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1

Property:Wave Period Range(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Period Range(s) Wave Period Range(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wave Period Range(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Wave Period Range(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 2.1 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 +

2

Periodic wave solutions of the Boussinesq equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boussinesq equation usually arises in a physical problem as a long wave equation. The present work extends the search of periodic wave solutions for it. The Hirota bilinear method and Riemann theta function are employed in the process. We also analyse the asymptotic property of periodic waves in detail. Furthermore, it is of interest to note that well-known soliton solutions can be reduced from the periodic wave solutions.

Yi Zhang; Ling-ya Ye; Yi-neng Lv; Hai-qiong Zhao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + C Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + 2.3 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 4.0 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 3.0 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 3.0 +

4

Dispersion of discontinuous periodic waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Benjamin-Bona-Mahony (BBM) model's is asymptotically...standard bidirectional Boussinesq systems is asymptotically...waves |k|1/2k Boussinesq system, regularized Boussinesq equation signk Boussinesq...Korteweg-de Vries k 3 RLW/BBM k 1 Figure 2. RLW...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

Samuel Walsh

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Solutions to Test 1 Review Problems 1. Here are two sound waves. Identify which is periodic. For the periodic wave, sketch a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Hz and BPM. Is the frequency within the range of human hearing? Answer. The periodic wave frequency is 1/0.01 = 100 Hz = 6000 BPM. 2. Functions. (a) For each function, determine whether and frequency =3 BPM (2) amplitude = 10 and fundamental period = 0.005 seconds. Answer. (1) since 3 BPM = 180 Hz

Hall, Rachel W.

7

Periodic Discrete Energy for Long-Range Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider periodic energy problems in Euclidean space with a special emphasis on long-range potentials that cannot be defined through the usual infinite sum. One of our main results builds on more recent developments of Ewald summation to define the periodic energy corresponding to a large class of long-range potentials. Two particularly interesting examples are the logarithmic potential and the Riesz potential when the Riesz parameter is smaller than the dimension of the space. For these examples, we use analytic continuation methods to provide concise formulas for the periodic kernel in terms of the Epstein Hurwitz Zeta function. We apply our energy definition to deduce several properties of the minimal energy including the asymptotic order of growth and the distribution of points in energy minimizing configurations as the number of points becomes large. We conclude with some detailed calculations in the case of one dimension, which shows the utility of this approach.

D. P. Hardin; E. B. Saff; Brian Simanek

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

Barsotti, Lisa

9

Gravitational Waves from Periodic Three-Body Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three bodies moving in a periodic orbit under the influence of Newtonian gravity ought to emit gravitational waves. We have calculated the gravitational radiation quadrupolar waveforms and the corresponding luminosities for the 13+11 recently discovered three-body periodic orbits in Newtonian gravity. These waves clearly allow one to distinguish between their sources: all 13+11 orbits have different waveforms and their luminosities (evaluated at the same orbit energy and body mass) vary by up to 13 orders of magnitude in the mean, and up to 20 orders of magnitude for the peak values.

Dmitrašinovi?, V; Hudomal, Ana

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the full S5 LIGO data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50–800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6×10[superscript -9]??Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced ...

Barsotti, Lisa

11

A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical of Mechanical Engineering) ABSTRACT Within a wave energy converter's operational bandwidth, device operation

Victoria, University of

12

Periodic gravitational waves from small cosmic string loops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider a population of small, high-velocity cosmic string loops. We assume the typical length of these loops is determined by the gravitational radiation scale and use the results of Polchinski and Rocha which pointed out their highly relativistic nature. A study of the gravitational wave emission from such a population is carried out. The large Lorentz boost involved causes the lowest harmonics of the loops to fall within the frequency band of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory detector. Because of this feature the gravitational waves emitted by such loops can be detected in a periodic search rather than in burst or stochastic analysis. It is shown that, for interesting values of the string tension (10-10?G??10-8), the detector can observe loops at reasonably high redshifts and that detection is, in principle, possible. We compute the number of expected observations produced by such a process. For a 10 h search we find that this number is of order O(10-4). This is a consequence of the low effective number density of the loops traveling along the line of sight. However, small probabilities of reconnection and longer observation times can improve the result.

Florian Dubath and Jorge V. Rocha

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

Pasyanos, M E

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

All-Sky LIGO Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Early Fifth-Science-Run Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50–1100 Hz and with the frequency’s time derivative in the range -5×10[superscript -9]–0??Hz?s[superscript -1]. ...

Zucker, Michael E.

15

Einstein@Home search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for periodic gravitational waves, from sources such as isolated rapidly spinning neutron stars, was carried out using 510 h of data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4). The search was for quasimonochromatic waves ...

Zucker, Michael E.

16

Periodic wave patterns of two-dimensional Boussinesq systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2006 ... Abstract. We prove the existence of a large family of two-dimensional travelling wave patterns for a Boussinesq system which describes.

2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

17

LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR PERIODIC TRAVELING WAVES OF THE BOUSSINESQ EQUATION AND THE KGZ SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR PERIODIC TRAVELING WAVES OF THE BOUSSINESQ EQUATION AND THE KGZ stability of spatially periodic waves for the Boussinesq equa- tion (the cases p = 2, 3) and the Klein interest will be mainly in two PDE - the Boussinesq equation and the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov system, although

Stanislavova, Milena

18

LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR PERIODIC TRAVELING WAVES OF THE BOUSSINESQ EQUATION AND THE KGZ SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR PERIODIC TRAVELING WAVES OF THE BOUSSINESQ EQUATION AND THE KGZ stability of spatially periodic waves for the Boussinesq equa- tion (the cases p = 2, 3) and the Klein in two PDEs - the Boussinesq equation and the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov system, although the methods that we

Stanislavova, Milena

19

Marine wind and wave height trends at different ERA-Interim forecast ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trends in marine wind speed and significant wave height are investigated using the global reanalysis ERA-Interim over the period 1979-2012, based on monthly mean and maximum data. Besides the traditional reanalysis, we include trends obtained at ...

Ole Johan Aarnes; Saleh Abdalla; Jean-Raymond Bidlot; Øyvind Breivik

20

Linear and nonlinear resonance of water waves near periodic structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first part of this thesis, we present a nonlinear theory for the excitation of trapped wave around a circular cylinder mounted at the center of a channel. It is well-known that near an infinite linear array of ...

Li, Yile, 1973-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Einstein@Home search for periodic gravitational waves in early S5 LIGO data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves from sources such as deformed isolated rapidly spinning neutron stars. The analysis uses 840 hours of data from 66 days of the fifth LIGO science run ...

Barsotti, Lisa

22

Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves ...

Jaeger, E. F.

23

Resonance modes, cavity field enhancements, and long-range collective photonic effects in periodic bowtie nanostructures  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of single-molecule sensitivity via surfaceenhanced Raman scattering on resonantly excited noble metal nanoparticles has brought an increasing interest in its applications to the molecule detection and identification. Periodic gold bowtie nanostructures have recently been shown to give a large enhancement factor sufficient for single molecule detection. In this work, we simulate the plasmon resonance for periodic gold bowtie nanostructures. The difference between the dipole and the quadrupole resonances is described by examining the magnitude and phase of electric field, the bound surface charge, and the polarization. The gap size dependence of the field enhancement can be interpreted by considering cavity field enhancement. Also, additional enhancement is obtained through the long-range collective photonic effect when the bowtie array periodicity matches the resonance wavelength.

Hsueh, Chun-Hway [ORNL; Li, Jia-Han [National Taiwan Ocean University; Hatab, Nahla A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gu, Baohua [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

On the joint distribution of wave heights and periods: The role of the spectral bandwidth  

SciTech Connect

The influence of spectral bandwidth on the probabilistic structure of the joint distribution of wave heights and periods is analyzed by means of simulated wave records. The authors put the emphasis on its effect upon the asymmetric and bimodal structure of the distributions. Moreover, the adequacy of some theoretical models to describe such features is considered.

Rodriguez, R.G.; Rubio, R.F.; Pacheco, M.M.; Martinez, M.A. [Univ. de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain). Dept. de Fisica

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1.0E-8 Hz/s to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from Short Fourier Transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as "StackSlide", averages normalized power from each SFT. A "weighted Hough" scheme is also developed and used, and which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as "PowerFlux", is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitationa...

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, a C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, a N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Waves and the equilibrium range at Ocean Weather Station P J. Thomson,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy spectra. Observations are consistent with a local balance between wind input and breaking is extended to a wider range of conditions using observations of wave energy spectra and wind speed during a 2 friction velocity u� (and thus wind stress) directly controls wave energy spectra levels at high fre

27

Ultrasonic wave propagation in random and periodic particulate composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specimens Periodic specimens were manufactured containing multiple layers of spherical inclusions. Early attempts to make a multiple layer specimen using only polyester proved difficult and layer alignment was poor. Because of this, a PMMA matrix...), and then allowed to cool to 310 K (100' F). The finished layer consisted of a 2. 63 inrn thick circular disk of clear PMMA with an embedded layer of spheres and alignment holes near the rim. After all the layers were manufactured, they were stacked and aligned...

Henderson, Benjamin Kyle

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Report on an all-sky LIGO search for periodic gravitational waves in the S4 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and having a negative frequency time derivative with magnitude between zero and $10^{-8}$ Hz/s. Data from the fourth LIGO science run have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of summing strain power were applied. Observing no evidence for periodic gravitational radiation, we report upper limits on strain amplitude and interpret these limits to constrain radiation from rotating neutron stars.

Alicia M. Sintes; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Quantum reflection and interference of matter waves from periodically doped surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that periodically doped, flat surfaces can act as reflective diffraction gratings for atomic and molecular matter waves. The diffraction element is realized by exploiting that charged dopants locally suppress quantum reflection from the Casimir-Polder potential. We present a general quantum scattering theory for reflection off periodically charged surfaces and discuss the requirements for the observation of multiple diffraction peaks.

Benjamin A. Stickler; Uzi Even; Klaus Hornberger

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ultrasonic wave propagation through a layer of spherical inclusions with random of periodic arrangements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ULTRASONIC %'AVE PROPAGATION THROUGH A LAYER OF SPHERICAL INCLUSIONS %ITH RANDOM OR PERIODIC ARRANGEMENTS A Thesis by NATHAN ALLAN DAY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AEcM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1994 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering ULTRASONIC WAVE PROPAGATION THROUGH A LAYER OF SPHERICAL INCLUSIONS WITH RANDOM OR PERIODIC ARRANGEMENTS A Thesis by NATHAN ALLAN DAY Submitted...

Day, Nathan Allan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Hamiltonian description of self-consistent wave-particle dynamics in a periodic Frederic Andre,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the electron, self-acceleration and acausality, also appear incompatible with the existence of a wellHamiltonian description of self-consistent wave-particle dynamics in a periodic structure Fr conserves energy and excludes self-acceleration. A complete Hamiltonian formulation results from adding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

Gulyaev–Bleustein Waves in a Layered Structure of Piezoelectric – Periodic Granular High-Temperature Superconductor Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bragg's interactions of Gulyaev–Bleustein surface waves with a periodic granular high-temperature superconducting medium are studied. Dispersion equations describing the characteristics of surface acoustoelect...

V. A. Krakovskii

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Optical disk resonators with micro-wave free spectral range for optoelectronic oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical disk resonators with micro-wave free spectral range for optoelectronic oscillator Herv to the resonator relaxation time = Q/ [2]. The optoelectronic delayed feed- back loop can thus oscillate at all. frequency selective resonator (e.g with a high Q factor). The detailed architecture is an optoelectronic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO), in NM, can detect photon bounces from retro-reflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference - only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations/turbulence (gravitational waves) in the flow of the dynamical 3-space relative to local systems/observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an effective "gravitational wave" detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave/turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

Reginald T Cahill

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Architecture, implementation and parallelization of the software to search for periodic gravitational wave signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parallelization, design and scalability of the \\sky code to search for periodic gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars is discussed. The code is based on an efficient implementation of the F-statistic using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. To perform an analysis of data from the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors' network, which will start operating in 2015, hundreds of millions of CPU hours will be required - the code utilizing the potential of massively parallel supercomputers is therefore mandatory. We have parallelized the code using the Message Passing Interface standard, implemented a mechanism for combining the searches at different sky-positions and frequency bands into one extremely scalable program. The parallel I/O interface is used to escape bottlenecks, when writing the generated data into file system. This allowed to develop a highly scalable computation code, which would enable the data analysis at large scales on acceptable time scales. Benchmarking of the c...

Poghosyan, Gevorg; Streit, Achim; Bejger, Micha?; Królak, Andrzej

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Long and Short Period P-wave amplitudes from Earthquakes in the Range 0°-114°  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......explosionsof 80kt, Miniata and Longshot fired at two test sites, the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Amchitka Island Test Site (ATS) in the Aleutian Islands, respectively......

D. C. Booth; P. D. Marshall; J. B. Young

1974-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Long-range triggered earthquakes that continue after the wave train passes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continue after the wave train passes, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,that continue after the wave train passes Emily E. Brodsky 1triggered early in the wave train. First, the sequences obey

Brodsky, Emily E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Architecture, implementation and parallelization of the software to search for periodic gravitational wave signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parallelization, design and scalability of the \\sky code to search for periodic gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars is discussed. The code is based on an efficient implementation of the F-statistic using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. To perform an analysis of data from the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors' network, which will start operating in 2015, hundreds of millions of CPU hours will be required - the code utilizing the potential of massively parallel supercomputers is therefore mandatory. We have parallelized the code using the Message Passing Interface standard, implemented a mechanism for combining the searches at different sky-positions and frequency bands into one extremely scalable program. The parallel I/O interface is used to escape bottlenecks, when writing the generated data into file system. This allowed to develop a highly scalable computation code, which would enable the data analysis at large scales on acceptable time scales. Benchmarking of the code on a Cray XE6 system was performed to show efficiency of our parallelization concept and to demonstrate scaling up to 50 thousand cores in parallel.

Gevorg Poghosyan; Sanchit Matta; Achim Streit; Micha? Bejger; Andrzej Królak

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Periodic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

04 04 by C.G. Wohl (LBNL). Adapted from the Commission of Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances, "Atomic Weights of the Elements 1995," Pure and Applied Chemistry 68, 2339 (1996), and G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra, "The 1993 Mass Evaluation," Nucl. Phys. A565, 1 (1993). The atomic number (top left) is the number of protons in the nucleus. The atomic mass (bottom) is weighted by isotopic abundances in the Earth's surface. For a new determination of atomic masses, not weighted by abundances, see G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl. Phys. A729, 337 (2003). Atomic masses are relative to the mass of the carbon-12 isotope, defined to be exactly 12 unified atomic mass units (u). Errors range from 1 to 9 in the last digit quoted. Relative isotopic abundances often vary considerably, both in natural and commercial samples. A number in parentheses is the mass of the longest-lived

40

New analytical solutions for dust acoustic solitary and periodic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma with kappa distributed electrons and ions  

SciTech Connect

Dust acoustic solitary waves and periodic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma with kappa distributed electrons and ions are investigated through non-perturbative approach. Basic equations are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations involving electrostatic potential. After that by applying the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems to this system, we have studied the existence of solitary wave solutions and periodic wave solutions. New analytical solutions for the above waves are derived depending on the parametric space. Regarding the solitary and periodic wave solutions, the combined effects of temperature ratio (?) of ions and electrons, spectral index (?) and density ratio (p) are studied on characteristics of dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves and periodic waves. The spectral index (?), density ratio (p) of ions and electrons and temperature ratio (?) significantly influence the characteristics of dust acoustic solitary and periodic structures.

Saha, Asit, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India) [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India)] [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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41

Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations  

SciTech Connect

Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-{sup 3}He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of {approx}50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Green, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Coherent searches for periodic gravitational waves from unknown isolated sources and Scorpius X-1: results from the second LIGO science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We carry out two searches for periodic gravitational waves using the most sensitive few hours of data from the second LIGO science run. The first search is targeted at isolated, previously unknown neutron stars and covers the entire sky in the frequency band 160-728.8 Hz. The second search targets the accreting neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1, covers the frequency bands 464-484 Hz and 604-624 Hz, and two binary orbit parameters. Both searches look for coincidences between the Livingston and Hanford 4-km interferometers. For isolated neutron stars our 95% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave strain amplitude range from 6.6E-23 to 1E-21 across the frequency band; For Scorpius X-1 they range from 1.7E-22 to 1.3E-21 across the two 20-Hz frequency bands. The upper limits presented in this paper are the first broad-band wide parameter space upper limits on periodic gravitational waves using coherent search techniques. The methods developed here lay the foundations for upcoming hi...

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Agresti, J; Allen, B; Allen, J; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Luna, M; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswaran, A J; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sanchodela, L; Jordana; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Spjeld, O; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, 2K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ward, R; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hamiltonian description of self-consistent wave-particle dynamics in a periodic structure Frederic Andre,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the electron, self-acceleration and acausality, are also incompatible with the existence of a wellHamiltonian description of self-consistent wave-particle dynamics in a periodic structure Fr. The dynamics conserves energy, and excludes self-acceleration. A complete hamiltonian formulation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

ULYSSES DETECTS LONG-SOUGHT WAVE MOTIONS OF THE SUN Periodic oscillations originating from deep within the Sun's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ULYSSES DETECTS LONG-SOUGHT WAVE MOTIONS OF THE SUN Periodic oscillations originating from deep within the Sun's interior have been detected for the first time in interplanetary space by the Ulysses mission to the poles of the Sun. The discovery was reported in this week's issue of Nature magazine

Christian, Eric

45

Stimulated Raman back scattering of extraordinary electromagnetic waves from periodically magnetized nanoparticle lattice  

SciTech Connect

Stimulated Raman back scattering of extraordinary electromagnetic waves from the nanoparticle lattice is investigated in the presence of the static magnetic field. In the context of macroscopic theory, dispersion relation and growth rate of extraordinary mode for different values of static magnetic field and lattice parameters are derived and analyzed. It is found that when the static magnetic field is off, dispersion relation has two branches. These branches are related to the plasmonic and body wave branches of the plane polarized wave. Low frequency branch of the pump wave is not involved in the instability while the other branch is not stable, and the growth rate of Raman back scattered wave has one peak. If the electrons have cyclotron frequency by static magnetic field, dispersion has three branches. These branches are related to the plasmonic and body wave branches of left and right hand circularly polarized waves. In this situation, it is found that low frequency lower branch of the pump wave is stable while other branches are not stable, and the growth rate of Raman back scattered wave has three peaks. Numerical study of growth rate in various cyclotron frequencies shows that the growth rate increases and the instability band width decreases with increasing static magnetic field.

Chakhmachi, A. [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 104.0 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 4.6 Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 1.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 12' by 12' concrete slabs anchored to flume walls

47

Comment on "Mode Conversion of Waves In The Ion-Cyclotron Frequency Range in Magnetospheric Plasmas"  

SciTech Connect

Recently, Kazakov and Fulop [1] studied mode conversion (MC) at the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance in planetary magnetospheric plasmas by simplifying the dispersion relation of the fast wave (FW) modes to describe a cutoff-resonance (CR) pair near the IIH resonance, which can be reduced to a Budden problem. They suggested that when the IIH resonance frequency (?S) approaches the crossover frequency (?cr), and the parallel wavenumber (k?) is close to the critical wavenumber k? ?(?S = ?cr), MC can be efficient for arbitrary heavy ion density ratios. In this Comment, we argue that (a) the FW dispersion relation cannot be simplified to the CR pair especially near ?cr because in many parameter regimes there is a cutoff-resonance-cutoff (CRC) triplet that completely changes the wave absorption; and (b) the maximum MC efficiency does not always occur near k? ?#25; k???.

Kim, Eun

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 33.5 Beam(m) 21.3 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 1.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 1.8 Wave Period Range(s) 1.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sand/sediment

49

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin 2 Wave Basin 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Length(m) 48.8 Beam(m) 26.5 Depth(m) 2.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Built to client specifications, currently rigid concrete over gravel fill

50

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheets Wave Basin Sheets Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sheets Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Rhode Island Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 30.0 Beam(m) 3.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $750(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.0 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Pre-programmed for regular and irregular waves, but wavemaker is capable of any input motion. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

51

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

52

DeFrees Large Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Large Wave Basin Large Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Large Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 32.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 64 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled 4m hydraulic wave paddle stroke allows a series of solitary waves to be generated; arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes

53

Effective poroelastic model for one-dimensional wave propagation in periodically layered media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......used to obtain responses of heterogeneous...Biot critical frequency is of the same...flow dissipates energy of the passing...in the space-frequency domain. By combining...no sources of energy at any place...CO2 Capture and Storage technology...solid. I. Low-frequency range. J. acoust......

Asiya M. Kudarova; Karel N. van Dalen; Guy G. Drijkoningen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Plasma Current Start-up Experiment using Waves in the Lower Hybrid Frequency Range in TST-2  

SciTech Connect

Noninductive plasma current (I{sub p}) start-up experiments using RF power in the lower hybrid frequency range are being conducted on the TST-2 spherical tokamak. The lower hybrid wave (LHW) has demonstrated efficient current drive in conventional tokamaks. However, in spherical tokamak (ST) plasmas with very high dielectric constants (;{epsilon}{approx}{omega}{sub pe}{sup 2}/{Omega}{sub e}{sup 2}>>1), accessibility of the LHW to the plasma core is severely limited. Our approach is to keep the plasma density low (such that {epsilon}{approx}1) during I{sub p} ramp-up. Once I{sub p} reaches a level sufficiently high for neutral beam current drive, plasma can be densified and transformed into an advanced tokamak plasma dominated by the self-driven bootstrap current. Initial plasma start-up experiments were performed on TST-2 using a combline antenna which excites a traveling fast wave. After formation of toroidal flux surfaces, RF power and vertical field were ramped up to increase I{sub p}. Up to 12 kA of Ip has been obtained by this method. Soft X-ray measurements indicate that the electron temperature increases as I{sub p} increases, and hard X-ray spectroscopy indicates that energetic electrons build up as I{sub p} is ramped up.

Takase, Y.; Wakatsuki, T.; Ejiri, A.; Kakuda, H.; Ambo, T.; Hanashima, K.; Hiratsuka, J.; Nagashima, Y.; Sakamoto, T.; Shino, R.; Sonehara, M.; Watanabe, O.; Yamaguchi, T. [University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa277-8561 Japan (Japan); Moeller, C. P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186 (United States); Kasahara, H.; Kumazawa, R.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Shimpo, F. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 Japan (Japan)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

Wave energy devices with compressible volumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...author and source are credited. Wave energy devices with compressible volumes Adi...1BJ, UK We present an analysis of wave energy devices with air-filled compressible...wave period range of about-4s. wave energy|compressible volume|axisymmetric device...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DeFrees Small Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Small Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 15.0 Beam(m) 0.8 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 30 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled hydraulic paddle, arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 1:10 sloping glass with dissipative horsehair covering if needed

57

Excitation of electrostatic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas  

SciTech Connect

We report the observation of electromagnetic radiation at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency that was considered to be converted from electrostatic waves called electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas. The excitation of EBWs was attributed to the thermalization of electrons accelerated by the reconnection electric field around the X-point. The radiative process discussed here is an acceptable explanation for observed radio waves pulsation associated with major flares.

Kuwahata, A., E-mail: kuwahata@ts.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Igami, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kawamori, E. [Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Attenuation of multiphase surface waves in the Basin and Range province, part I: Lg and Lg coda  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......regional phases Pg and Lg at the Nevada Test Site, J. geophys. Res., 86...1987. A study of P waves from Nevada Test Site explosions: near source informations...1986. Yield estimates of Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic......

J. Xie; B. J. Mitchell

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

60

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 15.2 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Special Physical Features Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control sys

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An analysis of the travel times of S waves to North American stations in the distance range 28° to 82°  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...i o-,.s ~.... ~ ,, ~ ,,/ \\Lt ~ ..... o'~ ', ,' , t / -%, o WWSS stoflons \\ / \\ \\ = CaHech slo'iions 1.6 Fzo. 2. Map of S Residuals for.U.S. Stations. TRAVEL TIMES OF S WAVES 767 l I I I I I I I I I I I i I I x x I...

H. A. Doyle; A. L. Hales

62

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

63

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

64

Upper Limit on a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves from Seismic Measurements in the Range 0.05 Hz to 1 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an upper limit of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}<1.2\\times 10^{8}$ on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.05 Hz - 1 Hz, which improves current upper limits from high-precision laboratory experiments by about 9 orders of magnitude. The limit is obtained using the response of Earth itself to GWs via a free-surface effect described more than 40 years ago by F.J. Dyson. The response was measured by a global network of broadband seismometers selected to maximize the sensitivity.

Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

65

1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ft Wave Flume Facility -ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

66

11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 77.4 Beam(m) 3.4 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

67

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 10-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

68

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Flume Facility Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 6-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 105.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

69

OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OTRC Wave Basin OTRC Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name OTRC Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (OTRC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 5.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $300/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 25 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.6 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description GEDAP 3D wave generation software, 48 hinged flap wave generator

70

Down hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe in the Range 0.1 Hz to 1 Hz using the Apollo Seismic Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe an analysis of Apollo era lunar seismic data that places an upper limit on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.1\\,Hz -- 1\\,Hz. We find that because the Moon's ambient noise background is much quieter than that of the Earth, significant improvements over an Earth based analysis were made. We find an upper limit of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}<1.2\\times 10^{5}$, which is three orders of magnitude smaller than a similar analysis of a global network of broadband seismometers on Earth and the best limits in this band to date. We also discuss the benefits of a potential Earth-Moon correlation search and compute the time-dependent overlap reduction function required for such an analysis. For this search, we find an upper limit an order of magnitude larger than the Moon-Moon search.

Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe in the Range 0.1 Hz to 1 Hz using the Apollo Seismic Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe an analysis of Apollo era lunar seismic data that places an upper limit on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.1\\,Hz -- 1\\,Hz. We find that because the Moon's ambient noise background is much quieter than that of the Earth, significant improvements over an Earth based analysis were made. We find an upper limit of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}<1.2\\times 10^{5}$, which is three orders of magnitude smaller than a similar analysis of a global network of broadband seismometers on Earth and the best limits in this band to date. We also discuss the benefits of a potential Earth-Moon correlation search and compute the time-dependent overlap reduction function required for such an analysis. For this search, we find an upper limit an order of magnitude larger than the Moon-Moon search.

Coughlin, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

MHL 2D Wind/Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL 2D Wind/Wave MHL 2D Wind/Wave Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL 2D Wind/Wave Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 35.1 Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Removable beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 20.4

75

Kink waves in solar spicules: observation and modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Height series of Doppler observation at the solar limb (covering 3800 - 8700 km distance above the photosphere) in $H_{\\alpha}$ spectral line obtained by big coronagraph of Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory \\citep{khu} show the periodic spatial distribution of Doppler velocities in spicules. We suggest that the periodic spatial distribution is caused by propagating kink waves in spicule. The wave length is found to be $\\sim$ 3500 km. Numerical modelling of kink wave propagation from the photosphere to observed heights gives the wave length of kink waves at the photosphere to be $\\sim$ 1000 km, which indicates to the granular origin of the waves. The period of waves is estimated to be in the range of 35-70 s.

V. Kukhianidze; T. V. Zaqarashvili; E. Khutsishvili

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

University of Iowa Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University of Iowa Wave Basin University of Iowa Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 40.0 Beam(m) 20.0 Depth(m) 3.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Towed 3DPIV; contactless motion tracking; free surface measurement mappingv Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Fully programmable for regular or irregular waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Trusses overlaid with lattice and matting Channel/Tunnel/Flume

77

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.  

SciTech Connect

The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis...

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Gravitational wave generation in power-law inflationary models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the generation of gravitational waves in power-law inflationary models. The energy spectrum of the gravitational waves is calculated using the method of continuous Bogoliubov coefficients. We show that, by looking at the interval of frequencies between 10^(-5) and 10^5 Hz and also at the GHz range, important information can be obtained, both about the inflationary period itself and about the thermalization regime between the end of inflation and the beginning of the radiation-dominated era. We thus deem the development of gravitational wave detectors, covering the MHz/GHz range of frequencies, to be an important task for the future.

Paulo M. Sá; Alfredo B. Henriques

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

80

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES  

SciTech Connect

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

Okamoto, Takenori J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Range imaging laser radar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

Scott, Marion W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

James, L. Allan

84

Wave and Tide-Dominated Coasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between the wave- and tide-dominated coastal extremes is a broad spectrum of wave and tide-dominated coasts. These range from settings with high wave energy and perceptible tidal energy associated with a low tida...

Edward J. Anthony

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

PROPAGATION OF ALFVENIC WAVES FROM CORONA TO CHROMOSPHERE AND CONSEQUENCES FOR SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

How do magnetohydrodynamic waves travel from the fully ionized corona, into and through the underlying partially ionized chromosphere, and what are the consequences for solar flares? To address these questions, we have developed a two-fluid model (of plasma and neutrals) and used it to perform one-dimensional simulations of Alfven waves in a solar atmosphere with realistic density and temperature structure. Studies of a range of solar features (faculae, plage, penumbra, and umbra) show that energy transmission from corona to chromosphere can exceed 20% of incident energy for wave periods of 1 s or less. Damping of waves in the chromosphere depends strongly on wave frequency: waves with periods 10 s or longer pass through the chromosphere with relatively little damping, however, for periods of 1 s or less, a substantial fraction (37%-100%) of wave energy entering the chromosphere is damped by ion-neutral friction in the mid- and upper chromosphere, with electron resistivity playing some role in the lower chromosphere and in umbras. We therefore conclude that Alfvenic waves with periods of a few seconds or less are capable of heating the chromosphere during solar flares, and speculate that they could also contribute to electron acceleration or exciting sunquakes.

Russell, A. J. B.; Fletcher, L. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

The role of tides in shelf-scale simulations of the wave energy resource  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many regions throughout the world that are suitable for exploitation of the wave energy resource also experience large tidal ranges and associated strong tidal flows. However, tidal effects are not included in the majority of modelling studies which quantify the wave energy resource. This research attempts to quantify the impact of tides on the wave energy resource of the northwest European shelf seas, a region with a significant wave energy resource, and where many wave energy projects are under development. Results of analysis based on linear wave theory, and the application of a non-linear coupled wave-tide model (SWAN–ROMS), suggest that the impact of tides is significant, and can exceed 10% in some regions of strong tidal currents (e.g. headlands). Results also show that the effect of tidal currents on the wave resource is much greater than the contribution of variations in tidal water depth, and that regions which experience lower wave energy (and hence shorter wave periods) are more affected by tides than high wave energy regions. While this research provides general guidelines on the scale of the impact in regions of strong tidal flow, high resolution site-specific coupled wave-tide models are necessary for more detailed analysis.

M. Reza Hashemi; Simon P. Neill

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Attenuation of sound waves in drill strings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During drilling of deep wells digital data are often transmitted from sensors located near the drill bit to the surface. Development of a new communication system with increased data capacity is of paramount importance to the drilling industry. Since steel drill strings are used transmission of these data by elastic carrier waves traveling within the drill pipe is possible but the potential communication range is uncertain. The problem is complicated by the presence of heavy?threaded tool joints every 10 m which form a periodic structure and produce classical patterns of passbands and stop bands in the wave spectra. In this article field measurements of the attenuation characteristics of a drill string in the Long Valley Scientific Well in Mammoth Lakes California are presented. Wave propagation distances approach 2 km. A theoretical model is discussed which predicts the location width and attenuation of the passbands. Mode conversion between extensional and bending waves and spurious reflections due to deviations in the periodic spacings of the tool joints are believed to be the sources of this attenuation. It is estimated that attenuation levels can be dramatically reduced by rearranging the individual pipes in the drill string according to length.

Douglas S. Drumheller

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Medium- and Long-Range Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In contrast to short and extended range forecasts, predictions for periods beyond 5 days use time-averaged, midtropospheric height fields as their primary guidance. As time ranges are increased to 3O- and 90-day outlooks, guidance increasingly ...

A. James Wagner

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Measuring the rotation period distribution of field M-dwarfs with Kepler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have analysed 10 months of public data from the Kepler space mission to measure rotation periods of main-sequence stars with masses between 0.3 and 0.55 M_sun. To derive the rotational period we introduce the autocorrelation function and show that it is robust against phase and amplitude modulation and residual instrumental systematics. Of the 2483 stars examined, we detected rotation periods in 1570 (63.2%), representing an increase of a factor ~ 30 in the number of rotation period determination for field M-dwarfs. The periods range from 0.37-69.7 days, with amplitudes ranging from 1.0-140.8 mmags. The rotation period distribution is clearly bimodal, with peaks at ~ 19 and ~ 33 days, hinting at two distinct waves of star formation, a hypothesis that is supported by the fact that slower rotators tend to have larger proper motions. The two peaks of the rotation period distribution form two distinct sequences in period-temperature space, with the period decreasing with increasing temperature, reminiscent of ...

McQuillan, Amy; Mazeh, Tsevi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves receive their energy from the wind by means of a ... whose yield is not yet clearly understood. Energy in the wave is more concentrated than in the wind ... density. For this reason a motor utilizing wave p...

Ferruccio Mosetti

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-multiple of the wavelength: n 2 L ,n 1,2,... . A vibrating string is an example of a transverse wave: its oscillation2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand

Glashausser, Charles

94

Metal-like self-organization of periodic nanostructures on silicon and silicon carbide under femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

Periodic structures were generated on Si and SiC surfaces by irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses. Self-organized structures with spatial periodicity of approximately 600?nm appear on silicon and silicon carbide in the laser fluence range just above the ablation threshold and upon irradiation with a large number of pulses. As in the case of metals, the dependence of the spatial periodicity on laser fluence can be explained by the parametric decay of laser light into surface plasma waves. The results show that the proposed model might be universally applicable to any solid state material.

Gemini, Laura [Advanced Research Center for beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, 611-0011 Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, 606-85802 Kyoto (Japan); FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); HiLASE Project, Institute of Physics, ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Hashida, Masaki; Shimizu, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, 611-0011 Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, 606-85802 Kyoto (Japan); Limpouch, Jiri [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Mocek, Tomas [HiLASE Project, Institute of Physics, ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

Harrison, Neil (Santa Fe, NM); Singleton, John (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Optical resonators based on Bloch surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A few recent works suggest the possibility of controlling light propagation at the interface of periodic multilayers supporting Bloch surface waves (BSWs), but optical resonators based on BSWs are yet to demonstrate. Here we discuss the feasibility of exploiting guided BSWs in a ring resonator configuration. In particular, we investigate the main issues related to the design of these structures, and we discuss about their limitations in terms of quality factors and dimensions. We believe these results might be useful for the development of a complete BSW-based platform for application ranging from optical sensing to the study of the light-matter interaction in micro and nano structures.

Menotti, Matteo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Experimental investigation on wave run-up characteristics along columns and air gap response of semi-submersible platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article mainly concentrates on a large-volume drilling semi-submersible platform, aiming to reveal wave run-up characteristics along square columns and give the relationship between air gap distributions and wave parameters. The tests with fixed model were conducted firstly on its encountering a series of monochromatic waves. A wide range of wave slope (H/L) were selected to investigate the air gap response in detail. As can be seen, larger wave steepness will generally cause smaller air gap in the same wave period, which indicates nonlinear effects of incoming wave can amplify wave elevation. Model tests with mooring condition were also conducted in the same wave conditions. As was expected, the maximum relative wave elevation reduces obviously compared with the fixed one. However, wave shape close to columns show higher harmonic characteristics due to interaction between waves and the columns of semi-submersible platform. Meaningful conclusions from the model tests are drawn in this article, which is helpful in air gap design of floating offshore platform to a certain extent. In addition, the experimental results will provide an important reference for further research on validation and update of theoretical models of air gap.

Tie-bing SHAN; Jian-min YANG; Xin LI; Long-fei XIAO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO Science Run and the second and third Virgo Science Runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ~2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semi-major axes of the orbit from ~0.6e-3 ls to ~6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3e-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for circular binary orbits, the upper limits obtained remain valid for orbital eccentricities as large as 0.9. In addition, upper limits are placed on continuous gravitational wave emission from the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1 between 20 Hz and 57.25 Hz.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

QUASI-PERIODIC WIGGLES OF MICROWAVE ZEBRA STRUCTURES IN A SOLAR FLARE  

SciTech Connect

Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures with periods ranging from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in an X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two to three significant periodicities and are almost in phase between stripes at different frequencies. The Alfvén speed estimated from the ZP structures is about 700 km s{sup –1}. We find the spatial size of the wave-guiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with a detected period of about 1 s. This suggests that the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

Yu, Sijie; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Nakariakov, V. M.; Selzer, L. A., E-mail: sjyu@nao.cas.cn [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Energy Dissipation of Unsteady Wave Breaking on Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy dissipation for unsteady deep-water breaking in wave groups on following and opposing currents, including partial wave-blocking conditions, was investigated by detailed laboratory measurements. A range of focusing wave conditions, ...

Aifeng Yao; Chin H. Wu

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

A Variable-resolution Surface Wave Dispersion Study of Eurasia, North Africa, and Surrounding Regions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a large-scale study of surface wave dispersion performed across Eurasia and North Africa. Improvements were made to previous surface wave work by enlarging the study region, increasing path density, improving spatial resolution, and expanding the period range. This study expands the coverage area northwards and eastwards relative to a previous dispersion analysis, which covered only North Africa and the Middle East. We have significantly increased the number of seismograms examined and group velocity measurements made. We have now made good quality dispersion measurements for about 30,000 Rayleigh wave and 20,000 Love wave paths, and have incorporated measurements from several other researchers into the study. A conjugate gradient method was employed for the group velocity tomography, which improved the inversion from the previous study by adopting a variable smoothness. This technique allows us to go to higher resolution where the data allow without producing artifacts. The current results include both Love and Rayleigh wave inversions across the region for periods from 7 to 100 seconds at 1{sup o} resolution. Short period group velocities are sensitive to slow velocities associated with large sedimentary features such as the Caspian Sea, West Siberian Platform, Mediterranean Sea, Bay of Bengal, Tarim Basin, and Persian Gulf. Intermediate periods are sensitive to differences in crustal thickness, such as those between oceanic and continental crust or along orogenic zones and continental plateaus. At longer periods, fast velocities are consistently found beneath cratons while slow upper mantle velocities occur along rift systems, subduction zones, and collision zones such as the Tethys Belt. We have compared the group velocities at various periods with features such as sediment thickness, topographic height, crustal thickness, proximity to plate boundaries, lithospheric age and lithospheric thickness, and find significant correlations. We don't find any similar correlation between the longest period surface waves and hot spots.

Pasyanos, M E

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Table 1 Highest tides (tide ranges) of the global ocean Country Site Tide range (m)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Climate. Indian Ocean Equatorial Currents. Internal Waves. Island Wakes. Langmuir Circula- tion and Instability. Mesoscale Eddies. Open Ocean Convection. Paci\\c Ocean Equatorial Currents. TurbulenceTable 1 Highest tides (tide ranges) of the global ocean Country Site Tide range (m) Canada Bay

Gorban, Alexander N.

103

Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave–short-wave resonance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave–short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics.

Shihua Chen; Jose M. Soto-Crespo; Philippe Grelu

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO Science Run and the second and third Virgo Science Runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ~2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semi-major axes of the orbit from ~0.6e-3 ls to ~6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3e-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for ci...

Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr\\Hoczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Breaking waves: Bifurcations leading to a singular wave state W. Tao Shi, Christopher L. Goodridge, and Daniel P. Lathrop*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breaking waves: Bifurcations leading to a singular wave state W. Tao Shi, Christopher L. Goodridge 1996 We examine free surface wave singularities that show a violent focusing of energy. Periodic, modulated, and frequency locked wave states lead to a state with fluid spikes. When the excitation of free

Lathrop, Daniel P.

106

Viscosity, Shear Waves, and Atomic-Level Stress-Stress Correlations  

SciTech Connect

The Green-Kubo equation relates the macroscopic stress-stress correlation function to a liquid's viscosity. The concept of the atomic-level stresses allows the macroscopic stress-stress correlation function in the equation to be expressed in terms of the space-time correlations among the atomic-level stresses. Molecular dynamics studies show surprisingly long spatial extension of stress-stress correlations and also longitudinal and transverse waves propagating in liquids over ranges which could exceed the system size. The results reveal that the range of propagation of shear waves corresponds to the range of distances relevant for viscosity. Thus our results show that viscosity is a fundamentally nonlocal quantity. We also show that the periodic boundary conditions play a nontrivial role in molecular dynamics simulations, effectively masking the long-range nature of viscosity.

Levashov, Valentin A [ORNL; Morris, James R [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

wave energy ? Wellenenergie f [Die einer Schwerewelle innewohnende potentielle und kinetische Energie. Sie ist etwa proportional dem Quadrat der Wellenhöhe. Zeichen: E we ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Flows and Waves in Braided Solar Coronal Magnetic Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the high frequency dynamics in the braided magnetic structure of an active region (AR 11520) moss as observed by High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). We detect quasi periodic flows and waves in these structures. We search for high frequency dynamics while looking at power maps of the observed region. We find that shorter periodicites (30 - 60 s) are associated with small spatial scales which can be resolved by Hi-C only. We detect quasi periodic flows with wide range of velocities from 13 - 185 km/s associated with braided regions. This can be interpreted as plasma outflows from reconnection sites. We also find presence of short period and large amplitude transverse oscillations associated with braided magnetic region. Such oscillations could be triggered by reconnection or such oscillation may trigger reconnection.

Pant, V; Banerjee, Dipankar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wave propagation in photonic crystals and metamaterials: Surface waves, nonlinearity and chirality  

SciTech Connect

Photonic crystals and metamaterials, both composed of artificial structures, are two interesting areas in electromagnetism and optics. New phenomena in photonic crystals and metamaterials are being discovered, including some not found in natural materials. This thesis presents my research work in the two areas. Photonic crystals are periodically arranged artificial structures, mostly made from dielectric materials, with period on the same order of the wavelength of the working electromagnetic wave. The wave propagation in photonic crystals is determined by the Bragg scattering of the periodic structure. Photonic band-gaps can be present for a properly designed photonic crystal. Electromagnetic waves with frequency within the range of the band-gap are suppressed from propagating in the photonic crystal. With surface defects, a photonic crystal could support surface modes that are localized on the surface of the crystal, with mode frequencies within the band-gap. With line defects, a photonic crystal could allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves along the channels. The study of surface modes and waveguiding properties of a 2D photonic crystal will be presented in Chapter 1. Metamaterials are generally composed of artificial structures with sizes one order smaller than the wavelength and can be approximated as effective media. Effective macroscopic parameters such as electric permittivity {epsilon}, magnetic permeability {mu} are used to characterize the wave propagation in metamaterials. The fundamental structures of the metamaterials affect strongly their macroscopic properties. By designing the fundamental structures of the metamaterials, the effective parameters can be tuned and different electromagnetic properties can be achieved. One important aspect of metamaterial research is to get artificial magnetism. Metallic split-ring resonators (SRRs) and variants are widely used to build magnetic metamaterials with effective {mu} < 1 or even {mu} < 0. Varactor based nonlinear SRRs are built and modeled to study the nonlinearity in magnetic metamaterials and the results will be presented in Chapter 3. Negative refractive index n is one of the major target in the research of metamaterials. Negative n can be obtained with a metamaterial with both {epsilon} and {mu} negative. As an alternative, negative index for one of the circularly polarized waves could be achieved with metamaterials having a strong chirality ?. In this case neither {epsilon} nor {mu} negative is required. My work on chiral metamaterials will be presented in Chapter 4.

Wang, Bingnan

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Vacuum Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

Paul S. Wesson

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

Midya, Bikashkali; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Suárez, O L Ramírez; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Estimating wave energy from a wave record  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This note is concerned with the calculation of wave energy from a time series record of wave heights. Various methods are used to estimate the wave energy. For wave records that contain a number of different ... ...

Sasithorn Aranuvachapun; John A. Johnson

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Coherence waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1955 Wolf noticed that the mutual coherence function ? obeys two wave equations [Proc. R. Soc. London230, 246 (1955)]. The physical optics of this finding is thoroughly presented in...

Lohmann, Adolf W; Mendlovic, David; Shabtay, Gal

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Computers: Honeywell's New Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE recent announcement by Honeywell of a new range of computers implies that the company's acquisition of the business ... software, maintenance and so on) is fully taken into account, the advantages of the Honeywell range could turn out to be much greater. The larger members of the new ...

1971-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

116

Investigation of periodic multilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Periodic multilayers of various periods were prepared according to an algorithm proposed by the authors. The reflectivity properties of these systems were investigated using neutron reflectometry.The obtained experimental results were compared with the theoretical expectations. In first approximation, the results proved the main features of the theoretical predictions. These promising results initiate further research of such systems.

Bodnarchuck, V; Ignatovich, V; Veres, T; Yaradaykin, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Simulation and design optimization for linear wave phenomena on metamaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Periodicity can change materials properties in a very unintuitive way. Many wave propagation phenomena, such as waveguides, light bending structures or frequency filters can be modeled through finite periodic structures ...

Saà-Seoane, Joel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

119

Long Wave/Short Wave Resonance in Equatorial Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that resonant coupling between ultra long equatorial Rossby waves and packets of either short Rossby or short westward-traveling gravity waves is possible. Simple analytic formulas give the discrete value of the packet wave number k, ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Budget Period 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Budget Period 1 Budget Period 1 Budget Period 2 Budget Period 3 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% PMC123.1 - Budget Justification for SF 424A Budget 0 Additional Explanations/Comments (as necessary) *IMPORTANT: In the space provided below (or as an attachment) provide a complete explanation and the full calculations used to derive the total indirect costs. If the total indirect costs are a cumulative amount of more than one calculation or rate application, the explanation and calculations should identify all rates used, along with the base they were applied to (and how the base was derived), and a total for each (along with grand total). The rates and how they are applied should not be averaged to get one indirect cost percentage. NOTE: The indirect rate should be applied to both the Federal Share and Recipient Cost Share.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Steady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-current interactions [29, 37] or flows generated by wind-shear [30] (see [6] for a comprehensive discussion than the mass-flux. It is important to note that fixing the mass-flux p0 does not fix the depth d

122

reflection of elastic waves from periodically stratified media with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Then from (ll), (14), and (18), the elastic moduli of the equivalent transverse iso- tropic medium are .... o4 = C44u2, = Tp(1 + ET)-1/2io(P-2 - s:)ll2 x exp [iw(l +.

M. SCHOENBERG**

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves Hiu Ning Chan (1 waves; Long-short resonance PACS Classification: 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg #12;2 ABSTRACT A resonance between long and short waves will occur if the phase velocity of the long wave matches the group velocity

124

Vortices in Brain waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Vortices in Brain Waves 62. M. E. Raichle, ScienceVORTICES IN BRAIN WAVES WALTER J. FREEMAN Department ofthat is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG).

Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Doppler effect for an optical discharge source of shock waves  

SciTech Connect

The Doppler effect for a moving pulsating optical discharge producing periodic shock waves is considered. The manifestations of the effect are limited by the wave merging mechanism. The validity conditions were found for the effect in the case of a pulsating source of shock waves. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

Tishchenko, V N [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Startup of distillation columns using profile position control based on nonlinear wave model  

SciTech Connect

Startup of distillation columns is a very challenging control problem because of its strong nonlinearity and a wide operating range during the transient period. A nonlinear wave model captures the essential dynamic behavior of the distillation process so that it is possible to deal with the difficulties encountered during startup operation. This paper is concerned with the startup of distillation systems using nonlinear wave model based control developed by Han and Park. This control scheme uses profile positions as controlled variables and is based on the nonlinear wave model by Hwang and generic model control scheme by Lee and Sullivan. It can be applied to a binary or a multicomponent distillation system that can be represented as a pseudobinary. The proposed control scheme is shown by simulation studies to provide a safe and economic startup operation not only for dual composition control of a simple distillation column but also for a complex distillation configuration.

Han, M.; Park, S. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Chemical Engineering Dept.] [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Chemical Engineering Dept.; [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Unimodal wave trains and solitons in convex FPU chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider atomic chains with nearest neighbour interactions and study periodic and homoclinic travelling waves which are called wave trains and solitons, respectively. Our main result is a new existence proof which relies on the constrained maximisation of the potential energy and exploits the invariance properties of an improvement operator. The approach is restricted to convex interaction potentials but refines the standard results as it provides the existence of travelling waves with unimodal and even profile functions. Moreover, we discuss the numerical approximation and complete localization of wave trains, and show that wave trains converge to solitons when the periodicity length tends to infinity.

Michael Herrmann

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

RangeTables.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(MeVcmmg) LET vs. Range in Si for 25 MeV SEE Beams (low LET) 4 He 14 N 0 0.5 1 1.5 0 600 1200 1800 2400 3000 3600 4 He 14 N 22 Ne 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 100 200 300 400 500...

129

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Notices This document is intended for the exclusive use of elements of the Department of Energy (DOE), to include the National Nuclear Security Administration, their contractors, and other government agencies/individuals authorized to use DOE facilities. DOE disclaims any and all liability for personal injury or property damage due to use of this document in any context by any organization, group, or individual, other than during official government activities. Local DOE management is responsible for the proper execution of firearms-related programs for

130

Periodic pumping tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......pumping period. The considered penetration depth (eq. 6) constitutes...well transmitted beyond the penetration depth. It is only a question...measurable. In contrast, flow rate measured at the pumping well...subsurface volume represented by penetration depth.) We cannot exclude......

Jörg Renner; Mareike Messar

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Origin of Ripples in Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters: Heating by MHD Waves?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider MHD waves as a heating source of cool cores of galaxy clusters. In particular, we focus on transverse waves (Alfven waves), because they can propagate a longer distance than longitudinal waves (sound waves). Using MHD simulations, we found that the transverse waves can stably heat a cool core if the wave period is large enough (>~ 10^8 yr). Moreover, the longitudinal waves that are created as a by-product of the nonlinear evolution of the transverse waves could be observed as the 'ripples' found in cool cores.

Yutaka Fujita; Takeru K. Suzuki; Takahiro Kudoh; Takaaki Yokoyama

2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

132

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

133

First Plasma Wave Observations at Neptune  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the electric field of plasma waves and radio emissions...range from 10 Hz to 56.2 kHz. Further information...high frequencies (>100 kHz) as much as 30 days before...closest approach (2), the plasma wave in-strument did...low frequencies (kHz) until only a few days...

D. A. Gurnett; W. S. Kurth; R. L. Poynter; L. J. Granroth; I. H. Cairns; W. M. Macek; S. L. Moses; F. V. Coroniti; C. F. Kennel; D. D. Barbosa

1989-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Effective Rate Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiscal Year 2014 Fiscal Year 2014 Effective Rate Period As of Beginning of the FY 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Mid-Year Changes (if applicable) 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement $73,441,557 CV-F13 Base Resource Revenue Requirement $69,585,875 First Preference Revenue Requirement $3,855,682

135

On the Heating of the Solar Corona and the Acceleration of the Low-Speed Solar Wind by Acoustic Waves Generated in Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate possibilities of solar coronal heating by acoustic waves generated not at the photosphere but in the corona, aiming at heating in the mid- to low-latitude corona where the low-speed wind is expected to come from. Acoustic waves of period tau ~ 100s are triggered by chromospheric reconnection, one model of small scale magnetic reconnection events recently proposed by Sturrock. These waves having a finite amplitude eventually form shocks to shape sawtooth waves (N-waves), and directly heat the surrounding corona by dissipation of their wave energy. Outward propagation of the N-waves is treated based on the weak shock theory, so that the heating rate can be evaluated consistently with physical properties of the background coronal plasma without setting a dissipation length in an ad hoc manner. We construct coronal structures from the upper chromosphere to the outside of 1AU for various inputs of the acoustic waves having a range of energy flux of F_{w,0} = (1-20) times 10^5 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} and a period of tau = 60-300s. The heating by the N-wave dissipation effectively works in the inner corona and we find that the waves of F_{w,0} >= 2 times 10^5 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} and tau >= 60s could maintain peak coronal temperature, T_{max} > 10^6 K. The model could also reproduce the density profile observed in the streamer region. However, due to its short dissipation length, the location of T_{max} is closer to the surface than the observation, and the resultant flow velocity of the solar wind is lower than the observed profile of the low-speed wind. The cooperations with other heating and acceleration sources with the larger dissipation length are inevitable to reproduce the real solar corona.

Takeru Ken Suzuki

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

Range Separated Brueckner Coupled Cluster Doubles Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a range-separation approximation to coupled cluster doubles (CCD) theory that successfully overcomes limitations of regular CCD when applied to the uniform electron gas. We combine the short-range ladder channel with the long-range ring channel in the presence of a Bruckner renormalized one-body interaction and obtain ground-state energies with an accuracy of 0.001 a.u./electron across a wide range of density regimes. Our scheme is particularly useful in the low-density and strongly-correlated regimes, where regular CCD has serious drawbacks. Moreover, we cure the infamous overcorrelation of approaches based on ring diagrams (i.e. the particle-hole random phase approximation). Our energies are further shown to have appropriate basis set and thermodynamic limit convergence, and overall this scheme promises energetic properties for realistic periodic and extended systems which existing methods do not possess.

Shepherd, James J; Scuseria, Gustavo E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dispersion equation for water waves with vorticity and Stokes waves on flows with counter-currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-dimensional free-boundary problem of steady periodic waves with vorticity is considered for water of finite depth. We investigate how flows with small-amplitude Stokes waves on the free surface bifurcate from a horizontal parallel shear flow in which counter-currents may be present. Two bifurcation mechanisms are described: for waves with fixed Bernoulli's constant and fixed wavelength. In both cases the corresponding dispersion equations serve for defining wavelengths from which Stokes waves bifurcate. Sufficient conditions guaranteeing the existence of roots of these equations are obtained. Two particular vorticity distributions are considered in order to illustrate general results.

Vladimir Kozlov; Nikolay Kuznetsov

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

Manglos, Stephen H. (East Syracuse, NY)

1989-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Implementation of an F-statistic all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Virgo VSR1 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an implementation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic to carry out the first search in data from the Virgo laser interferometric gravitational wave detector for periodic gravitational waves from a priori unknown, isolated rotating neutron stars. We searched a frequency $f_0$ range from 100 Hz to 1 kHz and the frequency dependent spindown $f_1$ range from $-1.6\\,(f_0/100\\,{\\rm Hz}) \\times 10^{-9}\\,$ Hz/s to zero. A large part of this frequency - spindown space was unexplored by any of the all-sky searches published so far. Our method consisted of a coherent search over two-day periods using the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic, followed by a search for coincidences among the candidates from the two-day segments. We have introduced a number of novel techniques and algorithms that allow the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm in the coherent part of the search resulting in a fifty-fold speed-up in computation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic with respect to the algorithm used in the other pipelines. No significant gravitational wave signal was found. The sensitivity of the search was estimated by injecting signals into the data. In the most sensitive parts of the detector band more than 90% of signals would have been detected with dimensionless gravitational-wave amplitude greater than $5 \\times 10^{-24}$.

J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; K. Borkowski; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; O. Dorosh; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; C. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; N. G. Kim

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves C.F. Driscoll, F. Anderegg, D 92093 USA Abstract. Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance is observed over a broad range. Laser Induced

California at San Diego, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Studies of ICRF mode conversion with phase contrast imaging and full-wave simulations in Alcator C-Mod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio frequency (rf) waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used for heating fusion plasmas. In a multi-ion-species plasma, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves and ion Bernstein ...

Tsujii, Naoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Plane waves Lumped systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems S x y z Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · open tube #12;2 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · closed tube Impedance · Cylindrical waves z x y r #12;3 Impedance · Cylindrical waves ­ Circumferential part n=0 n=1 n=2 n=3 Impedance · Cylindrical

Berlin,Technische Universität

143

Ball Packings with Periodic Constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We call a periodic ball packing in $$d$$d-dimensional Euclidean space periodically (resp. strictly) jammed with respect to a period lattice $$\\varLambda $$¿ if there are no nontrivial motions of the balls that preserve $$\\varLambda $$¿ (resp. that maintain ... Keywords: 52C17, Ball packings, Jamming, Periodic packings, Rigidity, Tensegrities

Robert Connelly, Jeffrey D. Shen, Alexander D. Smith

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Spiking mode operation for a uniform-period wiggler  

SciTech Connect

The onset of saturation in a uniform-period wiggler has been examined experimentally and through numerical simulations. Models have been constructed that explain the observations in simple and consistent ways. The models are based upon the development of strong frequency and amplitude modulation of the optical wave as a way to increase extraction efficiency and optical power.

Warren, R.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electromagnetic Siegert states for periodic dielectric structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formalism of Siegert states to describe the resonant scattering in quantum theory is extended to the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves on periodic dielectric arrays. The excitation of electromagnetic Siegert states by an incident wave packet and their decay is studied. The formalism is applied to develop a theory of coupled electromagnetic resonances arising in the electromagnetic scattering problem for two such arrays separated by a distance 2h (or, generally, when the physical properties of the scattering array depend on a real coupling parameter h). Analytic properties of Siegert states as functions of the coupling parameter h are established by the Regular Perturbation Theorem which is an extension the Kato-Rellich theorem to the present case. By means of this theorem, it is proved that if the scattering structure admits a bound state in the radiation continuum at a certain value of the coupling parameter h, then there always exist regions within the structure in which the near field can be amplified as much as desired by adjusting the value of h. This establishes a rather general mechanism to control and amplify optical nonlinear effects in periodically structured planar structures possessing a nonlinear dielectric susceptibility.

Friends R. Ndangali; Sergei V. Shabanov

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

146

A General Mapping Approach and New Travelling Wave Solutions to (2+1)-Dimensional Boussinesq Equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A general mapping deformation method is presented and applied to a (2+1)-dimensional Boussinesq system. Many new types of explicit and exact travelling wave solutions, which contain solitary wave solutions, periodic wave solutions, Jacobian and Weierstrass doubly periodic wave solutions, and other exact excitations like polynomial solutions, exponential solutions, and rational solutions, etc., are obtained by a simple algebraic transformation relation between the (2+1)-dimensional Boussinesq equation and a generalized cubic nonlinear Klein–Gordon equation.

Zheng Chun-Long; Chen Li-Qun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Instability of nonlinear dispersive solitary waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider linear instability of solitary waves of several classes of dispersive long wave models. They include generalizations of KDV, BBM, regularized Boussinesq equations, with general dispersive operators and nonlinear terms. We obtain criteria for the existence of exponentially growing solutions to the linearized problem. The novelty is that we dealt with models with nonlocal dispersive terms, for which the spectra problem is out of reach by the Evans function technique. For the proof, we reduce the linearized problem to study a family of nonlocal operators, which are closely related to properties of solitary waves. A continuation argument with a moving kernel formula is used to find the instability criteria. These techniques have also been extended to study instability of periodic waves and of the full water wave problem.

Zhiwu Lin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Instability of nonlinear dispersive solitary waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider linear instability of solitary waves of several classes of dispersive long wave models. They include generalizations of KDV, BBM, regularized Boussinesq equations, with general dispersive operators and nonlinear terms. We obtain criteria for the existence of exponentially growing solutions to the linearized problem. The novelty is that we dealt with models with nonlocal dispersive terms, for which the spectra problem is out of reach by the Evans function technique. For the proof, we reduce the linearized problem to study a family of nonlocal operators, which are closely related to properties of solitary waves. A continuation argument with a moving kernel formula are used to find the instability criteria. Recently, these techniques have also been extended to study instability of periodic waves and to the full water wave problem.

Lin, Zhiwu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Ball Packings with Periodic Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We call a periodic ball packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space periodically (strictly) jammed with respect to a period lattice if there are no nontrivial motions of the balls that preserve the period (that maintain some period with smaller or equal volume). In particular, we call a packing consistently periodically (strictly) jammed if it is periodically (strictly) jammed on every one of its periods. After extending a well-known bar framework and stress condition to strict jamming, we prove that a packing with period Lambda is consistently strictly jammed if and only if it is strictly jammed with respect to Lambda and consistently periodically jammed. We next extend a result about rigid unit mode spectra in crystallography to characterize periodic jamming on sublattices. After that, we prove that there are finitely many strictly jammed packings of m unit balls and other similar results. An interesting example shows that the size of the first sublattice on which a packing is first periodically unjammed is not bounded. Finally, we find an example of a consistently periodically jammed packing of low density \\delta = \\frac{4 \\pi}{6 \\sqrt{3} + 11} + \\epsilon ~ 0.59, where \\epsilon is an arbitrarily small positive number. Throughout the paper, the statements for the closely related notions of periodic infinitesimal rigidity and affine infinitesimal rigidity for tensegrity frameworks are also given.

Robert Connelly; Jeffrey D. Shen; Alexander D. Smith

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

INTERFERENCE FRINGES OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES AROUND SUNSPOTS  

SciTech Connect

Solar acoustic waves are scattered by a sunspot due to the interaction between the acoustic waves and the sunspot. The sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave. The scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave around the sunspot. The interference fringes between the scattered wave and the incident wave are visible in the intensity of the total wave because the coherent time of the incident wave is of the order of a wave period. The strength of the interference fringes anti-correlates with the width of temporal spectra of the incident wave. The separation between neighboring fringes increases with the incident wavelength and the sunspot size. The strength of the fringes increases with the radial order n of the incident wave from n = 0 to n = 2, and then decreases from n = 2 to n = 5. The interference fringes play a role analogous to holograms in optics. This study suggests the feasibility of using the interference fringes to reconstruct the scattered wavefields of the sunspot, although the quality of the reconstructed wavefields is sensitive to the noise and errors in the interference fringes.

Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao Hui; Yang, Ming-Hsu; Liang, Zhi-Chao, E-mail: chou@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Physics Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Estimating the potential of ocean wave power resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The realistic assessment of an ocean wave energy resource that can be converted to an electrical power at various offshore sites depends upon many factors, and these include estimating the resource recognizing the random nature of the site-specific wave field, and optimizing the power conversion from particular wave energy conversion devices. In order to better account for the uncertainty in wave power resource estimates, conditional probability distribution functions of wave power in a given sea-state are derived. Theoretical expressions for the deep and shallow water limits are derived and the role of spectral width is studied. The theoretical model estimates were compared with the statistics obtained from the wave-by-wave analysis of JONSWAP based ocean wave time-series. It was shown that the narrow-band approximation is appropriate when the variability due to wave period is negligible. The application of the short-term models in evaluating the long-term wave power resource at a site was illustrated using wave data measured off the California coast. The final example illustrates the procedure for incorporating the local wave data and the sea-state model together with a wave energy device to obtain an estimate of the potential wave energy that could be converted into a usable energy resource.

Amir H. Izadparast; John M. Niedzwecki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Wave-Packet Revivals for Quantum Systems with Nondegenerate Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The revival structure of wave packets is examined for quantum systems having energies that depend on two nondegenerate quantum numbers. For such systems, the evolution of the wave packet is controlled by two classical periods and three revival times. These wave packets exhibit quantum beats in the initial motion as well as new types of long-term revivals. The issue of whether fractional revivals can form is addressed. We present an analytical proof showing that at certain times equal to rational fractions of the revival times the wave packet can reform as a sum of subsidiary waves and that both conventional and new types of fractional revivals can occur.

Robert Bluhm; Alan Kostelecky; Bogdan Tudose

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

Universality of Sea Wave Growth and Its Physical Roots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern day studies of wind-driven sea waves are usually focused on wind forcing rather than on the effect of resonant nonlinear wave interactions. The authors assume that these effects are dominating and propose a simple relationship between instant wave steepness and time or fetch of wave development expressed in wave periods or lengths. This law does not contain wind speed explicitly and relies upon this asymptotic theory. The validity of this law is illustrated by results of numerical simulations, in situ measurements of growing wind seas and wind wave tank experiments. The impact of the new vision of sea wave physics is discussed in the context of conventional approaches to wave modeling and forecasting.

Zakharov, Vladimir E; Hwang, Paul A; Caulliez, Guillemette

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse  

SciTech Connect

Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

From a breather homoclinic wave to a rogue wave solution for the coupled Schrödinger–Boussinesq equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, two types of multi-parameter breather homoclinic wave solutions—including breather homoclinic wave and rational homoclinic wave solutions—are obtained by using the Hirota technique and ansätz with complexity of parameter for the coupled Schrödinger–Boussinesq equation. Rogue waves in the form of the rational homoclinic solution are derived when the periods of breather homoclinic wave go to infinite. Some novel features of homoclinic wave solutions are discussed and presented. In contrast to the normal bright rogue wave structure, a structure like a four-petaled flower in temporal–spatial distribution is exhibited. Further with the change of the wave number of the plane wave, the bright and dark rogue wave structures may change into each other. The bright rogue wave structure results from the full merger of two nearby peaks, and the dark rogue wave structure results from the full merger of two nearby holes. The dark rogue wave for the uncoupled Boussinesq equation is finally obtained. Its structural properties show that it never takes on bright rogue wave features with the change of parameter. It is hoped that these results might provide us with useful information on the dynamics of the relevant fields in physics.

Chuanjian Wang; Zhengde Dai; Changfu Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A FAST DIRECT SOLVER FOR QUASI-PERIODIC SCATTERING A. GILLMAN, A. BARNETT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A FAST DIRECT SOLVER FOR QUASI-PERIODIC SCATTERING PROBLEMS A. GILLMAN, A. BARNETT Abstract. We-of-plane electric field [5]). We seek the scattered wave u which 1 #12;2 A. GILLMAN, A. BARNETT solves, ( + 2 )u

Barnett, Alex

157

Synchronization of internal and external degrees of freedom of atoms in a standing laser wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider dissipative dynamics of atoms in a strong standing laser wave and find a nonlinear dynamical effect of synchronization between center-of-mass motion and internal Rabi oscillations. The synchronization manifests itself in the phase space as limit cycles which may have different periods and riddled basins of attraction. The effect can be detected in the fluorescence spectra of atoms as equidistant sideband frequencies with the space between adjacent peaks to be inversely proportional to the value of the period of the respective limit cycle. With increasing the intensity of the laser field, we observe numerically cascades of bifurcations that eventually end up in settling a strange chaotic attractor. A broadband noise is shown to destroy a fine structure of the bifurcation scenario, but prominent features of period-1 and period-3 limit cycles survive under a weak noise. The character of the atomic motion is analyzed with the help of the friction force whose zeroes are attractor or repellor points in the velocity space. We find ranges of the laser parameters where the atomic motion resembles a random but deterministic walking of atoms erratically jumping between different wells of the optical potential. Such a random walking is shown to be fractal in the sense that the measured characteristic of the motion, time of exit of atoms from a given space of the standing wave, is a complicated function that has a self-similar structure with singularities on a Cantor set of values of one of the control parameters.

V. Yu. Argonov; S. V. Prants

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wind/Wave Misalignment in the Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Wind resources far from the shore and in deeper seas have encouraged the offshore wind industry to look into floating platforms. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is developing a new technical specification for the design of floating offshore wind turbines that extends existing design standards for land-based and fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. The work summarized in this paper supports the development of best practices and simulation requirements in the loads analysis of floating offshore wind turbines by examining the impact of wind/wave misalignment on the system loads under normal operation. Simulations of the OC3-Hywind floating offshore wind turbine system under a wide range of wind speeds, significant wave heights, peak-spectral periods and wind/wave misalignments have been carried out with the aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool FAST [4]. The extreme and fatigue loads have been calculated for all the simulations. The extreme and fatigue loading as a function of wind/wave misalignment have been represented as load roses and a directional binning sensitivity study has been carried out. This study focused on identifying the number and type of wind/wave misalignment simulations needed to accurately capture the extreme and fatigue loads of the system in all possible metocean conditions considered, and for a down-selected set identified as the generic US East Coast site. For this axisymmetric platform, perpendicular wind and waves play an important role in the support structure and including these cases in the design loads analysis can improve the estimation of extreme and fatigue loads. However, most structural locations see their highest extreme and fatigue loads with aligned wind and waves. These results are specific to the spar type platform, but it is expected that the results presented here will be similar to other floating platforms.

Barj, L.; Stewart, S.; Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

PROPAGATION OF SEISMIC WAVES THROUGH A SPATIO-TEMPORALLY FLUCTUATING MEDIUM: HOMOGENIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of seismic wave travel times at the photosphere of the Sun have enabled inferences of its interior structure and dynamics. In interpreting these measurements, the simplifying assumption that waves propagate through a temporally stationary medium is almost universally invoked. However, the Sun is in a constant state of evolution, on a broad range of spatio-temporal scales. At the zero-wavelength limit, i.e., when the wavelength is much shorter than the scale over which the medium varies, the WKBJ (ray) approximation may be applied. Here, we address the other asymptotic end of the spectrum, the infinite-wavelength limit, using the technique of homogenization. We apply homogenization to scenarios where waves are propagating through rapidly varying media (spatially and temporally), and derive effective models for the media. One consequence is that a scalar sound speed becomes a tensorial wave speed in the effective model and anisotropies can be induced depending on the nature of the perturbation. The second term in this asymptotic two-scale expansion, the so-called corrector, contains contributions due to higher-order scattering, leading to the decoherence of the wave field. This decoherence may be causally linked to the observed wave attenuation in the Sun. Although the examples we consider here consist of periodic arrays of perturbations to the background, homogenization may be extended to ergodic and stationary random media. This method may have broad implications for the manner in which we interpret seismic measurements in the Sun and for modeling the effects of granulation on the scattering of waves and distortion of normal-mode eigenfunctions.

Hanasoge, Shravan M. [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Gizon, Laurent [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Bal, Guillaume [Department of Applied and Physical Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Infragravity waves over topography: generation, dissipation, and reflection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean surface infragravity waves (periods from 20 to 200 s) observed along the southern California coast are shown to be sensitive to the bottom topography of the shelf region, where propagation is linear, and of the ...

Thomson, James M. (James McArthur)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Magneto-Acoustic Wave Oscillations in Solar Spicules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some observations suggest that solar spicules show small amplitude and high frequency oscillations of magneto-acoustic waves, which arise from photospheric granular forcing. We apply the method of MHD seismology to determine the period of kink waves. For this purposes, the oscillations of a magnetic cylinder embedded in a field-free environment is investigated. Finally, diagnostic diagrams displaying the oscillatory period in terms of some equilibrium parameters are provided to allow a comparison between theoretical results and those coming from observations.

Ajabshirizadeh, A; Koutchmy, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Magneto-Acoustic Wave Oscillations in Solar Spicules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some observations suggest that solar spicules show small amplitude and high frequency oscillations of magneto-acoustic waves, which arise from photospheric granular forcing. We apply the method of MHD seismology to determine the period of kink waves. For this purposes, the oscillations of a magnetic cylinder embedded in a field-free environment is investigated. Finally, diagnostic diagrams displaying the oscillatory period in terms of some equilibrium parameters are provided to allow a comparison between theoretical results and those coming from observations.

A. Ajabshirizadeh; E. Tavabi; S. Koutchmy

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Long-Wave Infrared Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared: Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features

164

Ultrasonic guided waves in eccentric annular pipes  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the feasibility of using ultrasonic guided waves to rapidly inspect tubes and pipes for possible eccentricity. While guided waves are well established in the long range inspection of structures such as pipes and plates, studies for more complex cross sections are limited and analytical solutions are often difficult to obtain. Recent developments have made the Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method widely accessible for researchers to study guided wave properties in complex structures. Here the SAFE method is used to study the effect of eccentricity on the modal structures and velocities of lower order guided wave modes in thin pipes of diameters typically of interest to the industry. Results are validated using experiments. The paper demonstrates that even a small eccentricity in the pipe can strongly affect guided wave mode structures and velocities and hence shows potential for pipe eccentricity inspection.

Pattanayak, Roson Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu [Centre for NDE, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras Chennai 600036, T. N. (India)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Comparison of Measured and Predicted Wave-Impact Pressures from Breaking and Non-breaking Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact loads from waves on vessels and coastal structures are complex and may involve wave breaking, which has made these loads difficult to estimate numerically or empirically. Results from previous experiments have shown a wide range of forces and pressures measured from breaking and nonbreaking waves, with no clear trend between wave characteristics and the localized forces and pressures that they generate. In 2008, a canonical breaking wave impact data set was obtained at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, by measuring the distribution of impact pressures of incident nonbreaking and breaking waves on one face of a cube. This experimental effort was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), under the Dynamics of Interacting Platforms Program, Program Manager Dr. Ron Joslin. The effects of wave height, wavelength, face orientation, face angle, and submergence depth were investigated. Additionally, a limited number of runs were made at low forward speeds, ranging from about 0.5 to 2...

Fullerton, Anne M; Brewton, Susan; Brucker, Kyle A; O'Shea, Thomas T; Dommermuth, Douglas G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

POSSIBLE EVIDENCE OF ALFVEN-CYCLOTRON WAVES IN THE ANGLE DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC HELICITY OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect

The fluctuating magnetic helicity is considered an important parameter in diagnosing the characteristic modes of solar wind turbulence. Among them is the Alfven-cyclotron wave, which is probably responsible for the solar wind plasma heating, but has not yet been identified from the magnetic helicity of solar wind turbulence. Here, we present the possible signatures of Alfven-cyclotron waves in the distribution of magnetic helicity as a function of {theta}{sub VB}, which is the angle between the solar wind velocity and local mean magnetic field. We use magnetic field data from the STEREO spacecraft to calculate the {theta}{sub VB} distribution of the normalized reduced fluctuating magnetic helicity {sigma}{sub m}. We find a dominant negative {sigma}{sub m} for 1 s < p < 4 s (p is time period) and for {theta}{sub VB} < 30 deg. in the solar wind outward magnetic sector, and a dominant positive {sigma}{sub m} for 0.4 s < p < 4 s and for {theta}{sub VB}>150 deg. in the solar wind inward magnetic sector. These features of {sigma}{sub m} appearing around the Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron frequencies may be consistent with the existence of Alfven-cyclotron waves among the outward propagating fluctuations. Moreover, right-handed polarized waves at larger propagation angles, which might be kinetic Alfven waves or whistler waves, have also been identified on the basis of the {sigma}{sub m} features in the angular range 40 deg. < {theta}{sub VB} < 140 deg. Our findings suggest that Alfven-cyclotron waves (together with other wave modes) play a prominent role in turbulence cascading and plasma heating of the solar wind.

He Jiansen; Tu Chuanyi; Yao Shuo; Tian Hui [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Marsch, Eckart, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

Diffusion-induced periodic transition between oscillatory modes in amplitude-modulated patterns  

SciTech Connect

We study amplitude-modulated waves, e.g., wave packets in one dimension, overtarget spirals and superspirals in two dimensions, under mixed-mode oscillatory conditions in a three-variable reaction-diffusion model. New transition zones, not seen in the homogeneous system, are found, in which periodic transitions occur between local 1{sup N?1} and 1{sup N} oscillations. Amplitude-modulated complex patterns result from periodic transition between (N???1)-armed and N-armed waves. Spatial recurrence rates provide a useful guide to the stability of these modulated patterns.

Tang, Xiaodong; He, Yuxiu; Wang, Shaorong; Gao, Qingyu, E-mail: gaoqy@cumt.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China)] [College of Chemical Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China); Epstein, Irving R., E-mail: epstein@brandeis.edu [Department of Chemistry and Volen Center for Complex Systems, MS 015, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts 02454-9110 (United States); Wang, Qun [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)] [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fast-Wave Current Drive in a Toroidal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast-wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfvén wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into a plasma by a fast-wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast-wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities.

J. Goree; M. Ono; P. Colestock; R. Horton; D. McNeill; H. Park

1985-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nonlinear extraordinary wave in dense plasma  

SciTech Connect

Conditions for the propagation of a slow extraordinary wave in dense magnetized plasma are found. A solution to the set of relativistic hydrodynamic equations and Maxwell’s equations under the plasma resonance conditions, when the phase velocity of the nonlinear wave is equal to the speed of light, is obtained. The deviation of the wave frequency from the resonance frequency is accompanied by nonlinear longitudinal-transverse oscillations. It is shown that, in this case, the solution to the set of self-consistent equations obtained by averaging the initial equations over the period of high-frequency oscillations has the form of an envelope soliton. The possibility of excitation of a nonlinear wave in plasma by an external electromagnetic pulse is confirmed by numerical simulations.

Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Turikov, V. A. [Russian University of Peoples’ Friendship (Russian Federation)] [Russian University of Peoples’ Friendship (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave velocity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

43.30.Ft, 43... short range was deemed desirable for isolating the effects of shallow water internal waves on acoustic... internal waves are not un- usual and it was ......

171

Complex modes and new amplification regimes in periodic multi transmission lines interacting with an electron beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show the existence of a new regime of operation for travelling wave tubes (TWTs) composed of slow-wave periodic structures that support two or more electromagnetic modes, with at least two synchronized with an electron beam. The interaction between the slow-wave structure and an electron beam is quantified using a multi transmission line approach (MTL) and transfer matrix analysis leading to the identification of modes with complex Bloch wavenumber. In particular, we report a new operation condition for TWTs based on an electron beam synchronous to two modes exhibiting a degeneracy condition near a band edge in a MTL slow-wave periodic structure. We show a phenomenological change in the band structure of periodic TWT where we observe at least two growing modal cooperating solutions as opposed to a uniform MTL interacting with an electron beam where there is strictly only one growing mode solution.

Othman, Mohamed; Capolino, Filippo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

High order asymptotics for the electromagnetic scattering from thin periodic layers : the 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High order asymptotics for the electromagnetic scattering from thin periodic layers : the 3D of electromagnetic waves by a thin periodic layer made of an array of regularly-spaced obstacles. The size, they satisfy electrostatic problems posed in an infinite 3D strip that require a careful analysis. Error

Boyer, Edmond

173

Equal energy phase space trajectories in resonant wave interactions O. Yaakobia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equal energy phase space trajectories in resonant wave interactions O. Yaakobia and L. Friedlandb interacting wave systems with nonlinear frequency/ wave vector shifts is discussed. The corresponding these parameters vary in time or space. It is shown that the oscillation periods of two equal energy trajectories

Friedland, Lazar

174

Surface current effects on the fetch-limited growth of wave energy Brian K. Haus1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface current effects on the fetch-limited growth of wave energy Brian K. Haus1 Received 5 the fetch-limited growth of wind wave energy over a region with significant lateral shear of the current. Both the near-surface currents and wave energy and period were mapped over the highly sheared inshore

Miami, University of

175

astroph/9610086 Quasar Proper Motions and LowFrequency Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

astro­ph/9610086 11 Oct 1996 Quasar Proper Motions and Low­Frequency Gravitational Waves Carl R observational upper limits on the mass­energy of the cosmological gravitational­wave background, from limits on proper motions of quasars. Gravitational waves with periods longer than the time span of observations

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

176

Tracking Waves and Spiral Drift in Reaction-Diffusion Systems with Finite Bandwidth Dispersion Relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Tracking Waves and Spiral Drift in Reaction-Diffusion Systems with Finite Bandwidth We report experimental results on chemical waves in 1,4-cyclohexanedione Belousov-Zhabotinsky systems are unstable, pacemakers can generate short-wavelength patterns in which fast waves periodically annihilate

Steinbock, Oliver

177

Observations on the Energy Balance of Internal Waves during JASIN [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Observations on the Energy Balance of Internal Waves during JASIN [and Discussion...variation at one site of internal wave energy over a 40 day period during...wavefield, and the internal wave energy 11 days later. The Royal Society...

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Periodicities in gamma ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma ray burst models based on magnetic neutron stars face a problem of account for the scarcity of observed periods. Both this scarcity and the typical period found when any is detected are explained if the neutron stars are accreting in binary systems

Kent S. Wood

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

On a periodicity measure and superoscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomenon of superoscillation, where band limited signals can oscillate over some time period with a frequency higher than the band limit, is not only very interesting but it also seems to offer many practical applications. The first reason is that the superoscillation frequency can be exploited to perform tasks beyond the limits imposed by the lower bandwidth of the signal. The second reason is that it is generic and applies to any wave form, be it optical, electrical, sonic, or quantum mechanical. For practical applications, it is important to overcome two problems. The first problem is that an overwhelming proportion of the energy goes into the non superoscillating part of the signal. The second problem is the control of the shape of the superoscillating part of the signal. The first problem has been recently addressed by optimization of the super oscillation yield, the ratio of the energy in the superoscillations to the total energy of the signal. The second problem may arise when the superoscillation, is to mimic a high frequency purely perodic signal. This may be required, for example, when a superoscillating force is to drive a harmonic oscillator at a high resonance frequency. In this paper the degree of periodicity of a signal is defined and applied to some yield optimized superoscillating signals.

Nehemia Schwartz; Moshe Schwartz

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

180

Impurity bands and quasi-Bloch waves for a one-dimensional model of modulated crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the theory of quasi-periodic functions while the second relies on periodicity properties, impurity band, quasi-Bloch wave, quantum chaos, spectral algorithm, deformed crystal, Charge-Density Wave coupled oscillators; consult the book [1] and the recent paper [14] to which we are about to borrow

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Simulation of one-dimensional evolution of wind waves in a deep water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A direct wave model based on the one-dimensional nonlinear equations for potential waves is used for simulation of wave field development under the action of energy input dissipation and nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The equations are written in conformal surface-fitted nonstationary coordinate system. New schemes for calculating the input and dissipation of wave energy are implemented. The wind input is calculated on the basis of the parameterization developed through the coupled modeling of waves and turbulent boundary layer. The wave dissipation algorithm introduced to prevent wave breaking instability is based on highly selective smoothing of the wave surface and surface potential. The integration is performed in Fourier domain with the number of modes M = 2048 broad enough to reproduce the energy downshifting. As the initial conditions the wave field is assigned as train of Stokes waves with steepness ak = 0.15 at nondimensional wavenumber k = 512. Under the action of nonlinearity and energy input the spectrum starts to grow. This growth is followed by the downshifting. The total time of integration is equal to 7203 initial wave periods. During this time the energy increased by 1111 times. Peak of the spectrum gradually shifts from wavenumber nondimensional k = 512 down to k = 10. Significant wave height increases 33 times while the peak period increases 51 times. Rates of the peak downshift and wave energy evolution are in good agreement with the JONSWAP formulation.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Grating formation by a high power radio wave in near-equator ionosphere  

SciTech Connect

The formation of a volume grating in the near-equator regions of ionosphere due to a high power radio wave is investigated. The radio wave, launched from a ground based transmitter, forms a standing wave pattern below the critical layer, heating the electrons in a space periodic manner. The thermal conduction along the magnetic lines of force inhibits the rise in electron temperature, limiting the efficacy of heating to within a latitude of few degrees around the equator. The space periodic electron partial pressure leads to ambipolar diffusion creating a space periodic density ripple with wave vector along the vertical. Such a volume grating is effective to cause strong reflection of radio waves at a frequency one order of magnitude higher than the maximum plasma frequency in the ionosphere. Linearly mode converted plasma wave could scatter even higher frequency radio waves.

Singh, Rohtash; Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Extended range chemical sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

184

Kelvin Waves around Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean allows circumpolar structure and the Antarctic coastline plays a role as a waveguide for oceanic Kelvin waves. Under the cyclic conditions, the horizontal wavenumbers and frequencies for circumpolarly propagating waves are ...

Kazuya Kusahara; Kay I. Ohshima

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gravity perturbed Crapper waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waves are known to have multi-valued height. Using...gravity-capillary waves with multi-valued height. The...of single-valued and multi-valued travelling waves...absence of gravity, a family of exact solutions is...elliptic functions. Building upon the work by Tanveer...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

187

The Effect of Wave Breaking on the Wave Energy Spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of wave breaking on the wave energy spectral shape is examined. The Stokes wave-breaking criterion is first extended to random waves and a breaking wave model is established in which the elevation of breaking waves is expressed in ...

C. C. Tung; N. E. Huang

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Improving the assessment of wave energy resources by means of coupled wave-ocean numerical modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sea waves energy represents a renewable and sustainable energy resource, that nevertheless needs to be further investigated to make it more cost-effective and economically appealing. A key step in the process of Wave Energy Converters (WEC) deployment is the energy resource assessment at a sea site either measured or obtained through numerical model analysis. In these kind of studies, some approximations are often introduced, especially in the early stages of the process, viz. waves are assumed propagating in deep waters without underneath ocean currents. These aspects are discussed and evaluated in the Adriatic Sea and its northern part (Gulf of Venice) using locally observed and modeled wave data. In particular, to account for a “state of the art” treatment of the Wave–Current Interaction (WCI) we have implemented the Simulating \\{WAves\\} Nearshore (SWAN) model and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), fully coupled within the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) system. COAWST has been applied to a computational grid covering the whole Adriatic Sea and off-line nested to a high-resolution grid in the Gulf of Venice. A 15-year long wave data set collected at the oceanographic tower “Acqua Alta”, located approximately 15 km off the Venice coast, has also been analyzed with the dual purpose of providing a reference to the model estimates and to locally assess the wave energy resource. By using COAWST, we have quantified for the first time to our best knowledge the importance of the WCI effect on wave power estimation. This can vary up to 30% neglecting the current effect. Results also suggest the Gulf of Venice as a suitable testing site for WECs, since it is characterized by periods of calm (optimal for safe installation and maintenance) alternating with severe storms, whose wave energy potentials are comparable to those ordinarily encountered in the energy production sites.

Francesco Barbariol; Alvise Benetazzo; Sandro Carniel; Mauro Sclavo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shutdown Planning Shutdown Planning Planning Templates Shutdown Planning Schedules: Current Shutdown Schedule Archives: 2006 - 2013 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule: 2014 Archives: 2013 | 2012 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule (Fiscal Year 2014) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2013-3 2014-1 2014-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

190

Assessment of wave energy variation in the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since wave energy has the highest marine energy density in the coastal areas, assessment of its potential is of great importance. Furthermore, long term variation of wave power must be studied to ensure the availability of stable wave energy. In this paper, wave energy potential is assessed along the southern coasts of Iran, the Persian Gulf. For this purpose, SWAN numerical model and ECMWF wind fields were used to produce the time series of wave characteristics over 25 years from 1984 till 2008. Moreover, three points in the western, central and eastern parts of the Persian Gulf were selected and the time series of energy extracted from the modeled waves were evaluated at these points. The results show that there are both seasonal and decadal variations in the wave energy trends in all considered points due to the climate variability. There was a reduction in wave power values from 1990 to 2000 in comparison with the previous and following years. Comparison of wind speed and corresponding wave power variations indicates that a small variation in the wind speed can cause a large variation in the wave power. The seasonal oscillations lead to variation of the wave power from the lowest value in summer to the highest value in winter in all considered stations. In addition, the seasonal trend of wave power changed during the decadal variation of wave power. Directional variations of wave power were also assessed during the decadal variations and the results showed that the dominant direction of wave propagation changed in the period of 1990 to 2000 especially in the western station.

B. Kamranzad; A. Etemad-shahidi; V. Chegini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

MHK Technologies/Wave Water Pump WWP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pump WWP Pump WWP < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Water Pump WWP.gif Technology Profile Primary Organization Renewable Energy Wave Pumps Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Description The Water Wave Pump WWP is a point absorber that uses a submerged water pump to lift a small quantity of water to a higher head collect it in a piping network and feed it to a hydro turbine to produce power Mooring Configuration Gravity base installed at the sea bed Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions The REWP can pump water to a hgih head fro waves ranging between 1 2 meters to waves in excess of 4 meters high It self adjusts to varyilng sea levels and wave hights It resists storms safe to navigation as red floats are clearly seen during the day and red flashing lights during the night It does not disturb marine life or shore line scenic view

192

Numerical Modeling of Footpoint-driven Magneto-acoustic Wave Propagation in a Localized Solar Flux Tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present and discuss results of two-dimensional simulations of linear and nonlinear magneto-acoustic wave propagation through an open magnetic flux tube embedded in the solar atmosphere expanding from the photosphere through to the transition region and into the low corona. Our aim is to model and analyze the response of such a magnetic structure to vertical and horizontal periodic motions originating in the photosphere. To carry out the simulations, we employed our MHD code SAC (Sheffield Advanced Code). A combination of the VALIIIC and McWhirter solar atmospheres and coronal density profiles were used as the background equilibrium model in the simulations. Vertical and horizontal harmonic sources, located at the footpoint region of the open magnetic flux tube, are incorporated in the calculations, to excite oscillations in the domain of interest. To perform the analysis we have constructed a series of time-distance diagrams of the vertical and perpendicular components of the velocity with respect to the magnetic field lines at each height of the computational domain. These time-distance diagrams are subject to spatio-temporal Fourier transforms allowing us to build ?-k dispersion diagrams for all of the simulated regions in the solar atmosphere. This approach makes it possible to compute the phase speeds of waves propagating throughout the various regions of the solar atmosphere model. We demonstrate the transformation of linear slow and fast magneto-acoustic wave modes into nonlinear ones, i.e., shock waves, and also show that magneto-acoustic waves with a range of frequencies efficiently leak through the transition region into the solar corona. It is found that the waves interact with the transition region and excite horizontally propagating surface waves along the transition region for both types of drivers. Finally, we estimate the phase speed of the oscillations in the solar corona and compare it with the phase speed derived from observations.

V. Fedun; S. Shelyag; R. Erdélyi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

IPA Extensions Range: 025002AF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IPA Extensions Range: 0250­02AF This file contains an excerpt from the character code tables 0268IPA Extensions0250 025B LATIN SMALL LETTER OPEN E = LATIN SMALL LETTER EPSILON · lower-mid front

Erjavec, TomaÂ?

194

Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

Property:Current Velocity Range(m/s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Range(m/s) Velocity Range(m/s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Current Velocity Range(m/s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Current Velocity Range(m/s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 3.2 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 0.0 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 0.0 +

196

Transmission of energy down periodically ribbed elastic structures under fluid loading: spatialperiodicity in the pass bands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...long-range coupling|Green's function| Transmission of energy down periodically...long-range coupling; Green's function 1. Introduction Energy transmission down...fluid loading in energy transmission...properties of the Green's function...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

Mahmood, S. [Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, RS, Porto Alegre 915051-970 (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Haas, F. [Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, RS, Porto Alegre 915051-970 (Brazil)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Three-dimensional ultrasonic modeling of Rayleigh wave propagation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...3-mm vertical step at incidence angles ranging from 15 through 90 (normal incidence). The small signal arriving about I usec before the Rayleigh wave is an S wave excited at the step. At a given incidence angle, the waveforms for the INPUT 0 = 90...

John T. Bullitt; M. Nafi Toksöz

199

Search for gravitational waves from intermediate mass binary black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of nonspinning intermediate mass black holes in the total mass range 100–450??M? and with the component mass ratios between 1?1 ...

Barsotti, Lisa

200

An Autonomous Adaptive Scheduling Agent for Period Searching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the design and implementation of an autonomous adaptive software agent that addresses the practical problem of observing undersampled, periodic, time-varying phenomena using a network of HTN-compliant robotic telescopes. The algorithm governing the behaviour of the agent uses an optimal geometric sampling technique to cover the period range of interest, but additionally implements proactive behaviour that maximises the optimality of the dataset in the face of an uncertain and changing operating environment.

Eric S. Saunders; Tim Naylor; Alasdair Allan

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Experimental Measurements and Numerical Prediction of the Effect of Waves on Mooring Line Forces for a Container Ship Moored to Pile Supported and Solid Wall Docks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conditions of a moored container ship are examined by a physical model in a wave basin and by a numerical simulation. Each condition, wave period, significant wave height and wave direction, was isolated and tested for a 50:1 scale model of a...

Luai, Andres B

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

202

FROM LARGE-SCALE LOOPS TO THE SITES OF DENSE FLARING LOOPS: PREFERENTIAL CONDITIONS FOR LONG-PERIOD PULSATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

Long-period quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of solar flares are a class apart from shorter period events. By involving an external resonator, the mechanism they call upon differs from traditional QPP models, but has wider applications. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of spatially resolved QPPs, with periods around 10 minutes, observed in the X-ray spectrum primarily at energies between 3 and 25 keV. Complementary observations obtained in H{alpha} and radio emission in the kHz to GHz frequency range, together with an analysis of the X-ray plasma properties provide a comprehensive picture that is consistent with a dense flaring loop subject to periodic energization and thermalization. The QPPs obtained in H{alpha} and type III radio bursts, with similar periods as the QPPs in soft X-rays, have the longest periods ever reported for those types of data sets. We also report 1-2 GHz radio emission, concurrent with but unrestricted to the QPP time intervals, which is multi-structured at regularly separated narrowband frequencies and modulated with {approx}18 minute periods. This radio emission can be attributed to the presence of multiple 'quiet' large-scale loops in the background corona. Large scale but shorter inner loops below may act as preferential resonators for the QPPs. The observations support interpretations consistent with both inner and outer loops subject to fast kink magnetohydrodynamic waves. Finally, X-ray imaging indicates the presence of double coronal sources in the flaring sites, which could be the particular signatures of the magnetically linked inner loops. We discuss the preferential conditions and the driving mechanisms causing the repeated flaring.

Foullon, C.; Verwichte, E.; Nakariakov, V. M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Fletcher, L.; Hannah, I. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Cecconi, B. [LESIA, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France); Phillips, K. J. H. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Tan, B. L., E-mail: claire.foullon@warwick.ac.u [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

Observations of long period earthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

Waveforms of most seismic events accompanying hydraulic fracturing have been reported to contain clear P and S waves and have fault plane solutions consistent with shear displacement across a fault. This observation is surprising since classical hydraulic fracturing theory predicts the creation of a tensile opening of a cavity in response to fluid pressure. Very small long period events, similar to long period earthquakes observed at volcanoes, were found to occur during four hydraulic fracturing experiments carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Since the long period earthquakes occur in the same region as the shear type events, it is concluded that the unusual character of the long period earthquake waveforms is due to a source effect and not a path effect. The occurrence of long period earthquakes during hydraulic fracturing could indicate tensile fracturing. Many waveforms of these events are identical, which implies that these events represent repeated activation of a given source. A proposed source for these long period events is the sudden opening of a channel that connects two cracks filled with fluid at different pressures. The sizes of the two cracks differ, which causes two or more peaks to appear in the spectra, each peak being associated with one physical dimension of each crack. From the frequencies at which spectral peaks occur, crack lengths are estimated to be between 3 and 20m.

Bame, D.; Fehler, M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Analytical formulation of 3D dynamic homogenization for periodic elastic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogenization of the equations of motion for a three dimensional periodic elastic system is considered. Expressions are obtained for the fully dynamic effective material parameters governing the spatially averaged fields by using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. The effective equations are of Willis form (Willis 1997) with coupling between momentum and stress and tensorial inertia. The formulation demonstrates that the Willis equations of elastodynamics are closed under homogenization. The effective material parameters are obtained for arbitrary frequency and wavenumber combinations, including but not restricted to Bloch wave branches for wave propagation in the periodic medium. Numerical examples for a 1D system illustrate the frequency dependence of the parameters on Bloch wave branches and provide a comparison with an alternative dynamic effective medium theory (Shuvalov 2011) which also reduces to Willis form but with different effective moduli.

A. N. Norris; A. L. Shuvalov; A. A. Kutsenko

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

206

Range Condition: Key to Sustained Ranch Productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range condition, or a rangeland's "state of health," is an ecological measurement of the current condition of a range. Range condition is evaluated by the plant species composition. This leaflet explains the importance of range condition, how range...

McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

207

Periodic ripples in suspended graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the mechanism of wrinkling of suspended graphene, by means of atomistic simulations. We argue that the structural instability under edge compression is the essential physical reason for the formation of periodic ripples in graphene. The ripple wavelength and out-of-plane amplitude are found to obey 1/4-power scaling laws with respect to edge compression. Our results also show that parallel displacement of the clamped boundaries can induce periodic ripples, with oscillation amplitude roughly proportional to the 1/4 power of edge displacement.

Zhao Wang and Michel Devel

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Donald, Philip M. 1973. Cutting a young-growth, mixed-conifer stand to California Forest Practice Act StandardsPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 Cutting a Young-Growth, Mixed-Conifer Stand to California

Standiford, Richard B.

209

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. Hathaway, both of the Black Hills National Forest, Custer, South Dakota, provided the necessaryPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range FOREST SERVICE U. S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 Experiment Station USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 96 /1973 #12;CONTENTS

Standiford, Richard B.

210

Hysteresis of ionization waves  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H. [Institut fuer Physik, E.-M.-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Wilke, C. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung und Technologie, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

US Army Corps of Engineers

212

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer of the Subject II. Introduction­Historical Perspective III. Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations IV. Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics V. Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions VI

Hereman, Willy A.M.

213

Matter Waves and Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classical four-dimensional relativity gives a most natural and harmonious interpretation of the three basic phenomena of nature: gravity, electricity, and the wave structure of matter, provided that the basic assumptions of the Einsteinian theory are modified in two respects: (1) the fundamental invariant of the action principle is chosen as a quadratic instead of a linear function of the curvature components; (2) the static equilibrium of the world is replaced by a dynamic equilibrium. Electricity comes out as a second-order resonance effect of the matter waves. The matter waves are gravitational waves but superposed not on an empty Euclidean space but on a space of high average curvature.

Cornelius Lanczos

1942-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

kinetic wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

kinetic wave energy ? kinetische Wellenenergie f [Teil der Wellenlänge, die im Feld der Orbitalgeschwindigkeiten unter der Welle enthalten ist und als Orbitalbewegung am Ort verbleibt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

potential wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

potential wave energy ? potentielle Wellenenergie f [Der für die Auslenkung des Wasserspiegels zum Ruhewasserspiegel erforderliche Teil der Wellenenergie, die mit der Wellengeschwindigkeit fortbewegt...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Galileo Plasma Wave Observations in the Io Plasma Torus and Near Io  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of results from the Galileo plasma wave instrument dur-ing the...including the flyby of lo. The plasma wave subsystem (PWS) was designed to measure the spectrum of plasma waves and radio emissions over...frequency range from 5 Hz to 5.6 MHz (1). During the inbound pass...

D. A. Gurnett; W. S. Kurth; A. Roux; S. J. Bolton; C. F. Kennel

1996-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

217

Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves  

SciTech Connect

We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Range Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Range Fuels Name Range Fuels Address 11101 W. 120th Avenue Place Broomfield, Colorado Zip 80021 Sector Biomass Product Uses a thermochemical process to turn biomass into synthetic gas and then fuel Website http://www.rangefuels.com/ Coordinates 39.915572°, -105.122053° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.915572,"lon":-105.122053,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

219

PERSISTENT DOPPLER SHIFT OSCILLATIONS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURES OF ALFVENIC WAVES AND RECURRING UPFLOWS  

SciTech Connect

Using data obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we have performed a survey of obvious and persistent (without significant damping) Doppler shift oscillations in the corona. We have found mainly two types of oscillations from February to April in 2007. One type is found at loop footpoint regions, with a dominant period around 10 minutes. They are characterized by coherent behavior of all line parameters (line intensity, Doppler shift, line width, and profile asymmetry), and apparent blueshift and blueward asymmetry throughout almost the entire duration. Such oscillations are likely to be signatures of quasi-periodic upflows (small-scale jets, or coronal counterpart of type-II spicules), which may play an important role in the supply of mass and energy to the hot corona. The other type of oscillation is usually associated with the upper part of loops. They are most clearly seen in the Doppler shift of coronal lines with formation temperatures between one and two million degrees. The global wavelets of these oscillations usually peak sharply around a period in the range of three to six minutes. No obvious profile asymmetry is found and the variation of the line width is typically very small. The intensity variation is often less than 2%. These oscillations are more likely to be signatures of kink/Alfven waves rather than flows. In a few cases, there seems to be a {pi}/2 phase shift between the intensity and Doppler shift oscillations, which may suggest the presence of slow-mode standing waves according to wave theories. However, we demonstrate that such a phase shift could also be produced by loops moving into and out of a spatial pixel as a result of Alfvenic oscillations. In this scenario, the intensity oscillations associated with Alfvenic waves are caused by loop displacement rather than density change. These coronal waves may be used to investigate properties of the coronal plasma and magnetic field.

Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover St., Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Innes, Davina E.; Peter, Hardi, E-mail: htian@ucar.edu [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

220

Experimental Investigation on Density Wave Instability of Sodium Boiling Two-Phase Flow in an Annulus  

SciTech Connect

Experiments of density wave instability in a liquid sodium boiling two-phase flow experiments in an annulus were carried out in the following parameters range: heat flux from 80 kW/m{sup 2} to 976 kW/m{sup 2}, inlet subcooling from 25.6 deg. C to 226.8 deg. C, mass flow rate from 7.92 kg/h to 68.9 kg/h, system pressure from 2600 Pa to 0.12 Mpa. Not only the mechanism of the instability, critical conditions and oscillation period, but also the effects of pressure, mass flow rate and inlet subcooling on the density wave instability were explored experimentally and theoretically. From the experimental data, it was found that the lower the inlet temperature was, the higher the system pressure and the mass flow rate that could result in a more stable boiling two-phase flow were. A correlation for the density wave instability was obtained on from the dimensional analysis for the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. (authors)

Suizheng Qiu; Dounan Jia [Xi'an Jiaotong University, No.28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710049 (China); Minoru Takahashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Free-Wave Energy Dissipation in Experimental Breaking Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several transient wave trains containing an isolated plunging or spilling breaker at a prescribed location were generated in a two-dimensional wave flume using an energy focusing technique. Surface elevation measurements of each transient wave ...

Eustorgio Meza; Jun Zhang; Richard J. Seymour

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Observations on waveforms of capillary and gravity-capillary waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to extreme conditions in the field, there has not been any observational report on three-dimensional waveforms of short ocean surface waves. Three-dimensional waveforms of short wind waves can be found from integrating surface gradient image data (Zhang 1996a). Ocean surface gradient images are captured by an optical surface gradient detector mounted on a raft operating in the water offshore California (Cox and Zhang 1997). Waveforms and spatial structures of short wind waves are compared with early laboratory wind wave data (Zhang 1994, 1995). Although the large-scale wind and wave conditions are quite different, the waveforms are resoundingly similar at the small scale. It is very common, among steep short wind waves, that waves in the capillary range feature sharp troughs and flat crests. The observations show that most short waves are far less steep than the limiting waveform under weak wind conditions. Waveforms that resemble capillary-gravity solitons are observed with a close match to the form theoretically predicted for potential flows (Longuet-Higgins 1989, Vanden-Broeck and Dias 1992). Capillaries are mainly found as parasitic capillaries on the forward face of short gravity waves. The maximum wavelength in a parasitic wave train is less than a centimeter. The profiles of parasitic wave trains and longitudinal variations are shown. The phenomenon of capillary blockage (Phillips 1981) on dispersive freely traveling short waves is observed in the tank but not at sea. The short waves seen at sea propagate in all directions while waves in the tank are much more unidirectional.

Xin Zhang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Estimation of Heavy Ion Densities From Linearly Polarized EMIC Waves At Earth  

SciTech Connect

Linearly polarized EMIC waves are expected to concentrate at the location where their wave frequency satisfies the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance condition as the result of a mode conversion process. In this letter, we evaluate absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance in the Earth geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of helium and azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers in dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentration, it only occurs for a limited range of azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Our results suggest that, at L = 6.6, linearly polarized EMIC waves can be generated via mode conversion from the compressional waves near the crossover frequency. Consequently, the heavy ion concentration ratio can be estimated from observations of externally generated EMIC waves that have polarization.

Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong-Hun

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

225

Magnetic Field Generation by Detonation Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple model is given for the spontaneous magnetic field generation by a detonation wave in condensed matter. The field is shown to arise from the noncollinearity of the thermal and electron density gradients near a medium boundary at the detonation shock front. The model allows calculation of approximate values for the field strength at the front and penetration ahead of the detonation wave. For typical explosive media interfaced by air the magnetic field is predicted to lie in the range 0.1 to 15 G.

Michael J. Frankel and Edward T. Toton

1979-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

Some criteria for the symmetry of stratified water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers two-dimensional stably stratified steady periodic gravity water waves with surface profiles monotonic between crests and troughs. We provide sufficient conditions under which such waves are necessarily symmetric. This is done by first exploiting some elliptic structure in the governing equations to show that, in certain size regimes, a maximum principle holds. This then forms the basis for a method of moving planes argument.

Samuel Walsh

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Wave-Pipelined Router Architecture Using Ternary Associative Memory Jose G. Delgado-Frias* Jabulani Nyathi* Laxmi Bhuyant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Wave-Pipelined Router Architecture Using Ternary Associative Memory Jose G. Delgado University Abstract In this paper a wave-pipelining scheme is used to increase the per- formance of a router not occur. The results of the study show that wave-pipelining helps to reduce the clock period. 1

Nyathi, Jabulani

228

Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: the same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analysed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a "chaotic diode", where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

Stefano Lepri; Arkady Pikovsky

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

231

Nonlinear physics of shear Alfvén waves  

SciTech Connect

Shear Alfvén waves (SAW) play fundamental roles in thermonuclear plasmas of fusion interest, since they are readily excited by energetic particles in the MeV range as well as by the thermal plasma components. Thus, understanding fluctuation induced transport in burning plasmas requires understanding nonlinear SAW physics. There exist two possible routes to nonlinear SAW physics: (i) wave-wave interactions and the resultant spectral energy transfer; (ii) nonlinear wave-particle interactions of SAW instabilities with energetic particles. Within the first route, it is advantageous to understand and describe nonlinear processes in term of proximity of the system to the Alfvénic state, where wave-wave interactions are minimized due to the cancellation of Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. Here, various wave-wave nonlinear dynamics are elucidated in terms of how they break the Alfvénic state. In particular, we discuss the qualitative and quantitative modification of the SAW parametric decay process due to finite ion compressibility and finite ion Larmor radius. We also show that toroidal geometry plays a crucial role in the nonlinear excitation of zonal structures by Alfvén eigenmodes. Within the second route, the coherent nonlinear dynamics of structures in the energetic particle phase space, by which secular resonant particle transport can occur on meso- and macro-scales, must be addressed and understood. These 'nonlinear equilibria' or 'phase-space zonal structures' dynamically evolve on characteristic (fluctuation induced) turbulent transport time scales, which are generally of the same order of the nonlinear time scale of the underlying fluctuations. In this work, we introduce the general structure of nonlinear Schrödinger equations with complex integro-differential nonlinear terms, which govern these physical processes. To elucidate all these aspects, theoretical analyses are presented together with numerical simulation results.

Zonca, Fulvio [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Italy and Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 31007 (China); Chen, Liu [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 31007, P.R.C. and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

Rogers, S.C.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

233

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

234

Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2) 2) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2011-3 2012-1 2012-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

236

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1) 1) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2010-3 2011-1 2011-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

237

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3) 3) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2012-3 2013-1 2013-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

238

Normal Growth of Range Cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Brazos County, Texas BULLETIN NO. 409 MARCH, 1930 DIVISION OF RANGE ANIMAL HUSBANDRY - Lr9RARv' *n+!nmt">3~roql f', 44+lpl,9-' . 16' , ,, ..!c?! cq!!f?~c nt... of these special problems, the Texas Station presents in this Bulletin a study of the growth in weight and in measurements which actually took place in the calves born during nine years at Substation No. 14, the Ranch Experiment Station. This study so far has...

Lush, Jay L. (Jay Laurence)

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sound Waves in the Atmosphere at Infrasonic Frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various geophysical processes generate sound waves in the atmosphere. Some typical sources are auroral discharges in the upper atmosphere tornadoes and severe storms surface waves on the oceans volcanic explosions earthquakes and atmospheric oscillations arising from unstable wind flow at the tropopause. Man?made sources include powerful explosions and the shock waves from vehicles moving at supersonic speeds at altitudes below about 125 km. The components of sound?wave energy at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods >1.0 sec) are propagated for large distances (thousands of kilometers) over the earth's surface with very little loss of energy from absorption by viscosity and heat conduction. But the propagation depends strongly on (a) the horizontally stratified temperature structure of the atmosphere (b) the influence of gravity at oscillation periods greater than the atmospheric resonance period ?300 sec and (c) the nonuniform distribution of atmospheric winds. The microphones and electroacoustical apparatus at an infrasonics observation station e.g. the one at Washington D. C. measure (1) the amplitude and waveform of incident sound pressure (2) the direction of local propagation of the wave (3) the horizontal trace velocity and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various oscillation frequencies. Researches on propagation require observational data from a network of stations separated geographically by large distances coupled with theoretical analysis of sound propagation to arrive at useful results on the acoustics of the atmosphere.

Richard K. Cook

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Wave energy: a Pacific perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...study by Cornett used wind/wave hindcasting to assess Canada's offshore wave energy resource...will probably attract offshore birds, possibly leading...related projects, such as offshore wind farms. If wave energy development...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Rainbow trapping of guided waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rainbow trapping of guided waves Javier Polanco and Rosa M.the propagation of a wave packet that is a superpositionof three s-polarized guided waves with different frequencies

Polanco, Javier; Fitzgerald, Rosa M; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus and efficiency of seismic processing algorithms, especially for application to regions of structural complexity

243

Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

None

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Quasar Proper Motions and Low-Frequency Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report observational upper limits on the mass-energy of the cosmological gravitational-wave background, from limits on proper motions of quasars. Gravitational waves with periods longer than the time span of observations produce a simple pattern of apparent proper motions over the sky, composed primarily of second-order transverse vector spherical harmonics. A fit of such harmonics to measured motions yields a 95%-confidence limit on the mass-energy of gravitational waves with frequencies <2e-9 Hz, of <0.11/h*h times the closure density of the universe.

Carl R. Gwinn; T. Marshall Eubanks; Ted Pyne; Mark Birkinshaw; Demetrios N. Matsakis

1996-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

245

Quantum Revivals in Periodically Driven Systems close to nonlinear resonance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the quantum revival time for a wave-packet initially well localized in a one-dimensional potential in the presence of an external periodic modulating field. The dependence of the revival time on various parameters of the driven system is shown analytically. As an example of application of our approach, we compare the analytically obtained values of the revival time for various modulation strengths with the numerically computed ones in the case of a driven gravitational cavity. We show that they are in very good agreement.

Farhan Saif; Mauro Fortunato

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

List of Wave Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveEnergy&oldid267203" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

247

Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect

The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

Spatial Periodic Forcing Can Displace Patterns It Is Intended to Control  

Spatial periodic forcing of pattern-forming systems is an important, but lightly studied, method of controlling patterns. It can be used to control the amplitude and wave number of one-dimensional periodic patterns, to stabilize unstable patterns, and to induce them below instability onset. We show that, although in one spatial dimension the forcing acts to reinforce the patterns, in two dimensions it acts to destabilize or displace them by inducing two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns.

Mau, Yair; Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

Branch; Darren W. (Albuquerque, NM), Meyer; Grant D. (Ithaca, NY), Craighead; Harold G. (Ithaca, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

The orbital period distribution of subdwarf B binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a 3.5 year long campaign to measure orbital periods of subdwarf B (sdB) star binaries. We directly compare our observed orbital period distribution with that predicted by using binary population synthesis. Up to now, most of our systems seem to have been formed through two of the formation channels discussed by Han et al.(2003), i.e. the first and the second common envelope ejection (CE) channels. At this point, thanks to the long baseline of our observations, we are starting to detect also very long orbital period systems. These have probably come from a complete different formation path, the first stable Roche Lobe overflow (RLOF) channel in which the first mass transfer phase is stable. This channel is expected to lead to the formation of very wide binaries with orbital periods ranging between 0.5 to 2000 days.

L. Morales-Rueda; P. F. L. Maxted; T. R. Marsh

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

252

5 - Surface Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter summarizes the advantages of the surface wave (SW) plasma sources. It includes a summary of the wave and plasma properties of SW sustained plasma columns, review of the essential parts composing a SW plasma source; describes a family of efficient SW launchers for such plasma sources, dwells on three typical experimental arrangements and a brief summary recalling the advantages of SW plasma sources. Surface wave discharges have the advantage of the broadest operating conditions in terms of frequency, tube dimensions and shape, and gas pressure. For example they can be utilized over both the RF (radiofrequency) and microwave domains, which permits one to optimize given processes as a function of frequency (generally through changes in the electron energy distribution function). A further advantage of SW plasmas is that they are the best modeled HF plasmas. This provides insight into HF discharges in general since, to a first approximation, the local plasma properties of SW discharges are the same as in all RF and microwave discharges under given discharge conditions, and for a given HF power density deposited in the plasma. Compared to other RF and microwave plasma sources, SW discharges are undoubtedly the most flexible ones. They also are efficient discharges since very little HF power is lost in the impedance matching circuit. Finally, a major future avenue for these discharges is their operation as magnetized plasmas. As a first approach to presenting surface wave (SW) plasma sources, let us consider their distinctive features with respect to the other plasma sources described in the book:o1. The discharge can be sustained far away from the active zone of the field applicator. This is because the electric field supporting the discharge is provided by a wave that carries away the power from the applicator. It is an electromagnetic surface wave whose sole guiding structure is the plasma column that it sustains and the dielectric tube enclosing it [1]–[3]. This is, thus, a non-cumbersome method for producing long plasma columns; plasma columns up to 6 meters in length have been achieved in our laboratory while launching the wave with a field applicator that surrounded the discharge tube over a few centimeters in length only. [4][5] 2. The range of the applied field frequency f=?/2? is the broadest of all kinds of high frequency (HF) sustained plasma sources. We have succeeded in realizing HF power transfer to the discharge efficiently from approximately 10 \\{MHz\\} to 10 \\{GHz\\} [6] and, with impaired coupling efficiency, down to 200 kHz [7]. This frequency range includes radiofrequencies (RF) and the lower part of the microwave frequency spectrum; we use the term high frequencies to designate RF as well as microwave frequencies. An interesting aspect of this frequency flexibility is the possibility of acting on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to optimize a given plasma process [8]. 3. The gas pressure range is extremely large. On the one hand, one can operate SW discharges in the sub-mtorr range under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions, [9] while, on the other hand, it is possible to sustain a stable plasma of a few millimeters diameter at pressures at least a few times atmospheric pressure [10]. 4. The range of plasma, density, n, is very large. At reduced pressure and with f in the few \\{MHz\\} range, n, can be as low as 108 cm?3, [7] while at atmospheric pressure it can exceed 1015 cm?3[10] A related parameter is the degree of ionization ?i, i.e. the plasma density relative to the initial neutral atom concentration. Under ECR conditions, for example with f=2.45 \\{GHz\\} where n can reach up to a few 1012 cm?3, ?i ranges approximately from 0.1–10%, whereas in the above-mentioned atmospheric pressure case, it is smaller than 10?4. The higher n, the higher the rate of plasma processes depending on ions or on neutral particles (e.g., atoms, radicals) when the latter are obtained through electron collisions [8]. Large ?i values favor the existence of

Michel Moisan; Joëlle Margot; Zenon Zakrzewski

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Long-Period Solar Variability  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial climate records and historical observations of the Sun suggest that the Sun undergoes aperiodic oscillations in radiative output and size over time periods of centuries and millenia. Such behavior can be explained by the solar convective zone acting as a nonlinear oscillator, forced at the sunspot-cycle frequency by variations in heliomagnetic field strength. A forced variant of the Lorenz equations can generate a time series with the same characteristics as the solar and climate records. The timescales and magnitudes of oscillations that could be caused by this mechanism are consistent with what is known about the Sun and terrestrial climate.

GAUTHIER,JOHN H.

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

254

wave | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281559 Varnish cache server wave Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. Source Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Date Released December 05th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

255

Biologic response to complex blast waves  

SciTech Connect

Small, bare charges were detonated inside an M59 armored personnel carrier (APC) in an attempt to simulate the complex blast waves generated by the jets from shaped-charge warheads penetrating into armored vehicles. Anesthetized sheep were placed inside the APC at 92- and 122-cm ranges from 57- or 113-g pentolite charges. Pressure-time was measured by pressure transducers either mounted on the animals or free standing at comparable ranges on the opposite side of the vehicle. In general, the waveforms were characterized by an initial shock wave of less than 1-msec duration followed by repeated reflections of decreasing magnitude. No deaths nor lung hemorrhages were observed, but all the animals sustained severe ear injury. Animals subjected to peak overpressures of 1.2 to 2.3 bar from the 113-g explosions also received slight non-auditory blast injuries to the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; those exposed to peak overpressures of just under 1 bar from the 57-g charges did not. The non-auditory blast injuries inside the APC were more severe than those sustained by sheep at comparable distances from 113-g charges in the open. The results suggested that the biological consequences of a complex wave of the type encountered in this study can be equated approximately to a Friedlander wave with a peak overpressure equal to that of the complex wave and with a total impulse equal to the impulse over the first 2 to 3 msec of the complex wave. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Richmond, D.R.; Yelverton, J.T.; Fletcher, E.R.; Phillips, Y.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

257

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

258

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli MIT E .J. Porkolab Sherwood/Spring APS Denver May 2009 #12; 2 Participants in the Center for Simulation of Wave hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance

Wright, John C.

259

On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

260

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range lies at the west edge of the Great Basin, adjacent to the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. A basement complex of pre-Cenozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks is partly buried by approx.35 km^3 of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km^3 of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending order of abundance, and (2) < or =1.1 m.y., nearly equal amounts of basalt and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Range-Separated Brueckner Coupled Cluster Doubles Theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a range-separation approximation to coupled cluster doubles (CCD) theory that successfully overcomes limitations of regular CCD when applied to the uniform electron gas. We combine the short-range ladder channel with the long-range ring channel in the presence of a Bruckner renormalized one-body interaction and obtain ground-state energies with an accuracy of 0.001 a.u./electron across a wide range of density regimes. Our scheme is particularly useful in the low-density and strongly correlated regimes, where regular CCD has serious drawbacks. Moreover, we cure the infamous overcorrelation of approaches based on ring diagrams (i.e., the particle-hole random phase approximation). Our energies are further shown to have appropriate basis set and thermodynamic limit convergence, and overall this scheme promises energetic properties for realistic periodic and extended systems which existing methods do not possess.

James J. Shepherd; Thomas M. Henderson; Gustavo E. Scuseria

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains.

J. I. Arana; L. L. Bonilla; H. T. Grahn

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna  

SciTech Connect

ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517–520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20?MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45?kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF properties of the antenna if they are in the ICRF operating range. The effect on the wave propagation along the wall structure, which is acting as a spatially periodic (toroidally and poloidally) corrugated structure, and hence constitutes a slow wave structure modifying the wall boundary condition, is examined.

Durodié, F., E-mail: frederic.durodie@rma.ac.be; Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Huygen, S.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels (Belgium); Bamber, R.; Hancock, D.; Lockley, D.; Nightingale, M. P. S.; Shannon, M.; Tigwell, P.; Wilson, D. [EURATOM/CCFE Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Politechnico di Torino (Italy); Winkler, K. [IPP-MPI, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Traveling-wave photodetector  

SciTech Connect

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Analysis of Gravitational-Wave Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The field of gravitational-wave data analysis has expanded greatly over the past decade and significant developments have been made in methods of analyzing the data taken by resonant bar and interferometric detectors, as well as analysis of mock LISA data. This book introduces much of the required theoretical background in gravitational physics, statistics and time series analysis before moving on to a discussion of gravitational-wave data analysis techniques themselves. The book opens with an overview of the theory of gravitational radiation, providing a comprehensive discussion of various introductory topics: linearized gravity, transverse traceless gauge, the effects of gravitational waves (via geodesic deviation), energy and momentum carried by the waves, and generation of gravitational waves. The second chapter provides an introduction to the various sources of gravitational waves, followed by more detailed expositions on some of the primary sources. For example, the description of compact binary coalescence is thorough and includes a brief exposition of the post-Newtonian formalism and the effective one body method. There also follows extended derivations of gravitational waves from distorted neutron stars, supernovae and a stochastic background. Chapter three provides an introduction to the statistical theory of signal detection, including a discussion of parameter estimation via the Fisher matrix formalism. This is presented from a very mathematical, postulate based, standpoint and I expect that even established gravitational-wave data analysts will find the derivations here more formal than they are used to. The discussion of likelihood ratio tests and the importance of prior probabilities are presented particularly clearly. The fourth chapter covers time series analysis, with power spectrum estimation, extraction of periodic signals and goodness of fit tests. Chapter five switches topics and gives the details of the response of gravitational-wave detectors. The derivation is kept general at the outset, so that a detailed discussion of the response of the LISA detector is possible, before restricting to the long wavelength approximation for discussion of ground based detectors. Chapter six provides a detailed exposition of the maximum likelihood method for searching for signals in Gaussian noise. Jaranowski and Królak developed the F-statistic search method, which has become standard in searches for continuous waves and is also used in LISA data analysis. Perhaps then, it is unsurprising that the discussion of matched filtering is couched in terms of a generalized F-statistic method. This chapter also covers parameter estimation via the Fisher matrix and applications to networks of detectors. As in other chapters, the initial formalism is rather general but, in later sections, specific examples are given, such as the application to continuous wave, compact binary coalescence and stochastic signals. The seventh, and final, chapter provides examples of concrete methods for analyzing data. The focus is on methods which the authors are most familiar with and consequently these are mostly relevant for the analysis of resonant bar data and searches for continuous wave signals. The discussion of complexities arising in creating banks of template waveforms is likely to be of more general interest. The last two chapters of the book, which contain the meat of the subject of gravitational-wave data analysis, are regrettably short. Several large research areas are not discussed at all, including: time–frequency excess power search methods; Bayesian parameter estimation techniques (e.g. Markov Chain Monte Carlo) to go past the Fisher matrix approximation; signal consistency tests and other methods of dealing with non-Gaussian data. On the back cover, it states that `this book introduces researchers entering the field ... to gravitational-wave data analysis'. While this book certainly does contain much of the necessary introductory material, the presentation will likely prove too technical to be easily accessible to beginn

Stephen Fairhurst

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition {omega}wave frequency, k{sub ||} is the local parallel component of the wave vector, and v{sub te} is the local electron thermal speed. This excited slow wave may be related to the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave that propagates for frequencies above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency in warm plasmas or to a high frequency version of a kinetic Alfven wave. This slow wave, if physically real, would provide another path for rf power absorption in tokamaks and ST devices.

Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, 1066 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Berry, L. A.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Smithe, D. N. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

267

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave...

268

Digital video analysis of nonequilibrium periodic patterns induced in nematics by magnetic reorientation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Early-time dynamics of transient periodic structures in reorienting lyotropic nematics are analyzed via digital video microscopy. Measurements of the time dependence of the pattern power spectrum and critical wave number are presented. The data are compared to the results of a simple linear theory.

J. P. McClymer; M. M. Labes; M. R. Kuzma

1988-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

On the validity of 2Dsurface water wave models Guido Schneider, C. Eugene Wayne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of long waves with small amplitude. It is used in the numerical simulation of the spreading of tsunamis in the computation of the eigenmodes of Lake Constance in order to explain a documented time­periodic flooding

Wayne, Eugene

270

A Case Study of Mid-Atlantic Nocturnal Boundary Layer Events during WAVES 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Water Vapor Variability-Satellite/Sondes (WAVES) 2006 field campaign provided a contiguous 5-day period of concentrated high-resolution measurements to examine finescale boundary layer phenomena under the influence of a summertime subtropical ...

S. Rabenhorst; D. N. Whiteman; D.-L. Zhang; B. Demoz

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mathematical Caricature of Large Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kadomtsev-Petviiashvili equation is considered as a mathematical caricature of large and rogue waves.

Mikhail Kovalyov

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

Clustering of floaters by waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study experimentally how waves affect distribution of particles that float on a water surface. We show that clustering of small particles in a standing wave is a nonlinear effect with the clustering time decreasing as the square of the wave amplitude. In a set of random waves, we show that small floaters concentrate on a multi-fractal set.

P. Denissenko; G. Falkovich; S. Lukaschuk

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

273

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES Tuning Wave Dispersion in Resonant Networks Eyal Feigenbaum with meta-atoms. Resonant guided wave networks (RGWNs) are a new class of artificial photonic material,5 distinct from photonic crystals and metamateri- als, in which localized waves resonate in closed paths

Atwater, Harry

274

MHK Technologies/Multi Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Multi Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Leancon Wave Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Leancon Real Sea Test Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description MAWEC is an OWC wave energy converter that works differently from other OWCs in that it concurrently utilizes pressure and suck. This gives the wanted effect that the vertical force on the WEC is zero when the WEC stretches over more than one wave length. The device is V-shaped and oriented perpendicular to wave direction. The device consists of a number of vertical air tubes, and when a wave passes, air is pushed into a pressure channel that sucks air out of the suck channel. During one wave period each tube (120 in total) goes through a sequence where air is first pushed into a pressure channel when the wave is rising and is later sucked from the pressure channel when the wave is falling. In this situation there is constant pressure in the pressure channel and the air flow through the turbines is constant.

275

New subdwarf B star periods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subdwarf B (sdB) stars are thought to be helium burning stars with low mass hydrogen envelopes. Several evolutionary paths have been proposed to explain the formation of these systems. One of these scenarios is the evolution of the sdB progenitor within a binary system. We have looked systematically at bright sdB stars from the PG survey. By taking spectra at several different epochs we have measured the radial velocity shifts caused by the motion of the sdB star within the binary. Our data have been taken over a long time base line (2 years) which allowed us to find longer period binaries than known before. Here we present results for 29 sdB systems.

L. Morales-Rueda; P. F. L. Maxted; T. R. Marsh; R. C. North

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

All-dielectric three-dimensional broadband Eaton lens with large refractive index range  

SciTech Connect

We proposed a method to realize three-dimensional (3D) gradient index (GRIN) devices requiring large refractive index (RI) range with broadband performance. By combining non-resonant GRIN woodpile photonic crystals structure in the metamaterial regime with a compound liquid medium, a wide RI range (1–6.32) was fulfilled flexibly. As a proof-of-principle for the low-loss and non-dispersive method, a 3D Eaton lens was designed and fabricated based on 3D printing process. Full-wave simulation and experiment validated its omnidirectional wave bending effects in a broad bandwidth covering Ku band (12?GHz–18?GHz)

Yin, Ming; Yong Tian, Xiao, E-mail: leoxyt@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ling Wu, Ling; Chen Li, Di [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Selection Rules for the Nonlinear Interactions of Internal Gravity Waves and Inertia-Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal Gravity Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.1 Twodimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . . . . .Three dimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . .

Jiang, Chung-Hsiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Various Boussinesq solitary wave solutions  

SciTech Connect

The generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations have been used to model nonlinear wave evolution over variable topography and wave interactions with structures. Like the KdV equation, the gB equations support a solitary wave solution which propagates without changing shape, and this solitary wave is often used as a primary test case for numerical studies of nonlinear waves using either the gB or other model equations. Nine different approximate solutions of the generalized Boussinesq equations are presented with simple closed form expressions for the wave elevation and wave speed. Each approximates the free propagation of a single solitary wave, and eight of these solutions are newly obtained. The author compares these solutions with the well known KdV solution, Rayleigh`s solution, Laitone`s higher order solution, and ``exact`` numerical integration of the gB equations. Existing experimental data on solitary wave shape and wave speed are compared with these models.

Yates, G.T. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Spin Waves and Neutron Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review is given of the problems in this field and of the possibilities opened up by the fact that neutron scattering gives access to the time?dependent spin?correlation function in magnets over virtually the whole range of q t and T. New experimental results are given in connection with magnon energy linewidth and renormalization and some data are presented for the spin?wave stiffness of bcc 3d transition?metal alloys as a function of electron concentration showing effects explained by the electronic density?of?states curve. It is pointed out that the ground?state fluctuations of magnets give rise to effects in the formulas for neutron scattering.

R. D. Lowde

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn from Cassini's Approach and First Orbit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS...radio emissions and plasma waves across a broad...from 1 Hz to 16 MHz for electric fields and from 1 Hz to 12 kHz for magnetic fields...temperature of the local plasma. Our observations are...rotation of the upper atmosphere of Saturn, the period...

D. A. Gurnett; W. S. Kurth; G. B. Hospodarsky; A. M. Persoon; T. F. Averkamp; B. Cecconi; A. Lecacheux; P. Zarka; P. Canu; N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin; P. Galopeau; A. Roux; C. Harvey; P. Louarn; R. Bostrom; G. Gustafsson; J.-E. Wahlund; M. D. Desch; W. M. Farrell; M. L. Kaiser; K. Goetz; P. J. Kellogg; G. Fischer; H.-P. Ladreiter; H. Rucker; H. Alleyne; A. Pedersen

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapidly rotating neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries have been proposed as an interesting source of gravitational waves. In this chapter we present estimates of the gravitational wave emission for various scenarios, given the (electromagnetically) observed characteristics of these systems. First of all we focus on the r-mode instability and show that a 'minimal' neutron star model (which does not incorporate exotica in the core, dynamically important magnetic fields or superfluid degrees of freedom), is not consistent with observations. We then present estimates of both thermally induced and magnetically sustained mountains in the crust. In general magnetic mountains are likely to be detectable only if the buried magnetic field of the star is of the order of $B\\approx 10^{12}$ G. In the thermal mountain case we find that gravitational wave emission from persistent systems may be detected by ground based interferometers. Finally we re-asses the idea that gravitational wave emission may be balancing the accretion torque in these systems, and show that in most cases the disc/magnetosphere interaction can account for the observed spin periods.

Brynmor Haskell; Nils Andersson; Caroline D`Angelo; Nathalie Degenaar; Kostas Glampedakis; Wynn C. G. Ho; Paul D. Lasky; Andrew Melatos; Manuel Oppenoorth; Alessandro Patruno; Maxim Priymak

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Solitary and shock waves in magnetized electron-positron plasma  

SciTech Connect

An Ohm's law for electron-positron (EP) plasma is obtained. In the framework of EP magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate nonrelativistic nonlinear waves' solutions in a magnetized EP plasma. In the collisionless limit, quasistationary propagating solitary wave structures for the magnetic field and the plasma density are obtained. It is found that the wave amplitude increases with the Mach number and the Alfvén speed. However, the dependence on the plasma temperature is just the opposite. Moreover, for a cold EP plasma, the existence range of the solitary waves depends only on the Alfvén speed. For a hot EP plasma, the existence range depends on the Alfvén speed as well as the plasma temperature. In the presence of collision, the electromagnetic fields and the plasma density can appear as oscillatory shock structures because of the dissipation caused by the collisions. As the collision frequency increases, the oscillatory shock structure becomes more and more monotonic.

Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Abdukerim, Nuriman; Xie, Bai-Song, E-mail: bsxie@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, and College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, and College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision  

SciTech Connect

Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1?mT to 1?mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5?nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300?nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S., E-mail: wensiang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves P. Junga: a subexcitable photosensitive Belousov­Zhabotinsky reaction, hippocampal slices of rat brains, and astrocyte of such a behavior for calcium wave net- works in interconnected brain cells. I. INTRODUCTION Since the early days

Showalter, Kenneth

285

Configurations for short period rf undulators  

Several configurations for rf undulators energized at millimeter wavelengths and designed to produce coherent nanometer radiation from sub-GeV electron beams are analyzed and compared with one another. These configurations include a traveling-wave resonant ring, a standing wave resonator, and a resonator operating close to cutoff.

Kuzikov, S. V.; Jiang, Y.; Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Parametric instability of a monochromatic Alfven wave: Perpendicular decay in low beta plasma  

SciTech Connect

Two-dimensional hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the parametric decay of a monochromatic Alfven wave in low beta plasma. Both the linearly and left-hand polarized pump Alfven waves are considered in the paper. For the linearly polarized pump Alfven wave, either a parallel or obliquely propagating wave can lead to the decay along the perpendicular direction. Initially, the parametric decay takes place along the propagating direction of the pump wave, and then the decay occurs in the perpendicular direction. With the increase of the amplitude and the propagating angle of the pump wave (the angle between the propagating direction of the pump wave and the ambient magnetic field), the spectral range of the excited waves becomes broad in the perpendicular direction. But the effects of the plasma beta on the spectral range of the excited waves in perpendicular direction are negligible. However, for the left-hand polarized pump Alfven wave, when the pump wave propagates along the ambient magnetic field, the parametric decay occurs nearly along the ambient magnetic field, and there is no obvious decay in the perpendicular direction. Significant decay in the perpendicular direction can only be found when the pump wave propagates obliquely.

Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Shan, Lican; Wang, Shui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Li, Xing [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Gravitational wave heating of stars and accretion discs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......suppression of the heating rate if the forcing period...accretion discs. black hole physics|gravitational waves...the tidal disruption rate of stars due to the refilling...the medium that the GW passes through. The dissipation rate of the GW energy gives......

Gongjie Li; Bence Kocsis; Abraham Loeb

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

On Rayleigh waves in a wedge with free boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...against the half angle 0 in Figure 1. In this example, Xl = 2 cm (distance to the corner) and the period of L wave T = 15 usec. The elastic parameters have been determined in the earlier experiments. The smaller AE/E, the better is the approximation...

Rudolf Gutdeutsch

289

Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the storm generates 30 min period motion through interactions in the mixed layer. What angle from. The upper layer density is 1028 kg/m3, and the density is 1029 kg/m3 in the lower layer. a) A wind event generates an upwelling internal wave at 30N with a positive deviation in interface height of size 30m. What

Thompson, LuAnne

290

Reflection and transmission of surface waves in laterally varying media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......regional phases Pg and Lg at the Nevada Test Site, J. geophys. Res., 1981...velocity heterogeneity under the Nevada Test Site on short-period P wave amplitudes...Key 1967). In studies of the Nevada Test Site, Barker, Der & Mrazek (1981......

M. G. Bostock

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A Comparison of Single- and Multi-parameter Wave Criteria for Accessing Wind Turbines in Strategic Maintenance and Logistics Models for Offshore Wind Farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Different vessel types for transferring technicians for maintenance and inspection of offshore wind farms are often evaluated and compared by their limiting significant wave height for accessing the wind turbines. The limiting significant wave height is also the parameter that is often used as the access criteria in strategic decision support tools for maintenance and logistics for offshore wind farms. In practice, however, other wave parameters, such as the peak wave period and wave heading, have major influence on the accessibility to a wind turbine for a given vessel. We compare the use of single-parameter and multi-parameter wave criteria for access to wind turbines in two strategic maintenance and logistics models for offshore wind farms: one simulation model and one optimization model. Multi-parameter wave criteria in the form of limiting significant wave heights as functions of peak wave period and wave heading are obtained by numerical analysis of the vessel docking operation. Results for availability, operation and maintenance costs and the optimal vessel fleet size and mix are found using both these multi-parameter wave criteria and using a corresponding single-parameter limiting significant wave height. The comparison indicates that the use of a single limiting significant wave height can give similar results as when using more complex multi-parameter wave criteria. An important precondition is that the single limiting significant wave height is carefully chosen to represent the vessel and the wave conditions.

Iver Bakken Sperstad; Elin E. Halvorsen-Weare; Matthias Hofmann; Lars Magne Nonås; Magnus Stålhane; MingKang Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

On gravitational waves in spacetimes with a nonvanishing cosmological constant  

SciTech Connect

We study the effect of a cosmological constant {lambda} on the propagation and detection of gravitational waves. To this purpose we investigate the linearized Einstein's equations with terms up to linear order in {lambda} in a de Sitter and an anti-de Sitter background spacetime. In this framework the cosmological term does not induce changes in the polarization states of the waves, whereas the amplitude gets modified with terms depending on {lambda}. Moreover, if a source emits a periodic waveform, its periodicity as measured by a distant observer gets modified. These effects are, however, extremely tiny and thus well below the detectability by some 20 orders of magnitude within present gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO or future planned ones such as LISA.

Naef, Joachim; Jetzer, Philippe; Sereno, Mauro [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Negative-mass Instability in Nonlinear Plasma Waves  

SciTech Connect

The negative-mass instability (NMI), previously found in ion traps, appears as a distinct regime of the sideband instability in nonlinear plasma waves with trapped particles. As the bounce frequency of these particles decreases with the bounce action, bunching can occur if the action distribution is inverted in trapping islands. In contrast to existing theories that also infer instabilities from the anharmonicity of bounce oscillations, spatial periodicity of the islands turns out to be unimportant, and the particle distribution can be unstable even if it is at at the resonance. An analytical model is proposed which describes both single traps and periodic nonlinear waves and concisely generalizes the conventional description of the sideband instability in plasma waves. The theoretical results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations carried out for a regime accentuating the NMI effect.

I.Y. Dodin, P.F. Schmit, J. Rocks and N.J. Fisch

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Breaking wind waves as a source of ambient noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical model for the prediction of ambient noise level due to collective oscillations of air bubbles under breaking wind waves is presented. The model uses a budget of the energy flux from the breaking waves to quantify acoustic power radiation by a bubble cloud. A shift of the noise spectra to lower frequency due to collective bubble oscillation is assumed. The model derives good estimates of the magnitude slope and frequency range of the noise spectra using the wind speed or height of breaking waves.

Pavlo Tkalich; Eng Soon Chan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mode propagation and absorption loss in metal-clad periodic optical waveguides  

SciTech Connect

In terms of the mode eigenvalue equations are field distributions, calculations are performed for Au/InGaAsP/InP, air/Au/InGaAsP/InP, and Au/DiO{sub 2}InGaAsP/InP periodic optical waveguides. On the basis of the computed results, the coupling property in the periodic structure is analyzed, the mode split and the mode band formation of both TE and TM guided modes are described, and the effects of the thickness of the metal cladding and the oxide buffer layer on mode propagation and absorption loss are discussed for TE and TM guided modes as well as for the TM surface-plasma mode. Furthermore, the conversion from the surface-plasma wave to the guided wave for the TM mode is explained for Au/SiO{sub 2}/InGaAsP/InP periodic structures. 27 refs., 8 figs.

Chunsheng Ma [Jilin Univ., Changchun (China)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

298

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Doppler Effect of Nonlinear Waves and Superspirals in Oscillatory Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonlinear waves emitted from a moving source are studied. A meandering spiral in a reaction-diffusion medium provides an example in which waves originate from a source exhibiting a back-and-forth movement in a radial direction. The periodic motion of the source induces a Doppler effect that causes a modulation in wavelength and amplitude of the waves (“superspiral”). Using direct simulations as well as numerical nonlinear analysis within the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, we show that waves subject to a convective Eckhaus instability can exhibit monotonic growth or decay as well as saturation of these modulations depending on the perturbation frequency. Our findings elucidate recent experimental observations concerning superspirals and their decay to spatiotemporal chaos.

Lutz Brusch; Alessandro Torcini; Markus Bär

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Doppler Effect of Nonlinear Waves and Superspirals in Oscillatory Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear waves emitted from a moving source are studied. A meandering spiral in a reaction-diffusion medium provides an example, where waves originate from a source exhibiting a back-and-forth movement in radial direction. The periodic motion of the source induces a Doppler effect that causes a modulation in wavelength and amplitude of the waves (``superspiral''). Using the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, we show that waves subject to a convective Eckhaus instability can exhibit monotonous growth or decay as well as saturation of these modulations away from the source depending on the perturbation frequency. Our findings allow a consistent interpretation of recent experimental observations concerning superspirals and their decay to spatio-temporal chaos.

Lutz Brusch; Alessandro Torcini; Markus Baer

2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

302

Resonant wave-particle interactions modified by intrinsic Alfvenic turbulence  

SciTech Connect

The concept of wave-particle interactions via resonance is well discussed in plasma physics. This paper shows that intrinsic Alfven waves can qualitatively modify the physics discussed in conventional linear plasma kinetic theories. It turns out that preexisting Alfven waves can affect particle motion along the ambient magnetic field and, moreover, the ensuing force field is periodic in time. As a result, the meaning of the usual Landau and cyclotron resonance conditions becomes questionable. It turns out that this effect leads us to find a new electromagnetic instability. In such a process intrinsic Alfven waves not only modify the unperturbed distribution function but also result in a different type of cyclotron resonance which is affected by the level of turbulence. This instability might enable us to better our understanding of the observed radio emission processes in the solar atmosphere.

Wu, C. S.; Lee, K. H. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Wang, C. B. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Surface waves on multilayered anelastic media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with these portions of Lg, the group-velocity curves representing the attenu- SURFACE TAVES ON MULTILAYERED ANELASTIC &,[EDIA 911 ation lows are relatively steep. Thus, after traversing a long oceanic path, the energy in the Lg 1 and Lg 2 period ranges...

Fred Schwab; Leon Knopoff

304

Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions  

SciTech Connect

A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Error distribution and correction of the predicted wave characteristics over the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind-waves are the most important environmental parameter for the design of coastal and offshore structures, sediment transport, coastal erosion etc. Therefore, an accurate evaluation of the wave climate is of great importance. Due to the lack of long term measurements, nowadays numerically modeled wave data are widely used for determining the wave climate. The numerically simulated wave data are continuous in time and space, but generally inaccurate in enclosed and semi-enclosed basins mainly due to the inaccurate wind input data. The main goal of this study is to develop a new and efficient approach to improve the hindcasted wave parameters in the Persian Gulf. Hence, the third generation SWAN model was employed for the wave modeling forced by the 6-hourly ECMWF wind data with a resolution of 0.5°. A new methodology was introduced for the distribution of wave prediction errors from discrete observation points to the other points of interest. It was found that the proposed method which considers the wave generation physics, leads to a significant improvement in the predicted wave parameters. In addition, it was revealed that the improvements in prediction of waves with higher wave heights and longer periods are more than those of others. This was shown to be due to the higher correlation between high values of output parameters which contain larger errors. The influence radius in the error distribution procedure was found to be near 2° (~200 km).

Mohammad Hadi Moeini; Amir Etemad-Shahidi; Vahid Chegini; Iraj Rahmani; Mona Moghaddam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Polariton dispersion of periodic quantum well structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the polariton dispersion relations of a periodic quantum-well structure with a period in the vicinity of half the exciton resonance wavelength, i.e., the Bragg structure. We classified polariton mod...

A. V. Mintsev; L. V. Butov; C. Ell; S. Mosor…

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Implementation of barycentric resampling for continuous wave searches in gravitational wave data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe an efficient implementation of a coherent statistic for searches of continuous gravitational wave from neutron stars. The algorithm works by transforming the data taken by a gravitational wave detector from a moving Earth bound frame to one that sits at the Solar System barycenter. Many practical difficulties arise in the implementation of this algorithm, some of which have not been discussed previously. These difficulties include constraints of small computer memory, discreteness of the data, losses due to interpolation, and gaps in real data. This implementation is considerably more efficient than previous implementations of these kinds of searches on Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave (LIGO) detector data. The speed-up factors range from 10, when applied to Einstein@Home, to about 2000 for targeted searches which integrate over months of data.

Pinkesh Patel; Xavier Siemens; Rejean Dupuis; Joseph Betzwieser

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

309

The dispersive Alfven wave in the time-stationary limit with a focus on collisional and warm-plasma effects  

SciTech Connect

A nonlinear, collisional, two-fluid model of uniform plasma convection across a field-aligned current (FAC) sheet, describing the stationary Alfven (StA) wave, is presented. In a previous work, Knudsen showed that, for cold, collisionless plasma [D. J. Knudsen, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 10761 (1996)], the stationary inertial Alfven (StIA) wave can accelerate electrons parallel to a background magnetic field and cause large, time-independent plasma-density variations having spatial periodicity in the direction of the convective flow over a broad range of spatial scales and energies. Knudsen suggested that these fundamental properties of the StIA wave may play a role in the formation of discrete auroral arcs. Here, Knudsen's model has been generalized for warm, collisional plasma. From this generalization, it is shown that nonzero ion-neutral and electron-ion collisional resistivity significantly alters the perpendicular ac and dc structure of magnetic-field-aligned electron drift, and can either dissipate or enhance the field-aligned electron energy depending on the initial value of field-aligned electron drift velocity. It is also shown that nonzero values of plasma pressure increase the dominant Fourier component of perpendicular wavenumber.

Finnegan, S. M.; Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Knudsen, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part I: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Shear Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the emission of internal gravity waves from a local westerly shear layer is studied. Thermal and/or vorticity forcing of the shear layer with a wide range of frequencies and scales can lead to strong emission of gravity waves in ...

Nikolaos A. Bakas; Petros J. Ioannou

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Wave Loading on Floating Platforms by Internal Solitary Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morison’s equation is used for estimating internal solitary wave-induced forces exerted on SPAR and semi-submersible platforms. And the results we got have also ... estimate internal wave loading even for SPAR an...

H. Q. Zhang; J. C. Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

Yuksel, Cem

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Critical coupling and coherent perfect absorption for ranges of energies due to a complex gain and loss symmetric system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system.

Mohammad Hasan; Ananya Ghatak; Bhabani Prasad Mandal

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. (2005) “Modeling guided wave propagation with applicationMultiple Guided Ultrasonic Wave Features,” ASME Journal ofto-spar joints using guided waves and macro fiber composite

Bartoli, Ivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Model study of waves generated by convection with direct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Model study of waves generated circulation, structure and stability on a global scale. Gravity waves can be generated by convection, the authors examine an event on January 12, 2003, when convective waves were clearly generated by a period

Alexander, M. Joan

318

Dependence of synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave and electron cyclotron wave on the frequency and parallel refractive index of electron cyclotron wave for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The physical mechanism of the synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW) in tokamaks is investigated using theoretical analysis and simulation methods in the present paper. Research shows that the synergy relationship between the two waves in velocity space strongly depends on the frequency ? and parallel refractive index N{sub //} of ECW. For a given spectrum of LHW, the parameter range of ECW, in which the synergy current exists, can be predicted by theoretical analysis, and these results are consistent with the simulation results. It is shown that the synergy effect is mainly caused by the electrons accelerated by both ECW and LHW, and the acceleration of these electrons requires that there is overlap of the resonance regions of the two waves in velocity space.

Huang, J.; Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China) [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

Walsh, Donald Eugene

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Equation of state data for gold in the pressure range <10 TPa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report experimental data on the equation of state of gold in the pressure range 2–10 TPa obtained using laser-driven shock waves. The experiments have been realized using an iodine high-power laser with subnanosecond pulses and techniques like phase zone plates and hohlraums to produce spatially uniform shocks. Our data are compared with existing equation of state models.

Dimitri Batani, Antonio Balducci, Daniele Beretta, Andrea Bernardinello, Thorsten Löwer, Michel Koenig, Alessandra Benuzzi, Bernard Faral, and Tom Hall

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electromagnetically induced torque on a large ring in the microwave range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetically induced torque on a large ring in the microwave range Olivier EMILE1) Abstract We report on the exchange of Orbital Angular Momentum between an electromagnetic wave and a 30 cm in the detection of angular momentum in electromagnetics, in acoustics and also in the magnetization

Boyer, Edmond

322

Wireless power transmission using ultrasonic guided waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The unavailability of suitable power supply at desired locations is currently an important obstacle in the development of distributed, wireless sensor networks for applications such as structural health monitoring of aircraft. Proposed solutions range from improved batteries to energy harvesting from vibration, temperature gradients and other sources. A novel approach is being investigated at Cardiff University School of Engineering in cooperation with Airbus. It aims to utilise ultrasonic guided Lamb waves to transmit energy through the aircraft skin. A vibration generator is to be placed in a location where electricity supply is readily available. Ultrasonic waves generated by this device will travel through the aircraft structure to a receiver in a remote wireless sensor node. The receiver will convert the mechanical vibration of the ultrasonic waves back to electricity, which will be used to power the sensor node. This paper describes the measurement and modelling of the interference pattern which emerges when Lamb waves are transmitted continuously as in this power transmission application. The discovered features of the pattern, such as a large signal amplitude variation and a relatively high frequency, are presented and their importance for the development of a power transmission system is discussed.

A Kural; R Pullin; C Featherston; C Paget; K Holford

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the Wave Hub experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of wave energy on biodiversity...accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent...in the form of wind, wave and tidal...Rajapandian2007A review of wind energy technologiesRenew...emergence and the challenges it facesRefocus...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Plane wave solution for elastic wave scattering by a heterogeneous ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A plane-wave method for computing the three-dimensional scattering of propagating elastic waves ... boundary conditions also called linear slip interface conditions, and therefore, called the ... good agreement between measured waves and theoretical ..... tribution with a mean and a standard deviation of the com-.

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

S-wave scattering lengths and effective ranges for collisions of ground state Be atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jamieson,M.J. Cheung,A.S.C. Ouerdane,H. Jeung,G.H. Geum,N. Journal of Physics B, Volume 40 pp 3497-3504

Jamieson, M.J.

326

Resuspension of Clays Under Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Owing to their complex form, very small size and relatively low density, clays freshly deposited in a bay are vulnerable to resuspension when agitated by waves. The model of resuspension of clays under wave motio...

Prida Thimakorn

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

MHD Waves in Astrophysical Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the wave velocities on the angle ? between the undisturbed field B 0 and the wave vector k is clearly demonstrated in a polar diagram—the phase velocity diagram. In Fig.?15.2, th...

Boris V. Somov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Elgen Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elgen Wave Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elgen Wave Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:www.elgenwave.com This company is listed in the Marine...

329

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

California at Davis, University of

330

The Nonlinear Equatorial Kelvin Wave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the method of strained coordinates, a uniformly valid approximation to the nonlinear equatorial Kelvin wave is derived. It is shown that nonlinear effects are negligible for the Kelvin waves associated with the Gulf of Guinea upwelling. The ...

John P. Boyd

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ionized impurity scattering in periodically ?-doped InP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quantum mobility in the individual minibands of InP with periodic Si ? doping was estimated from the Shubnikov–de Haas spectra of the samples, measured at 4.2 K in fields of 0–14 T. The set of samples studied had a sheet density of Si atoms of about 4.9×1012 cm-2 in each doped layer, and a doping period in the range 90–300 ?. A theoretical model for the quantum mobility in individual minibands was developed, and theoretical estimates of the quantum mobility are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. It is observed that at a fixed doping period the quantum mobilities increase with the index of the miniband, and the quantum mobility in an individual miniband decreases when the doping period is made shorter. The dependence of the quantum mobility on the miniband index and doping periodicity correlates with the dependence of the mean distance between electrons and the doped layer on the same quantities. These results demonstrate that in ?-doped semiconductors the binding length of the quantum-confined electronic charge is a very important parameter, determining the carrier mobility which can be attained in these systems.

A. B. Henriques, L. C. D. Gon?calves, N. F. Oliveira Jr., P. L. Souza, and B. Yavich

1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Magnetic field effect on stimulated Raman scattering of electromagnetic waves from nanoparticle lattice  

SciTech Connect

The influence of a static magnetic field on the Raman scattering of a millimeter pump wave propagating through periodic nanoparticles is studied. Formulas for the growth rate of the scattered electromagnetic wave and the electrostatic wave are derived and analyzed. It is found that the growth rate for the backscattering case is larger than that of forward scattering and the growth rate is increased by the static magnetic field. A resonance in the dispersion relation of the electromagnetic wave is found as a combination of the cyclotron and plasma frequency. However, no instability was found for this lower branch of the dispersion curve.

Chakhmachi, A. [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Averaging over fast gravity waves for geophysical flows with arbitrary potential vorticity  

SciTech Connect

Here a mathematically rigorous framework is developed for deriving new reduced simplified dynamical equations for geophysical flows with arbitrary potential vorticity interacting with fast gravity waves. The examples include the rotating Boussinesq and rotating shallow water equations in the quasigeostrophic limit with vanishing Rossby number. For the spatial periodic case the theory implies that the quasi-geostrophic equations are valid limiting equations in the weak topology for arbitrary initial data. Furthermore, simplified reduced equations are developed for the fashion in which the vortical waves influence the gravity waves through averaging over specific gravity wave/vortical resonances. 18 refs.

Embid, P.F. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Majda, A.J. [New York Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice  

SciTech Connect

We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

Spherical waves r Legendre polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Impedance · Spherical waves r er e e Impedance · Legendre polynomials P0(x) = 1 P1(x) = x P2(x · Spherical waves ­ Spherical Hankel functions hn (2)(kr)=jn(kr)-iyn(kr) Impedance · Spherical waves Order: 0 1 4 Circumferential And azimuthal: 0,0 1,1 3,2 #12;3 Impedance · Spherical waves ­ Arbitrary

Berlin,Technische Universität

336

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms at station 139. Keywords: wave energy, survivability, breaking waves, joint distribution, OWEC INTRODUCTION

Haller, Merrick

337

The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE  

SciTech Connect

All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection. The wave activity is strongest in the lower stratosphere below 22 km and, during the suppressed monsoon period, is modulated with a 3-4-day period. The concentration of the wave activity in the lower stratosphere is consistent with the properties of the environment in which these waves propagate, whereas its 3-4-day modulation is explained by the variation of the convection activity in the TWP-ICE domain. At low rainfall intensity the wave activity increases as rainfall intensity increases. At high values of rainfall intensity, however, the wave activity associated with deep convective clouds is independent of the rainfall intensity. The convection and gravity waves observed during TWP-ICE are simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. These simulations are compared with radiosonde observations described above and are used to determine some of the properties of convectively generated gravity waves. The gravity waves appear to be well simulated by the model. The model is used to explore the relationships between the convection, the gravity waves and cirrus.

Reeder, Michael J. [Monash University; Lane, Todd P. [University of Melbourne; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen [Monash University

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker, meterstick, sound tube apparatus, thermometer, microphone INTRODUCTION traveling wave of sinusoidal shape

Glashausser, Charles

339

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

340

Energy Loss by Breaking waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of the frequency of wind wave breaking in deep water are combined with laboratory estimates of the rate of energy loss a from single breaking wave to infer the net rate of energy transfer to the mixed layer from breaking waves, as a ...

S. A. Thorpe

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

Ryu, Yong Uk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan | Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan June 26, 2014 For a couple of years now, we have been waiting to get started on the next nuclear physics long range plan (LRP). What does that mean?...

343

Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

344

American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

345

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since radar involves the transmission, propagation and scattering of EM waves by various is the electrostatic force between two point charges. #12;Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves Electric fields

Rutledge, Steven

346

Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article analyzes the coherence of low-mode signals at ranges of 3515 and 5171 km using data from the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) and Alternate Source Test (AST) experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii and Kiritimati received M-sequences transmitted from two sources: the 75-Hz bottom-mounted ATOC source on Pioneer Seamount and the near-axial dual-frequency (28/84 Hz) AST source deployed nearby. This study demonstrates that the characteristics of the mode signals at 5171-km range are quite similar to those at 3515-km range. At 75 Hz the mode time spreads are on the order of 1.5 s implying a coherence bandwidth of 0.67 Hz. The time spread of the 28-Hz signals is somewhat lower but these signals show significantly less frequency-selective fading than the 75-Hz signals suggesting that at the lower frequency the multipaths are temporally resolvable. Coherence times for mode 1 at 75 Hz are on the order of 8 min for the 3515-km range and 6 min for 5171-km range. At 28 Hz mode 1 is much more stable with a magnitude-squared coherence of greater than 0.6 for the 20-min transmission period.

Kathleen E. Wage; Matthew A. Dzieciuch; Peter F. Worcester; Bruce M. Howe; James A. Mercer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Electron Bernstein waves in spherical torus plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Propagation and absorption of the electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) in spherical tokamaks (STs) have been intensively discussed in recent years because the EBWs coupled with an externally launched electromagnetic beam seem to be the only opportunity for microwave plasma heating and current drive in the electron cyclotron (EC) frequency range in the STs. The whole problem of the electron Bernstein heating and current drive (EBWHCD) in spherical plasmas is naturally divided into three major parts: coupling of incident electromagnetic waves (EMWs) to the EBWs near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) surface, propagation and absorption of the EBWs in the plasma interior and generation of noninductive current driven by the EBWs. The present paper is a brief survey of the most important theoretical and numerical results on the issue of EBWs.

Saveliev, A. N. [A.F.Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

THE DECAYING LONG-PERIOD OSCILLATION OF A STELLAR MEGAFLARE  

SciTech Connect

We analyze and interpret the oscillatory signal in the decay phase of the U-band light curve of a stellar megaflare observed on 2009 January 16 on the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. The oscillation is well approximated by an exponentially decaying harmonic function. The period of the oscillation is found to be 32 minutes, the decay time about 46 minutes, and the relative amplitude 15%. As this observational signature is typical of the longitudinal oscillations observed in solar flares at extreme ultraviolet and radio wavelengths, associated with standing slow magnetoacoustic waves, we suggest that this megaflare may be of a similar nature. In this scenario, macroscopic variations of the plasma parameters in the oscillations modulate the ejection of non-thermal electrons. The phase speed of the longitudinal (slow magnetoacoustic) waves in the flaring loop or arcade, the tube speed, of about 230 km s{sup -1} would require a loop length of about 200 Mm. Other mechanisms, such as standing kink oscillations, are also considered.

Anfinogentov, S. [Institute of Solar Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Nakariakov, V. M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Mathioudakis, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kowalski, A. F., E-mail: anfinogentov@iszf.irk.ru [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

350

Waves in Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Quadratic corrections to the metaplectic formulation of mode conversions. In this work we showed how to systematically deal with quadratic corrections beyond the usual linearization of the dispersion matrix at a conversion. The linearization leads to parabolic cylinder functions as the local approximation to the full-wave behavior, but these do not include the variation in amplitude associated with ray refraction in the neighborhood of the conversion. Hence, the region over which they give a good fit to the incoming and outgoing WKB solutions is small. By including higher order corrections it is possible to provide a much more robust matching. We also showed that it was possible, in principle, to extend these methods to arbitrary order. A new normal form for mode conversion. This is based upon our earlier NSF-DOE-funded work on ray helicity. We have begun efforts to apply these new ideas in practical ray tracing algorithms. Group theoretical foundation of path integrals and phase space representations of wave problems. Using the symbol theory of N. Zobin, we developed a new understanding of path integrals on phase space. The initial goal was to find practical computational tools for dealing with non-standard mode conversions. Along the way we uncovered a new way to represent wave functions directly on phase space without the intermediary of a Wigner function. We are exploring the use of these ideas for numerical studies of conversion, with the goal of eventually incorporating kinetic effects. Wave packet studies of gyroresonance crossing. In earlier work, Huanchun Ye and Allan Kaufman -- building upon ideas due to Lazar Friedland -- had shown that gyroresonance crossings could be treated as a double conversion. This perspective is one we have used for many of our papers since then. We are now performing a detailed numerical comparison between full-wave and ray tracing approaches in the study of minority-ion gyroresonance crossing. In this study, a fast magnetosonic wave -- supported by a majority-ion species such as deuterium -- crosses the resonance layer associated with a minority species, such as hydrogen. By using wave packets instead of harmonic solutions, it becomes easy to see the evolution in k-space of the minority-ion disturbance, and the time delay for emission of the reflected fast-wave packet. Iterated conversion in a cavity. When mode conversion occurs in a cavity where rays are trapped, multiple conversions will occur and the resulting absorption profile will typically have a complicated spatial dependence due to overlapping interference patterns. The goal of this work is to develop fast and efficient ray-based methods for computing the cavity response to external driving, and to compute the spatial absorption profile. We have introduced a new approach that allows us to visualize in great detail the underlying iterated ray geometry, and should lead to simpler methods for identifying parameter values where global changes occur in the qualitative response (e.g. global bifurcations).

Tracy, Eugene R

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Self-similar nested sequences on a chaotic attractor for traveling-wave electrophoresis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oscillating electric potentials are applied to interdigitated arrays of cylindrical electrodes above and below a stationary conducting viscous fluid. The phases of these potentials are chosen to produce a longitudinal traveling wave that traps high-mobility ions and partially traps intermediate-mobility ions in periodic and narrowband chaotic attractors with average velocities that are commensurate with the wave speed. Stable periodic attractors have periods up to 101 times the wave period. Incommensurate broadband chaotic attractors are described by one-dimensional iterated contact-angle return maps, which feature self-similar nested sequences that converge geometrically at unstable trapped orbits. Sequences of singular angles and sequences of step transitions are characterized by distinct convergence factors. A criterion for allowed interelectrode orbits is developed. Experiments are suggested to evaluate the applicability of the theory to microfluidic separations.

Boyd F. Edwards

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Short-range correlations in isospin symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter: a microscopic perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine short-range correlations in nuclear and neutron matter through the properties of the correlated wave function obtained by solving the Bethe-Goldstone equation. We explore tensor correlations through the dominant tensor-driven transition and central correlations through the singlet and triplet S waves. We compare predictions from a popular meson-theoretic nucleon- nucleon potential employed in the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach with those from two- and three-body high-quality chiral interactions in Brueckner G-matrix calculations. Short-range correlations in symmetric matter are remarkably stronger than in neutron matter. We find that short-range correlations are very model dependent and have a large impact on the symmetry energy above normal density.

Francesca Sammarruca

2014-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

353

Short-range correlations in isospin symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter: a microscopic perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine short-range correlations in nuclear and neutron matter through the properties of the correlated wave function obtained by solving the Bethe-Goldstone equation. We explore tensor correlations through the dominant tensor-driven transition and central correlations through the singlet and triplet S waves. We compare predictions from a popular meson-theoretic nucleon- nucleon potential employed in the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach with those from two- and three-body high-quality chiral interactions in Brueckner G-matrix calculations. Short-range correlations in symmetric matter are remarkably stronger than in neutron matter. We find that short-range correlations are very model dependent and have a large impact on the symmetry energy above normal density.

Sammarruca, Francesca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

SES Probationary Period | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SES Probationary Period SES Probationary Period SES Probationary Period An individual's initial appointment as an SES career appointee becomes final only after the individual has served a 1-year probationary period as a career appointee. That employee's rating official must perform an assessment of the new SES's performance during the probationary period. After the one year the selecting official must certify that the appointee performed at the level of excellence expected of a senior executive during the probationary period. When a career appointee's executive qualification have been certified by a Qualifications Review Board on the basis of special or unique qualities, as described in Sec. 317.502(c), the probationary assessment must address any executive development activities the agency identified in support of the

355

Fractional Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Estimation of Q for Long-Period (>2 sec) Waves in the Los Angeles Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as Santa Susanna and Jensen...122 at the Santa Monica city...the near field and is in...021-0.056 (Santa Clara Valley...San Onofre nuclear generating...models. Laboratory testing of...e.g., Field et al...for future development of improved...

K. B. Olsen; S. M. Day; C. R. Bradley

357

Ecology Letien, (2001) 4 : 30-37 Periodic travelling waves in cyclic predator-prey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

statistical methods, together with extensive spatiotempor- al data sets (reviewed by Bjornstad ct al. 1999

Sherratt, Jonathan A.

358

New Double Periodic Solutions for a Kind of Nonlinear Wave Equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with Eq. (2 1) yields a system of equations for Fi and Fi-1...Fi-1 1 - F2 in the obtained system of equations to zero, we can...Benjamin-Bona-Mahony (BBM) equation, ut + ux + uux...Consider the Modified Improved Boussinesq equation,30) utt - uxx......

Huaitang Chen; Hongqing Zhang

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

New Double Periodic Solutions for a Kind of Nonlinear Wave Equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of the combined KdV and mKdV equation Example 1. Consider the Benjamin-Bona-Mahony (BBM) equation, ut + ux + uux + puxxt = 0...Consider the Modified Improved Boussinesq equation,30) utt - uxx + 3 a (u3......

Huaitang Chen; Hongqing Zhang

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Comment on 'Q for short-period P waves: is it frequency dependent?' by A. Douglas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......recorded from explosions at the Shagan River Test Site (STS), USSR and the Nevada Test Site (NTS), USA from which he has concluded...Shagan River Test Site (STS), USSR and the Nevada Test Site (NTS), USA from which he has concluded......

John R. Murphy

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Amplitude—Distance Curve for Short Period Teleseismic P-Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......data from 1 explosion; U.S. Nevada Test Site: data from 5 explosions; French...0'1510.37 YKA 0.1610.36 Nevada test site 0.08 0.01 0.14 -0.03 -0...01 0.34 -0.08 -0.09 Nevada test site 0.06 0.22 0.10 -0.08......

E. W. Carpenter; P. D. Marshall; A. Douglas

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Q for short-period P-waves: is it frequency dependent?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Test Site (STS), USSR and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) USA. One type assumes...Empirical mb :Ms relations at the Nevada Test Site site with applications to mb -yield...areas and media at the USERDA Nevada Test Site, 1975. University of California......

A. Douglas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Spatial asynchrony and periodic travelling waves in cyclic populations of field voles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Linden, H. & Helle, E. 1997a Solar activity and hare dynamics...E. & Gosline, J. M. 1997 Solar activity and mammal cycles in...R. & Dale, M. 1993 Can solar cycle and climate synchronize the snowshoe hare cycle in Canada? Evidence from tree rings and...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressible Turbulence Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material Interfaces Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material Interfaces Lele.jpg Alternate Title: High-fidelity simulations of supersonic turbulent mixing and combustion Key Challenges: Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of isotropic turbulence interacting with a normal shock wave and turbulent multi-material mixing in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) Why it Matters: Shock/turbulence interaction is a fundamental phenomenon in fluid mechanics that occurs in a wide range of interesting problems in various disciplines, including supernova explosions, inertial confinement fusion, hypersonic flight and propulsion, and shock wave lithotripsy. Accomplishments: A novel solution-adaptive algorithm that applies different

365

Gravitational wave astronomy and cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first direct observation of gravitational waves' action upon matter has recently been reported by the BICEP2 experiment. Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are being installed. They will soon be commissioned, and then begin searches for high-frequency gravitational waves at a sensitivity level that is widely expected to reach events involving compact objects like stellar mass black holes and neutron stars. Pulsar timing arrays continue to improve the bounds on gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies, and may detect a signal on roughly the same timescale as ground-based detectors. The science case for space-based interferometers targeting millihertz sources is very strong. The decade of gravitational-wave discovery is poised to begin. In this writeup of a talk given at the 2013 TAUP conference, we will briefly review the physics of gravitational waves and gravitational-wave detectors, and then discuss the promise of these measurements for making cosmological measurements in the near future.

Scott A. Hughes

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Laser-Ranging Long Baseline Differential Atom Interferometers for Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High sensitivity differential atom interferometers are promising for precision measurements in science frontiers in space, including gravity field mapping for Earth science studies and gravitational wave detection. We propose a new configuration of twin atom interferometers connected by a laser ranging interferometer (LRI-AI) to provide precise information of the displacements between the two AI reference mirrors and a means to phase-lock the two independent interferometer lasers over long distances, thereby further enhancing the feasibility of long baseline differential atom interferometers. We show that a properly implemented LRI-AI can achieve equivalent functionality to the conventional differential atom interferometer measurement system. LRI-AI isolates the laser requirements for atom interferometers and for optical phase readout between distant locations, thus enabling optimized allocation of available laser power within a limited physical size and resource budget. A unique aspect of LRI-AI also enables...

Chiow, Sheng-wey; Yu, Nan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Nw_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=401461" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded

368

Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

D. Kuridze; T. V. Zaqarashvili

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

ISABE-2005-1214 Optimum Applications of Four-Port Wave Rotors for Gas Turbines Enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ISABE-2005-1214 Optimum Applications of Four-Port Wave Rotors for Gas Turbines Enhancement Emmett investigations on wave rotor applications for gas turbines have been published, among them conceptual, analytical in the gas turbine industry. The results and conclusions are derived from a wide- range multi

Müller, Norbert

370

Lightning and Plasma Wave Observations from the Galileo Flyby of Venus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...descended through the atmosphere, and for the Pioneer-Venus...of locally generated plasma waves (3). The Galileo...lightning does exist in the atmosphere of Venus. The Galileo...4), the Galileo plasma wave SCIENCE, VOL...frequencies up to 5.6 MHz. This frequency range...

D. A. GURNETT; W. S. KURTH; A. ROUX; R. GENDRIN; C. F. KENNEL; S. J. BOLTON

1991-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

WAVE INTERACTION EFFECTS FOR NONCOMPLIANT TLP P. Teigen J.M. Niedzwecki  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tests in an offshore basin. The main focus is put on evalu­ ating higher order wave effects and related for a range of frequencies at designated loca­ tions within the confines of the TLP. The relevance of non wave records. INTRODUCTION To maintain positive air gap under extreme storm condi­ tions is generally

Sweetman, Bert

372

Semiclassical wave functions and energy spectra in polygon billiards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A consistent scheme of semiclassical quantization in polygon billiards by wave function formalism is presented. It is argued that it is in the spirit of the semiclassical wave function formalism to make necessary rationalization of respective quantities accompanied the procedure of the semiclassical quantization in polygon billiards. Unfolding rational polygon billiards (RPB) into corresponding Riemann surfaces (RS) periodic structures of the latter are demonstrated with 2g independent periods on the respective multitori with g as their genuses. However it is the two dimensional real space of the real linear combinations of these periods which is used for quantizing RPB. A class of doubly rational polygon billiards (DRPB) is distinguished for which these real linear relations are rational and their semiclassical quantization by wave function formalism is presented. It is shown that semiclassical quantization of both the classical momenta and the energy spectra are determined completely by periodic structure of the corresponding RS. Each RS is then reduced to elementary polygon patterns (EPP) as its basic periodic elements. Each such EPP can be glued to a torus of genus g. Semiclassical wave functions (SWF) are then constructed on EPP. The SWF for DRPB appear to be exact. They satisfy the Dirichlet, the Neumannn or the mixed boundary conditions. Not every mixing is allowed however and a respective incompleteness of SWF is discussed. Dens families of DRPB are used for approximate semiclassical quantization of RPB. General rational polygons are quantized by approximating them by DRPB. An extension of the formalism to irrational polygons is described as well. The semiclassical approximations constructed in the paper are controlled by general criteria of the eigenvalue theory. A relation between the superscar solutions and SWF constructed in the paper is also discussed.

Stefan Giller

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand  

SciTech Connect

The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S. [NDE Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Surface wave dynamics in orbital shaken cylindrical containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Be it to aerate a glass of wine before tasting, to accelerate a chemical reaction or to cultivate cells in suspension, the "swirling" (or orbital shaking) of a container ensures good mixing and gas exchange in an efficient and simple way. Despite being used in a large range of applications this intuitive motion is far from being understood and presents a richness of patterns and behaviors which has not yet been reported. The present research charts the evolution of the waves with the operating parameters identifying a large variety of patterns, ranging from single and multiple crested waves to breaking waves. Free surface and velocity fields measurements are compared to a potential sloshing model, highlighting the existence of various flow regimes. Our research assesses the importance of the modal response of the shaken liquids, laying the foundations for a rigorous mixing optimization of the orbital agitation in its applications. Copyright (2014) American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded ...

Reclari, Martino; Tissot, Stéphanie; Obreschkow, Danail; Wurm, Florian Maria; Farhat, Mohamed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

Manhart, R.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Imaging short-period seismic radiation from the 27 February 2010 Chile (MW 8.8) earthquake by back-projection of P, PP,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging short-period seismic radiation from the 27 February 2010 Chile (MW 8.8) earthquake by back projected to the source region to image locations of coherent short-period seismic wave radiation. Several in North America (P), Japan (PKIKP), and Europe (PP), as well as a global configuration of stations

Madariaga, Raúl

377

Engineering Design Method of Energy Coupler and Impedance Transformer for Millimeter Wave Tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The engineering design method of heliz-waveguide and rectangular coupled cavitiy-waveguide energy coupler employed in millimeter wave tubes is described. Experiments show that, ... at wide frequency range in micr...

Shunkang Liu

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The periodic variations of a white-light flare observed with ULTRACAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High time resolution observations of a white--light flare on the active star EQ PegB show evidence of intensity variations with a period of approximately 10 s. The period drifts to longer values during the decay phase of the flare. If the oscillation is interpreted as an impulsively--excited, standing--acoustic wave in a flare loop, the period implies a loop length of 1.7 Mm and 3.4 Mm for the case of the fundamental mode and the second harmonic, respectively. However, the small loop lengths imply a very high modulation depth making the acoustic interpretation unlikely. A more realistic interpretation may be that of a fast--MHD wave, with the modulation of the emission being due to the magnetic field. Alternatively, the variations could be due to a series of reconnection events. The periodic signature may then arise as a result of the lateral separation of individual flare loops or current sheets with oscillatory dynamics (i.e. periodic reconnection).

M. Mathioudakis; D. S. Bloomfield; D. B. Jess; V. S. Dhillon; T. R. Marsh

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ulysses Radio and Plasma Wave Observations in the Jupiter Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...upstream electron plasma waves between 5 and 7 kHz (Fig. LD...decrease to 2 kHz occurred, identified by the plasma exper-iment...presence of the lo plasma torus (29...between 40 and 200 kHz, when Ulysses...range of 2 to 20 MHz. It is not clear...

R. G. Stone; B. M. Pedersen; C. C. Harvey; P. Canu; N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin; M. D. Desch; C. de Villedary; J. Fainberg; W. M. Farrell; K. Goetz; R. A. Hess; S. Hoang; M. L. Kaiser; P. J. Kellogg; A. Lecacheux; N. Lin; R. J. MacDowall; R. Manning; C. A. Meetre; N. Meyer-Vernet; M. Moncuquet; V. Osherovich; M. J. Reiner; A. Tekle; J. Thiessen; P. Zarka

1992-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Born–Oppenheimer Approximation to the Wave Operators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We apply the Born–Oppenheimer approximation to a scattering problem. We consider a diatomic molecule with short-range potential separating into two atoms. Using our earlier mathematical results we construct a leading order expansion to the wave operator for this scattering channel. We comment on limitation and possible extensions of this work.

Armin Kargol

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Period Changes in Ultra-compact Double White Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years there has been much interest in the nature of two stars, V407 Vul and RXJ0806+1527, which are widely thought to be binary white dwarfs of very short orbital period, 570 and 321 seconds respectively. As such they should be strong sources of gravitational waves and possible ancestors of the accreting AM CVn stars. Monitoring at X-ray and optical wavelengths has established that the period of each star is decreasing, at rates compatible with that expected from gravitational radiation. This has been taken to support the ``unipolar inductor'' model in which the white dwarfs are detached and the X-rays produced by the dissipation of magnetically-induced electric currents. In this paper we show that this interpretation is incorrect because it ignores associated torques which transfer angular momentum between the spin of the magnetic white dwarf and the orbit. We show that this torque is 10^5 times larger than the GR term in the case of V407 Vul, and 10 times larger for RXJ0806+1527. For V407 Vul, the unipolar inductor model can only survive if the white dwarf spins 100 times faster than the orbit. Since this could only come about through accretion, the validity of the unipolar inductor appears questionable for this star. We also consider whether accretion models can fit the observed spin-up, concluding that they can, provided that a mechanism exists for driving the mass transfer rate away from its equilibrium value.

T. R. Marsh; G. Nelemans

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

Range Design Criteria- June 4, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document contains the currently-approved firearms "Range Design Criteria" referred to on DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations

383

Abstract--A hybrid wave-pipeline multiplier architecture is described in this paper. Mathematical analysis is provided to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- A hybrid wave-pipeline multiplier architecture is described in this paper. Mathematical analysis is provided to show the performance gains possible with hybrid wave-pipeline over conventional pipeline architectures. The clock period in conventional pipeline scheme is proportional to the maximum

Delgado-Frias, José G.

384

Millimeter wave interconnect and slow wave transmission lines in CMOS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When heading into the millimeter wave frequency band, even wires on CMOS exhibit transmission line effects, this thesis therefore presents models, simulation and measurements for… (more)

Bjørndal, Øystein

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Seasonal variation of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric equatorial waves over the tropical Pacific  

SciTech Connect

Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric wind data spanning 31 years from 1964 to 1994 were analyzed at rawinsonde stations in the central/western Pacific. Traditional spectral and cross-spectral analysis led to the conclusion that there is a significant signal with periods between 3 and 4.5 days, which the authors link with the dominant antisymmetric waves predicted by theory to have these periods, mixed Rossby-gravity waves, and equatorial Rossby waves. Then the authors applied the seasonally varying spectral analysis method developed by Madden to study the average seasonal variation of these waves. The seasonally varying analysis suggested that there are significant twice-yearly maxima in equatorial wave activity throughout the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, with peaks occurring in late winter-spring and in late summer-fall. The twice-yearly signal was most prominent at the 70-hPa and 100-hPa levels. Similar and consistent results were also shown by an autoregressive cyclic spectral analysis. The cyclic spectral analysis suggested that the frequency characteristics of the v-wind wave power are different during the two maxima at some stations. In addition, the seasonally varying squared coherence between the u and v winds and the associated phase implied that there is horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves and that the sign of the flux is different during the two maxima. The differences in wave characteristics during the maxima periods may be related to different wave modes, seasonal variation of the basic zonal state, or possibly to different equatorial wave forcing mechanisms (i.e., convective versus lateral excitations). 52 refs., 12 figs.

Wikle, C.K.; Tsing-Chang Chen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Madden, R.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Iterated multidimensional wave conversion  

SciTech Connect

Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

Brizard, A. J. [Dept. Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D. [Dept. Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Kaufman, A. N. [LBNL and Physics Dept., UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, A. S. [T-5, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zobin, N. [Dept. Mathematics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Gravity Waves in the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present numerical simulations of penetrative convection and gravity wave excitation in the Sun. Gravity waves are self-consistently generated by a convective zone overlying a radiative interior. We produce power spectra for gravity waves in the radiative region as well as estimates for the energy flux of gravity waves below the convection zone. We calculate a peak energy flux in waves below the convection zone to be three orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates for m=1. The simulations show that the linear dispersion relation is a good approximation only deep below the convective-radiative boundary. Both low frequency propagating gravity waves as well as higher frequency standing modes are generated; although we find that convection does not continually drive the standing g-mode frequencies.

Tamara M. Rogers; Gary A. Glatzmaier

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

Acoustic radiation due to surface wave breaking.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While wave breaking is continually occurring at the sea surface its transient and sporadic nature makes it difficult to measure. Experimental results are presented that show how acoustic methods can be used as a remote sensor of this fundamental process. Sea surface?generated acoustic radiation (40 to 4000 Hz) is directly related to a quantitative measure of the boundary dynamics; i.e. the Toba variable. The frequency spectrum of the radiation remains remarkably unchanged over a wide range of environmental conditions but the correlation between the sound pressure level and the Toba variable undergoes an abrupt change when spilling breakers start to occur. Results support the use of acoustics to remotely measure the rate of energy being dissipated by wave breaking and the wavelength of the dominant gravity wave component. Theoretical studies have related the field measurements to analytical and laboratory results cited in the literature indicating that remote monitoring of the rate of occurrence and size distribution of ‘‘infant’’ (freshly entrained) bubbles may be possible if splashes on the surface do not radiate significant sound. Signal processing algorithms for the remote measurements discussed above are enhanced by eigenstructure analysis of the measured cross?spectral density matrix. [Work sponsored by ONR and NUSC.

Robert M. Kennedy; Stewart A. L. Glegg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Millimeter-Wave Mixing with Josephson Junctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments are reported in which two millimeter-wave signals incident on point-contact Josephson junctions produced changes in the junction dc voltage versus current characteristic and an intermediate frequency output whose amplitude depended sensitively on both junction bias and applied power. Equations are derived, based on Josephson's phenomenological equations, for the Josephson current in a junction exposed to two applied rf signals. When the applied signals differ appreciably in frequency, additional constant-voltage steps in the V-I curve are predicted which are spaced at the difference frequency. These steps have been observed in experiments employing sources at 64 and 72 Gc/sec. Results of mixing experiments utilizing two sources nearly equal in frequency are reported at 23 and at 72 Gc/sec. In this case the two waves beat together and are equivalent in their effect to a single signal amplitude modulated at the difference frequency. Also explained on the same basis are experiments in which the third harmonic of a signal at 24 Gc/sec mixed with a signal at 72 Gc/sec. These results demonstrate the existence of the Josephson mixing mechanism as opposed to classical nonlinear mixing, and they show that it is operative at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies over a wide range of power.

C. C. Grimes and Sidney Shapiro

1968-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

LIGO and the Search for Gravitational Waves  

SciTech Connect

Gravitational waves, predicted to exist by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity but as yet undetected, are expected to be emitted during violent astrophysical events such as supernovae, black hole interactions and the coalescence of compact binary systems. Their detection and study should lead to a new branch of astronomy. However the experimental challenge is formidable: ground-based detection relies on sensing displacements of order 10{sup -18} m over a frequency range of tens of hertz to a few kHz. There is currently a large international effort to commission and operate long baseline interferometric detectors including those that comprise LIGO - the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory - in the USA. In this talk I will give an introduction to the topic of gravitational wave detection and in particular review the status of the LIGO project which is currently taking data at its design sensitivity. I will also look to the future to consider planned improvements in sensitivity for such detectors, focusing on Advanced LIGO, the proposed upgrade to the LIGO project.

Robertson, Norna A.

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

391

Mixed solitons in a (2+1)-dimensional multicomponent long-wave–short-wave system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive a (2+1)-dimensional multicomponent long-wave?short-wave resonance interaction (LSRI) system as the evolution equation for propagation of N-dispersive waves in weak Kerr-type nonlinear medium in the small-amplitude limit. The mixed- (bright-dark) type soliton solutions of a particular (2+1)-dimensional multicomponent LSRI system, deduced from the general multicomponent higher-dimensional LSRI system, are obtained by applying the Hirota's bilinearization method. Particularly, we show that the solitons in the LSRI system with two short-wave components behave like scalar solitons. We point out that for an N-component LSRI system with N>3, if the bright solitons appear in at least two components, interesting collision behavior takes place, resulting in energy exchange among the bright solitons. However, the dark solitons undergo standard elastic collision accompanied by a position shift and a phase shift. Our analysis on the mixed bound solitons shows that the additional degree of freedom which arises due to the higher-dimensional nature of the system results in a wide range of parameters for which the soliton collision can take place.

T. Kanna; M. Vijayajayanthi; M. Lakshmanan

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A dimension-breaking phenomenon for water waves with weak surface tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well known that the water-wave problem with weak surface tension has small-amplitude line solitary-wave solutions which to leading order are described by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The present paper contains an existence theory for three-dimensional periodically modulated solitary-wave solutions which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of propagation and are periodic in the transverse direction; they emanate from the line solitary waves in a dimension-breaking bifurcation. In addition, it is shown that the line solitary waves are linearly unstable to long-wavelength transverse perturbations. The key to these results is a formulation of the water wave problem as an evolutionary system in which the transverse horizontal variable plays the role of time, a careful study of the purely imaginary spectrum of the operator obtained by linearising the evolutionary system at a line solitary wave, and an application of an infinite-dimensional version of the classical Lyapunov centre theorem.

Mark D. Groves; Shu-Ming Sun; Erik Wahlén

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma  

SciTech Connect

A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N. [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); Adámek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Herrmann, 1981) and secondary oil recovery in western Colorado at the Rangely oil field (Gibbs et al. 1973COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah

Sheehan, Anne F.

395

Photometric Calibration of High Dynamic Range Cameras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calibration of cameras with a dynamic range of more than six orders of magnitude such as complex camera re with a total dynamic range of 8 orders of luminance magnitude. Three acquisitions: without filter, using to the measurements of 6 gray patches of GretagMacbeth ColorChecker chart under 6 different illumination conditions. 0

Durand, Frédo

396

Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials.

Ivan Fernandez-Corbaton; Mauro Cirio; Alexander Büse; Lucas Lamata; Enrique Solano; Gabriel Molina-Terriza

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=40142

398

A Reconsideration of Matter Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matter waves were discovered in the early 20th century from their wavelength, predicted by DeBroglie, Planck's constant divided by the particle's momentum, that is, lmw = h/mv. But, the failure to obtain a reasonable theory for the matter wave frequency resulted somewhat in loss of further interest. It was expected that the frequency of the matter wave should correspond to the particle kinetic energy, that is, fmw = 1/2mv^2/h but the resulting velocity of the matter of the particle, v = fmw x lmw, is that the matter wave moves at one half the speed of the particle, obviously absurd as the particle and its wave must move together. If relativistic mass is used (as it should in any case) the problem remains, the same mass appearing in numerator and denominator and canceling. It is no help to hypothesize that the total energy, not just the kinetic energy, yields the matter wave. That attributes a matter wave to a particle at rest. It also gives the resulting velocity as c^2/v, the wave racing ahead of its particle. A reinterpretation of Einstein's derivation of relativistic kinetic energy (which produced his famous E = mc^2) leads to a valid matter wave frequency and a new understanding of particle kinetics and of the atom's stable orbits.

Roger Ellman

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fabrication of nanoscale charge density wave systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoscale charge density wave systems of quasi-one-dimensional o ? TaS 3 crystals were fabricated.Goldelectrodes 400 nm wide were made by standard lift-off technique on o ? TaS 3 nanocrystals prepared by deposition on silicon substrates. Interface resistance was higher than 100 G ? just after evaporation and were significantly reduced by electron-beam irradiation. The electrodes were tested down to 80 mK and were found quite durable for cryogenic measurement. The temperature dependence of the resistance of the nanocrystal was represented as the variable-range-hopping-type conduction with one dimension over the wide range of temperature from 4.2 to 100 K. This behavior was different from that of conventional bulk samples.

Katsuhiko Inagaki; Takeshi Toshima; Satoshi Tanda; Kazuhiko Yamaya; Shinya Uji

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR A 5.4 MINUTE ORBITAL PERIOD IN HM CANCRI  

SciTech Connect

HM Cancri is a candidate ultracompact binary white dwarf with an apparent orbital period of only 5.4 minutes, as suggested by X-ray and optical light-curve modulations on that period, and by the absence of longer-period variability. In this Letter, we present Keck-I spectroscopy which shows clear modulation of the helium emission lines in both radial velocity and amplitude on the 5.4 minute period and no other. The data strongly suggest that the binary is emitting He I 4471 from the irradiated face of the cooler, less massive star, and He II 4686 from a ring around the more massive star. From their relative radial velocities, we measure a mass ratio q = 0.50 {+-} 0.13. We conclude that the observed 5.4 minute period almost certainly represents the orbital period of an interacting binary white dwarf. We thus confirm that HM Cnc is the shortest period binary star known: a unique test for stellar evolution theory, and one of the strongest known sources of gravitational waves for LISA.

Roelofs, Gijs H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rau, Arne [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marsh, Tom R.; Steeghs, Danny [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Groot, Paul J.; Nelemans, Gijs [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: groelofs@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: arau@mpe.mpg.de

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Coulomb wave functions in momentum space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An algorithm to calculate non-relativistic partial-wave Coulomb functions in momentum space is presented. The arguments are the Sommerfeld parameter ? , the angular momentum l , the asymptotic momentum q and the ‘running’ momentum p , where both momenta are real. Since the partial-wave Coulomb functions exhibit singular behavior when p ? q , different representations of the Legendre functions of the 2nd kind need to be implemented in computing the functions for the values of p close to the singularity and far away from it. The code for the momentum-space Coulomb wave functions is applicable for values of | ? | in the range of 1 0 ? 1 to 10 , and thus is particularly suited for momentum space calculations of nuclear reactions. Program Summary Program title: libcwfn Catalogue identifier: AEUQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEUQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 864503 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7178021 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, Fortran 77, Python, make (GNU Make dialect), GNU Bash shell interpreter (available as /bin/bash). Computer: Apple Powermac (Intel Xeon), ASUS K53U (AMD E-350 (Dual Core)), DELL Precision T3500 (Intel Xeon), NERSC Carver (Intel Nehalem Quad Core). Operating system: Linux, Windows (using Cygwin). RAM: less than 512 Mbytes Classification: 17.8, 17.13, 17.16. Nature of problem: The calculation of partial wave Coulomb functions with integer l and all other arguments real. Solution method: Computing the value of the function using explicit formulae and algorithms. Running time: Less than 1 0 ? 3  s.

V. Eremenko; N.J. Upadhyay; I.J. Thompson; Ch. Elster; F.M. Nunes; G. Arbanas; J.E. Escher; L. Hlophe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations  

SciTech Connect

Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

Chen, Yi-Chiuan, E-mail: YCChen@math.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shyan-Shiou, E-mail: sschen@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Juan-Ming, E-mail: jmyuan@pu.edu.tw [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Discrete wave turbulence of rotational capillary water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the discrete wave turbulent regime of capillary water waves with constant non-zero vorticity. The explicit Hamiltonian formulation and the corresponding coupling coefficient are obtained. We also present the construction and investigation of resonance clustering. Some physical implications of the obtained results are discussed.

Adrian Constantin; Elena Kartashova; Erik Wahlén

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hamiltonian description of low frequency waves propagation and absorption in magnetically confined plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Magnetically confined fusion plasmas feature a large variety of waves. In the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF), radiofrequency waves are routinely used for plasma heating and non-inductive current-drive, whereas unstable modes in the Alfven range of frequencies are observed in ongoing experiments and are expected to play a crucial role in future devices. In experiments where Alfven and ICRF waves co-exist, a strong interplay between them is observed via the intermediary of the wave accelerated fast ions. A Hamiltonian description of the resonating particles is particularly well adapted to describe accurately their interaction with ICRF and Alfven waves. It provides a convenient framework for self-consistent calculations of the wave propagation and the kinetics of resonating plasma species. In the wave-field calculation, this formulation allows to account for non-local effects caused by wide fast particle orbits (e.g. wave accelerated fast ions and alpha particles). We present here the progress made in the development of the full-wave code EVE, based on a Hamiltonian description of the particle dynamics in terms of action-angle variables. The formalism of EVE, the numerical aspects, as well as some simulation results obtained with the code are discussed.

Dumont, R. J.; Eriksson, L.-G. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nonreciprocal dispersion of spin waves in ferromagnetic thin films covered with a finite-conductivity metal  

SciTech Connect

We study the effect of one-side metallization of a uniform ferromagnetic thin film on its spin-wave dispersion relation in the Damon–Eshbach geometry. Due to the finite conductivity of the metallic cover layer on the ferromagnetic film, the spin-wave dispersion relation may be nonreciprocal only in a limited wave-vector range. We provide an approximate analytical solution for the spin-wave frequency, discuss its validity, and compare it with numerical results. The dispersion is analyzed systematically by varying the parameters of the ferromagnetic film, the metal cover layer and the value of the external magnetic field. The conclusions drawn from this analysis allow us to define a structure based on a 30?nm thick CoFeB film with an experimentally accessible nonreciprocal dispersion relation in a relatively wide wave-vector range.

Mruczkiewicz, M.; Krawczyk, M. [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, Pozna? 61-614 (Poland)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

Laboratory Studies of Nonlinear and Breaking Surface Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Breaking-wave generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the wave tank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On steep gravity waves meeting a vertical wall: a triple

Drazen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Shear-wave crosswell reflection imaging in west Texas  

SciTech Connect

Crosswell reflection imaging was recently introduced as a method for high-resolution (of the order of a few feet) imaging of reservoirs. P-wave imaging was successfully tested on short and intermediate-offset crosswell profiles. Although shear-wave imaging was demonstrated with a short-offset (187 feet) data set, it was generally believed that high-frequency shear imaging at larger interwell distances might not be feasible, because the high-frequency shear waves will suffer large attenuation losses, resulting in poor signal-to-noise ratios for the shear-wave reflections. In this paper the authors present a real-data study, illustrating that shear-wave imaging was feasible at a west Texas carbonate reservoir for an interwell distance of 586 feet. Although the shear direct arrival and reflections are not always evident in the raw gathers processing and stacking enhances them enough to allow imaging of the interwell area for the whole depth range covered by the survey. The results clearly indicate that further work on shear-wave crosswell reflection imaging is warranted.

Lazaratos, S.K.; Marion, B.P. [TomoSeis Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Langan, R. [Chevron Petroleum Technology, La Habra, CA (United States); Harris, J.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Dynamic control of spin wave spectra using spin-polarized currents  

SciTech Connect

We describe a method of controlling the spin wave spectra dynamically in a uniform nanostripe waveguide through spin-polarized currents. A stable periodic magnetization structure is observed when the current flows vertically through the center of nanostripe waveguide. After being excited, the spin wave is transmitted at the sides of the waveguide. Numerical simulations of spin-wave transmission and dispersion curves reveal a single, pronounced band gap. Moreover, the periodic magnetization structure can be turned on and off by the spin-polarized current. The switching process from full rejection to full transmission takes place within less than 3?ns. Thus, this type magnonic waveguide can be utilized for low-dissipation spin wave based filters.

Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu, E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Tang, Xiaoli; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong, E-mail: zzy@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Fangohr, Hans [Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

412

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

PARS II Process Document – DOE Period Close  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document details the process adopted by the Office of Acquisition and Project Management to prepare APM DepSec Monthly Status Report, finalize DOE close period package, and perform reporting...

414

EIS-0504: Notice of Extension of Scoping Period | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extension of Scoping Period EIS-0504: Notice of Extension of Scoping Period Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi FERC extended the scoping period to September...

415

Excitation of plasma waves in the ionosphere caused by atmospheric acoustic waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transformation of atmospheric acoustic waves into plasma waves in the ionosphere is investigated. The transformation mechanism is based on plasma wave exitation by growing acoustic waves, when ... is reached....

N. Ya. Kotsarenko; R. Pérez Enríquez; S. V. Koshevaya

416

Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computed by Wheeler Stretching and Linear Extrapolation modifications to Linear Random Wave Theory and the Hybrid Wave Model. Extreme wave acceleration fields arc compared with Hybrid Wave Model acceleration fields only. Comparisons between measurements...

Longridge, Jonathon Kent

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Lengthening the Storage Period of Cucumbers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 576 AUGUST 1939 DIVISION OF RURAL HOME RESEARCH AND DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE 1NGTHENING THE STORAGE PERIOD OF CUCUMBERS..., in common storage. Consid- ering only loss of weight the period of common storage was increased from 1 to 7 weeks. When other factors such as palatability are taken into account, M. T. Cellophane wrapped cucumbers remained in good condition only about 10...

Hawthorn, L. R. (Leslie Rushton); Whitacre, Jessie (Jessie Opal); Yarnell, S. H. (Sidney Howe)

1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

High?frequency cutoff periodic dielectric waveguides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report high?frequency cutoff in periodic dielectric waveguides. The guides consisted of 1?? photoresist film with a surface corrugation of up to 500 Å overlaid on fused silica substrates. At a wavelength of 1.064 ? we obtained transition between complete cutoff and propagation by variation in the periodicity of the guide of ± 30 Å. For gratings having 500?Å corrugation unobstructed propagation at 1.32 ? occurred with complete stopping of 1.064?? light.

F.W. Dabby; M.A. Saifi; A. Kestenbaum

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN MAGNETIZED SOLAR ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

We present results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in a solar magnetic flux tube. Our study aims at understanding the properties of a range of MHD wave modes generated by different photospheric motions. We consider two scenarios observed in the lower solar photosphere, namely, granular buffeting and vortex-like motion, among the simplest mechanism for the generation of waves within a strong, localized magnetic flux concentration. We show that granular buffeting is likely to generate stronger slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves as compared to swirly motions. Correspondingly, the energy flux transported differs as a result of the driving motions. We also demonstrate that the waves generated by granular buffeting are likely to manifest in stronger emission in the chromospheric network. We argue that different mechanisms of wave generation are active during the evolution of a magnetic element in the intergranular lane, resulting in temporally varying emission at chromospheric heights.

Vigeesh, G. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R. [SP2RC, Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hasan, S. S. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore (India)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

Seabed shear stresses under irregular waves plus current from Monte Carlo simulations of parameterized models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shear stresses on a rough seabed under irregular waves plus current are calculated. Parameterized models valid for regular waves plus current have been used in Monte Carlo simulations, assuming the wave amplitudes to be Rayleigh-distributed. Numerical estimates of the probability distribution functions are presented. For waves only, the shear stress maxima follow a Weibull distribution, while for waves plus current, both the maximum and time-averaged shear stresses are well represented by a three-parameter Weibull distribution. The behaviour of the maximum shear stresses under a wide range of wave-current conditions has been investigated, and it appears that under certain conditions, the current has a significant influence on the maximum shear stresses. Results of comparison between predictions and measurements of the maximum bottom shear stresses from laboratory and field experiments are presented.

Lars Erik Holmedal; Dag Myrhaug; Håvard Rue

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

422

Coniferous Forests of the Colorado Front Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forests along the Front Range of Colorado are exposed to elevated concentrations of ozone and other pollutants (see Chapter 3) due to emissions from the urbanized corridor stretching from Colorado Springs to D...

D. A. Graybill; D. L. Peterson…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Megatectonics of the Coast Ranges, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...folding is shearing well casings and buckling surface pipelines. There are, however, numer...sions and must be a factor in global tectonics. In the Coast Ranges...San Andreas fault has played in global tectonics. In this paper, an...

424

Long Range Campus Development Plan Existing Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design solutions and in serving members of the larger community. The Long Range Campus Development Plan environments and year-round recreation opportunities. During the summer season, daylight lasts into the evening

Maxwell, Bruce D.

425

Atmospheric Noises in SLF/ELF Ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Chap. 8, based on available materials, including public literature and non-public AD reports, and our recent work, synthesized summaries are given. By using the observation data in HF and VLF ranges, the globa...

Prof. Weiyan Pan; Dr. Kai Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Laser Range Finder Mapping of Floating Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using laser range finders as a method of navigation is popular with mobile land robots; however, there has been little research using it with water vehicles. Therefore, this thesis explores the usage and data flow of a ...

Hui, Corinna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Systematic calculations of plasma transport coefficients for the Periodic Table  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical results are given for the ionization state, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and thermoelectric coefficient for the entire Periodic Table over extreme ranges of temperature and density. A spherical average ion embedded in a uniform plasma background is used as a model to evaluate the electron densities of states, elastic scattering cross sections, and ionization states. These are then combined with one-component plasma structure factors to compute mean relaxation times and electrical resistivities according to an extended Ziman formula. The method of Lampe is used to compute thermal conductivities and thermoelectric coefficients from these values. Some experimental comparisons are made. The transport coefficients appear to be accurate for weakly and moderately correlated plasmas, but not for strongly correlated liquids or crystalline materials. The coefficients are tabulated as numerical functions of temperature and density. The tables extend in temperature from 10-2 to 104 eV. Density ranges depend upon atomic mass; lower limits range from 10-4 to 10-2 g/cm3, and upper limits range from 105 to 107 g/cm3. Indications are given of the regions of validity of the results.

George A. Rinker

1988-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Programmable near-infrared ranging system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high angular resolution ranging system particularly suitable for indoor plications involving mobile robot navigation and collision avoidance uses a programmable array of light emitters that can be sequentially incremented by a microprocessor. A plurality of adjustable level threshold detectors are used in an optical receiver for detecting the threshold level of the light echoes produced when light emitted from one or more of the emitters is reflected by a target or object in the scan path of the ranging system.

Everett, Jr., Hobart R. (San Diego, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Wave energy technology in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wave energy technology in China Yage...Energy and Gas Hydrate...wave energy technology, summarizing...of an air turbine rotating at...research, development and construction...variable-pitch air turbine for the Azores...Liu2000Research and development of Daguan...National Ocean Technology Center, Tianjin...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri approve the attached thesis Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri Principal

Wood, Stephen L.

433

KRONOSEISMOLOGY: USING DENSITY WAVES IN SATURN'S C RING TO PROBE THE PLANET'S INTERIOR  

SciTech Connect

Saturn's C ring contains multiple spiral patterns that appear to be density waves driven by periodic gravitational perturbations. In other parts of Saturn's rings, such waves are generated by Lindblad resonances with Saturn's various moons, but most of the wave-like C-ring features are not situated near any strong resonance with any known moon. Using stellar occultation data obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft, we investigate the origin of six unidentified C-ring waves located between 80,900 and 87,200 km from Saturn's center. By measuring differences in the waves' phases among the different occultations, we are able to determine both the number of arms in each spiral pattern and the speeds at which these patterns rotate around the planet. We find that all six of these waves have between two and four arms and pattern speeds between 1660 Degree-Sign day{sup -1} and 1861 Degree-Sign day{sup -1}. These speeds are too large to be attributed to any satellite resonance. Instead, they are comparable to the predicted pattern speeds of waves generated by low-order normal-mode oscillations within the planet. The precise pattern speeds associated with these waves should therefore provide strong constraints on Saturn's internal structure. Furthermore, we identify multiple waves with the same number of arms and very similar pattern speeds, indicating that multiple m = 3 and m = 2 sectoral (l = m) modes may exist within the planet.

Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D., E-mail: mmhedman@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

ION HEATING BY A SPECTRUM OF OBLIQUELY PROPAGATING LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVEN WAVES  

SciTech Connect

Ion stochastic heating by a monochromatic Alfven wave, which propagates obliquely to the background magnetic field, has been studied by Chen et al. It is shown that ions can be resonantly heated at frequencies a fraction of the ion cyclotron frequency when the wave amplitude is sufficiently large. In this paper, the monochromatic wave is extended to a spectrum of left-hand polarized Alfven waves. When the amplitude of the waves is small, the components of the ion velocity have several distinct frequencies, and their motions are quasi-periodic. However, when the amplitude of the waves is sufficiently large, the components of the ion velocity have a spectrum of continuous frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency due to the nonlinear coupling between the Alfven waves and the ion gyromotion, and the ion motions are stochastic. Compared with the case of a monochromatic Alfven wave, the threshold of the ion stochastic heating by a spectrum of Alfven waves is much lower. Even when their frequencies are only several percent of the ion cyclotron frequency, the ions can also be stochastically heated. The relevance of this heating mechanism to solar corona is also discussed.

Lu Quanming [CAS Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Chen Liu [Institute for Fusion and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2009-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

HOMOLOGOUS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVES IN THE EMERGING FLUX REGION OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations, we present four homologous extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves within 3 hr on 2010 November 11. All EUV waves emanated from the same emerging flux region (EFR), propagated in the same direction, and were accompanied by surges, weak flares, and faint coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The waves had the basically same appearance in all EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO. The waves propagated at constant velocities in the range of 280-500 km s{sup -1}, with little angular dependence, which indicated that the homologous waves could be likely interpreted as fast-mode waves. The waves are supposed to likely involve more than one driving mechanism, and it was most probable that the waves were driven by the surges, due to their close timing and location relations. We also propose that the homologous waves were intimately associated with the continuous emergence and cancellation of magnetic flux in the EFR, which could supply sufficient energy and trigger the onsets of the waves.

Zheng Ruisheng; Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Hong Junchao; Yang, B.; Yang Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves  

SciTech Connect

We carried out a series of particle simulations to study electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves generated by an electron ring distribution. The electron ring distribution leads to excitations of X-mode waves mainly in the perpendicular direction, Z-mode waves in the perpendicular and parallel directions, and whistler-mode waves mainly in the parallel direction. The parallel Z- and whistler-mode waves can lead to an effective acceleration of ring electrons. The electron acceleration is mainly determined by the wave amplitude and phase velocity, which in turn is affected by the ratio of electron plasma to cyclotron frequencies. For the initial kinetic energy ranging from 100 to 500 keV, the peak energy of the accelerated electrons is found to reach 2–8 times the initial kinetic energy. We further study the acceleration process by test-particle calculations in which electrons interact with one, two, or four waves. The electron trajectories in the one-wave case are simple diffusion curves. In the multi-wave cases, electrons are accelerated simultaneously by counter-propagating waves and can have a higher final energy.

Lee, K. H. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Omura, Y. [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)] [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Lee, L. C. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear ...

Zheng, Yingcai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Second Harmonic Resonance for Equatorial Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simple, exact analytical conditions for second harmonic resonance between equatorial waves are derived. Such resonance can occur only between two Rossby waves or two westward travelling gravity waves. It is shown that regardless of whether the ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Echelle diagrams and period spacings of g modes in gamma Doradus stars from four years of Kepler observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use photometry from the Kepler Mission to study oscillations in gamma Doradus stars. Some stars show remarkably clear sequences of g modes and we use period echelle diagrams to measure period spacings and identify rotationally split multiplets with l=1 and l=2. We find small deviations from regular period spacings that arise from the gradient in the chemical composition just outside the convective core. We also find stars for which the period spacing shows a strong linear trend as a function of period, consistent with relatively rapid rotation. Overall, the results indicate it will be possible to apply asteroseismology to a range of gamma Dor stars.

Bedding, Timothy R; Colman, Isabel L; Kurtz, Donald W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Astrophysical model selection in gravitational wave astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space-based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve ?5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

Matthew R. Adams; Neil J. Cornish; Tyson B. Littenberg

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

442

Astrophysical Model Selection in Gravitational Wave Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a Hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve ~5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

Matthew Adams; Neil Cornish; Tyson Littenberg

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spar Buoy Engine Spar Buoy Engine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Functional Design Engineering Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A long period spar buoy supports a subsurface flow augmentor The augmentor directs water from the wave s submarine flow field to a free prime mover piston The prime mover is decoupled from the machine s PTO during times in the wave s cycle when there is little power available for conversion Wave energy is stored in the device until the is enough flow magnetude that power take off can efficiently take place Power can be taken off as high pressure water crankshaft torque or directly as DC electricity

444

An effective long-range attraction between protein molecules in solutions studied by small angle neutron scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small angle neutron scattering intensity distributions taken from cytochrome C and lysozyme protein solutions show a rising intensity at very small wave vector, Q, which can be interpreted in terms of the presence of a weak long-range attraction between protein molecules. This interaction has a range several times that of the diameter of the protein molecule, much greater than the range of the screened electrostatic repulsion. We show evidence that this long-range attraction is closely related to the type of anion present and ion concentration in the solution.

Yun Liu; Emiliano Fratini; Piero Baglioni; Wei-Ren Chen; Sow-Hsin Chen

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

445

New wave effects in nonstationary plasma  

SciTech Connect

Through particle-in-cell simulations and analytics, a host of interesting and novel wave effects in nonstationary plasma are examined. In particular, Langmuir waves serve as a model system to explore wave dynamics in plasmas undergoing compression, expansion, and charge recombination. The entire wave life-cycle is explored, including wave excitation, adiabatic evolution and action conservation, nonadiabatic evolution and resonant wave-particle effects, collisional dissipation, and potential laboratory applications of the aforementioned phenomenology.

Schmit, P. F. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States); Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Comparison of wave hindcasts, using Wilson's method, with observation and with other hindcast methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and period charact- erising the waves as they leave the generating area. Second is the determination of the travel time for the wave energy to reach the coast and the decrease in height and 1ncrease in per1od accompanying this travel over a region... Africa. Most of the work was done under United States Navy contract by Sverdrup snd Munk. From a study of the processes by which energy is transmitted from wind to ~aves, they der1ved the, energy relations which related wave height and velocity...

Srivastava, Parmatma Saran

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

447

Are "EIT Waves" Fast-Mode MHD Waves?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the nature of large-scale, coronal, propagating wave fronts (``EIT waves'') and find they are incongruous with solutions using fast-mode MHD plane-wave theory. Specifically, we consider the following properties: non-dispersive single pulse manifestions, observed velocities below the local Alfven speed, and different pulses which travel at any number of constant velocities, rather than at the ``predicted'' fast-mode speed. We discuss the possibility of a soliton-like explanation for these phenomena, and show how it is consistent with the above-mentioned aspects.

M. J. Wills-Davey; C. E. DeForest; J. O. Stenflo

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

448

Standing waves in the Gulf of Finland and their relationship to the basin-wide Baltic seiches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standing waves in the Gulf of Finland and their relationship to the basin-wide Baltic seiches Bror identify three different local oscillatory modes: one in the Gulf of Finland with the two distinct periods in the Gulf of Riga with the period 17 h. The most pronounced mode is that in the Gulf of Finland. No clear

Nycander, Jonas

449

Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to detect and avoid obstacles. Principle Investigators: Randy Beard, Tim McLain Laser Range Finder Opti-Logic RS400 Laser path, laser detects object. 2. Upon detection, insert cylindrical object into world map and plan path

Wirthlin, Michael J.

450

Review of recent experimental and modeling progress in the lower hybrid range of frequencies at ITER relevant parameters  

SciTech Connect

Progress in experiment and simulation capability in the lower hybrid range of frequencies at ITER relevant parameters is reviewed. Use of LH power in reactor devices is motivated in terms of its potential for efficient off-axis current profile control. Recent improvements in simulation capability including the development of full-wave field solvers, inclusion of the scrape off layer (SOL) in wave propagation codes, the use of coupled ray tracing/full-wave/3D (r v{sub ?}, v{sub //}) Fokker Planck models, and the inclusion of wave scattering as well as nonlinear broadening effects in ray tracing / Fokker Planck codes are discussed. Experimental and modeling results are reviewed which are aimed at understanding the spectral gap problem in LH current drive (LHCD) and the density limit that has been observed and mitigated in LHCD experiments. Physics mechanisms that could be operative in these experiments are discussed, including toroidally induced variations in the parallel wavenumber, nonlinear broadening of the pump wave, scattering of LH waves from density fluctuations in the SOL, and spectral broadening at the plasma edge via full-wave effects.

Bonoli, Paul T. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, NW16-240, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Dartmouth Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dartmouth Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dartmouth Wave Energy Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:www.dartmouthwaveenergy This...

452

Wind Waves and Sun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waves and Sun Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wind Waves and Sun Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:www.windwavesandsun.com This company is...

453

Wave Wind LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Wind LLC Place: Sun Prairie, Wisconsin Zip: 53590 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Wisconsin-based wind developer and construction services provider. References: Wave...

454

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HW aves B. Heat-related

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Sandia National Laboratories: wave energy converter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wave energy converter Sandia Funded to Model Power Pods for Utility-Scale Wave-Energy Converter On September 16, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

456

SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

Choi, Myunghee [Retired] [Retired; Chan, Vincent S. [General Atomics] [General Atomics

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

457

Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium  

SciTech Connect

The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period ? is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods ? between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

Hayrapetyan, A.G., E-mail: armen@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G. [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Fritzsche, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany) [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking November 6, 2007 - 5:00pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you. And let me say how much it means to have my old friend Vinodh here to introduce me. You are a true pioneer in this industry. I also want to thank Mitch for asking me to be here. It's good to see Tom Dorr from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, our partner in so much of the federal government's biomass research and development and deployment efforts. Gov. Perdue, as always, it's great to be in Georgia and to see the progress occurring here under your leadership. I want to reaffirm our support for governors and state legislators who exhibit the kind of leadership you've shown in developing America's new energy future.

459

Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

Valentine, Kenneth H. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TimePeriod TimePeriod Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "TimePeriod" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 0.4 kV remote control (Smart Grid Project) + Not available + 2 220 kV SSSC device for power flow control (Smart Grid Project) + Jul 2009 Jul 2014 + A A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) + Oct 2009 Dec 2015 + ADELE Project AACAES (Smart Grid Project) + Dec 2009 Dec 2013 + AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) + 2011-2014 + AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Belgium) + 2011-2014 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Definition: Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features such as hot springs, fumaroles, and snow melt. LWIR can also be used to map the distribution of certain minerals related to hydrothermal alterations.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ Katherine Young,Timothy Reber,Kermit Witherbee. 2012. Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei. In: Proceedings of the Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal

462

Improved ion acceleration via laser surface plasma waves excitation  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of enhancing the emission of the ions accelerated in the interaction of a high intensity ultra-short (<100 fs) laser pulse with a thin target (<10?{sub 0}), via surface plasma wave excitation is investigated. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed for laser intensities ranging from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} Wcm{sup ?2}?m{sup 2}. The surface wave is resonantly excited by the laser via the coupling with a modulation at the target surface. In the cases where the surface wave is excited, we find an enhancement of the maximum ion energy of a factor ?2 compared to the cases where the target surface is flat.

Bigongiari, A. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France) [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); TIPS/LULI, Université Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilée, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Raynaud, M. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Riconda, C. [TIPS/LULI, Université Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilée, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine (France)] [TIPS/LULI, Université Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilée, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Héron, A. [CPHT, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [CPHT, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nuclear correlation and finite interaction-range effects in high-energy $(e,e'p)$ nuclear transparency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear transparency is calculated for high-energy, semi-inclusive $(e,e'p)$ reactions, by accounting for all orders of Glauber multiple-scattering and by using realistic finite-range $p N$ interaction and (dynamically and statistically) correlated nuclear wave functions. The nuclear correlation effect is reduced due to the $p N$ finite-range effect. The net effect is small, and depends sensitively on details of the nuclear correlations in finite nuclei, which are poorly known at present.

Ryoichi Seki; T. D. Shoppa; Akihisa Kohama; Koichi Yazaki

1995-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

Mirror force induced wave dispersion in Alfvén waves  

SciTech Connect

Recent hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulations of global scale standing shear Alfvén waves along the Earth's closed dipolar magnetic field lines show that the upward parallel current region within these waves saturates and broadens perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and that this broadening increases with the electron temperature. Using resistive MHD simulations, with a parallel Ohm's law derived from the linear Knight relation (which expresses the current-voltage relationship along an auroral field line), we explore the nature of this broadening in the context of the increased perpendicular Poynting flux resulting from the increased parallel electric field associated with mirror force effects. This increased Poynting flux facilitates wave energy dispersion across field lines which in-turn allows for electron acceleration to carry the field aligned current on adjacent field lines. This mirror force driven dispersion can dominate over that associated with electron inertial effects for global scale waves.

Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Nondestructive testing using stress waves: wave propagation in layered media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of stress waves in several civil engineering applications such as nondestructive testing of soil deposits or pavement systems has become extremely popular over the last few years. In all cases, a dynamic impulse is applied to the surface...

Ortega, Jose Alberto

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Branes are Waves and Monopoles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent paper it was shown that fundamental strings are null waves in Double Field Theory. Similarly, membranes are waves in exceptional extended geometry. Here the story is continued by showing how various branes are Kaluza-Klein monopoles of these higher dimensional theories. Examining the specific case of the E7 exceptional extended geometry, we see that all branes are both waves and monopoles. Along the way we discuss the O(d; d) transformation of localized brane solutions not associated to an isometry and how true T-duality emerges in Double Field Theory when the background possesses isometries.

David S. Berman; Felix J. Rudolph

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

467

Recirculation in multiple wave conversions  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional multiple wave-conversion model is constructed that allows energy recirculation in ray phase space. Using a modular eikonal approach, the connection coefficients for this model are calculated by ray phase-space methods. Analytical results (confirmed numerically) show that all connection coefficients exhibit interference effects that depend on an interference phase, calculated from the coupling constants and the area enclosed by the intersecting rays. This conceptual model, which focuses on the topology of intersecting rays in phase space, is used to investigate how mode conversion between primary and secondary waves is modified by the presence of a tertiary wave.

Kaufman, A. N.; Brizard, A.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Tracy, E.R.

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

The effects of a Severn Barrage on wave conditions in the Bristol Channel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The study investigates the impact that construction of a Severn Barrage in the Severn Estuary, on the west coast of the UK, might have on local wave conditions. Implementation of a barrage will impact on tidal currents and water elevations in the wider region. There is strong tidal modulation of wave conditions under the natural regime and therefore barrage-induced changes to tidal conditions could affect wave modulation in the region. This paper uses Swan, an open source 3rd generation spectral wave model, to investigate the possible impacts of construction of a barrage on tidal modulation of the wave conditions. It is found that current variations, rather than water level variations, are the dominant factor in tidal modulation of wave conditions. Barrage implementation does not substantially change the modulation of the wave period or direction. However, barrage implementation does affect the tidal modulation of wave heights in the area of interest. The tidal modulation of the wave heights is generally reduced compared to the natural case; the peaks in the wave heights on an incoming tide are slightly lowered and there is lesser attenuation in wave heights on the outgoing tide. This modulation leads to net changes in the wave heights over one tidal cycle. For all of the tested wave conditions, this net change is small for the majority of the tested domain, namely to within ±5% of the no barrage case. There are some areas of greater change, most notably larger net increases in the wave heights near the North Somerset coast where the post-construction net wave height increase over a tidal cycle approach 20% of the pre-construction conditions. These changes do not impact coastal flooding because the wave height increase is not co-incident with high tide. Importantly, the maximum wave height is not increased and thus the likelihood of extreme events is not increased. The area of greatest reduction is between Swansea and Porthcawl. Changes over a neap tidal cycle show similar patterns of net change, but the modulation over the tidal cycle is different; primarily the magnitude of modulation is half that for the spring tide case and the shape is altered in some locations.

I. Fairley; R. Ahmadian; R.A. Falconer; M.R. Willis; I. Masters

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Wave Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:30pm Addthis Photo of a large wave. Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.) However, wave energy cannot be harnessed everywhere. Wave power-rich areas of the world include the western coasts of Scotland, northern Canada, southern Africa, and Australia as well as the northeastern and northwestern coasts of the United States. In the Pacific Northwest alone, it is feasible that wave energy could produce 40-70 kilowatts (kW) per 3.3 feet (1 meter) of western coastline. Wave Energy Technologies

470

On the energy partition in oscillations and waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A class of generally nonlinear dynamical systems is considered, for which the Lagrangian is represented as a sum of homogeneous functions of the displacements and their derivatives. It is shown that an energy partition as a single relation follows directly from the Euler-Lagrange equation in its general form. It is defined solely by the homogeneity orders. If the potential energy is represented by a single homogeneous function, as well as the kinetic energy, the partition between these energies is defined uniquely. Finite discrete systems, finite continual bodies, homogeneous and periodic-structure waveguides are considered. The general results are illustrated by examples of various types of oscillations and waves, linear and nonlinear, homogeneous and forced, steady-state and transient, periodic, non-periodic and solitary, regular, parametric and resonant. The reduced energy partition relation for statics is also presented.

Slepyan, Leonid

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Gravitomagnetism and the Earth-Mercury range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically work out the impact of the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect on the Earth-Mercury range caused by the gravitomagnetic field of the rotating Sun. The peak-to peak nominal amplitude of the resulting time-varying signal amounts to 1.75 10^1 m over a temporal interval 2 yr. Future interplanetary laser ranging facilities should reach a cm-level in ranging to Mercury over comparable timescales; for example, the BepiColombo mission, to be launched in 2014, should reach a 4.5 - 10 cm level over 1 - 8 yr. We looked also at other Newtonian (solar quadrupole mass moment, ring of the minor asteroids, Ceres, Pallas, Vesta, Trans-Neptunian Objects) and post-Newtonian (gravitoelectric Schwarzschild solar field) dynamical effects on the Earth-Mercury range. They act as sources of systematic errors for the Lense-Thirring signal which, in turn, if not properly modeled, may bias the recovery of some key parameters of such other dynamical features of motion. Their nominal peak-to-peak amplitudes are as large as 4 10^5 m (Schwarzschild), 3 10^2 m (Sun's quadrupole), 8 10^1 m (Ceres, Pallas, Vesta), 4 m (ring of minor asteroids), 8 10^-1 m (Trans-Neptunian Objects). Their temporal patterns are different with respect to that of the gravitomagnetic signal.

Lorenzo Iorio

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

Nonperturbative short-range dynamics in TMDs  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers: deep inelastic processes and transverse momentum distributions; chiral symmetry breaking, including the physical picture, the dynamical model, and parton distributions; partonic structures, including transverse momentum distributions, coordinate space correlator, and short range correlations; and measurements of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, correlations, and multi-parton processes in pp interactions.

Weiss, Christian [JLAB

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Signal Fluctuations in the BIFI Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short?term and long?term fluctuation studies have been made in the BIFI Shallow X Water Acoustic Range which is 37 kyd in length. It is shown how time?smear analysis may be used to predict the extent of short?term signal fluctuation by taking into account the energy content of the “front” and “tail” of the received signal. The method is applied to an actual received signal with good results. Long?term fluctuation such as that due to tide is considered in terms of normal mode theory using the results of the time smear analysis to provide an estimate of the relative strengths of the modes. When applied to the BIFI range this method predicts that tidal effects will cause negligible fluctuations in the received signal due to the absence of modes other than the fundamental at this large range. This prediction was verified by experiment. At shorter ranges the interaction of several modes will cause relatively large fluctuations in the signal as the water depth changes during the tidal cycle.

W. G. Kanabis; B. Sussman

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Discussion of long-range weather prediction  

SciTech Connect

A group of scientists at Los Alamos have held a series of discussions of the issues in and prospects for improvements in Long-range Weather Predictions Enabled by Proving of the Atmosphere at High Space-Time Resolution. The group contained the requisite skills for a full evaluation, although this report presents only an informal discussion of the main technical issues. The group discussed all aspects of the proposal, which are grouped below into the headings: (1) predictability; (2) sensors and satellites, (3) DIAL and atmospheric sensing; (4) localized transponders; and (5) summary and integration. Briefly, the group agreed that the relative paucity of observations of the state of the atmosphere severely inhibits the accuracy of weather forecasts, and any program that leads to a more dense and uniform observational network is welcome. As shown in Long-range Weather more dense and uniform observational network is welcome. As shown in Long-range Weather Predictions, the pay-back of accurate long-range forecasts should more than justify the expenditure associated with improved observations and forecast models required. The essential step is to show that the needed technologies are available for field test and space qualification.

Canavan, G.H.

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z