the search for living accommodations near the lab. For further assistance e-mail User Liaison or call 757-269-6388. On-Site Accommodations SURA Residence Facility Off-Site Accommodations Negotiated Lodging

  19. Symmetries of the triple degenerate DNLS equations for weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, G. M.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1996-07-20

    A formulation of Hamiltonian and Lagrangian variational principles, Lie point symmetries and conservation laws for the triple degenerate DNLS equations describing the propagation of weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves along the ambient magnetic field, in {beta}{approx}1 plasmas is given. The equations describe the interaction of the Alfven and magnetoacoustic modes near the triple umbilic point, where the fast magnetosonic, slow magnetosonic and Alfven speeds coincide and a{sub g}{sup 2}=V{sub A}{sup 2} where a{sub g} is the gas sound speed and V{sub A} is the Alfven speed. A discussion is given of the travelling wave similarity solutions of the equations, which include solitary wave and periodic traveling waves. Strongly compressible solutions indicate the necessity for the insertion of shocks in the flow, whereas weakly compressible, near Alfvenic solutions resemble similar, shock free travelling wave solutions of the DNLS equation.

  20. Extension arm for mobile travelers suit case

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byington, Gerald A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus for adjusting a luggage handle in relation to a luggage frame utilized to transport luggage by a traveler. The handle is connected to two extendable and retractable slide tube assemblies, the assemblies allow for the telescoping of the luggage handle to multiple positions in relation to a pair of fixed frame tubes connected to a luggage shell with wheels, to accommodate the height and personal stride of traveler. The luggage handle incorporates triggering buttons that allow ambidextrous and single-handed control of the height of the handle and slide tube assembly in relation to the luggage. The handle and slide tube assembly are connected by interior filaments to pulleys and filaments within two concentric light-weight slide tubes, which are inserted respectively into two fixed frame tubes, to allow a multitude of positions for the slide tubes to lock into the fixed frame tubes. The apparatus can be pushed or pulled by the traveler, and the support shell can accommodate multiple pieces of luggage.

  1. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; Andr, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (20012010) of data from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.

  2. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of datamore » from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.« less

  3. CONNECTING THE SUN AND THE SOLAR WIND: THE FIRST 2.5-DIMENSIONAL SELF-CONSISTENT MHD SIMULATION UNDER THE ALFVEN WAVE SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumoto, Takuma; Suzuki, Takeru Ken

    2012-04-10

    The solar wind emanates from the hot and tenuous solar corona. Earlier studies using 1.5-dimensional simulations show that Alfven waves generated in the photosphere play an important role in coronal heating through the process of nonlinear mode conversion. In order to understand the physics of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration together, it is important to consider the regions from photosphere to interplanetary space as a single system. We performed 2.5-dimensional, self-consistent magnetohydrodynamic simulations, covering from the photosphere to the interplanetary space for the first time. We carefully set up the grid points with spherical coordinates to treat the Alfven waves in the atmosphere with huge density contrast and successfully simulate the solar wind streaming out from the hot solar corona as a result of the surface convective motion. The footpoint motion excites Alfven waves along an open magnetic flux tube, and these waves traveling upward in the non-uniform medium undergo wave reflection, nonlinear mode conversion from Alfven mode to slow mode, and turbulent cascade. These processes lead to the dissipation of Alfven waves and acceleration of the solar wind. It is found that the shock heating by the dissipation of the slow-mode wave plays a fundamental role in the coronal heating process, whereas the turbulent cascade and shock heating drive the solar wind.

  4. MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with fewer parts Electromechanical loads are real time adjustable with respect to wave sensor web resulting in optimal energy conversion from near fully submerged wave following...

  5. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  6. Sec. Chu Travels to Houston | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chu Travels to Houston Sec. Chu Travels to Houston February 2, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis The Houston Medical Center Thermal Energy Corporation Control Room. | Photo Courtesy of the Texas Medical Center The Houston Medical Center Thermal Energy Corporation Control Room. | Photo Courtesy of the Texas Medical Center Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs Secretary Chu traveled to Houston, Texas, today to meet with executives from various oil and gas

  7. Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save on Travel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Costs | Department of Energy Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save on Travel Costs Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save on Travel Costs April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis With $2.1 million in EERE funds, the Thurston Regional Planning Council developed the "Thurston Here to There" project. Thurston Here to There is a website that provides Thurston County residents with maps, timetables, and other transportation information. These travel

  8. Solar Decathlon: How far did they travel? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decathlon Journeys Visualizing the distances that each Solar Decathlon house travelled Click competitors to toggle their journeys on and off. All routes and distances are...

  9. Travelers Rest, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Travelers Rest, South Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.9676167, -82.4434548 Show Map Loading map......

  10. Statement by DOE Spokesperson on Secretary Moniz's Travel to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    travel to Geneva on Saturday to join Secretary Kerry in continued negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program. Department of Energy officials have consistently been...

  11. Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

  12. DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    document reviews with regulators instead of meeting in person and reduced rental car usage by standardizing travel arrangements so that only one rental car is necessary per...

  13. Secretary Bodman Travels to Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    business leaders in Jordan. He will also travel to the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Egypt, to continue dialogues with global leaders, enhance the United States' relationship...

  14. Secretary Bodman Travels to Russia to Advance Energy Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Russia to Advance Energy Security Secretary Bodman Travels to Russia to Advance Energy Security March 15, 2006 - 12:20pm Addthis Promotes Transparent Markets and Clean Energy ...

  15. Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On Wednesday, January 25, Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Henry Kelly will travel to Houston, Texas, to make an announcement about President ...

  16. Brain teasers traveling exhibit opens at Los Alamos National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain teasers exhibit opens at museum Brain Teasers traveling exhibit opens at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum The interactive exhibit is a collection of ...

  17. NNSA Administrator D'Agostino's 2009 IAEA Travel Blog | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09 IAEA Travel Blog | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  18. Preliminary result of P-wave speed tomography beneath North Sumatera region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jatnika, Jajat; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Wandono

    2015-04-24

    The structure of P-wave speed beneath the North Sumatra region was determined using P-wave arrival times compiled by MCGA from time periods of January 2009 to December 2012 combining with PASSCAL data for February to May 1995. In total, there are 2,246 local earthquake events with 10,666 P-wave phases from 63 stations seismic around the study area. Ray tracing to estimate travel time from source to receiver in this study by applying pseudo-bending method while the damped LSQR method was used for the tomographic inversion. Based on assessment of ray coverage, earthquakes and stations distribution, horizontal grid nodes was set up of 3030 km2 for inside the study area and 8080 km2 for outside the study area. The tomographic inversion results show low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex region and around the Sumatra Fault Zones (SFZ). These features are consistent with previous study. The low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex are observed around Mt. Pusuk Bukit at depths of 5?km down to 100?km. The interpretation is these anomalies may be associated with ascending hot materials from subduction processes at depths of 80?km down to 100?km. The obtained Vp structure from local tomography will give valuable information to enhance understanding of tectonic and volcanic in this study area.

  19. Marine pipeline dynamic response to waves from directional wave spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambrakos, K.F.

    1982-07-01

    A methodology has been developed to calculate the dynamic probabilistic movement and resulting stresses for marine pipelines subjected to storm waves. A directional wave spectrum is used with a Fourier series expansion to simulate short-crested waves and calculate their loads on the pipeline. The pipeline displacements resulting from these loads are solutions to the time-dependent beam-column equation which also includes the soil resistance as external loading. The statistics of the displacements for individual waves are combined with the wave statistics for a given period of time, e.g. pipeline lifetime, to generate probabilistic estimates for net pipeline movement. On the basis of displacements for specified probability levels the pipeline configuration is obtained from which pipeline stresses can be estimated using structural considerations, e.g. pipeline stiffness, end restraints, etc.

  20. THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu E-mail: devore@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-09-20

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )}. In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  1. NO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW BLAST WAVES ENCOUNTERING SUDDEN CIRCUMBURST DENSITY CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gat, Ilana; Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power-law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreading, collimation, and edge effects of the blast wave as it encounters the change in circumburst medium. In all cases considered in this paper, we find that a flare will not be observed for any of the density changes studied.

  2. Integrated coherent matter wave circuits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryu, C.; Boshier, M. G.

    2015-09-21

    An integrated coherent matter wave circuit is a single device, analogous to an integrated optical circuit, in which coherent de Broglie waves are created and then launched into waveguides where they can be switched, divided, recombined, and detected as they propagate. Applications of such circuits include guided atom interferometers, atomtronic circuits, and precisely controlled delivery of atoms. We report experiments demonstrating integrated circuits for guided coherent matter waves. The circuit elements are created with the painted potential technique, a form of time-averaged optical dipole potential in which a rapidly moving, tightly focused laser beam exerts forces on atoms through theirmoreelectric polarizability. Moreover, the source of coherent matter waves is a BoseEinstein condensate (BEC). Finally, we launch BECs into painted waveguides that guide them around bends and form switches, phase coherent beamsplitters, and closed circuits. These are the basic elements that are needed to engineer arbitrarily complex matter wave circuitry.less

  3. Urban structure and its influence on vehicle travel reduction strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, F.; Jones, D.W.; Harrison, G.

    1996-04-01

    This paper examines what is known about the relationship between urban spatial structure (i.e. the arrangement of residential, industrial, commercial, recreational and municipal buildings and land lots) and urban travel. The first section provides an overview of the empirical evidence for relationships between urban spatial structure and travel in the United States. Section two focuses on the barriers to and opportunities for reducing the use of automobiles and light trucks in urban areas. The final section offers a policy-point-of-impact perspective on the sort of instruments governments have at their disposal for reducing vehicular travel.

  4. Deputy Secretary Poneman to Travel to Russia | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Travel to Russia Deputy Secretary Poneman to Travel to Russia December 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, December 6, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman will travel to Russia as part of the ongoing cooperation between the two countries on nuclear security and peaceful nuclear energy issues. On Tuesday, Deputy Secretary Poneman will co-chair the U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Plenary Meeting with Director General of the State Atomic

  5. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  6. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  7. Fact #842: October 13, 2014 Vehicles and Vehicle Travel Trends...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reflecting that the average driver is driving more miles in 2012 than in 1950. However, the trends have changed for vehicle miles traveled and number of vehicles in operation. ...

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-04

    To supplement information contained in the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) by providing further clarification and establishing Department of Energy (DOE) policy on matters that the FTR left to Agency discretion. Canceled by DOE M 552.1-1A.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-17

    The Manual supplements information in the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) by providing further clarification and establishing Department of Energy (DOE) policy on matters that the FTR left to Agency discretion. Supersedes DOE M 552.1-1.

  10. ORISE: CDC Travelers' Health Team Receives Innovation Award for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CDC Travelers' Health Team Receives Innovation Award for Website Redesign ORISE serves as lead redesign contractor on award-winning website redesign for the CDC How ORISE is Making...

  11. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Gttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  12. ORISE: CDC Travelers' Health Team Receives Innovation Award for Website

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redesign CDC Travelers' Health Team Receives Innovation Award for Website Redesign ORISE serves as lead redesign contractor on award-winning website redesign for the CDC How ORISE is Making a Difference The Communication and Education Team of the Travelers' Health Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has received the CDC Director's Award for Innovation. Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, Director, CDC, bestowed the award in May in recognition of excellent work in the redesign

  13. Secretary Moniz Announces Travel to Alaska, Idaho, Wyoming, Missouri to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Discuss Energy Opportunities and Attend Dedication of Kansas City Plant | Department of Energy Travel to Alaska, Idaho, Wyoming, Missouri to Discuss Energy Opportunities and Attend Dedication of Kansas City Plant Secretary Moniz Announces Travel to Alaska, Idaho, Wyoming, Missouri to Discuss Energy Opportunities and Attend Dedication of Kansas City Plant August 14, 2014 - 3:30pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON - Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will speak at two events in

  14. GPS Travel Survey Data Collection and Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GPS Travel Survey Data Collection and Analysis GPS Travel Survey Data Collection and Analysis 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vssp_08_markel.pdf More Documents & Publications Route-Based Controls Potential for Efficiency Gains Light Duty Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Systems Analysis Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations

  15. The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel, IG-0872

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel DOE/IG-0872 October 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 16, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert: "The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel" INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy and its workforce of 116,000 Federal and contractor

  16. MONDAY: Secretary Chu Travels to New Jersey and Philadelphia | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy MONDAY: Secretary Chu Travels to New Jersey and Philadelphia MONDAY: Secretary Chu Travels to New Jersey and Philadelphia September 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - On Monday, September 27, 2010, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Representative Rush Holt will tour Applied Photovoltaics. With help from a Recovery Act-funded $1.1 million clean energy manufacturing tax credit, Applied Photovoltaics will manufacture solar energy modules for use in building-integrated

  17. Evolution of rogue waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolba, R. E. El-Bedwehy, N. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2015-04-15

    The evolution of rogue waves associated with the dynamics of positively charged dust grains that interact with streaming electrons and ions is investigated. Using a perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrdinger equation (NLSE). The rational solution of the NLSE is presented, which proposed as an effective tool for studying the rogue waves in Jupiter. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming densities of the ions and electrons. Furthermore, the supersonic rogue waves are much taller than the subsonic rogue waves by ?25 times.

  18. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  19. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

  20. Time Structure of the LANSCE Beam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The proton beam is delivered to Target-1 after passing through the proton storage ring (PSR). The time it takes an 800 MeV proton to travel one circuit of the PSR is 360 ns. The...

  1. EERE Success Story—Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save on Travel Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thurston County provides travel information for lower costs, improved safety, and faster response to challenges.

  2. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dohner, Jeffrey L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  3. Orthogonally interdigitated shielded serpentine travelling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagen, Edward C. (Las Vegas, NV); Hudson, Charles L. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A new deflection structure (12) which deflects a beam of charged particles, uch as an electron beam (15), includes a serpentine set (20) for transmitting a deflection field, and a shielding frame (25) for housing the serpentine set (20). The serpentine set (20) includes a vertical serpentine deflection element (22) and a horizontal serpentine deflection element (24). These deflection elements (22, 24) are identical, and are interdigitatedly and orthogonally disposed relative to each other, for forming a central transmission passage (75), through which the electron beam (15) passes, and is deflected by the deflection field, so as to minimize drift space signal distortion. The shielding frame (25) includes a plurality of ground blocks (26, 28, 30, 32), and forms an internal serpentine trough (77) within these ground blocks, for housing the serpentine set (20). The deflection structure (12) further includes a plurality of feedthrough connectors (35, 37, 35I, 37I), which are inserted through the shielding frame (25), and which are electrically connected to the serpentine set (20).

  4. Orthogonally interdigitated shielded serpentine travelling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagen, E.C.; Hudson, C.L.

    1995-07-25

    A new deflection structure which deflects a beam of charged particles, such as an electron beam, includes a serpentine set for transmitting a deflection field, and a shielding frame for housing the serpentine set. The serpentine set includes a vertical serpentine deflection element and a horizontal serpentine deflection element. These deflection elements are identical, and are interdigitatedly and orthogonally disposed relative to each other, for forming a central transmission passage, through which the electron beam passes, and is deflected by the deflection field, so as to minimize drift space signal distortion. The shielding frame includes a plurality of ground blocks, and forms an internal serpentine trough within these ground blocks, for housing the serpentine set. The deflection structure further includes a plurality of feedthrough connectors which are inserted through the shielding frame, and which are electrically connected to the serpentine set. 10 figs.

  5. Shear wave transducer for boreholes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, N.H.

    1984-08-23

    A technique and apparatus is provided for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data are used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  6. Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Numerous transportation strategies are directed at reducing energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by changing the behavior of individual drivers or travelers. These behavioral changes may have the effect of reducing travel, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing travel. Since the 1970s, federal, regional, state and municipal agencies have tried to reduce energy use, emissions, and congestion by influencing travel behavior. This report reviews and summarizes the literature on relationships between these strategies and transportation-related energy use and GHG emissions to examine how changes to travel behavior can reduce transportation energy use and discuss the potential for federal actions to affect travel behavior.

  7. Wave transmission over submerged breakwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, N.; Wurjanto, A. )

    1989-09-01

    Monochromatic wave reflection and transmission over a submerged impermeable breakwater is predicted numerically by slightly modifying the numerical model developed previously for predicting wave reflection and run-up on rough or smooth impermeable slopes. The slight modification is related to the landward boundary condition required for the transmitted wave propagating landward. In addition to the conservation equations of mass and momentum used to compute the flow field, an equation of energy is derived to estimate the rate of energy dissipation due to wave breaking. The computed reflection and transmission coefficients are shown to be in agreement with available small-scale test data. The numerical model also predicts the spatial variation of the energy dissipation, the mean water level difference, and the time-averaged volume flux per unit width, although available measurements are not sufficient for evaluating the capabilities and limitations of the numerical model for predicting these quantities.

  8. Mission Support Alliance (MSA) (MSA) Beryllium Health Advocate Travel Contacts Company info

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mission Support Alliance (MSA) (MSA) Beryllium Health Advocate Travel Contacts Company info Site Beryllium Health Advocate Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) (WRPS) Beryllium Health Advocate Travel Contacts Company info CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) (CHPRC) Beryllium Health Advocate Travel Contacts Company info Calin Tebay (509) 376-5602 office (509) 987-2288 cell Email: Calin_P_Tebay@rl.gov Teri Parke 376-7817 E-mail questions ^Travel Questions-MSA Contact Travel

  9. Travel & Hotels | Center for Energy Efficient Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time and hassle saved will be more than worth it. UC Santa Barbara is an easy 5 minute cab ride from the Santa Barbara Airport, see taxi information below. For Santa Barbara...

  10. Gravitational waves found, black-hole models led the way

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gravitational waves found, black-hole models led the way Gravitational waves found, black-hole models led the way Gravitational waves were predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity in 1916, and now, almost exactly 100 years later, the faint ripples across space-time have been found. February 11, 2016 A simulation of two merging black holes, creating gravitational waves. Photo courtesy of LIGO. A simulation of two merging black holes, creating gravitational waves. Photo courtesy of

  11. Final Report Phase I Study to Characterize the Market Potential for Non-Motorized Travel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [Macrosys; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The idea of livable communities suggests that people should have the option to utilize non-motorized travel (NMT), specifically walking and bicycling, to conduct their daily tasks. Forecasting personal travel by walk and bike is necessary as part of regional transportation planning, and requires fine detail not only about individual travel, but also on transportation and neighborhood infrastructure. In an attempt to characterize the 'market' potential for NMT, the Office of Planning, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) funded the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to conduct a study. The objectives of this effort were to identify factors that influence communities to walk and bike and to examine why, or why not, travelers walk and bike in their communities. This study relied on information collected under the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) as the major source of data, and was supplemented with data from the American Community Survey (ACS), educational survey, health, employment, and others. Initial statistical screening methods were applied to sort through over 400 potential predictor variables, and examined with various measures (e.g., walk trip per person, walk mileage per person, bike trip per person, bike mileage per person) as the dependent variables. The best geographic level of detail used in the modeling for this study was determined to be the Census block group level for walking and Census tract level for biking. The need for additional supplemental private data (i.e., Walk Scores and Nielsen employment data), and geospatial information that reflects land use and physical environments, became evident after an examination of findings from the initial screening models. To be feasible, in terms of costs and time, the geographic scale of the study region was scaled down to nine selected NHTS add-on regions. These regions were chosen based on various criteria including transit availability, population size, and a mix of geographic locations across the nation. Given the similarities in modeling results from walk trips and walk mileages, additional modeling efforts conducted under the later part of this study were focused on walk trips per person. Bike models were limited only with the stepwise logistic models using Census tracts in the selected regions. Due to NHTS sampling limitations, only about 12% of these tracts have bike trips recorded from NHTS sampled households. The modeling with NHTS bike data proved to be more challenging and time consuming than what was anticipated. Along with the late arrival of Nielsen employment data, the project team had to limit the modeling effort to focus on walking. Therefore, the final modeling and discriminant analysis was conducted only for walking trips.

  12. Spin Wave Genie

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce themore » time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.« less

  13. Secretary Chu Travels to Memphis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Travels to Memphis Secretary Chu Travels to Memphis January 31, 2011 - 2:33pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? The Sharp solar manufacturing plant has produced more than 2 million solar panels since 2002, increased its staff from 300 to 480 employees over the last year, and produces enough solar paneling to power more than 140,000 homes. Worldwide, FedEx Express is operating 329 hybrid and 19

  14. Secretary Chu to Travel to Houston Today | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Travel to Houston Today Secretary Chu to Travel to Houston Today July 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - At the direction of President Obama, as part of the Administration's ongoing oil spill response efforts U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu is making his fifth trip to Houston today to continue to help identify strategies for containing the oil and ultimately killing the well. Secretary Chu and his scientific team are coordinating their work with National Incident Commander Admiral

  15. Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles When a household has more than one vehicle, the secondary vehicles travel fewer miles than the primary vehicle. In a two-vehicle household, the second vehicle travels less than half of the miles that the primary vehicle travels in a day. In a six-vehicle household, the sixth vehicle travels fewer than five miles a day. Daily Vehicle

  16. NNSA Administrator D'Agostino's Safeguards Conference Travel Blog |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration D'Agostino's Safeguards Conference Travel Blog | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters

  17. Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (Glen Allen, VA)

    1992-01-01

    A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

  18. Effects of reagent rotational excitation on the H + CHD{sub 3} → H{sub 2} + CD{sub 3} reaction: A seven dimensional time-dependent wave packet study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-10-14

    Seven-dimensional time-dependent wave packet calculations have been carried out for the title reaction to obtain reaction probabilities and cross sections for CHD{sub 3} in J{sub 0} = 1, 2 rotationally excited initial states with k{sub 0} = 0 − J{sub 0} (the projection of CHD{sub 3} rotational angular momentum on its C{sub 3} axis). Under the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation, the initial states with the projection of the total angular momentum on the body fixed axis (K{sub 0}) equal to k{sub 0} are found to be much more reactive, indicating strong dependence of reactivity on the orientation of the reagent CHD{sub 3} with respect to the relative velocity between the reagents H and CHD{sub 3}. However, at the coupled-channel (CC) level this dependence becomes much weak although in general the K{sub 0} specified cross sections for the K{sub 0} = k{sub 0} initial states remain primary to the overall cross sections, implying the Coriolis coupling is important to the dynamics of the reaction. The calculated CS and CC integral cross sections obtained after K{sub 0} averaging for the J{sub 0} = 1, 2 initial states with all different k{sub 0} are essentially identical to the corresponding CS and CC results for the J{sub 0} = 0 initial state, meaning that the initial rotational excitation of CHD{sub 3} up to J{sub 0} = 2, regardless of its initial k{sub 0}, does not have any effect on the total cross sections for the title reaction, and the errors introduced by the CS approximation on integral cross sections for the rotationally excited J{sub 0} = 1, 2 initial states are the same as those for the J{sub 0} = 0 initial state.

  19. Energy Extraction from a Slider-Crank Wave Energy under Irregular Wave Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sang, Yuanrui; Karayaka, H. Bora; Yan, Yanjun; Zhang, James Z.; Muljadi, Eduard; Yu, Yi-Hsiang

    2015-08-24

    A slider-crank wave energy converter (WEC) is a novel energy conversion device. It converts wave energy into electricity at a relatively high efficiency, and it features a simple structure. Past analysis on this particular WEC has been done under regular sinusoidal wave conditions, and suboptimal energy could be achieved. This paper presents the analysis of the system under irregular wave conditions; a time-domain hydrodynamics model is adopted and a rule-based control methodology is introduced to better serve the irregular wave conditions. Results from the simulations show that the performance of the system under irregular wave conditions is different from that under regular sinusoidal wave conditions, but a reasonable amount of energy can still be extracted.

  20. Pulse Wave Well Development Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, S.

    2001-02-23

    Conventional methods of well development at the Savannah River Site generate significant volumes of investigative derived waste (IDW) which must be treated and disposed of at a regulated Treatment, Storage, or Disposal (TSD) facility. Pulse Wave technology is a commercial method of well development utilizing bursts of high pressure gas to create strong pressure waves through the well screen zone, extending out into the formation surrounding the well. The patented process is intended to reduce well development time and the amount of IDW generated as well as to micro-fracture the formation to improve well capacity.

  1. Evidence for wave heating of the quiet-sun corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2014-11-10

    We have measured the energy and dissipation of Alfvnic waves in the quiet Sun. A magnetic field model was used to infer the location and orientation of the magnetic field lines along which the waves are expected to travel. The waves were measured using spectral lines to infer the wave amplitude. The waves cause a non-thermal broadening of the spectral lines, which can be expressed as a non-thermal velocity v {sub nt}. By combining the spectroscopic measurements with this magnetic field model, we were able to trace the variation of v {sub nt} along the magnetic field. At each footpoint of the quiet-Sun loops, we find that waves inject an energy flux in the range of 1.3-5.5 10{sup 5} erg cm{sup 2} s{sup 1}. At the minimum of this range, this amounts to more than 80% of the energy needed to heat the quiet Sun. We also find that these waves are dissipated over a region centered on the top of the loops. The position along the loop where the damping begins is strongly correlated with the length of the loop, implying that the damping mechanism depends on the global loop properties rather than on local collisional dissipation.

  2. Will We Drive Less? A White Paper on U.S. Light Duty Travel ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vehicle travel in the U.S. and other developed nations, with VMT likely stagnating or dropping in the future. This report examines a variety of issues surrounding light-duty travel...

  3. Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 File fotw903web.xlsx More Documents ...

  4. ORISE: CDC Travelers' Health Mobile App, Designed by ORISE, Gains Attention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Multiple Websites Can I Eat This? Mobile App Helps International Travelers Make Safe Dining Choices CDC Travelers' Health app, designed by ORISE, gains attention on multiple websites How ORISE is Making a Difference The Can I Eat This? mobile app, which ORISE staff helped develop for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has been receiving positive feedback from food and travel experts. The app, recently released by the CDC's Travelers' Health Branch, earned a positive

  5. Fact# 904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Both Increased during 2015 | Department of Energy 4: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 Fact# 904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The nation's highway vehicle miles of travel (VMT) and the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) reflect strikingly similar patterns, indicating the strong relationship between the nation's economy and its travel. Beginning in

  6. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  7. NEW - DOE O 551.1D Chg 1 (PgChg), Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The requirement to surrender official passports is considered burdensome to travelers and will be removed as a requirement and replaced with a process that requires travelers be responsible for safeguarding their own official passports. In conjunction with this revision, administrative changes will be made to update the title of the Office of Travel Management.

  8. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.10.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10? nT, using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  9. Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power in Hawaii Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power in Hawaii July 29, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis...

  10. Traveling Electrons in Loosely Bound Layers | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Traveling Electrons in Loosely Bound Layers September 24, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) was recently discovered in WTe2, triggering extensive research on this material regarding the XMR origin. Since WTe2 is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, this material has been considered to be electronically two-dimensional. Here a team of users from Argonne's Materials Science Division and Northern Illinois

  11. Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear scar Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's nuclear scar Researchers have devised a method to use cosmic rays to gather detailed information from inside the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors. October 17, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory Muon Radiography team members stand in front of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex during a visit to determine evaluate whether Los Alamos' Scattering

  12. Watching Spins Travel across Borders | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Watching Spins Travel across Borders Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Spintronics is a field that keeps both scientists and engineers excited from a fundamental physics and applications perspective. But what is "spintronics" exactly? In order to understand this new field of magnetism research, it is necessary to take a step back and revisit conventional electronics. For almost a century, electronic devices - starting with the early vacuum tubes - have used the charge of

  13. Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Description 2 History 3 Technology 4 Current and Possible Wave Farms 5 Pros and Cons Description Wave energy (or wave power) is...

  14. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

  15. Propagating spectroscopy of backward volume spin waves in a metallic FeNi film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, N.; Ishida, N.; Kawakami, T.; Sekiguchi, K.

    2014-01-20

    We report a propagating spin wave spectroscopy for a magnetostatic backward volume spin wave in a metallic Fe{sub 19}Ni{sub 81} film. We show that the mutual-inductance between two independent antennas detects a small but clear propagation signal of backward volume spin waves. All experimental data are consistent with the time-domain propagating spin-wave spectroscopy. The control of propagating backward spin wave enables to realize the miniaturize spin-wave circuit.

  16. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shin, Yong W. (Western Springs, IL); Wiedermann, Arne H. (Chicago Heights, IL); Ockert, Carl E. (Vienna, VA)

    1985-01-01

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  17. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  18. INTERFERENCE FRINGES OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES AROUND SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao Hui; Yang, Ming-Hsu; Liang, Zhi-Chao

    2012-10-20

    Solar acoustic waves are scattered by a sunspot due to the interaction between the acoustic waves and the sunspot. The sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave. The scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave around the sunspot. The interference fringes between the scattered wave and the incident wave are visible in the intensity of the total wave because the coherent time of the incident wave is of the order of a wave period. The strength of the interference fringes anti-correlates with the width of temporal spectra of the incident wave. The separation between neighboring fringes increases with the incident wavelength and the sunspot size. The strength of the fringes increases with the radial order n of the incident wave from n = 0 to n = 2, and then decreases from n = 2 to n = 5. The interference fringes play a role analogous to holograms in optics. This study suggests the feasibility of using the interference fringes to reconstruct the scattered wavefields of the sunspot, although the quality of the reconstructed wavefields is sensitive to the noise and errors in the interference fringes.

  19. 10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services Yes Past Pertinent...

  20. Travel determinants and multi-scale transferability of national activity patterns to local populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, Kriste M; Gou; ias, Konstadinos G

    2010-11-30

    The ability to transfer national travel patterns to a local population is of interest when attempting to model megaregions or areas that exceed metropolitan planning organization (MPO) boundaries. At the core of this research are questions about the connection between travel behavior and land use, urban form, and accessibility. As a part of this process, a group of land use variables have been identified to define activity and travel patterns for individuals and households. The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) participants are divided into categories comprised of a set of latent cluster models representing persons, travel, and land use. These are compared to two sets of cluster models constructed for two local travel surveys. Comparison of means statistical tests are used to assess differences among sociodemographic groups residing in localities with similar land uses. The results show that the NHTS and the local surveys share mean population activity and travel characteristics. However, these similarities mask behavioral heterogeneity that are shown when distributions of activity and travel behavior are examined. Therefore, data from a national household travel survey cannot be used to model local population travel characteristics if the goal to model the actual distributions and not mean travel behavior characteristics.

  1. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  2. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore » intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  3. Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekhiche, Mike; Downie, Bruce

    2013-10-21

    Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large‐scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy� to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high‐voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon‐based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take‐off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take‐off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

  4. WindWaveFloat Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alla Weinstein, Dominique Roddier, Kevin Banister

    2012-03-30

    Principle Power Inc. and National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) have completed a contract to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating wave energy converters into the WindFloat, resulting in a new concept called the WindWaveFloat (WWF). The concentration of several devices on one platform could offer a potential for both economic and operational advantages. Wind and wave energy converters can share the electrical cable and power transfer equipment to transport the electricity to shore. Access to multiple generation devices could be simplified, resulting in cost saving at the operational level. Overall capital costs may also be reduced, provided that the design of the foundation can be adapted to multiple devices with minimum modifications. Finally, the WindWaveFloat confers the ability to increase energy production from individual floating support structures, potentially leading to a reduction in levelized energy costs, an increase in the overall capacity factor, and greater stability of the electrical power delivered to the grid. The research conducted under this grant investigated the integration of several wave energy device types into the WindFloat platform. Several of the resulting system designs demonstrated technical feasibility, but the size and design constraints of the wave energy converters (technical and economic) make the WindWaveFloat concept economically unfeasible at this time. Not enough additional generation could be produced to make the additional expense associated with wave energy conversion integration into the WindFloat worthwhile.

  5. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 24 min and gravity waves with periods of 616 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of MayJuly 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  6. Secretary Bodman Travels to the Middle East | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Middle East Secretary Bodman Travels to the Middle East November 10, 2005 - 2:22pm Addthis Four-nation swing to emphasize domestic energy needs and goals WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman embarked upon a four-nation tour through the Middle East to enhance the United States' relationship with major oil-producing nations, promote economic liberalization and increased foreign investment in the region, and reaffirm U.S. energy policy goals. "Both consumers and producers

  7. Laser- and Radar-based Mission Concepts for Suborbital and Spaceborne Monitoring of Seismic Surface Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxall, W; Schultz, C A; Tralli, D M

    2004-09-21

    The development of a suborbital or spaceborne system to monitor seismic waves poses an intriguing prospect for advancing the state of seismology. This capability would enable an unprecedented global mapping of the velocity structure of the earth's crust, understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics and wave propagation effects, and event source location, characterization and discrimination that are critical for both fundamental earthquake research and nuclear non-proliferation applications. As part of an ongoing collaboration between LLNL and JPL, an advanced mission concept study assessed architectural considerations and operational and data delivery requirements, extending two prior studies by each organization--a radar-based satellite system (JPL) for earthquake hazard assessment and a feasibility study of space- or UAV-based laser seismometer systems (LLNL) for seismic event monitoring. Seismic wave measurement requirements include lower bounds on detectability of specific seismic sources of interest and wave amplitude accuracy for different levels of analysis, such as source characterization, discrimination and tomography, with a 100 {micro}m wave amplitude resolution for waves nominally traveling 5 km/s, an upper frequency bound based on explosion and earthquake surface displacement spectra, and minimum horizontal resolution (1-5 km) and areal coverage, in general and for targeted observations. For a radar system, corresponding engineering and operational factors include: Radar frequency (dictated by required wave amplitude measurement accuracy and maximizing ranging, Doppler or interferometric sensitivity), time sampling (maximum seismic wave frequency and velocity), and overall system considerations such as mass, power and data rate. Technical challenges include characterization of, and compensation for, phase distortion resulting from atmospheric and ionospheric perturbations and turbulence, and effects of ground scattering characteristics and seismic ground motion on phase coherence over interferometric time intervals. Since the temporal sampling requirement may be finer than that possible for a high-altitude sensor to traverse a synthetic aperture length, a geostationary, real-aperture Ka-band system or constellation for equatorial and moderate-latitude global coverage is one option considered. The short wavelength would maximize interferometric sensitivity to small surface displacements and minimize required antenna area. Engineering issues include the design and deployment of a large ({approx} 100m) fixed aperture antenna; and fast electronic beam steering (entire aperture within nominal 1 s interferometric interval) with high-efficiency integrated transmit/receive modules. For a suborbital system, platform instability is an issue whereas at high earth orbit signal-to-noise and attendant power requirements dominate. Data delivery requirements include large-volume data storage and transmission; development of real-time, on-board event detection and processing algorithms, and data management structures for these very large data sets. A far-term roadmap would comprise a proof-of-concept demonstration using a laser or radar system mounted on a stratospheric balloon or UAV to image seismic wavefields from planned events (e.g. large mine blasts and/or purpose-designed explosions) and earthquake targets of opportunity. The technological challenges to developing any such seismic monitoring system, whether laser- or radar-based, are at this stage enormous. However, these concept studies suggest the long-term feasibility of such a system and drive the development of enabling technologies while fostering collaboration on meeting scientific and operational challenges of agencies such as NASA, DOE and DoD.

  8. WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter - SIMulator)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-11-26

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) is a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model wave energy converters (WECs) when they are subject to operational waves. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/Simulink using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. In WEC-Sim, WECs are modeled by connecting rigid bodies to one another with joint or constraint blocks from the WEC-Sim library. WEC-Sim is a publicly available, open-sourcemore » code to model WECs.« less

  9. WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter - SIMulator)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-26

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) is a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model wave energy converters (WECs) when they are subject to operational waves. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/Simulink using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. In WEC-Sim, WECs are modeled by connecting rigid bodies to one another with joint or constraint blocks from the WEC-Sim library. WEC-Sim is a publicly available, open-source code to model WECs.

  10. Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

  11. A technical review of urban land use - transportation models as tools for evaluating vehicle travel reduction strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, F.

    1995-07-01

    The continued growth of highway traffic in the United States has led to unwanted urban traffic congestion as well as to noticeable urban air quality problems. These problems include emissions covered by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA), as well as carbon dioxide and related {open_quotes}greenhouse gas{close_quotes} emissions. Urban travel also creates a major demand for imported oil. Therefore, for economic as well as environmental reasons, transportation planning agencies at both the state and metropolitan area level are focussing a good deal of attention on urban travel reduction policies. Much discussed policy instruments include those that encourage fewer trip starts, shorter trip distances, shifts to higher-occupancy vehicles or to nonvehicular modes, and shifts in the timing of trips from the more to the less congested periods of the day or week. Some analysts have concluded that in order to bring about sustainable reductions in urban traffic volumes, significant changes will be necessary in the way our households and businesses engage in daily travel. Such changes are likely to involve changes in the ways we organize and use traffic-generating and-attracting land within our urban areas. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the ability of current analytic methods and models to support both the evaluation and possibly the design of such vehicle travel reduction strategies, including those strategies involving the reorganization and use of urban land. The review is organized into three sections. Section 1 describes the nature of the problem we are trying to model, Section 2 reviews the state of the art in operational urban land use-transportation simulation models, and Section 3 provides a critical assessment of such models as useful urban transportation planning tools. A number of areas are identified where further model development or testing is required.

  12. Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dataset | Department of Energy 3: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 - Dataset Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 File fotw#903_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications 2015 GTO Peer Review U.S. LNG Imports and Exports (2004-2012) 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Main Report)

  13. Secretary Chu To Travel to Scotland and Ireland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To Travel to Scotland and Ireland Secretary Chu To Travel to Scotland and Ireland November 1, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - This week, Secretary Chu will travel to Scotland and Ireland where he will meet with government and academic leaders, as well as American and Irish business leaders who are engaged in clean energy industries. Both Scotland and Ireland share similar energy challenges and resources with the United States, including significant offshore wind energy potential. These

  14. Energy Secretary Bodman Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Energy and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Security | Department of Energy Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Energy and Nuclear Security Energy Secretary Bodman Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Energy and Nuclear Security May 20, 2005 - 12:49pm Addthis Trip Will Focus on World Energy Security, Energy Resource Development, and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, DC -- Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman next week will travel to Moscow, Russia; Baku, Azerbaijan; and Kiev, Ukraine, where he will hold discussions

  15. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Price of Gasoline - Dataset | Department of Energy 60 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline File fotw#860_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications Fact #906: January 4, 2016 VMT and the Price of Gasoline Typically Move in Opposition -

  16. TEE-0068 - In the Matter of Bowlin Travel Centers, Inc. | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 8 - In the Matter of Bowlin Travel Centers, Inc. TEE-0068 - In the Matter of Bowlin Travel Centers, Inc. Bowlin Travel Centers, Inc., filed an Application for Exception with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). The firm requests permanent relief from its requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." As explained below, we

  17. Fact #552: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region Fact #552: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region Total vehicle miles of travel (VMT) in the U.S. have declined from 2007 to 2008. The latest data available, September 2008, shows a 4.4% decline in travel that varies by region. Comparing September 2007 to September 2008, the South Atlantic and South Gulf regions experienced VMT declines of more than 5%. Total U.S. cumulative VMT for 2008 (January-September) is 3.5%

  18. Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle travel in the U.S. varies by month. There are many reasons for this, including the fact that some months are shorter than others. The vehicle miles of travel (VMT) recorded in February is always the lowest of the year. February 2010 was the lowest in this data series, which is likely weather-related (snowstorms in the Northeast).

  19. Fact #670: April 11, 2011 Vehicle-Miles of Travel Rises in 2010 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0: April 11, 2011 Vehicle-Miles of Travel Rises in 2010 Fact #670: April 11, 2011 Vehicle-Miles of Travel Rises in 2010 The preliminary estimates from the Federal Highway Administration show that vehicle-miles of travel (VMT) increased slightly in 2010 over the previous year, but have not surpassed the peak of 3.03 trillion miles in 2007. Total U.S. VMT declined during the economic downturns in the mid-70's, early 80's, and in 2008. Total Vehicle-Miles of Travel,

  20. Fact #842: October 13, 2014 Vehicles and Vehicle Travel Trends have Changed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Since 2008 | Department of Energy 2: October 13, 2014 Vehicles and Vehicle Travel Trends have Changed Since 2008 Fact #842: October 13, 2014 Vehicles and Vehicle Travel Trends have Changed Since 2008 As the U.S. population has doubled from 1950 to 2012, the number of vehicles has grown nearly 6-fold and vehicle travel even more than that. The number of vehicles and vehicle travel peaked in 2007 and 2008, respectively, and remained at similar levels in 2012. The growth in licensed drivers has

  1. Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State | Department of Energy 2: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week In the United States, the U.S. Department of Transportation classifies 3.9 million miles of roadway as rural and 1.2 million miles of roadway as urban. Each state has a different travel pattern affecting the proportion of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) on rural versus urban roads.

  2. Methods for use in detecting seismic waves in a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.; Fincke, James R.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-02-20

    The invention provides methods and apparatus for detecting seismic waves propagating through a subterranean formation surrounding a borehole. In a first embodiment, a sensor module uses the rotation of bogey wheels to extend and retract a sensor package for selective contact and magnetic coupling to casing lining the borehole. In a second embodiment, a sensor module is magnetically coupled to the casing wall during its travel and dragged therealong while maintaining contact therewith. In a third embodiment, a sensor module is interfaced with the borehole environment to detect seismic waves using coupling through liquid in the borehole. Two or more of the above embodiments may be combined within a single sensor array to provide a resulting seismic survey combining the optimum of the outputs of each embodiment into a single data set.

  3. Nonlinear waves and coherent structures in the quantum single-wave model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzenov, Stephan I. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Marinov, Kiril B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Starting from the von Neumann-Maxwell equations for the Wigner quasi-probability distribution and for the self-consistent electric field, the quantum analog of the classical single-wave model has been derived. The linear stability of the quantum single-wave model has been studied, and periodic in time patterns have been found both analytically and numerically. In addition, some features of quantum chaos have been detected in the unstable region in parameter space. Further, a class of standing-wave solutions of the quantum single-wave model has also been found, which have been observed to behave as stable solitary-wave structures. The analytical results have been finally compared to the exact system dynamics obtained by solving the corresponding equations in Schrodinger representation numerically.

  4. A simple line wave generator using commercial explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, John S; Jackson, Scott I; Hill, Larry G

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple and inexpensive explosive line wave generator has been designed using commercial sheet explosive and plane wave lens concepts. The line wave generator is constructed using PETN and RDX based sheet explosive for the slow and fast components respectively. The design permits the creation of any desired line width. A series of experiments were performed on a 100 mm design, measuring the detonation arrival time at the output of the generator using a streak camera. An iterative technique was used to adjust the line wave generator's slow and fast components, so as to minimize the arrival time deviation. Designs, test results, and concepts for improvements will be discussed.

  5. Fast wave evanescence in filamentary boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Radio frequency waves for heating and current drive of plasmas in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices must first traverse the scrape-off-layer (SOL) before they can be put to their intended use. The SOL plasma is strongly turbulent and intermittent in space and time. These turbulent properties of the SOL, which are not routinely taken into account in wave propagation codes, can have an important effect on the coupling of waves through an evanescent SOL or edge plasma region. The effective scale length for fast wave (FW) evanescence in the presence of short-scale field-aligned filamentary plasma turbulence is addressed in this paper. It is shown that although the FW wavelength or evanescent scale length is long compared with the dimensions of the turbulence, the FW does not simply average over the turbulent density; rather, the average is over the exponentiation rate. Implications for practical situations are discussed.

  6. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wavemore » disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.« less

  7. Nonlinear oscillations and waves in an arbitrary mass ratio cold plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Prabal Singh

    2011-12-15

    It is well known that nonlinear standing oscillations in an arbitrary mass ratio cold plasma always phase mix away. However, there exist nonlinear electron-ion traveling wave solutions, which do not exhibit phase mixing because they have zero ponderomotive force. The existence of these waves has been demonstrated using a perturbation method. Moreover, it is shown that cold plasma BGK waves [Albritton et al., Nucl. Fusion 15, 1199 (1975)] phase mix away if ions are allowed to move and the scaling of phase mixing is found to be different from earlier work [Sengupta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1867 (1999)]. Phase mixing of these waves has been further verified in 1-D particle in cell simulation.

  8. Study of lower hybrid wave propagation in ionized gas by Hamiltonian theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casolari, A.; Cardinali, A.

    2014-02-12

    In order to find an approximate solution to the Vlasov-Maxwell equation system describing the lower hybrid wave propagation in magnetic confined plasmas, the use of the WKB method leads to the ray tracing equations. The Hamiltonian character of the ray tracing equations is investigated analytically and numerically in order to deduce the physical properties of the wave propagating without absorption in the confined plasma. The consequences of the Hamiltonian character of the equations on the travelling wave, in particular, on the evolution of the parallel wavenumber along the propagation path have been accounted and the chaotic diffusion of the timeaveraged parallel wave-number towards higher values has been evaluated. Numerical analysis by means of a Runge-Kutta based algorithm implemented in a ray tracing code supplies the analytical considerations. A numerical tool based on the symplectic integration of the ray trajectories has been developed.

  9. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  10. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  11. Wave Propagation Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  12. The various manifestations of collisionless dissipation in wave propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent

    2012-06-15

    The propagation of an electrostatic wave packet inside a collisionless and initially Maxwellian plasma is always dissipative because of the irreversible acceleration of the electrons by the wave. Then, in the linear regime, the wave packet is Landau damped, so that in the reference frame moving at the group velocity, the wave amplitude decays exponentially with time. In the nonlinear regime, once phase mixing has occurred and when the electron motion is nearly adiabatic, the damping rate is strongly reduced compared to the Landau one, so that the wave amplitude remains nearly constant along the characteristics. Yet, we show here that the electrons are still globally accelerated by the wave packet, and in one dimension, this leads to a non local amplitude dependence of the group velocity. As a result, a freely propagating wave packet would shrink, and therefore, so would its total energy. In more than one dimension, not only does the magnitude of the group velocity nonlinearly vary, but also its direction. In the weakly nonlinear regime, when the collisionless damping rate is still significant compared to its linear value, the group velocity is directed towards the outside of the wave packet and tends to increase its transverse extent, while the opposite is true once the wave is essentially undamped. The impact of the nonlinear variation of the group velocity on the transverse size of the wave packet is quantified, and compared to that induced by the self-focussing due to wave front bowing.

  13. Decay of helical Kelvin waves on a quantum vortex filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-07-15

    We study the dynamics of helical Kelvin waves moving along a quantum vortex filament driven by a normal fluid flow. We employ the vector form of the quantum local induction approximation (LIA) due to Schwarz. For an isolated filament, this is an adequate approximation to the full Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov dynamics. The motion of such Kelvin waves is both translational (along the quantum vortex filament) and rotational (in the plane orthogonal to the reference axis). We first present an exact closed form solution for the motion of these Kelvin waves in the case of a constant amplitude helix. Such solutions exist for a critical wave number and correspond exactly to the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, so perturbations of such solutions either decay to line filaments or blow-up. This leads us to consider helical Kelvin waves which decay to line filaments. Unlike in the case of constant amplitude helical solutions, the dynamics are much more complicated for the decaying helical waves, owing to the fact that the rate of decay of the helical perturbations along the vortex filament is not constant in time. We give an analytical and numerical description of the motion of decaying helical Kelvin waves, from which we are able to ascertain the influence of the physical parameters on the decay, translational motion along the filament, and rotational motion, of these waves (all of which depend nonlinearly on time). One interesting finding is that the helical Kelvin waves do not decay uniformly. Rather, such waves decay slowly for small time scales, and more rapidly for large time scales. The rotational and translational velocity of the Kelvin waves depend strongly on this rate of decay, and we find that the speed of propagation of a helical Kelvin wave along a quantum filament is large for small time while the wave asymptotically slows as it decays. The rotational velocity of such Kelvin waves along the filament will increase over time, asymptotically reaching a finite value. These decaying Kelvin waves correspond to wave number below the critical value for the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, and hence our results on the Schwarz quantum LIA correspond exactly to what one would expect from prior work on the Donnelly-Glaberson instability.

  14. PROPAGATION OF ALFVENIC WAVES FROM CORONA TO CHROMOSPHERE AND CONSEQUENCES FOR SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Fletcher, L.

    2013-03-10

    How do magnetohydrodynamic waves travel from the fully ionized corona, into and through the underlying partially ionized chromosphere, and what are the consequences for solar flares? To address these questions, we have developed a two-fluid model (of plasma and neutrals) and used it to perform one-dimensional simulations of Alfven waves in a solar atmosphere with realistic density and temperature structure. Studies of a range of solar features (faculae, plage, penumbra, and umbra) show that energy transmission from corona to chromosphere can exceed 20% of incident energy for wave periods of 1 s or less. Damping of waves in the chromosphere depends strongly on wave frequency: waves with periods 10 s or longer pass through the chromosphere with relatively little damping, however, for periods of 1 s or less, a substantial fraction (37%-100%) of wave energy entering the chromosphere is damped by ion-neutral friction in the mid- and upper chromosphere, with electron resistivity playing some role in the lower chromosphere and in umbras. We therefore conclude that Alfvenic waves with periods of a few seconds or less are capable of heating the chromosphere during solar flares, and speculate that they could also contribute to electron acceleration or exciting sunquakes.

  15. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

  16. Detonation waves in pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, C.M.; Breithaupt, R.D.; Kury, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    Fabry{endash}Perot laser interferometry was used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of tantalum discs accelerated by detonating pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) charges and of the interfaces between PETN detonation products and lithium fluoride crystals. The experimental records were compared to particle velocity histories calculated using very finely zoned meshes of the exact dimensions with the DYNA2D hydrodynamic code. The duration of the PETN detonation reaction zone was demonstrated to be less than the 5 ns initial resolution of the Fabry{endash}Perot technique, because the experimental records were accurately calculated using an instantaneous chemical reaction, the Chapman{endash}Jouguet (C-J) model of detonation, and the reaction product Jones{endash}Wilkins{endash}Lee (JWL) equation of state for PETN detonation products previously determined by supracompression (overdriven detonation) studies. Some of the PETN charges were pressed to densities approaching the crystal density and exhibited the phenomenon of superdetonation. An ignition and growth Zeldovich{endash}von Neumann{endash}Doring (ZND) reactive flow model was developed to explain these experimental records and the results of previous PETN shock initiation experiments on single crystals of PETN. Good agreement was obtained for the induction time delays preceding chemical reaction, the run distances at which the initial shock waves were overtaken by the detonation waves in the compressed PETN, and the measured particle velocity histories produced by the overdriven detonation waves before they could relax to steady state C-J velocity and pressure. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Request for Travel Funds for Systems Radiation Biology Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2014-03-22

    The 3rd International Systems Radiation Biology Workshop brought together the major European, US and Japanese research programs on radiation risk as well as selected experts representing systems biological approaches to discuss how the new methodologies could be best exploited for low dose research. A significant part of the workshop was devoted to discussions organised as breakout group sessions. To facilitate discussions number of participants was limited to 60 persons. To achieve the goals of this symposium in this international conference, support from DOE is vital. Hence, this proposal requested support in the amount of $15,000 to cover the travel expenses of international experts and radiation biology scientists from the United States. This supporting mechanism was clearly identified to the selected US participants as a conference support award from the DOE (See attached PDF). The workshop was an outstanding opportunity to strengthen interactions between leading experts in the emerging areas of radiation sciences, and will also provide opportunities for younger scientists to meet with experts and discuss their results. This workshop was designed to endorse active engagement in international collaboration. A major objective of this conference was to effectively communicate research results, in order to ensure that current thinking reflects sound science of radiation biology. Further, this international event addressed the use and success of scientific initiatives in radiation biology for policymakers, standard-setters, and the general public.

  18. Nonlinear Trivelpiece--Gould waves: Recurrence, harmonic cascade, and sidebands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, J.A.C.; Lapao, L.M.; Mendonca, J.T. )

    1993-03-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of Trivelpiece--Gould waves propagating in a magnetized plasma column is presented in this paper. In the experiments, these waves are excited by a radio frequency (rf) source, which also serves to create the plasma. Observation of nonlinear effects includes space and time recurrence effects, a wave spectrum containing a large number (up to 25) harmonics, and low-frequency sidebands. The theoretical model explains the recurrence effects as a consequence of multiple nonlinear interactions between the fundamental wave and its harmonics. A good agreement is found between theory and the experiments.

  19. Collaborative Research: Dynamics of Electrostatic Solitary Waves on Current Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Jolene S.

    2012-10-31

    The research carried out under the subject grant has provided insight into the generation of Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs), which are nonlinear structures observed in space plasma data. These ESWs, appearing as pulses in the electric field time series data, represent the presence of several hundred meters to kilometer size positive potential structures, similar to champagne bubbles, where the electrons have been depleted, and which travel along Earth's magnetic field lines. The laboratory experiments carried out at the UCLA LAPD under the grant allowed us the opportunity to change various plasma and field conditions within the plasma device, and experiment with injection of suprathermal electron beams, in order to create ESWs. This then allowed us to determine the most likely method of generation of the ESWs. By comparing the properties of the ESWs observed in the LAPD to those observed in space and the plasma and field conditions under which those ESWs were observed in both locations, we were able to evaluate various ESW generation mechanisms. The findings of the laboratory experiments are that ESWs are generated through a lower hybrid instability. The ESWs observed in Earth's auroral current regions have similar characteristics to those generated by the laboratory when referenced to basic plasma and field characteristics, leading us to the conclusion that the lower hybrid drift instability is certainly a possibility for generation of the ESWs, at least in the auroral (northern/southern lights) regions. Due to space instrumentation insufficiencies and the limitations on telemetry, and thus poor time resolution, it is not possible to determine absolutely what generates these bubbles in space, but the laboratory experiments and supporting simulations have helped us to further our understanding of the processes under which they are generated. The public benefits from the findings of this research because the research is focused on current layers around Earth, which are affected by our Sun's activity. Understanding how these current layers are affected by the Sun provides insight into why radio communications are sometimes affected on Earth and how these layers help protect and facilitate our life on Earth.

  20. Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Asit E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-15

    The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index ? on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

  1. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  2. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  3. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  4. Notice of Intent to Develop a Page Change to DOE O 551.1D, Official Foreign Travel

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-05-21

    The requirement to surrender official passports is considered burdensome to travelers and will be removed as a requirement and replaced with a process that requires travelers be responsible for safeguarding their own official passports. In conjunction with this revision, administrative changes will be made to update the title of the Office of Travel Management.

  5. Travel Patterns and Characteristics of Elderly Subpopulation in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling; Wilson, Daniel W.; Reuscher, Tim; Yang, Jianjiang; Taylor, Rob D.; Chin, Shih-Miao

    2015-03-01

    With the increasing demographic shift towards a larger population of elderly (individuals 65 years and older), it is essential for policy makers and planners to have an understanding of transportation issues that affect the elderly. These issues include livability of the community, factors impacting travel behavior and mobility, transportation safety, etc. In this study, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was tasked by the New York State (NYS) Department of Transportation to conduct a detailed examination of travel behaviors, and identify patterns and trends of the elderly within NYS. The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) was used as the primary data source to analyze subjects and address questions such as: Are there differences in traveler demographics between the elderly population and those of younger age groups who live in various NYS regions; e.g., New York City, other urban areas of NYS, or other parts of the country? How do they compare with the population at large? Are there any regional differences (e.g., urban versus rural)? Gender differences? Do any unique travel characteristics or patterns exist within the elderly group? In addition to analysis of NHTS data, roadway travel safety concerns associated with elderly travelers were also investigated in this study. Specifically, data on accidents involving the elderly (including drivers, passengers, and others) as captured in the Fatal Analysis Reporting System (FARS) database was analyzed to examine elderly driver and elderly pedestrian travel safety issues in NYS. The analyses of these data sets provide a greater understanding of the elderly within NYS and their associated transportation issues. Through this study, various key findings on elderly population size, household characteristics, and travel patterns were produced and are report herein this report.

  6. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  7. Formation mechanism of steep wave front in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, M. Kasuya, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kobayashi, T.; Arakawa, H.; Itoh, K.; Fukunaga, K.; Yamada, T.; Yagi, M.

    2015-03-15

    Bifurcation from a streamer to a solitary drift wave is obtained in three dimensional simulation of resistive drift waves in cylindrical plasmas. The solitary drift wave is observed in the regime where the collisional transport is important as well as fluctuation induced transport. The solitary drift wave forms a steep wave front in the azimuthal direction. The phase of higher harmonic modes are locked to that of the fundamental mode, so that the steep wave front is sustained for a long time compared to the typical time scale of the drift wave oscillation. The phase entrainment between the fundamental and second harmonic modes is studied, and the azimuthal structure of the stationary solution is found to be characterized by a parameter which is determined by the deviation of the fluctuations from the Boltzmann relation. There are two solutions of the azimuthal structures, which have steep wave front facing forward and backward in the wave propagation direction, respectively. The selection criterion of these solutions is derived theoretically from the stability of the phase entrainment. The simulation result and experimental observations are found to be consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  8. Secretaries Chu and Locke to Travel to China Next Week | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Locke to Travel to China Next Week Secretaries Chu and Locke to Travel to China Next Week July 6, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Commerce Secretary Gary Locke will travel to China from July 14 to 17. The two secretaries will highlight the tremendous potential for mutually beneficial relationships in the clean energy sector. "Clean energy will drive the economy of the future, both in the United States and around the world," Chu said.

  9. Secretary Chu To Travel to China and Japan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To Travel to China and Japan Secretary Chu To Travel to China and Japan November 5, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. -U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel to China and Japan November 14 - 19 to meet with government officials, business leaders and others to discuss the Department's ongoing clean energy and scientific collaboration with both countries. More information about the trip is as follows: Shanghai, China On Sunday, November 14, Secretary Chu will tour clean energy

  10. Secretary Chu will Travel to China to Highlight Clean Energy Partnerships |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy will Travel to China to Highlight Clean Energy Partnerships Secretary Chu will Travel to China to Highlight Clean Energy Partnerships April 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel to China from May 24th to 28th to highlight the benefit of U.S.-China partnerships and cooperation in the clean energy sector. He will visit with government officials, academia and members of the private sector in both Beijing and Shanghai to learn

  11. DOE Premium Class Travel Reports for FY 09 and FY 13

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    #1 Travel Mode 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Fiscal Year 2009 FIRST CLASS TRAVEL REPORT Type name of reporting agency here. Point of Contact : Phone Number: Fax Number: Email Address: ROSSANA BALLANTINE 301-903-9936 301-903-2853 Rossana Ballantine@hg.doe.gov Reporting Period : October 1, 2008 - Sept ember 30, 2009 Total Number of Records Reported: Total Cost of First Class Accomodations Reported: Total Cost of Alternative Coach-Class Accomodations Reported: Traveler Origin

  12. Fact #566: April 13, 2009 Vehicle Travel and the Price of Gasoline |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6: April 13, 2009 Vehicle Travel and the Price of Gasoline Fact #566: April 13, 2009 Vehicle Travel and the Price of Gasoline The price of gasoline is one factor that can have an effect on the number of highway vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The graph below shows a three-month moving average of the percentage change of monthly data from one year to the next (i.e., February 2001 data were compared with February 2000 data). In 2008, when gasoline prices were 20-30% higher,

  13. Fact #584: August 17, 2009 The Price of Gasoline and Vehicle Travel: How Do

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    They Relate? | Department of Energy 4: August 17, 2009 The Price of Gasoline and Vehicle Travel: How Do They Relate? Fact #584: August 17, 2009 The Price of Gasoline and Vehicle Travel: How Do They Relate? The price of gasoline is one factor that can have an effect on the number of highway vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The graph below shows a three-month moving average of the percentage change of monthly data from one year to the next (i.e., February 2001 data were compared with February

  14. Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 6: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose In 2009, getting to and from work accounted for about 27% of household vehicle-miles of travel (VMT). Work-related business was 8.4% of VMT in 2001, but declined to 6.7% in 2009, possibly due to advancements in computing technology making it possible for more business to be handled electronically. VMT for shopping was almost

  15. Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Daily vehicle miles of travel (VMT) have been higher in 2015 than in any of the last ten years. Since April 2015, VMT has averaged 8.9 billion miles per day or more - levels not reached in any month over the last ten years. The cyclical nature of VMT shows that the summer months tend to have the highest vehicle

  16. Statement on U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Travel to Istanbul,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Turkey | Department of Energy Statement on U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Travel to Istanbul, Turkey Statement on U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Travel to Istanbul, Turkey November 19, 2013 - 9:48am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 "U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz will travel to Istanbul, Turkey November 20 to 23 and give opening remarks at the 5th Atlantic Council Energy Summit. Secretary Moniz will also attend the Ministerial meeting on 'Energy

  17. U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST AND AUTHORIZATION FOR OFFICIAL TRAVEL (Change of Station)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY REQUEST AND AUTHORIZATION FOR OFFICIAL TRAVEL (Change of Station) (Do Not Remove Carbons) DOE F 1510.9 (07-93) (Previously CR-279A) (07-89 edition may be used) 1. Amendment 2. Division/Office Code 3. (Leave Blank) Authorization Number 4. Employee's Name (First name, middle initial and last name) 5. Spouse Plans To: 6. No. of Dependents Age 12 and Over Traveling with Employee (excluding spouse) 7. No. of Dependents Under 12 Traveling with Employee 8. No. of Dependents Age 12 and Over

  18. DOE Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 13 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 13 DOE Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 13 This report was provided to the FOIA office in response to several FOIA requests. PDF icon DOEPremiumClassTravelReportsFY09-FY13.pdf More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE 2015-07-15: Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Refrigerated Bottled or Canned Beverage Vending Machines, Final Rule Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle

  19. Shear wave transducer for stress measurements in boreholes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Nai-Hsien (Castro Valley, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data is used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  20. Wave Star Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Star Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Star Energy Place: Denmark Zip: DK-2920 Product: Denmark-based private wave device developer. References: Wave Star Energy1...

  1. Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin...

  2. Be aware of Zika on business, spring break travel | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be aware of Zika on business, spring break travel People traveling to tropical climates on business or for spring break vacations should take precautions to avoid contracting the zika virus, according the Centers for Disease Control. The zika virus is one of several mosquito-borne that have been on the upswing in Central and South America and the Carribean. To learn more about the zika virus, check out this information

  3. Secretary Bodman to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cooperation | Department of Energy to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International Energy Cooperation Secretary Bodman to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International Energy Cooperation January 10, 2008 - 10:23am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman next week will embark on a five-nation tour through the Middle East to enhance the United States' relationship with oil-producing nations, promote sustained investment in conventional and

  4. Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across America to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Discuss the Obama Administration's Commitment to Energy Innovation and Manufacturing | Department of Energy Travel Across America to Discuss the Obama Administration's Commitment to Energy Innovation and Manufacturing Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across America to Discuss the Obama Administration's Commitment to Energy Innovation and Manufacturing January 24, 2012 - 3:47pm Addthis Washington D.C. - This week, Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Deputy Secretary Daniel

  5. Secretary Chu to Travel to India and China to Promote Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partnerships | Department of Energy India and China to Promote Clean Energy Partnerships Secretary Chu to Travel to India and China to Promote Clean Energy Partnerships November 10, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy announced today that Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel to India and China from Thursday, November 12 to Wednesday, November 18 as part of the Department's efforts to advance opportunities for international clean energy cooperation. During the

  6. Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Across the Continental United States | Department of Energy Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States Data analysis from this study will provide insight into real-world performance of current emissions reduction devices, under various operating conditions, and with respect to greenhouse gas emissions. PDF icon p-03_carder.pdf

  7. Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and IAEA General Conference | Department of Energy Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial and IAEA General Conference Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial and IAEA General Conference A letter issued by the Department of Energy's Office of Public Affairs detailling the mission behind the U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman's trip to Vienna, Austria, to chair the second Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Ministerial on

  8. Elgen Wave | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elgen Wave Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elgen Wave Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.elgenwave.com This company is listed in the Marine and...

  9. Estimating Traveler Populations at Airport and Cruise Terminals for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochem, Warren C; Sims, Kelly M; Bright, Eddie A; Urban, Marie L; Rose, Amy N; Coleman, Phil R; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, uses of high-resolution population distribution databases are increasing steadily for environmental, socioeconomic, public health, and disaster-related research and operations. With the development of daytime population distribution, temporal resolution of such databases has been improved. However, the lack of incorporation of transitional population, namely business and leisure travelers, leaves a significant population unaccounted for within the critical infrastructure networks, such as at transportation hubs. This paper presents two general methodologies for estimating passenger populations in airport and cruise port terminals at a high temporal resolution which can be incorporated into existing population distribution models. The methodologies are geographically scalable and are based on, and demonstrate how, two different transportation hubs with disparate temporal population dynamics can be modeled utilizing publicly available databases including novel data sources of flight activity from the Internet which are updated in near-real time. The airport population estimation model shows great potential for rapid implementation for a large collection of airports on a national scale, and the results suggest reasonable accuracy in the estimated passenger traffic. By incorporating population dynamics at high temporal resolutions into population distribution models, we hope to improve the estimates of populations exposed to or at risk to disasters, thereby improving emergency planning and response, and leading to more informed policy decisions.

  10. Electromagnetic wave propagation through an overdense magnetized collisional plasma layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, C.; Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Hughes, T. P. [Voss Scientific LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The results of investigations into the feasibility of using a magnetic window to propagate electromagnetic waves through a finite-sized overdense plasma slab are described. We theoretically calculate the transmission coefficients for right- and left-handed circularly polarized plane waves through a uniform magnetized plasma slab. Using reasonable estimates for the plasma properties expected to be found in the ionized shock layer surrounding a hypersonic aircraft traveling in the earth's upper atmosphere (radio blackout conditions), and assuming a 1 GHz carrier frequency for the radio communications channel, we find that the required magnetic field for propagation of right-handed circularly polarized, or whistler, waves is on the order of a few hundred gauss. Transmission coefficients are calculated as a function of sheath thickness and are shown to be quite sensitive to the electron collision frequency. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are shown to be in good agreement with the theory. These simulations also demonstrate that Ohmic heating of the electrons can be considerable. Two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using a simplified waveguide and antenna model illustrate the same general transmission behavior as the theory and one-dimensional simulations. In addition, a net focusing effect due to the plasma is also observed in two and three dimensions. These simulations can be extended to design and analyze more realistic waveguide and antenna models.

  11. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M. E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  12. AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan

    2013-02-10

    Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

  13. Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave...

  14. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  15. Charge Density Wave Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The

  16. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of {sup 4}He nanodroplets on surfaces: {sup 4}He/graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-21

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He–surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on {sup 4}He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of {sup 4}He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the {sup 4}He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  17. Characterising the acceleration phase of blast wave formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, T. E. Pasley, J.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.

    2014-10-15

    Intensely heated, localised regions in uniform fluids will rapidly expand and generate an outwardly propagating blast wave. The Sedov-Taylor self-similar solution for such blast waves has long been studied and applied to a variety of scenarios. A characteristic time for their formation has also long been identified using dimensional analysis, which by its very nature, can offer several interpretations. We propose that, rather than simply being a characteristic time, it may be interpreted as the definitive time taken for a blast wave resulting from an intense explosion in a uniform media to contain its maximum kinetic energy. A scaling relation for this measure of the acceleration phase, preceding the establishment of the blast wave, is presented and confirmed using a 1D planar hydrodynamic model.

  18. Ocean current wave interaction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.G.

    1980-09-20

    A numerical model has been developed to incorporate refraction of ocean surface gravity waves by major ocean currents. The model is initialized with directional wave spectra and verified with aircraft synthetic aperture radar X band spectra, laser profilometer spectra, and pitch and roll buoy data. Data collected during the Marineland test experiment are used as surface truth observations for the wave-current study. Evidence of Gulf Stream refraction and trapping of surface waves as well as caustics in the current is shown and modeled assuming a nonuniform Gulf Stream distribution. Frequency and directional resolution of the wave spectral distribution and the current refraction patterns illustrates the need for further study of ocean current-wave interaction in wave refraction studies.

  19. Shock wave convergence in water with parabolic wall boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanuka, D.; Shafer, D.; Krasik, Ya.

    2015-04-28

    The convergence of shock waves in water, where the cross section of the boundaries between which the shock wave propagates is either straight or parabolic, was studied. The shock wave was generated by underwater electrical explosions of planar Cu wire arrays using a high-current generator with a peak output current of ?45?kA and rise time of ?80?ns. The boundaries of the walls between which the shock wave propagates were symmetric along the z axis, which is defined by the direction of the exploding wires. It was shown that with walls having a parabolic cross section, the shock waves converge faster and the pressure in the vicinity of the line of convergence, calculated by two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations coupled with the equations of state of water and copper, is also larger.

  20. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  1. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  2. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  3. Conversion of borehole Stoneley waves to channel waves in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the mode conversion of borehole Stoneley waves to stratigraphically guided channel waves was discovered in data from a crosswell acoustic experiment conducted between wells penetrating thin coal strata located near Rifle, Colorado. Traveltime moveout observations show that borehole Stoneley waves, excited by a transmitter positioned at substantial distances in one well above and below a coal stratum at 2025 m depth, underwent partial conversion to a channel wave propagating away from the well through the coal. In an adjacent well the channel wave was detected at receiver locations within the coal, and borehole Stoneley waves, arising from a second partial conversion of channel waves, were detected at locations above and below the coal. The observed channel wave is inferred to be the third-higher Rayleigh mode based on comparison of the measured group velocity with theoretically derived dispersion curves. The identification of the mode conversion between borehole and stratigraphically guided waves is significant because coal penetrated by multiple wells may be detected without placing an acoustic transmitter or receiver within the waveguide. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Nearshore Wave Propagation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Converter Effects on Nearshore Wave Propagation Jesse Roberts 1 , Grace Chang *2 , Craig Jones *3 Sandia National Laboratories 1515 Eubank SE, Albuquerque, NM 87123 USA 1...

  5. Wave forces on an array of oscillating water column type free standing wave energy caissons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelamani, S.; Thiruvenkatasamy, K.

    1995-12-31

    The wave induced in-line forces on a 1:50 scale model of an array of Multi resonant Oscillating Water Column (MOWC) type free standing wave energy caisson were experimentally investigated. A range of hydrodynamic parameters with different damping of oscillating water column (OWC) chamber and various center to center spacings between the caissons were used. In general, the force on the MOWC caisson array is two times that of a vertical wall, for maximum damping of OWC chamber. Reduction of damping of the OWC air chamber reduces the force on the array of caissons. With reduced damping, forces on OWC array can even be smaller than that the ones on a vertical wall. For smaller center to center (C/C) spacing between the caissons with respect to its harbor width, OWC array acts like a perforated breakwater, attracting smaller wave forces and for higher C/C spacing, it behaves like a vertical wall.

  6. On the dispersion relation of the transit time instability in inverted fireballs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2014-08-15

    Recently discovered inverted fireballs are non-linear plasma phenomena, which are formed in hollow grid anodes with high transparency in an existing background plasma. If a sufficiently large potential is applied, accelerated electrons from the bulk start to oscillate through the grid. Experimental investigations have shown that they produce different types of plasma instabilities. One of those oscillations is a transit time instability which originates from strong electron beams that travel through the inverted fireball. This type of instability is similar to vircator reflex oscillations and produces radio frequency waves. Hence, it is suitable to convert DC signals into signals oscillating in the MHz range. This paper analyses the dispersion relation of the transit time instability for three different plasma regimes. The regimes can be divided into a collision less regime, a regime with high collisionality and one in between those former two. It is demonstrated that the plasma properties of the surrounding background plasma have a strong influence on the behavior of the instability itself.

  7. Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and...

  8. Electron acceleration and emission in a field of a plane and converging dipole wave of relativistic amplitudes with the radiation reaction force taken into account

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashinov, Aleksei V; Gonoskov, Arkady A; Kim, A V; Marklund, Mattias; Mourou, G; Sergeev, Aleksandr M

    2013-04-30

    A comparative analysis is performed of the electron emission characteristics as the electrons move in laser fields with ultra-relativistic intensity and different configurations corresponding to a plane or tightly focused wave. For a plane travelling wave, analytical expressions are derived for the emission characteristics, and it is shown that the angular distribution of the radiation intensity changes qualitatively even when the wave intensity is much less than that in the case of the radiation-dominated regime. An important conclusion is drawn that the electrons in a travelling wave tend to synchronised motion under the radiation reaction force. The characteristic features of the motion of electrons are found in a converging dipole wave, associated with the curvature of the phase front and nonuniformity of the field distribution. The values of the maximum achievable longitudinal momenta of electrons accelerated to the centre, as well as their distribution function are determined. The existence of quasi-periodic trajectories near the focal region of the dipole wave is shown, and the characteristics of the emission of both accelerated and oscillating electrons are analysed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  9. Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveBasin&oldid596392" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  10. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  11. Wave | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing...

  12. Wave energy and intertidal productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, E.G. Jr.; Paine, R.T.; Quinn, J.F.; Suchanek, T.H.

    1987-03-01

    In the northern Pacific, intertidal zones of the most wave-beaten shores receive more energy from breaking waves than from the sun. Despite severe mortality from winter storms, communities at some wave-beaten sites produce an extraordinary quantity of dry matter per unit area of shore per year. At wave-beaten sites of Tatoosh Island, WA, sea palms, Postelsia palmaeformis, can produce > 10 kg of dry matter, or 1.5 x 10/sup 8/ J, per m/sup 2/ in a good year. Extraordinarily productive organisms such as Postelsia are restricted to wave-beaten sites. Intertidal organisms cannot transform wave energy into chemical energy, as photosynthetic plants transform solar energy, nor can intertidal organisms harness wave energy. Nonetheless, wave energy enhances the productivity of intertidal organisms. On exposed shores, waves increase the capacity of resident algae to acquire nutrients and use sunlight, augment the competitive ability of productive organism, and protect intertidal residents by knocking away their enemies or preventing them from feeding.

  13. WaveDyn: A Design Tool for Performance & Operational Loads Modeling of WECs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experience with Validating MHK Tools National Renewable Energy Laboratory - Broomfield, CO - July 9 th 2012 Contents * Overview of GL Garrad Hassan * List of Tools/Core Expertise: Dedicated Software * Waves: Resource assessment and site data analysis * WaveDyn: WEC performance and loads calculation (time-domain) * WaveFarmer: Planning and optimization of a WEC array * Tides: Resource assessment and site data analysis * Tidal Bladed: Tidal Turbine performance and loads calculation (time-domain) *

  14. Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predicted | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein predicted By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research February 12, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The collision of two black holes - an event detected for the first time ever by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO - is seen in this still from a computer simulation. (Image by SXS) The collision of two black holes - an

  15. Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predicted | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein predicted By Catherine andonella, Office of the Dean for Research February 12, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The collision of two black holes - an event detected for the first time ever by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO - is seen in this still from a computer simulation. (Image by SXS) The collision of two black holes - an

  16. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to the Middle East Next Week |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy the Middle East Next Week Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to the Middle East Next Week February 18, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Next week U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel to the Middle East to meet with senior government officials, research and scientific leaders, and members of the private sector as part of the Administration's efforts to continue strengthening U.S. partnerships within the region. Secretary Chu will discuss a range of energy

  17. GE, NASA Work to Relaunch Supersonic Air Travel | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supporting NASA's efforts to Relaunch Commercial Supersonic Air Travel Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Supporting NASA's efforts to Relaunch Commercial Supersonic Air Travel Awarded 2- year $599,000 program to reduce engine noise during takeoffs and landings NISKAYUNA, NY - JUNE 10, 2015 - Scientists

  18. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy | Department of Energy Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy January 31, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of the Energy Department's ongoing efforts to highlight President Obama's State of the Union address and discuss the Obama Administration's commitment

  19. Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason

  20. A STUDY OF ALFVN WAVE PROPAGATION AND HEATING THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Alfvn wave propagation, reflection, and heating of the chromosphere are studied for a one-dimensional solar atmosphere by self-consistently solving plasma, neutral fluid, and Maxwell's equations with incorporation of the Hall effect and strong electron-neutral, electron-ion, and ion-neutral collisions. We have developed a numerical model based on an implicit backward difference formula of second-order accuracy both in time and space to solve stiff governing equations resulting from strong inter-species collisions. A non-reflecting boundary condition is applied to the top boundary so that the wave reflection within the simulation domain can be unambiguously determined. It is shown that due to the density gradient the Alfvn waves are partially reflected throughout the chromosphere and more strongly at higher altitudes with the strongest reflection at the transition region. The waves are damped in the lower chromosphere dominantly through Joule dissipation, producing heating strong enough to balance the radiative loss for the quiet chromosphere without invoking anomalous processes or turbulences. The heating rates are larger for weaker background magnetic fields below ?500 km with higher-frequency waves subject to heavier damping. There is an upper cutoff frequency, depending on the background magnetic field, above which the waves are completely damped. At the frequencies below which the waves are not strongly damped, the interaction of reflected waves with the upward propagating waves produces power at their double frequencies, which leads to more damping. The wave energy flux transmitted to the corona is one order of magnitude smaller than that of the driving source.

  1. Wave energy absorber mountable on wave-facing structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, H.

    1983-09-13

    A wave energy absorber comprising a caisson mountable on the seaside surface of an existing breakwater or coastal embankment, which caisson has a water chamber with an open side and a rear wall facing the open side. The distance from the open side to the rear wall is longer than one quarter of a wavelength L /SUB c/ in the water chamber so as to generate a standing wave in the water chamber with a node of the standing wave at a distance L /SUB c/ /4 from the rear wall toward the open side. A wave power turbine impeller is pivotally supported in the caisson at the node position, the impeller rotating in only one direction, whereby wave energy is absorbed by the impeller for further conversion into electric or thermal energy. The caisson itself can also be utilized as a breakwater or an embankment.

  2. Alfven-wave particle interaction in finite-dimensional self-consistent field model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padhye, N.; Horton, W.

    1998-10-09

    A low-dimensional Hamiltonian model is derived for the acceleration of ions in finite amplitude Alfven waves in a finite pressure plasma sheet. The reduced low-dimensional wave-particle Hamiltonian is useful for describing the reaction of the accelerated ions on the wave amplitudes and phases through the self-consistent fields within the envelope approximation. As an example, the authors show for a single Alfven wave in the central plasma sheet of the Earth`s geotail, modeled by the linear pinch geometry called the Harris sheet, the time variation of the wave amplitude during the acceleration of fast protons.

  3. Relativistic electron scattering by magnetosonic waves: Effects of discrete wave emission and high wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we study relativistic electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We compare results of test particle simulations and the quasi-linear theory for different spectra of waves to investigate how a fine structure of the wave emission can influence electron resonant scattering. We show that for a realistically wide distribution of wave normal angles θ (i.e., when the dispersion δθ≥0.5{sup °}), relativistic electron scattering is similar for a wide wave spectrum and for a spectrum consisting in well-separated ion cyclotron harmonics. Comparisons of test particle simulations with quasi-linear theory show that for δθ>0.5{sup °}, the quasi-linear approximation describes resonant scattering correctly for a large enough plasma frequency. For a very narrow θ distribution (when δθ∼0.05{sup °}), however, the effect of a fine structure in the wave spectrum becomes important. In this case, quasi-linear theory clearly fails in describing accurately electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We also study the effect of high wave amplitudes on relativistic electron scattering. For typical conditions in the earth's radiation belts, the quasi-linear approximation cannot accurately describe electron scattering for waves with averaged amplitudes >300 pT. We discuss various applications of the obtained results for modeling electron dynamics in the radiation belts and in the Earth's magnetotail.

  4. Ulysses observations of magnetic waves due to newborn interstellar pickup ions. II. Application of turbulence concepts to limiting wave energy and observability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-06-01

    The low-frequency magnetic waves that arise from the isotropization of newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) are reasonably well described by linear and quasi-linear kinetic theory in so far as those theories predict the wave frequency and polarization in the spacecraft frame. Those theories fail to describe the scarce observability of the waves. Quasilinear theory predicts that the wave power should accumulate over long periods of time as the relatively weak kinetic instability slowly adds power to the observed spectrum. At the same time it has been argued that the same wave energy must serve as a secondary source of thermal ion heating in the outer heliosphere once the initial turbulence is depleted. To the extent that turbulent transport of the wave energy acts against the spectrally confined accumulation of wave energy, turbulence should be a limiting factor in observability. We argue that turbulence does limit the observability of the waves and we use turbulence theory to predict the observed wave energy. We compare this prediction against a database of 502 wave observations attributed to newborn interstellar PUIs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft.

  5. Compressive passive millimeter wave imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Liao, Shaolin; Elmer, Thomas W; Koehl, Eugene R; Heifetz, Alexander; Raptis, Apostolos C

    2015-01-27

    A compressive scanning approach for millimeter wave imaging and sensing. A Hadamard mask is positioned to receive millimeter waves from an object to be imaged. A subset of the full set of Hadamard acquisitions is sampled. The subset is used to reconstruct an image representing the object.

  6. Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Dieckman, Stephen L.

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

  7. Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape-off layer of NSTX and NSTX-U Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full wave simulations of fast wave heating...

  8. DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy’s Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles.

  9. How many electric miles do Nissan Leafs and Chevrolet Volts in The EV Project travel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents travel statistics and metrics describing the driving behavior of Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt drivers in the EV Project. It specifically quantifies the distance each group of vehicles drives each month. This paper will be published to INL's external website and will be accessible by the general public.

  10. Microsoft Word - gra-ugs-program-travel-regs-tr9003.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No: CFO-TR9003 Revision: 2 Issued: 1/27/14 Effective Date: 1/27/14 Required Review Date: 1/27/16 LANL CFO-TR9003 1 of 7 GRA and UGS Program Travel Table o f C ontents 1.0 Purpose ........................................................................................................................................ 2 2.0 Authority and Applicability ............................................................................................................ 2 2.1 Authority

  11. NNSA Launches Second Travel Blog to Feature Administrator's Work at Next

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Generation Safeguards Meeting in Japan | National Nuclear Security Administration Second Travel Blog to Feature Administrator's Work at Next Generation Safeguards Meeting in Japan | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our

  12. MHK Technologies/C Wave | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    homepage C Wave.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization C Wave Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Description The C Wave...

  13. Methods and apparatus for use in detecting seismic waves in a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.; Fincke, James R.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2006-05-23

    The invention provides methods and apparatus for detecting seismic waves propagating through a subterranean formation surrounding a borehole. In a first embodiment, a sensor module uses the rotation of bogey wheels to extend and retract a sensor package for selective contact and magnetic coupling to casing lining the borehole. In a second embodiment, a sensor module is magnetically coupled to the casing wall during its travel and dragged therealong while maintaining contact therewith. In a third embodiment, a sensor module is interfaced with the borehole environment to detect seismic waves using coupling through liquid in the borehole. Two or more of the above embodiments may be combined within a single sensor array to provide a resulting seismic survey combining the optimum of the outputs of each embodiment into a single data set.

  14. (3 + 1)-dimensional cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation for nonextensive dust acoustic waves: Symbolic computation and exact solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Shimin; Wang Hongli; Mei Liquan

    2012-06-15

    By combining the effects of bounded cylindrical geometry, azimuthal and axial perturbations, the nonlinear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of negatively charged dust grains, nonextensive ions, and nonextensive electrons are studied in this paper. Using the reductive perturbation method, a (3 + 1)-dimensional variable-coefficient cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the nonlinear propagation of DAWs is derived. Via the homogeneous balance principle, improved F-expansion technique and symbolic computation, the exact traveling and solitary wave solutions of the KdV equation are presented in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Moreover, the effects of the plasma parameters on the solitary wave structures are discussed in detail. The obtained results could help in providing a good fit between theoretical analysis and real applications in space physics and future laboratory plasma experiments where long-range interactions are present.

  15. C Wave Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: C-Wave Ltd Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: SO17 1BJ Product: C-Wave is developing an innovative wave power technology using a unique...

  16. The occurrence and wave properties of H⁺-, He⁺-, and O⁺-band EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J. -C.; Allen, R. C.; Smith, C. W.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-09-26

    We perform a statistical study of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves detected by the Van Allen Probes mission to investigate the spatial distribution of their occurrence, wave power, ellipticity, and normal angle. The Van Allen Probes have been used which allow us to explore the inner magnetosphere (1.1 to 5.8 RE). Magnetic field measurements from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science on board the Van Allen Probes are used to identify EMIC wave events for the first 22 months of the mission operation (8 September 2012 to 30 June 2014). EMIC waves are examined in H⁺-, He⁺-, and O⁺-bands. Over 700 EMIC wave events have been identified over the three different wave bands (265 H⁺-band events, 438 He⁺-band events, and 68 O⁺-band events). EMIC wave events are observed between L = 2 – 8, with over 140 EMIC wave events observed below L = 4. The results show that H⁺-band EMIC waves have two peak magnetic local time (MLT) occurrence regions: pre-noon (09:00 < MLT ≤ 12:00) and afternoon (15:00 < MLT ≤ 17:00) sectors. He⁺-band EMIC waves feature an overall stronger dayside occurrence. O⁺-band EMIC waves have one peak region located in the morning sector at lower L shells (L < 4). He⁺-band EMIC waves average the highest wave power overall (>0.1 nT²/Hz), especially in the afternoon sector. Ellipticity observations reveal that linearly polarized EMIC waves dominate in lower L shells.

  17. The occurrence and wave properties of H⁺-, He⁺-, and O⁺-band EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J. -C.; Allen, R. C.; Smith, C. W.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-09-26

    We perform a statistical study of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves detected by the Van Allen Probes mission to investigate the spatial distribution of their occurrence, wave power, ellipticity, and normal angle. The Van Allen Probes have been used which allow us to explore the inner magnetosphere (1.1 to 5.8 RE). Magnetic field measurements from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science on board the Van Allen Probes are used to identify EMIC wave events for the first 22 months of the mission operation (8 September 2012 to 30 June 2014). EMIC waves are examined in H⁺-,more » He⁺-, and O⁺-bands. Over 700 EMIC wave events have been identified over the three different wave bands (265 H⁺-band events, 438 He⁺-band events, and 68 O⁺-band events). EMIC wave events are observed between L = 2 – 8, with over 140 EMIC wave events observed below L = 4. The results show that H⁺-band EMIC waves have two peak magnetic local time (MLT) occurrence regions: pre-noon (09:00 < MLT ≤ 12:00) and afternoon (15:00 < MLT ≤ 17:00) sectors. He⁺-band EMIC waves feature an overall stronger dayside occurrence. O⁺-band EMIC waves have one peak region located in the morning sector at lower L shells (L < 4). He⁺-band EMIC waves average the highest wave power overall (>0.1 nT²/Hz), especially in the afternoon sector. Ellipticity observations reveal that linearly polarized EMIC waves dominate in lower L shells.« less

  18. Resonant wave-particle interactions modified by intrinsic Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C. S.; Lee, K. H.; Wang, C. B.; Wu, D. J.

    2012-08-15

    The concept of wave-particle interactions via resonance is well discussed in plasma physics. This paper shows that intrinsic Alfven waves can qualitatively modify the physics discussed in conventional linear plasma kinetic theories. It turns out that preexisting Alfven waves can affect particle motion along the ambient magnetic field and, moreover, the ensuing force field is periodic in time. As a result, the meaning of the usual Landau and cyclotron resonance conditions becomes questionable. It turns out that this effect leads us to find a new electromagnetic instability. In such a process intrinsic Alfven waves not only modify the unperturbed distribution function but also result in a different type of cyclotron resonance which is affected by the level of turbulence. This instability might enable us to better our understanding of the observed radio emission processes in the solar atmosphere.

  19. Topeka’s “Green Light Tunnel” Saves Fuel and Time

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Topeka, Kansas is saving their motorists time and gasoline through the use of a real-time, adaptive "green light tunnel". A traffic signal system that synchronizes traffic lights in order to create a series of green lights that result in fewer stops and less travel time.

  20. Semiclassical wave-packets emerging from interaction with an environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recchia, Carla; Teta, Alessandro

    2014-01-15

    We study the quantum evolution in dimension three of a system composed by a test particle interacting with an environment made of N harmonic oscillators. At time zero the test particle is described by a spherical wave, i.e., a highly correlated continuous superposition of states with well localized position and momentum, and the oscillators are in the ground state. Furthermore, we assume that the positions of the oscillators are not collinear with the center of the spherical wave. Under suitable assumptions on the physical parameters characterizing the model, we give an asymptotic expression of the solution of the Schrdinger equation of the system with an explicit control of the error. The result shows that the approximate expression of the wave function is the sum of two terms, orthogonal in L{sup 2}(R{sup 3(N+1)}) and describing rather different situations. In the first one, all the oscillators remain in their ground state and the test particle is described by the free evolution of a slightly deformed spherical wave. The second one consists of a sum of N terms where in each term there is only one excited oscillator and the test particle is correspondingly described by the free evolution of a wave packet, well concentrated in position and momentum. Moreover, the wave packet emerges from the excited oscillator with an average momentum parallel to the line joining the oscillator with the center of the initial spherical wave. Such wave packet represents a semiclassical state for the test particle, propagating along the corresponding classical trajectory. The main result of our analysis is to show how such a semiclassical state can be produced, starting from the original spherical wave, as a result of the interaction with the environment.

  1. Mirror force induced wave dispersion in Alfvn waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.

    2013-06-15

    Recent hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulations of global scale standing shear Alfvn waves along the Earth's closed dipolar magnetic field lines show that the upward parallel current region within these waves saturates and broadens perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and that this broadening increases with the electron temperature. Using resistive MHD simulations, with a parallel Ohm's law derived from the linear Knight relation (which expresses the current-voltage relationship along an auroral field line), we explore the nature of this broadening in the context of the increased perpendicular Poynting flux resulting from the increased parallel electric field associated with mirror force effects. This increased Poynting flux facilitates wave energy dispersion across field lines which in-turn allows for electron acceleration to carry the field aligned current on adjacent field lines. This mirror force driven dispersion can dominate over that associated with electron inertial effects for global scale waves.

  2. Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Ocean Wave Energy Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the...

  3. Wave Wind LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Wind LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Wind LLC Place: Sun Prairie, Wisconsin Zip: 53590 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Wisconsin-based wind developer and...

  4. Wind Waves and Sun | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Waves and Sun Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wind Waves and Sun Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.windwavesandsun.com This company is...

  5. Clean Wave Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clean Wave Ventures Place: Indianapolis, Indiana Zip: 46204 Product: Midwest-based venture capital firm specializing in high growth...

  6. Kinetic Wave Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kinetic Wave Power Address: 2861 N Tupelo St Place: Midland Zip: 48642 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

  7. Triton Sea Wave Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Triton Sea Wave Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Triton Sea Wave Technologies Address: 22 A Thrakis Zip: 15669 Region: Greece Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year...

  8. Motor Wave Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Motor Wave Group Place: Hong Kong Region: China Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.motorwavegroup.com This company is listed...

  9. Euro Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Euro Wave Energy Region: Norway Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.eurowaveenergy.com This company is listed in the Marine...

  10. Dartmouth Wave Energy Searaser | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Searaser Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dartmouth Wave Energy (Searaser) Place: United Kingdom Product: British firm developing the wave energy converter, Searaser....

  11. Leancon Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Leancon Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Leancon Wave Energy Address: Alpedalsvej 37 Place: Kolding Zip: 6000 Region: Denmark Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

  12. Wave Energy Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean » Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:30pm Addthis Photo of a large wave. Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.) However, wave energy cannot be harnessed everywhere. Wave power-rich areas of the world include the western coasts of

  13. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, A. N.; Brizard, A.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Tracy, E.R.

    2008-07-30

    A one-dimensional multiple wave-conversion model is constructed that allows energy recirculation in ray phase space. Using a modular eikonal approach, the connection coefficients for this model are calculated by ray phase-space methods. Analytical results (confirmed numerically) show that all connection coefficients exhibit interference effects that depend on an interference phase, calculated from the coupling constants and the area enclosed by the intersecting rays. This conceptual model, which focuses on the topology of intersecting rays in phase space, is used to investigate how mode conversion between primary and secondary waves is modified by the presence of a tertiary wave.

  14. ARE PULSING SOLITARY WAVES RUNNING INSIDE THE SUN?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Charles L.

    2012-09-10

    A precise sequence of frequencies-detected four independent ways-is interpreted as a system of solitary waves below the Sun's convective envelope. Six future observational or theoretical tests of this idea are suggested. Wave properties (rotation rates, radial energy distribution, nuclear excitation strength) follow from conventional dynamics of global oscillation modes after assuming a localized nuclear term strong enough to perturb and hold mode longitudes into alignments that form 'families'. To facilitate future tests, more details are derived for a system of two dozen solitary waves 2 {<=} l {<=} 25. Wave excitation by {sup 3}He and {sup 14}C burning is complex. It spikes by factors M{sub 1} {<=} 10{sup 3} when many waves overlap in longitude but its long-time average is M{sub 2} {<=} 10. Including mixing can raise overall excitation to {approx}50 times that in a standard solar model. These spikes cause tiny phase shifts that tend to pull wave rotation rates toward their ideal values {proportional_to}[l(l + 1)]{sup -1}. A system like this would generate some extra nuclear energy in two spots at low latitude on opposite sides of the Sun. Each covers about 20 Degree-Sign of longitude. Above a certain wave amplitude, the system starts giving distinctly more nuclear excitation to some waves (e.g., l = 9, 14, and 20) than to neighboring l values. The prominence of l = 20 has already been reported. This transition begins at temperature amplitudes {Delta}T/T = 0.03 in the solar core for a typical family of modes, which corresponds to {delta}T/T {approx} 0.001 for one of its many component oscillation modes.

  15. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: Wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argonov, V. Yu.

    2014-11-15

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field can suppress packet splitting for some atoms whose specific velocities are in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. We also demonstrate that the modulated field can not only trap but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensemble having wide initial velocity and energy distributions. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while the trapped atoms have a narrow energy distribution.

  16. SECONDARY WAVES AND/OR THE 'REFLECTION' FROM AND 'TRANSMISSION' THROUGH A CORONAL HOLE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2.2 FLARE OBSERVED WITH SDO/AIA AND STEREO/EUVI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Vourlidas, Angelos; Zhang Jie; Cheng Xin

    2012-09-10

    For the first time, the kinematic evolution of a coronal wave over the entire solar surface is studied. Full Sun maps can be made by combining images from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory satellites, Ahead and Behind, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, thanks to the wide angular separation between them. We study the propagation of a coronal wave, also known as the 'Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope' wave, and its interaction with a coronal hole (CH) resulting in secondary waves and/or reflection and transmission. We explore the possibility of the wave obeying the law of reflection. In a detailed example, we find that a loop arcade at the CH boundary cascades and oscillates as a result of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave passage and triggers a wave directed eastward that appears to have reflected. We find that the speed of this wave decelerates to an asymptotic value, which is less than half of the primary EUV wave speed. Thanks to the full Sun coverage we are able to determine that part of the primary wave is transmitted through the CH. This is the first observation of its kind. The kinematic measurements of the reflected and transmitted wave tracks are consistent with a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic wave interpretation. Eventually, all wave tracks decelerate and disappear at a distance. A possible scenario of the whole process is that the wave is initially driven by the expanding coronal mass ejection and subsequently decouples from the driver and then propagates at the local fast-mode speed.

  17. Evolution of a wave packet scattered by a one-dimensional potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatrian, A Zh; Alexanyan, Al G; Khoetsyan, V A; Alexanyan, N A

    2013-06-30

    We consider the evolution of a wave packet that is made up of a group of the wave functions describing the stationary scattering process and tunnels through a one-dimensional potential of arbitrary form. As the main characteristics of the time difference of the tunnelling process, use is made of the propagation speed of the wave-packet maximum. We show that the known Hartman formula for the tunnelling time corresponds to the wave packet with a wavenumber-uniform spectral composition in the case, when the phase and transmission coefficient modulus dispersions are taken into account only in the linear approximation. The amplitude of the main peak of the transmitted wave intensity is proven to be independent of the tunnelling time and is determined by the transmission coefficient of the spectral component at the carrier frequency and the spectral width of the wave packet. In the limit of an infinitely wide potential barrier the amplitude of the wave-packet maximum is shown to tend to zero slower than the tunnelling time tends to its asymptotic value, i.e., indeed we deal with the paradox of an infinitely large propagation speed of a wave disturbance through the barrier. (propagation of wave fronts)

  18. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  19. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, V. Lance

    1990-01-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1988 spring outmigration at two migrant traps; one each on the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Due to the low runoff year, chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was very low. Steelhead trout catch was higher than normal, probably due to trap modifications and because the trap was moved to the east side of the river. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout catch at the Clearwater River trap was similar to 1987. Total cumulative recovery of PIT tagged fish at the three dams, with PIT tag detection systems was: 55% for chinook salmon, 73% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 75% for wild steelhead trout. Travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, was affected by discharge. Statistical analysis showed that as discharge increased from 40 kcfs to 80 kcfs, chinook salmon travel time decreased three fold, and steelhead trout travel time decreased two fold. There was a statistical difference between estimates of travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged and freeze branded steelhead trout, but not for chinook salmon. These differences may be related to the estimation techniques used for PIT tagged and freeze branded groups, rather than real differences in travel time. 10 figs, 15 tabs.

  20. Wave-operated power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghesquiere, H.

    1980-08-12

    This wave-operated power plant comprises a perforated caisson breakwater in which propellers, or turbines, are mounted in the perforations or openings and drives hydraulic pumps connected thereto, which in turn drives a hydraulic motor coupled to an electric generator. One-way flap valves are mounted in the openings. Some of said flap valves allow the rushing waves to enter the caisson, while the other flap valves allow the water to flow out of the caisson.

  1. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe

    2013-07-29

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  2. Time Off

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Off Time Off A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact Benefits Office (505)...

  3. Optimization of High-order Wave Equations for Multicore CPUs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-11-01

    This is a simple benchmark to guage the performance of a high-order isotropic wave equation grid. The code is optimized for both SSE and AVX and is parallelized using OpenMP (see Optimization section). Structurally, the benchmark begins, reads a few command-line parameters, allocates and pads the four arrays (current, last, next wave fields, and the spatially varying but isotropic velocity), initializes these arrays, then runs the benchmark proper. The code then benchmarks the naive, SSEmore » (if supported), and AVX (if supported implementations) by applying the wave equation stencil 100 times and taking the average performance. Boundary conditions are ignored and would noiminally be implemented by the user. THus, the benchmark measures only the performance of the wave equation stencil and not a full simulation. The naive implementation is a quadruply (z,y,x, radius) nested loop that can handle arbitrarily order wave equations. The optimized (SSE/AVX) implentations are somewhat more complex as they operate on slabs and include a case statement to select an optimized inner loop depending on wave equation order.« less

  4. EVIDENCE FOR THE PHOTOSPHERIC EXCITATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Shelyag, S., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Main Physics Building, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, County Antrim BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-01

    Observing the excitation mechanisms of incompressible transverse waves is vital for determining how energy propagates through the lower solar atmosphere. We aim to show the connection between convectively driven photospheric flows and incompressible chromospheric waves. The observations presented here show the propagation of incompressible motion through the quiet lower solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the chromosphere. We determine photospheric flow vectors to search for signatures of vortex motion and compare results to photospheric flows present in convective simulations. Further, we search for the chromospheric response to vortex motions. Evidence is presented that suggests incompressible waves can be excited by the vortex motions of a strong magnetic flux concentration in the photosphere. A chromospheric counterpart to the photospheric vortex motion is also observed, presenting itself as a quasi-periodic torsional motion. Fine-scale, fibril structures that emanate from the chromospheric counterpart support transverse waves that are driven by the observed torsional motion. A new technique for obtaining details of transverse waves from time-distance diagrams is presented and the properties of transverse waves (e.g., amplitudes and periods) excited by the chromospheric torsional motion are measured.

  5. Secretary Chu To Travel to Scotland and Ireland | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington, D.C. - This week, Secretary Chu will travel to Scotland and Ireland where he will meet with government and academic leaders, as well as American and Irish business leaders who are engaged in clean energy industries. Both Scotland and Ireland share similar energy challenges and resources with the United States, including significant offshore wind energy potential. These countries have set rigorous renewable energy goals, including wind and water power, towards meeting the European

  6. Effect of non-uniform slow wave structure in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with a resonant reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Changhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Huo, Shaofei; Bai, Xianchen; Shi, Yanchao; Liu, Guozhi

    2013-11-15

    This paper provides a fresh insight into the effect of non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) used in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a resonant reflector. Compared with the uniform SWS, the reflection coefficient of the non-uniform SWS is higher, leading to a lower modulating electric field in the resonant reflector and a larger distance to maximize the modulation current. Moreover, for both types of RBWOs, stronger standing-wave field takes place at the rear part of the SWS. In addition, besides Cerenkov effects, the energy conversion process in the RBWO strongly depends on transit time effects. Thus, the matching condition between the distributions of harmonic current and standing wave field provides a profound influence on the beam-wave interaction. In the non-uniform RBWO, the region with a stronger standing wave field corresponds to a higher fundamental harmonic current distribution. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a diode voltage of 1.02 MV and beam current of 13.2 kA, a microwave power of 4 GW has been obtained, compared to that of 3 GW in the uniform RBWO.

  7. Notice of Intent to Submit Page Changes to Revise DOE O 552.1A, Travel Policy and Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2016-01-07

    A page-change is being undertaken to reflect changes in responsibilities brought about by the August 2013 reorganization which transferred travel related functions and systems between the Office of Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) and the Office of Management (MA).

  8. Notice of Intent to Submit Page Changes to Revise DOE O 552.1A, Travel Policy and Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2016-01-07

    A page change is being undertaken to reflect changes in responsibilities brought about by the August 2013 reorganization which transferred travel related functions and systems between the Office of Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) and the Office of Management (MA).

  9. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  10. Electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K. H.; Omura, Y.; Lee, L. C.; Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taiwan

    2013-11-15

    We carried out a series of particle simulations to study electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves generated by an electron ring distribution. The electron ring distribution leads to excitations of X-mode waves mainly in the perpendicular direction, Z-mode waves in the perpendicular and parallel directions, and whistler-mode waves mainly in the parallel direction. The parallel Z- and whistler-mode waves can lead to an effective acceleration of ring electrons. The electron acceleration is mainly determined by the wave amplitude and phase velocity, which in turn is affected by the ratio of electron plasma to cyclotron frequencies. For the initial kinetic energy ranging from 100 to 500 keV, the peak energy of the accelerated electrons is found to reach 28 times the initial kinetic energy. We further study the acceleration process by test-particle calculations in which electrons interact with one, two, or four waves. The electron trajectories in the one-wave case are simple diffusion curves. In the multi-wave cases, electrons are accelerated simultaneously by counter-propagating waves and can have a higher final energy.

  11. Global coherence of dust density waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killer, Carsten; Melzer, Andr

    2014-06-15

    The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

  12. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  13. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microseismic travel time data Lees, J.M.; Wu, H. (1 August 1999) P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Additional References...

  14. Three-body dwell time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, N. G.

    2010-06-15

    The lifetime of an unstable state or resonance formed as an intermediate state in two-body scattering is known to be related to the dwell time or the time spent within a given region of space by the two interacting particles. This concept is extended to the case of three-body systems and a relation connecting the three-body dwell time with the two-body dwell times of the substructures of the three-body system is derived for the case of separable wave functions. The Kapur-Peierls formalism is revisited to discover one of the first definitions of dwell time in the literature. An extension of the Kapur-Peierls formalism to the three-body case shows that the lifetime of a three-body resonance can indeed be given by the three-body dwell time.

  15. Combined distance-of-flight and time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Enke, Christie G; Ray, Steven J; Graham, Alexander W; Hieftje, Gary M; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W

    2014-02-11

    A combined distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) instrument includes an ion source configured to produce ions having varying mass-to-charge ratios, a first detector configured to determine when each of the ions travels a predetermined distance, a second detector configured to determine how far each of the ions travels in a predetermined time, and a detector extraction region operable to direct portions of the ions either to the first detector or to the second detector.

  16. Nonlinear dissipation of circularly polarized Alfven waves due to the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nariyuki, Y.; Hada, T.; Tsubouchi, K.

    2012-08-15

    In the present study, the dissipation processes of circularly polarized Alfven waves in solar wind plasmas including beam components are numerically discussed by using a 2-D hybrid simulation code. Numerical results suggest that the parent Alfven waves are rapidly dissipated due to the presence of the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves, such as kinetic Alfven waves. The nonlinear wave-wave coupling is directly evaluated by using the induction equation for the parent wave. It is also observed both in the 1-D and 2-D simulations that the presence of large amplitude Alfven waves strongly suppresses the beam instabilities.

  17. Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-12-15

    Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

  18. Interface boundary conditions for dynamic magnetization and spin wave dynamics in a ferromagnetic layer with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostylev, M.

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we derive the interface exchange boundary conditions for the classical linear dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic layers with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI). We show that IDMI leads to pinning of dynamic magnetization at the interface. An unusual peculiarity of the IDMI-based pinning is that its scales as the spin-wave wave number. We incorporate these boundary conditions into an existing numerical model for the dynamics of the Damon-Eshbach spin wave in ferromagnetic films. IDMI affects the dispersion and the frequency non-reciprocity of the travelling Damon-Eshbach spin wave. For a broad range of film thicknesses L and wave numbers, the results of the numerical simulations of the spin wave dispersion are in a good agreement with a simple analytical expression, which shows that the contribution of IDMI to the dispersion scales as 1/L, similarly to the effect of other types of interfacial anisotropy. Suggestions to experimentalists how to detect the presence of IDMI in a spin wave experiment are given.

  19. Attosecond Electron Wave-Packet Interference Observed by Transient Absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holler, M.; Schapper, F.; Gallmann, L.; Keller, U.

    2011-03-25

    We perform attosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy around the first ionization threshold of helium and observe rapid oscillations of the absorption of the individual harmonics as a function of time delay with respect to a superimposed, moderately strong infrared laser field. The phase relation between the absorption modulation of individual harmonics gives direct evidence for the interference of transiently bound electronic wave packets as the mechanism behind the absorption modulation.

  20. Method for generation of THz frequency radiation and sensing of large amplitude material strain waves in piezoelectric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Evan J.; Armstrong, Michael R.

    2010-09-07

    Strain waves of THz frequencies can coherently generate radiation when they propagate past an interface between materials with different piezoelectric coefficients. Such radiation is of detectable amplitude and contains sufficient information to determine the time-dependence of the strain wave with unprecedented subpicosecond, nearly atomic time and space resolution.

  1. Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under Wave Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. S. [Department of Scientific Research, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China); Cai, F. [Department of Navigation, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China); Xu, W. M. [Department of Hydrography and Cartography, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China)

    2011-09-28

    The ship motion equation with a cosine wave excitement force describes the slip moments in regular waves. A new kind of wave excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine functions was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular waves. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the wave excitement force was applied by sums of cosine functions. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.

  2. Non-contact feature detection using ultrasonic Lamb waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2011-06-28

    Apparatus and method for non-contact ultrasonic detection of features on or within the walls of hollow pipes are described. An air-coupled, high-power ultrasonic transducer for generating guided waves in the pipe wall, and a high-sensitivity, air-coupled transducer for detecting these waves, are disposed at a distance apart and at chosen angle with respect to the surface of the pipe, either inside of or outside of the pipe. Measurements may be made in reflection or transmission modes depending on the relative position of the transducers and the pipe. Data are taken by sweeping the frequency of the incident ultrasonic waves, using a tracking narrow-band filter to reduce detected noise, and transforming the frequency domain data into the time domain using fast Fourier transformation, if required.

  3. SDO/AIA AND HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS OF INTERACTION BETWEEN AN EUV WAVE AND ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Liheng; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Liu, Wei; Shen, Yuandeng E-mail: zjun@bao.ac.cn

    2013-09-20

    We present detailed analysis of an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave and its interaction with active region (AR) loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). This wave was initiated from AR 11261 on 2011 August 4 and propagated at velocities of 430-910 km s{sup 1}. It was observed to traverse another AR and cross over a filament channel on its path. The EUV wave perturbed neighboring AR loops and excited a disturbance that propagated toward the footpoints of these loops. EIS observations of AR loops revealed that at the time of the wave transit, the original redshift increased by about 3 km s{sup 1}, while the original blueshift decreased slightly. After the wave transit, these changes were reversed. When the EUV wave arrived at the boundary of a polar coronal hole, two reflected waves were successively produced and part of them propagated above the solar limb. The first reflected wave above the solar limb encountered a large-scale loop system on its path, and a secondary wave rapidly emerged 144 Mm ahead of it at a higher speed. These findings can be explained in the framework of a fast-mode magnetosonic wave interpretation for EUV waves, in which observed EUV waves are generated by expanding coronal mass ejections.

  4. Travelling fronts of the CO oxidation on Pd(111) with coverage-dependent diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cisternas, Jaime, E-mail: jecisternas@miuandes.cl [Facultad de Ingeniera y Ciencias Aplicadas, Universidad de los Andes, Monseor Alvaro del Portillo 12455, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Karpitschka, Stefan [Physics of Fluids, University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Wehner, Stefan [Institut fr Integrierte Naturwissenschaften - Physik, Universitt Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany)

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study a surface reaction on Pd(111) crystals under ultra-high-vacuum conditions that can be modeled by two coupled reaction-diffusion equations. In the bistable regime, the reaction exhibits travelling fronts that can be observed experimentally using photo electron emission microscopy. The spatial profile of the fronts reveals a coverage-dependent diffusivity for one of the species. We propose a method to solve the nonlinear eigenvalue problem and compute the direction and the speed of the fronts based on a geometrical construction in phase-space. This method successfully captures the dependence of the speed on control parameters and diffusivities.

  5. Whistler wave generation by non-gyrotropic, relativistic, electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skender, M.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-04-15

    Particle-in-cell code, EPOCH, is used for studying features of the wave component evident to propagate backwards from the front of the non-gyrotropic, relativistic beam of electrons injected in the Maxwellian, magnetised background plasma with decreasing density profile. According to recent findings presented in Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011)], Schmitz and Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013)], and Pechhacker and Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012)], in a 1.5-dimensional magnetised plasma system, the non-gyrotropic beam generates freely escaping electromagnetic radiation with properties similar to the Type-III solar radio bursts. In this study, the backwards propagating wave component evident in the perpendicular components of the electromagnetic field in such a system is presented for the first time. Background magnetic field strength in the system is varied in order to prove that the backwards propagating wave's frequency, prescribed by the whistler wave dispersion relation, is proportional to the specified magnetic field. Moreover, the identified whistlers are shown to be generated by the normal Doppler-shifted relativistic resonance. Large fraction of the energy of the perpendicular electromagnetic field components is found to be carried away by the whistler waves, while a small but sufficient fraction is going into L- and R-electromagnetic modes.

  6. Nonintrusive stabilization of a conical detonation wave for supersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrier, G.F.; Fendell, F.E.; Fink, S.F. IV

    1995-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies are undertaken of the feasibility of an air-breathing supersonic combustor based on a stabilized, conically configured (oblique) detonation wave. The conical wave is the result of the interaction of a train of spherical detonation waves, each directly initiated by a brief, localized deposition of energy from a very-rapidly-repeated pulsed laser. The laser is tightly focused on a fixed site (in the combustor) where there is a steady uniform supersonic stream of combustible gas. Simple analysis of the requirements for (nonintrusive) direct initiation of an individual spherical detonation wave by a single laser pulse relates the pulse-energy and pulse-duration parameters. Then, an estimate is given of the entropy production associated with the early-time interaction of spherical detonations created in a supersonic reactive stream by a train of laser pulses. The entropy production, which arises from reflected shocks in the already detonated mixture, is reduced by increasing the repetition rate of the laser. Finally, the fuel/air mixing is inevitably imperfect in practical high-speed combustors. The authors investigate that portion of the throughput which is compressed, but not reacted, during transit of the conical detonation wave, because of imperfect mixing. Specifically, they estimate the spatial scale of the cold-mixture inhomogeneity that still permits diffusive burnup, prior to exhaust from the nozzle of the combustor.

  7. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, A. J. Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-15

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrdinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  8. WETGen (Wave Energy Turbine GENerator) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WETGen (Wave Energy Turbine GENerator) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: WETGen (Wave Energy Turbine GENerator) Name WETGen (Wave Energy Turbine GENerator) Place Coos Bay, Oregon...

  9. Sandia Energy - WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter...

  10. MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Air Piston | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Wave Air Piston.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Ocean Wave Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator...

  11. Oregon Wave Energy Trust OWET | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Energy Trust OWET Jump to: navigation, search Name: Oregon Wave Energy Trust (OWET) Place: Portland, Oregon Zip: 97207 Product: String representation "The Oregon Wave ... rgy...

  12. On quantization of nondispersive wave packets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altaisky, M. V.

    2013-10-15

    Nondispersive wave packets are widely used in optics and acoustics. We found it interesting that such packets could be also a subject of quantum field theory. Canonical commutation relations for the nondispersive wave packets are constructed.

  13. Rene Wave Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rene Wave Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rene Wave Ltd Address: 85 Emmett Ave Suite 2508 Place: Toronto Zip: M6M 5A2 Region: Canada Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

  14. Wave Energy Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Energy Centre Address: Wave Energy Centre Av Manuela da Maia 36 R C Dto Place: Lisboa Zip: 1000-201 Region: Portugal Sector: Marine...

  15. Next Wave Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Next Wave Energy Inc Place: Denver,CO, Colorado Zip: 80202 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: NextWave Energy was a consulting firm focused...

  16. Property:Wave Direction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Basin + Uni-Directional + Lakefront Tow Tank + Uni-Directional + Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model + Uni-Directional + M MHL 2D WindWave + Uni-Directional + MHL...

  17. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the ? channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  18. Gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries in circular orbits: limits from the North American nanohertz observatory for gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Ellis, J. A.; Demorest, P. B.; Deng, X.; Koop, M.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Garver-Daniels, N.; Lorimer, D. R.; Jenet, F.; Jones, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lommen, A. N.; Collaboration: NANOGrav Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    We perform a search for continuous gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries using robust frequentist and Bayesian techniques. We augment standard pulsar timing models with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency variable pulse shape terms. We apply our techniques to the Five Year Data Release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We find that there is no evidence for the presence of a detectable continuous gravitational wave; however, we can use these data to place the most constraining upper limits to date on the strength of such gravitational waves. Using the full 17 pulsar data set we place a 95% upper limit on the strain amplitude of h {sub 0} ? 3.0 10{sup 14} at a frequency of 10 nHz. Furthermore, we place 95% sky-averaged lower limits on the luminosity distance to such gravitational wave sources, finding that d{sub L} ? 425 Mpc for sources at a frequency of 10 nHz and chirp mass 10{sup 10} M {sub ?}. We find that for gravitational wave sources near our best timed pulsars in the sky, the sensitivity of the pulsar timing array is increased by a factor of ?four over the sky-averaged sensitivity. Finally we place limits on the coalescence rate of the most massive supermassive black hole binaries.

  19. Spatio-temporal evolution of magnetosonic wave in the laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P. Singh, Ram Kishor Sharma, Swati; Tiwary, Prem Pyari; Modi, K. V.; Satsangi, V. R.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents a theoretical model for the transient response of nonlinear coupling between magnetosonic wave and ion acoustic wave in the overdense plasma. Filamentation of magnetosonic wave has been considered to be responsible for magnetic turbulence during the laser plasma interaction. The ion acoustic wave gets excited due to the ponderomotive force exerted by magnetosonic wave and this ion acoustic wave in turn generates perturbation in the background density in the form of spatial density harmonics. Numerical simulation has been carried out for dimensionless coupled equations of magnetosonic wave and ion acoustic wave; and the results show quite complex localized structures that grow with time. The power spectrum has also been studied which shows that the spectral index follows an approximate scaling of the order of ∼k{sup −2.4} at smaller scales. The data obtained from numerical simulation are used in semi analytical model to better understand the mechanism of nonlinear evolution of magnetosonic wave. The results indicate considerable randomness in the spatial structure of the magnetic field profile which gives sufficient indication of turbulence.

  20. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  1. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  2. Numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfvn waves in solar magnetic arcades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmielewski, P.; Murawski, K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2014-09-20

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfvn waves in an isolated solar arcade, which is gravitationally stratified and magnetically confined. We study numerically the propagation of Alfvn waves along the magnetic structure that extends from the lower chromosphere, where the waves are generated, to the solar corona, and analyze the influence of the arcade size and the width of the initial pulses on the wave propagation and reflection. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical VAL-C model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the asymmetric magnetic arcade. The propagation and reflection of Alfvn waves in this arcade is described by 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal that the Alfvn wave amplitude decreases as a result of a partial reflection of Alfvn waves in the solar transition region, and that the waves that are not reflected leak through the transition region and reach the solar corona. We also find the decrement of the attenuation time of Alfvn waves for wider initial pulses. Moreover, our results show that the propagation of Alfvn waves in the arcade is affected by the spatial dependence of the Alfvn speed, which leads to phase mixing that is stronger for more curved and larger magnetic arcades. We discuss the processes that affect the Alfvn wave propagation in an asymmetric solar arcade and conclude that besides phase mixing in the magnetic field configuration, the plasma properties of the arcade, the size of the initial pulse, and the structure of the solar transition region all play a vital role in the Alfvn wave propagation.

  3. Quantifying EV battery end-of-life through analysis of travel needs with vehicle powertrain models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saxena, Samveg; Le Floch, Caroline; MacDonald, Jason; Moura, Scott

    2015-05-15

    Electric vehicles enable clean and efficient transportation; however, concerns about range anxiety and battery degradation hinder EV adoption. The common definition for battery end-of-life is when 70-80% of original energy capacity remain;, however, little analysis is available to support this retirement threshold. By applying detailed physics-based models of EVs with data on how drivers use their cars, we show that EV batteries continue to meet daily travel needs of drivers well beyond capacity fade of 80% remaining energy storage capacity. Further, we show that EV batteries with substantial energy capacity fade continue to provide sufficient buffer charge for unexpected tripsmore » with long distances. We show that enabling charging in more locations, even if only with 120 V wall outlets, prolongs useful life of EV batteries. Battery power fade is also examined and we show EVs meet performance requirements even down to 30% remaining power capacity. Our findings show that defining battery retirement at 70-80% remaining capacity is inaccurate. Battery retirement should instead be governed by when batteries no longer satisfy daily travel needs of a driver. Using this alternative retirement metric, we present results on the fraction of EV batteries that may be retired with different levels of energy capacity fade.« less

  4. Quantifying EV battery end-of-life through analysis of travel needs with vehicle powertrain models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxena, Samveg; Le Floch, Caroline; MacDonald, Jason; Moura, Scott

    2015-05-15

    Electric vehicles enable clean and efficient transportation; however, concerns about range anxiety and battery degradation hinder EV adoption. The common definition for battery end-of-life is when 70-80% of original energy capacity remain;, however, little analysis is available to support this retirement threshold. By applying detailed physics-based models of EVs with data on how drivers use their cars, we show that EV batteries continue to meet daily travel needs of drivers well beyond capacity fade of 80% remaining energy storage capacity. Further, we show that EV batteries with substantial energy capacity fade continue to provide sufficient buffer charge for unexpected trips with long distances. We show that enabling charging in more locations, even if only with 120 V wall outlets, prolongs useful life of EV batteries. Battery power fade is also examined and we show EVs meet performance requirements even down to 30% remaining power capacity. Our findings show that defining battery retirement at 70-80% remaining capacity is inaccurate. Battery retirement should instead be governed by when batteries no longer satisfy daily travel needs of a driver. Using this alternative retirement metric, we present results on the fraction of EV batteries that may be retired with different levels of energy capacity fade.

  5. Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power in Hawaii |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power in Hawaii Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power in Hawaii July 29, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis The Azura device sits 30m out from the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) in Oahu. The Azura device sits 30m out from the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) in Oahu. With support from the Energy Department and the U.S. Navy, a prototype wave energy device has advanced successfully from initial concept to

  6. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  7. Millimeter-wave active probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza; Bloom, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

  8. Ponderomotive Forces On Waves In Modulated Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodin, I.Y; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-28

    Nonlinear interactions of waves via instantaneous cross-phase modulation can be cast in the same way as ponderomotive wave-particle interactions in high-frequency electromagnetic fi eld. The ponderomotive effect arises when rays of a probe wave scatter off perturbations of the underlying medium produced by a second, modulation wave, much like charged particles scatter off a quasiperiodic field. Parallels with the point-particle dynamics, which itself is generalized by this theory, lead to new methods of wave manipulation, including asymmetric barriers for light.

  9. Freak waves in white dwarfs and magnetars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabry, R.; Moslem, W. M.; Shukla, P. K.

    2012-12-15

    We report properties of ion acoustic freak waves that propagate in a plasma composed of warm ions and ultrarelativistic electrons and positrons. The dynamics of the nonlinear freak waves is governed by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The possible region for the freak waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of white dwarfs and magnetars corona. It is found that for low wave number, the nonlinear ion-acoustic wave packets are structurally stable in magnetars corona than in white dwarfs. However, for large wave numbers the situation is opposite. The critical wave number threshold (k{sub c}), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, is defined for both applications. It is seen that near to k{sub c} the freak wave amplitude becomes high, but it decreases whenever we stepped away from k{sub c}. For the wave numbers close to k{sub c}, the increase of the unperturbed density ratio of positrons-to-electrons ({beta}) would lead to increase the freak wave amplitude, but for larger wave numbers the amplitude decreases with the increase of {beta}.

  10. [Trip report of travel to Las Vegas to consider specification for the Integrated Data System (IDS) with administrative memos]. Volume 1, FY92--FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, J.

    1994-12-15

    This document is a compilation of travel reports and memorandums that are the results of planning between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Computer Applications Group, Inc.

  11. Low-frequency dilatational wave propagation through unsaturated porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, W.-C.; Sposito, G.; Majer, E.

    2007-02-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the low-frequency behavior of dilatational waves propagating through a homogeneous elastic porous medium containing two immiscible fluids. The theory is based on the Berryman-Thigpen-Chin (BTC) model, in which capillary pressure effects are neglected. We show that the BTC model equations in the frequency domain can be transformed, at sufficiently low frequencies, into a dissipative wave equation (telegraph equation) and a propagating wave equation in the time domain. These partial differential equations describe two independent modes of dilatational wave motion that are analogous to the Biot fast and slow compressional waves in a single-fluid system. The equations can be solved analytically under a variety of initial and boundary conditions. The stipulation of 'low frequency' underlying the derivation of our equations in the time domain is shown to require that the excitation frequency of wave motions be much smaller than a critical frequency. This frequency is shown to be the inverse of an intrinsic time scale that depends on an effective kinematic shear viscosity of the interstitial fluids and the intrinsic permeability of the porous medium. Numerical calculations indicate that the critical frequency in both unconsolidated and consolidated materials containing water and a nonaqueous phase liquid ranges typically from kHz to MHz. Thus engineering problems involving the dynamic response of an unsaturated porous medium to low excitation frequencies (e.g. seismic wave stimulation) should be accurately modeled by our equations after suitable initial and boundary conditions are imposed.

  12. Wave

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with high heat and humidity levels. Heat and humidity take their toll faster on the elderly, small children, and those with respiratory health problems. ANLERNL-01-08 2...

  13. Interferometric millimeter wave and THz wave doppler radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Elmer, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    A mixerless high frequency interferometric Doppler radar system and methods has been invented, numerically validated and experimentally tested. A continuous wave source, phase modulator (e.g., a continuously oscillating reference mirror) and intensity detector are utilized. The intensity detector measures the intensity of the combined reflected Doppler signal and the modulated reference beam. Rigorous mathematics formulas have been developed to extract bot amplitude and phase from the measured intensity signal. Software in Matlab has been developed and used to extract such amplitude and phase information from the experimental data. Both amplitude and phase are calculated and the Doppler frequency signature of the object is determined.

  14. Numerical Analysis for Controlling the Eigenmode Formation of Alfven Waves in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ichimura, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higaki, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kakimoto, S. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ide, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Inoue, D. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nagai, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakagome, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fukuyama, A. [Kyoto University (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15

    The numerical analysis is performed with two dimensional wave code for controlling the eigenmode formation of fast Alfven waves in the GAMMA 10 central cell. The plasma production by fast waves depends on the wave excitation in the plasma. Eigenmodes are strongly formed when the boundary conditions in the axial and radial directions are satisfied. As the optimum density for the formation of eigenmode exists discretely, the density is clamped at the value where the eigenmode is strongly formed. For the higher density plasma production, the eigenmodes must be continuously excited as the density increases. It is found that the almost continuous excitation of eigenmodes can be realized by using two waves with different frequencies at the same time.

  15. A Simultaneous Multi-phase Approach to Determine P-wave and S-wave Attenuation of the Crust and Upper Mantle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Matzel, E M

    2009-02-26

    We have generalized the methodology of our regional amplitude tomography from the Lg phase to the four primary regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg). Differences in the geometrical spreading, source term, site term, and travel paths are accounted for, while event source parameters such as seismic moment are consistent among phases. In the process, we have developed the first regional attenuation model that uses the amplitudes of four regional phases to determine a comprehensive P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle. When applied to an area encompassing the Middle East, eastern Europe, western Asia, south Asia, and northeast Africa for the 1-2 Hz passband, we find large differences in the attenuation of the lithosphere across the region. The tectonic Tethys collision zone has high attenuation, while stable outlying regions have low attenuation. While crust and mantle Q variations are often consistent, we do find several notable areas where they differ considerably, but are appropriate given the region's tectonic history. Lastly, the relative values of Qp and Qs indicate that scattering Q is likely the dominant source of attenuation in the crust at these frequencies.

  16. Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian E; Ulrich, Timothy J; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves A; Larmat, Carene; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert A; Griffa, Michele

    2009-01-01

    An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy during the back propagation stage of the time reversal process. During the back propagation phase of an ideal time reversal experiment, wave energy coalesces from all angles of incidence to recreate the source event; after the recreation, wave energy diverges in every direction. An energy current imaging method based on this convergence/divergence behavior has been developed. The energy current imaging method yields a smaller spatial distribution for source reconstruction than is possible with traditional energy imaging methods.

  17. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-14

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g.more » by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is cyclic ‘‘diversity waves’’ triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances are characterized by a bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak - species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.« less

  18. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian, L. K.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Klecker, B.; Omidi, N.; Isenberg, P. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Vias, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  19. Cyber Wars Have SQUIDs, Will Travel A Trip to Nuclear North Korea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lo s a l a m o s s c i e n c e a n d t e c h n o lo g y m ag a z i n e JUly 20 09 Wired for the Future Cyber Wars Have SQUIDs, Will Travel A Trip to Nuclear North Korea 1 663 lo s a l a m o s s c i e n c e a n d t e c h n o lo g y m ag a z i n e J U ly 2 0 0 9 During the Manhattan Project, Enrico Fermi, Nobel Laureate and leader of F-Division, meets with San Ildefonso Pueblo's Maria Martinez, famous worldwide for her extraordinary black pottery. features from terry wallace PrINcIPaL aSSocIatE

  20. The generation and damping of propagating MHD kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Erdlyi, R.; Hillier, A. E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk

    2014-03-20

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvn and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  1. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Universit della Calabria, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Universit della Calabria, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

  2. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cosson, Pierdavide; Lognonn, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing the vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.

  3. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing themore » vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.« less

  4. Seismic Surface-Wave Tomography of Waste Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leland Timothy Long

    2002-12-17

    Surface-wave group-velocity tomography is an efficient way to obtain images of the group velocity over a test area. Because Rayleigh-wave group velocity depends on frequency, there are separate images for each frequency. Thus, at each point in these images the group velocities define a dispersion curve, a curve that relates group velocity to frequency. The objective of this study has been to find an accurate and efficient way to find the shear-wave structure from these dispersion curves. The conventional inversion techniques match theoretical and observed dispersion curves to determine the structure. These conventional methods do not always succeed in correctly differentiating the fundamental and higher modes, and for some velocity structures can become unstable. In this research a perturbation technique was developed. The perturbation method allows the pre-computation of a global inversion matrix which improves efficiency in obtaining solutions for the structure. Perturbation methods are stable and mimic the averaging process in wave propagation; hence. leading to more accurate solutions. Finite difference techniques and synthetic trace generation techniques were developed to define the perturbations. A new differential trace technique was developed for slight variations in dispersion. The improvements in analysis speed and the accuracy of the solution could lead to real-time field analysis systems, making it possible to obtain immediate results or to monitor temporal change in structure, such as might develop in using fluids for soil remediation.

  5. Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Gurtug, O. E-mail: habib.mazhari@emu.edu.tr

    2014-11-01

    In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

  6. Mixing characteristics of compressible vortex rings interacting with normal shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetegen, B.M. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Hermanson, J.C. )

    1995-01-01

    Current interest in the interaction between compressible vortical flows and shock waves is largely motivated by the need to promote rapid, loss-effective mixing and combustion of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels for supersonic combustor applications. The instability mechanisms and mixing enhancement arising from the interaction of a compressible vortex ring with a normal shock wave were studied in a colinear, dual-shock tube. This flow geometry simulates features of the interaction of a shock wave with a jet containing streamwise vorticity, a configuration of significant interest for supersonic combustion applications. Flow visualization and quantitative concentration measurements were performed by planar laser Rayleigh scattering. For a given primary shock strength, interfacial instability is more evident in a weak vortex ring than in a strong vortex ring. In all cases, the identity of the vortex ring is lost after a sufficiently long time of interaction. The probability density function of the mixed fluid changes rapidly from a bimodal distribution to a single peak upon processing by a shock wave. The most probable concentration decreases with time, indicating a rapid increase in mixing and dilution of the vortex fluid. The mixing enhancement is most rapid for the case of a strong vortex ring interacting with a strong shock wave, somewhat slower for a weak vortex ring and a strong shock wave, and significantly slower for the case of a strong vortex ring and a weaker shock wave. These observations are consistent with the earlier numerical predictions.

  7. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Mayu; Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Husler, Bernd; Ptzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ?30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ?6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvn waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  8. Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1C Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop - Broomfield, CO July 9 th , 2012 Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects Outline  Overview of SNL's Large-Scale Wave and WEC Array Modeling Activities * WEC Farm Modeling on Roadmap * SNL Current Modeling Capabilities * SNL WEC Farm Model Tool Development WEC Farm Modeling  WEC Farms * Currently focused on improving large scale wave models for environmental assessments WEC Farm Modeling: WEC

  9. ARM - Lesson Plans: Moving Water and Waves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving Water and Waves Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Moving Water and Waves Objective The objective of this activity is to enable students to demonstrate how wind causes water to move and generate waves and how water pressure causes water to move from higher

  10. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  11. HEATING THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BY THE SELF-ENHANCED THERMAL WAVES CAUSED BY THE DYNAMO PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumin, Yurii V. E-mail: dumin@izmiran.ru

    2012-05-20

    We discuss a possible mechanism for heating the solar atmosphere by the ensemble of thermal waves, generated by the photospheric dynamo and propagating upward with increasing magnitudes. These waves are self-sustained and amplified due to the specific dependence of the efficiency of heat release by Ohmic dissipation on the ratio of the collisional to gyrofrequencies, which in its turn is determined by the temperature profile formed in the wave. In the case of sufficiently strong driving, such a mechanism can increase the plasma temperature by a few times, i.e., it may be responsible for heating the chromosphere and the base of the transition region.

  12. Direct imaging of rotational wave-packet dynamics of diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, P. W.; Lee, Kevin F.; Corkum, P. B.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Rayner, D. M.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Spanner, M.

    2003-08-01

    We use linearly polarized 45 fs pulses to create rotational wave packets in N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. We Coulomb explode molecules with a high-intensity circularly polarized pulse and use an ion imaging detector to measure a series of two-dimensional projections of the wave packet's angular distribution in 27 fs increments. We highlight the evolving wave packet near the first, second, sixth, and tenth full revival times and also near the one-eighth, one-quarter, one-half, and three-quarter fractional revivals.

  13. Terahertz electromagnetic wave generation and amplification by an electron beam in the elliptical plasma waveguides with dielectric rod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahmani, Z. Jazi, B.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.

    2014-09-15

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in an elliptical plasma waveguide including strongly magnetized plasma column and a dielectric rod is investigated. The dispersion relation of guided hybrid electromagnetic waves is obtained. Excitation of the waves by a thin annular relativistic elliptical electron beam will be studied. The time growth rate of electromagnetic waves is obtained. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, radius of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of the annular elliptical beam on the growth rate and the frequency spectra are numerically presented.

  14. Electrojet-independent ionospheric extremely low frequency/very low frequency wave generation by powerful high frequency waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold; Chang, Chia-Lie

    2010-08-15

    Results of extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) wave generation by intensity-modulated high frequency (HF) heaters of 3.2 MHz in Gakona, Alaska, near local solar noon during a geomagnetic quiet time, are presented to support an electrojet-independent ELF/VLF wave generation mechanism. The modulation was set by splitting the HF transmitter array into two subarrays; one was run at cw full power and the other run alternatively at 50% and 100% power modulation by rectangular waves of 2.02, 5, 8, and 13 kHz. The most effective generation was from the X-mode heater with 100% modulation. While the 8 kHz radiation has the largest wave amplitude, the spectral intensity of the radiation increases with the modulation frequency, i.e., 13 kHz line is the strongest. Ionograms recorded significant virtual height spread of the O-mode sounding echoes. The patterns of the spreads and the changes of the second and third hop virtual height traces caused by the O/X-mode heaters are distinctively different, evidencing that it is due to differently polarized density irregularities generated by the filamentation instability of the O/X-mode HF heaters.

  15. SeWave | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    50:50 JV between UK's Wavegen and Faroese electricity company SEV to to design and build a tunnelled demonstration wave power plant in the Faroes Islands. References:...

  16. Wave Power Plant Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Power Plant Inc Address: 2563 Granite Park Dr Place: Lincoln Zip: 95648 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

  17. Lower Hybrid to Whistler Wave Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winske, Dan

    2012-07-16

    In this presentation we discuss recent work concerning the conversion of whistler waves to lower hybrid waves (as well as the inverse process). These efforts have been motivated by the issue of attenuation of upward propagating whistler waves in the ionosphere generated by VLF transmitters on the ground, i.e., the 'Starks 20 db' problem, which affects the lifetimes of energetic electrons trapped in the geomagnetic field at low magnetic altitude (L). We discuss recent fluid and kinetic plasma simulations as well as ongoing experiments at UCLA to quantify linear and nonlinear mode conversion of lower hybrid to whistler waves.

  18. European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC) series are international, technical and scientific conferences, focussed on ocean renewable energy and widely respected for their commitment to...

  19. Apparatus for utilizing the energy of wave swells and waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubois, Y.; Dubois, F.Y.

    1983-07-05

    The invention involves a device for utilizing the energy from sea swells and waves. The device is characterized by the combination of: (a) a vessel adapted to follow the regular undulations of sea swells at a place of anchorage, and constructed in a manner to face the swells so as to pitch and not to roll while anchored; (b) air cylinders disposed at least at one extremity of the vessel to moderate more or less the amplitude of the pitching; (c) watertight compartments containing a liquid; (d) prime movers, such as continuously powered turbines, located in the path of the liquid and suited to harness energy from the liquid as it moves so as to supply mechanical energy to at least one rotatable shaft; and (e) liquid deflectors located at the extremities of each water-tight compartment.

  20. EERE Success Story-Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Azura device sits 30m out from the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) in Oahu. The Azura device sits 30m out from the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) in Oahu. With support from the ...

  1. MHK Technologies/Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    float can house point absorbers The hybrid wave power rig is based on the patented wave energy converter from 2005 Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 48:21.4 <<...

  2. Terahertz near-field imaging of surface plasmon waves in graphene structures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitrofanov, O.; Yu, W.; Thompson, R. J.; Jiang, Y.; Greenberg, Z. J.; Palmer, J.; Brener, I.; Pan, W.; Berger, C.; de Heer, W. A.; et al

    2015-09-08

    In this study, we introduce a near-field scanning probe terahertz (THz) microscopy technique for probing surface plasmon waves on graphene. Based on THz time-domain spectroscopy method, this near-field imaging approach is well suited for studying the excitation and evolution of THz plasmon waves on graphene as well as for mapping of graphene properties at THz frequencies on the sub-wavelength scale.

  3. Study of nonlinear electron-acoustic solitary and shock waves in a dissipative, nonplanar space plasma with superthermal hot electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jiu-Ning He, Yong-Lin; Luo, Jun-Hua; Nan, Ya-Gong; Han, Zhen-Hai; Dong, Guang-Xing; Duan, Wen-Shan; Li, Jun-Xiu

    2014-01-15

    With the consideration of the superthermal electron distribution, we present a theoretical investigation about the nonlinear propagation of electron-acoustic solitary and shock waves in a dissipative, nonplanar non-Maxwellian plasma comprised of cold electrons, superthermal hot electrons, and stationary ions. The reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a modified Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation for nonlinear waves in this plasma. We discuss the effects of various plasma parameters on the time evolution of nonplanar solitary waves, the profile of shock waves, and the nonlinear structure induced by the collision between planar solitary waves. It is found that these parameters have significant effects on the properties of nonlinear waves and collision-induced nonlinear structure.

  4. Efficient transformer for electromagnetic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, R.B.

    A transformer structure for efficient transfer of electromagnetic energy from a transmission line to an unmatched load provides voltage multiplication and current division by a predetermined constant. Impedance levels are transformed by the square of that constant. The structure includes a wave splitter, connected to an input transmission device and to a plurality of output transmission devices. The output transmission devices are effectively connected in parallel to the input transmission device. The output transmission devices are effectively series connected to provide energy to a load. The transformer structure is particularly effective in increasing efficiency of energy transfer through an inverting convolute structure by capturing and transferring energy losses from the inverter to the load.

  5. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF A LARGE-SCALE WAVE EVENT IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE: FROM PHOTOSPHERE TO CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu

    2012-06-20

    For the first time, we report a large-scale wave that was observed simultaneously in the photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and low corona layers of the solar atmosphere. Using the high temporal and high spatial resolution observations taken by the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope at Hida Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board Solar Dynamic Observatory, we find that the wave evolved synchronously at different heights of the solar atmosphere, and it propagated at a speed of 605 km s{sup -1} and showed a significant deceleration (-424 m s{sup -2}) in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations. During the initial stage, the wave speed in the EUV observations was 1000 km s{sup -1}, similar to those measured from the AIA 1700 A (967 km s{sup -1}) and 1600 A (893 km s{sup -1}) observations. The wave was reflected by a remote region with open fields, and a slower wave-like feature at a speed of 220 km s{sup -1} was also identified following the primary fast wave. In addition, a type-II radio burst was observed to be associated with the wave. We conclude that this wave should be a fast magnetosonic shock wave, which was first driven by the associated coronal mass ejection and then propagated freely in the corona. As the shock wave propagated, its legs swept the solar surface and thereby resulted in the wave signatures observed in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere. The slower wave-like structure following the primary wave was probably caused by the reconfiguration of the low coronal magnetic fields, as predicted in the field-line stretching model.

  6. Gravitational wave hotspots: Ranking potential locations of single-source gravitational wave emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Joseph; Polin, Abigail; Lommen, Andrea; Christy, B; Stappers, Ben; Finn, Lee Samuel; Jenet, F. A.

    2014-03-20

    The steadily improving sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems in the nearby universe will be detectable sometime during the next decade. Currently, PTAs assume an equal probability of detection from every sky position, but as evidence grows for a non-isotropic distribution of sources, is there a most likely sky position for a detectable single source of GWs? In this paper, a collection of Galactic catalogs is used to calculate various metrics related to the detectability of a single GW source resolvable above a GW background, assuming that every galaxy has the same probability of containing an SMBHB. Our analyses of these data reveal small probabilities that one of these sources is currently in the PTA band, but as sensitivity is improved regions of consistent probability density are found in predictable locations, specifically around local galaxy clusters.

  7. Frequency sweep rates of rising tone electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Comparison between nonlinear theory and Cluster observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Zhaoguo; Zong, Qiugang Wang, Yongfu; Liu, Siqing; Lin, Ruilin; Shi, Liqin

    2014-12-15

    Resonant pitch angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been suggested to account for the rapid loss of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons. For the rising tone EMIC wave (classified as triggered EMIC emission), its frequency sweep rate strongly affects the efficiency of pitch-angle scattering. Based on the Cluster observations, we analyze three typical cases of rising tone EMIC waves. Two cases locate at the nightside (22.3 and 22.6 magnetic local time (MLT)) equatorial region and one case locates at the duskside (18MLT) higher magnetic latitude (??=?9.3) region. For the three cases, the time-dependent wave amplitude, cold electron density, and cold ion density ratio are derived from satellite data; while the ambient magnetic field, thermal proton perpendicular temperature, and the wave spectral can be directly provided by observation. These parameters are input into the nonlinear wave growth model to simulate the time-frequency evolutions of the rising tones. The simulated results show good agreements with the observations of the rising tones, providing further support for the previous finding that the rising tone EMIC wave is excited through the nonlinear wave growth process.

  8. Controller for a wave energy converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, David G.; Bull, Diana L.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2015-09-22

    A wave energy converter (WEC) is described, the WEC including a power take off (PTO) that converts relative motion of bodies of the WEC into electrical energy. A controller controls operation of the PTO, causing the PTO to act as a motor to widen a wave frequency spectrum that is usable to generate electrical energy.

  9. Wave Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wave Energy Resource Assessment Office presentation icon 52_wave_resource_assessment_epri_jacobson.ppt More Documents & Publications OTEC resource assessment OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Sub-System Dynamic Interaction Validation (OPPSDIV) Whitestone Power & Communications (TRL 1 2 3 System) - Whitestone Poncelet RISEC Project

  10. Relativistic electron acceleration by oblique whistler waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Peter H.; School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 ; Pandey, Vinay S.; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2013-11-15

    Test-particle simulations of electrons interacting with finite-amplitude, obliquely propagating whistler waves are carried out in order to investigate the acceleration of relativistic electrons by these waves. According to the present findings, an efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons requires a narrow range of oblique propagation angles, close to the whistler resonance cone angle, when the wave amplitude is held constant at relatively low value. For a constant wave propagation angle, it is found that a range of oblique whistler wave amplitudes permits the acceleration of relativistic electrons to O(MeV) energies. An initial distribution of test electrons is shown to form a power-law distribution when plotted in energy space. It is also found that the acceleration is largely uniform in electron pitch-angle space.

  11. Multi-time Schrdinger equations cannot contain interaction potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrat, Sren; Tumulka, Roderich

    2014-03-15

    Multi-time wave functions are wave functions that have a time variable for every particle, such as ?(t{sub 1},x{sub 1},...,t{sub N},x{sub N}). They arise as a relativistic analog of the wave functions of quantum mechanics but can be applied also in quantum field theory. The evolution of a wave function with N time variables is governed by N Schrdinger equations, one for each time variable. These Schrdinger equations can be inconsistent with each other, i.e., they can fail to possess a joint solution for every initial condition; in fact, the N Hamiltonians need to satisfy a certain commutator condition in order to be consistent. While this condition is automatically satisfied for non-interacting particles, it is a challenge to set up consistent multi-time equations with interaction. We prove for a wide class of multi-time Schrdinger equations that the presence of interaction potentials (given by multiplication operators) leads to inconsistency. We conclude that interaction has to be implemented instead by creation and annihilation of particles, which, in fact, can be done consistently [S. Petrat and R. Tumulka, Multi-time wave functions for quantum field theory, Ann. Physics (to be published)]. We also prove the following result: When a cut-off length ? > 0 is introduced (in the sense that the multi-time wave function is defined only on a certain set of spacelike configurations, thereby breaking Lorentz invariance), then the multi-time Schrdinger equations with interaction potentials of range ? are consistent; however, in the desired limit ? ? 0 of removing the cut-off, the resulting multi-time equations are interaction-free, which supports the conclusion expressed in the title.

  12. High-resolution in situ observations of electron precipitation-causing EMIC waves

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodger, Craig J.; Hendry, Aaron T.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Brundell, James B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2015-11-21

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are thought to be important drivers of energetic electron losses from the outer radiation belt through precipitation into the atmosphere. While the theoretical possibility of pitch angle scattering-driven losses from these waves has been recognized for more than four decades, there have been limited experimental precipitation observations to support this concept. We have combined satellite-based observations of the characteristics of EMIC waves, with satellite and ground-based observations of the EMIC-induced electron precipitation. In a detailed case study, supplemented by an additional four examples, we are able to constrain for the first time the location, size,more » and energy range of EMIC-induced electron precipitation inferred from coincident precipitation data and relate them to the EMIC wave frequency, wave power, and ion band of the wave as measured in situ by the Van Allen Probes. As a result, these observations will better constrain modeling into the importance of EMIC wave-particle interactions.« less

  13. Thermoacoustic wave propagation modeling using a dynamically adaptive wavelet collocation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilyev, O.V.; Paolucci, S.

    1996-12-31

    When a localized region of a solid wall surrounding a compressible medium is subjected to a sudden temperature change, the medium in the immediate neighborhood of that region expands. This expansion generates pressure waves. These thermally-generated waves are referred to as thermoacoustic (TAC) waves. The main interest in thermoacoustic waves is motivated by their property to enhance heat transfer by inducing convective motion away from the heated area. Thermoacoustic wave propagation in a two-dimensional rectangular cavity is studied numerically. The thermoacoustic waves are generated by raising the temperature locally at the walls. The waves, which decay at large time due to thermal and viscous diffusion, propagate and reflect from the walls creating complicated two-dimensional patterns. The accuracy of numerical simulation is ensured by using a highly accurate, dynamically adaptive, multilevel wavelet collocation method, which allows local refinements to adapt to local changes in solution scales. Subsequently, high resolution computations are performed only in regions of large gradients. The computational cost of the method is independent of the dimensionality of the problem and is O(N), where N is the total number of collation points.

  14. High-resolution in situ observations of electron precipitation-causing EMIC waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodger, Craig J.; Hendry, Aaron T.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Brundell, James B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2015-11-21

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are thought to be important drivers of energetic electron losses from the outer radiation belt through precipitation into the atmosphere. While the theoretical possibility of pitch angle scattering-driven losses from these waves has been recognized for more than four decades, there have been limited experimental precipitation observations to support this concept. We have combined satellite-based observations of the characteristics of EMIC waves, with satellite and ground-based observations of the EMIC-induced electron precipitation. In a detailed case study, supplemented by an additional four examples, we are able to constrain for the first time the location, size, and energy range of EMIC-induced electron precipitation inferred from coincident precipitation data and relate them to the EMIC wave frequency, wave power, and ion band of the wave as measured in situ by the Van Allen Probes. As a result, these observations will better constrain modeling into the importance of EMIC wave-particle interactions.

  15. Energy propagation by transverse waves in multiple flux tube systems using filling factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Doorsselaere, T.; Gijsen, S. E.; Andries, J.; Verth, G. E-mail: stief.gijsen@wis.kuleuven.be E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    In the last few years, it has been found that transverse waves are present at all times in coronal loops or spicules. Their energy has been estimated with an expression derived for bulk Alfvn waves in homogeneous media, with correspondingly uniform wave energy density and flux. The kink mode, however, is localized in space with the energy density and flux dependent on the position in the cross-sectional plane. The more relevant quantities for the kink mode are the integrals of the energy density and flux over the cross-sectional plane. The present paper provides an approximation to the energy propagated by kink modes in an ensemble of flux tubes by means of combining the analysis of single flux tube kink oscillations with a filling factor for the tube cross-sectional area. This finally allows one to compare the expressions for energy flux of Alfvn waves with an ensemble of kink waves. We find that the correction factor for the energy in kink waves, compared to the bulk Alfvn waves, is between f and 2f, where f is the density filling factor of the ensemble of flux tubes.

  16. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.; Matteini, L.; Santolk, O.

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ?10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor ? {sub e?} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for ? {sub e?} ? 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  17. Peculiarity of convergence of shock wave generated by underwater electrical explosion of ring-shaped wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, D.; Toker, G. R.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Gleizer, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2013-05-15

    Nanosecond timescale underwater electrical wire explosions of ring-shaped Cu wires were investigated using a pulsed generator with a current amplitude up to 50 kA. It was shown that this type of wire explosion results in the generation of a toroidal shock wave (SW). Time- and space-resolved optical diagnostics were used to determine azimuthal uniformity of the shock wave front and its velocity. It was found that the shock wave preserves its circular front shape in the range of radii 50?mwave propagates with a constant velocity of v{sub sw}=1.2M, where M is the Mach number. The dynamics of the leading part of the shock wave, based on the oblique shock wave theory, is presented, explaining the constant velocity of the shock wave.

  18. Quality analysis of the solution produced by dissection algorithms applied to the traveling salesman problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cesari, G.

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to analyze experimentally the quality of the solution obtained with dissection algorithms applied to the geometric Traveling Salesman Problem. Starting from Karp`s results. We apply a divide and conquer strategy, first dividing the plane into subregions where we calculate optimal subtours and then merging these subtours to obtain the final tour. The analysis is restricted to problem instances where points are uniformly distributed in the unit square. For relatively small sets of cities we analyze the quality of the solution by calculating the length of the optimal tour and by comparing it with our approximate solution. When the problem instance is too large we perform an asymptotical analysis estimating the length of the optimal tour. We apply the same dissection strategy also to classical heuristics by calculating approximate subtours and by comparing the results with the average quality of the heuristic. Our main result is the estimate of the rate of convergence of the approximate solution to the optimal solution as a function of the number of dissection steps, of the criterion used for the plane division and of the quality of the subtours. We have implemented our programs on MUSIC (MUlti Signal processor system with Intelligent Communication), a Single-Program-Multiple-Data parallel computer with distributed memory developed at the ETH Zurich.

  19. Beyond telecommuting: A new paradigm for the effect of telecommunications on travel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niles, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    Conventional wisdom about social and economic behavior holds that the use of telecommunications is a natural substitute for transportation. For example, telephone calls can replace travel to meetings, and facsimile or electronic-mail transmission of documents substitutes for courier or postal delivery. The moving of information can replace the moving of period and goods. Vehicle traffic on the national transportation infrastructure can be replaced by digital traffic on what is now called the National Information Infrastructure (NII). A leading example is telecommuting. This means using telecommunications to replace commuting between home and work. Telecommuting is an optional way of expanding employees` work locations in those circumstances where it yields both improved organizational performance and employee satisfication. Telecommuting accounts for 7.6 million U.S. workers as of early 1993, up 15% from the 6.6 million counted in 1992. The growth of telecommuting has been strong for the past five years. No one has identified any reasons to suggest that this growth will abate in the forseeable future.

  20. Wave merging mechanism: formation of low-frequency Alfven and magnetosonic waves in cosmic plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tishchenko, V N; Shaikhislamov, I F

    2014-02-28

    We investigate the merging mechanism for the waves produced by a pulsating cosmic plasma source. A model with a separate background/source description is used in our calculations. The mechanism was shown to operate both for strong and weak source background interactions. We revealed the effect of merging of individual Alfven waves into a narrow low-frequency wave, whose amplitude is maximal for a plasma expansion velocity equal to 0.5 1 of the Alfven Mach number. This wave is followed along the field by a narrow low-frequency magnetosonic wave, which contains the bulk of source energy. For low expansion velocities the wave contains background and source particles, but for high velocities it contains only the background particles. The wave lengths are much greater than their transverse dimension. (letters)

  1. MHK Technologies/WaveStar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the MHK database homepage WaveStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Star Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsWave Star Energy 1...

  2. Property:Wave Period Range(s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:Wave Period Range(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wave Period Range(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Wave...

  3. Variation of Langmuir wave polarization with electron beam speed in type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malaspina, David M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Ergun, Robert E.

    2013-06-13

    Observations by the twin STEREO spacecraft of in-situ electric field waveforms and radio signatures associated with type III radio bursts have demonstrated that the polarization of electron beam-driven waves near the local plasma frequency depends strongly on the speed of the driving electron beam. We expand upon a previous study by including all radio bursts with in-situ waveforms observed by STEREO in 2011. The expanded data set contains five times more radio bursts (35 up from 7) and three times as many Langmuir waves (663 up from 168). While this expanded study supports the results of the original study, that faster (slower) beam electrons drive waves with strong (weak) electric fields perpendicular to the local magnetic field, the larger data set emphasizes that the observation of strong perpendicular electric fields at high electron beam speeds is probabilistic rather than definite. This property supports the interpretation of wave polarization dependence on beam speed as Langmuir/z-mode waves shifted to small wave number through interaction with turbulent solar wind density fluctuations.

  4. A study of the propagation of compression waves in porous medium filled with steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutrisno; Djoko Wintolo; Samsul Kamal; Sudarman, S.

    1996-01-24

    A preliminary investigation on the propagation of compression waves through a radial system of porous medium filled with steam has been conducted for the case of uniform and non-uniform basic temperature distributions. When a relatively weak pressure disturbance is introduced as a signal source in a uniform temperature system, it is found that the pressure disturbance decays away and smears out as time progresses. However, for the case of a nonuniform basic temperature distribution, the temperature gradient and fluid viscosity give significant effects on the reduction of pressure signal attenuation. The attenuation of the compression waves depends on the wave frequencies. For higher frequencies the strength of the signal decays rapidly, and for lower frequencies the signal could propagate farther away. It is found also that porosity and permeability distributions gives significant effects on the amplitude and the wave profiles.

  5. Efficient terahertz-wave generation and its ultrafast optical modulation in charge ordered organic ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Hirotake Iwai, Shinichiro; Itoh, Keisuke; Goto, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Yakushi, Kyuya

    2014-04-28

    Efficient terahertz (THz) wave generation in strongly correlated organic compounds ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} and ??-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} (ET:bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene) was demonstrated. The spontaneous polarization induced by charge ordering or electronic ferroelectricity was revealed to trigger the THz-wave generation via optical rectification; the estimated 2nd-order nonlinear optical susceptibility for ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} is over 70 times larger than that for prototypical THz-source ZnTe. Ultrafast (<1 ps) and sensitive (?40%) photoresponse of the THz wave was observed for ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3}, which is attributable to photoinduced quenching of the polarization accompanied by insulator(ferroelectric)-to-metal transition. Modulation of the THz wave was observed for ??-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} upon the poling procedure, indicating the alignment of polar domains.

  6. Wave-particle Interactions In Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Wave-particle interactions in EB rotating plasmas feature an unusual effect: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. This wave-particle interaction generalizes the alpha channeling effect, in which radio frequency waves are used to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. In rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A particularly simple way to achieve this effect is to use a high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field. Rotation can also be sustained by waves in plasmas without a kinetic energy source. This type of wave has been considered for plasma centrifuges used for isotope separation. Energy may also be transferred from the electric field to particles or waves, which may be useful for ion heating and energy generation.

  7. Fall 2007 American Geophysical Union Meeting Student Travel Support for Environmental Nanomaterials Session (#B35) (December 10-14, 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Hochella, Jr.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of award no. DE-FG02-08ER15925 was to fund travel for students to present at the Fall 2007 American Geophysical Meeting. This was done successfully, and five students (Bin Xie, Qiaona Hu, Katie Schreiner, Daria Kibanova, and Frank-Andreas Weber) gave excellent oral and poster presentations at the meeting. Provided are the conference abstracts for their presentations.

  8. Arranging Prescription Drug Coverage for Extended Stays (Travel or Long-Term Work Assignments) When Outside the United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arranging Prescription Drug Coverage for Extended Stays (Travel or Long-Term Work Assignments) When Outside the United States Planning an extended vacation or working abroad? rx_lanl_override_0311 Maintaining prescription coverage and accessing care for long-term stays abroad What you need to know about override requests and obtaining Rx drugs. Your BCBSNM prescription drug coverage limits override requests to a 90-day supply. Override requests cannot be approved - and are not available -

  9. Wave Energy Converter System Requirements and Performance Metrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department and Wave Energy Scotland are holding a joint workshop on wave energy converter (WEC) system requirements and performance metrics on Friday, February 26.

  10. MHK Technologies/Indian Wave Energy Device IWAVE | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indian Wave Energy Device IWAVE < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Indian Wave Energy Device IWAVE.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  11. Wave propagation in anisotropic elastic materials and curvilinear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wave propagation in anisotropic elastic materials and curvilinear coordinates using a summation-by-parts finite difference method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wave...

  12. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave...

  13. MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge...

  14. L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers...

  15. Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density Simulations Run at NERSC Support Fusion Experiments at MIT, General Atomics ...

  16. Green Wave Energy Corp GWEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Energy Corp GWEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Wave Energy Corp GWEC Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in...

  17. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in...

  18. Gravitational waves and the scale of inflation (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gravitational waves and the scale of inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gravitational waves and the scale of inflation Authors: Mirbabayi, Mehrdad ; Senatore, ...

  19. A New Mechanism of Charge Density Wave Discovered in Transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 A New Mechanism of Charge Density Wave Discovered in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Charge density waves (CDW) are a type of coupled electronic-lattice instability found in...

  20. Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator Arrays Prev Next Title: Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator Arrays Authors: Hu,...

  1. Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Overseeing Organization University of New...

  2. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of the United States ocean wave energy resource. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource More Documents...

  3. Characterization of Heat-Wave Propagation through Laser-Driven...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization of Heat-Wave Propagation through Laser-Driven Ti-Doped Underdense Plasma Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of Heat-Wave Propagation...

  4. Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense Plasma for Efficient X-Ray Generation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Supersonic Heat Wave...

  5. Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense Plasma for Efficient X-Ray Generation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in...

  6. 3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC)...

  7. Impurity states in multiband s -wave superconductors: Analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Impurity states in multiband s -wave superconductors: Analysis of iron pnictides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impurity states in multiband s -wave superconductors:...

  8. Development of Feedforward Control Strategies for Wave Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wave and Tidal Find More Like This Return to Search Development of Feedforward Control Strategies for Wave Energy Conversion Technologies National Renewable Energy...

  9. Characteristics of seismic waves from Soviet peaceful nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Characteristics of seismic waves from Soviet peaceful nuclear explosions in salt Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characteristics of seismic waves from...

  10. BlueWave Capital LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BlueWave Capital LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: BlueWave Capital LLC Place: Boston, Massachusetts Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Knowledge-based investment firm focused...

  11. 5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC)...

  12. 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .5-ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers...

  13. MHK Technologies/DEXA Wave Converter | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Description The wave energy conversion is similar to other devices There is no data publicly available...

  14. California Wave Energy Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Energy Partners LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Wave Energy Partners LLC Address: 1590 Reed Road Place: Pennington Zip: 8534 Region: United States Sector:...

  15. Wave Dragon ApS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Denmark Country: Denmark Zip: DK-2200 Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Product: Wave energy converter development company. Has patented the Wave Dragon, an offshore floating...

  16. Danish Wave Energy Development Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Energy Development Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Danish Wave Energy Development Ltd Place: Gentofte, Denmark Zip: 2820 Product: Original developer and now holding...

  17. Ocean Wave Energy Company OWECO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Company OWECO Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ocean Wave Energy Company (OWECO) Place: Bristol, Rhode Island Sector: Ocean Product: Wave energy device developer. The...

  18. MHK Technologies/WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type...

  19. MHK Technologies/The Crestwing Wave Energy Converter | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crestwing Wave Energy Converter < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Crestwing Wave Energy Converter.jpg Technology Profile...

  20. MHK Technologies/Magnetohydrodynamic MHD Wave Energy Converter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnetohydrodynamic MHD Wave Energy Converter MWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Magnetohydrodynamic MHD Wave Energy...