National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wave period ranges

  1. Stratified Steady Periodic Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-02-11

    This paper considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. We prove the existence of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed and amplitude.

  2. Predicting short-period, wind-wave-generated seismic1 noise in coastal regions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Victor C.

    Predicting short-period, wind-wave-generated seismic1 noise in coastal regions2 Florent Gimberta recorded in this period range is mostly caused by local wind-waves, i.e. by wind-waves occurring within in nearly opposite directions is orders of magnitude smaller than previously suggested for wind-waves, does

  3. Property:Wave Period Range(s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to:SpatialResolution JumpTypesUtilityWas

  4. Periodic Discrete Energy for Long-Range Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Hardin; E. B. Saff; Brian Simanek

    2014-12-11

    We consider periodic energy problems in Euclidean space with a special emphasis on long-range potentials that cannot be defined through the usual infinite sum. One of our main results builds on more recent developments of Ewald summation to define the periodic energy corresponding to a large class of long-range potentials. Two particularly interesting examples are the logarithmic potential and the Riesz potential when the Riesz parameter is smaller than the dimension of the space. For these examples, we use analytic continuation methods to provide concise formulas for the periodic kernel in terms of the Epstein Hurwitz Zeta function. We apply our energy definition to deduce several properties of the minimal energy including the asymptotic order of growth and the distribution of points in energy minimizing configurations as the number of points becomes large. We conclude with some detailed calculations in the case of one dimension, which shows the utility of this approach.

  5. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

  6. A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical of Mechanical Engineering) ABSTRACT Within a wave energy converter's operational bandwidth, device operation

  7. Non-Foster Circuit Loaded Periodic Structures for Broadband Fast and Slow Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    1.1 Periodic Structure, Fast and Slow Wave Propagation . 1.2for a periodic structure. . . . . . . Slow and fast waveA unit cell of a periodic structure . . . . .

  8. Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, searchContDiv JumpTechDsc JumpLabVelocity at Wave

  9. Passive Millimeter-Wave Ranging Using Discrete Lenses with Wave-Front Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    of a receiving discrete lens with modulated amplitude and/or phase response. The result is a set of image pat on a relatively small (100-element) discrete lens antenna array with a cosinusoidal amplitude mask and half curve around 94 GHz. Waves in this fre- quency range penetrate through dust, fog and smoke

  10. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  11. FLUCTUATION STUDIES IN THE ALFVEN WAVE RANGE OF FREQUENCIES IN THE TOKAPOLE II TOKAMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    FLUCTUATION STUDIES IN THE ALFVEN WAVE RANGE OF FREQUENCIES IN THE TOKAPOLE II TOKAMAK (Poster (7W;Abstract (modified) Fluctuation Studies in the Alfyen wave range of frequencies in the Tokapole I I Tokamak

  12. The periodic standing-wave approximation: post-Minkowski computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Beetle; Benjamin Bromley; Napoleón Hernández; Richard H. Price

    2007-08-08

    The periodic standing wave method studies circular orbits of compact objects coupled to helically symmetric standing wave gravitational fields. From this solution an approximation is extracted for the strong field, slowly inspiralling motion of black holes and binary stars. Previous work on this model has dealt with nonlinear scalar models, and with linearized general relativity. Here we present the results of the method for the post-Minkowski (PM) approximation to general relativity, the first step beyond linearized gravity. We compute the PM approximation in two ways: first, via the standard approach of computing linearized gravitational fields and constructing from them quadratic driving sources for second-order fields, and second, by solving the second-order equations as an ``exact'' nonlinear system. The results of these computations have two distinct applications: (i) The computational infrastructure for the ``exact'' PM solution will be directly applicable to full general relativity. (ii) The results will allow us to begin supplying initial data to collaborators running general relativistic evolution codes.

  13. 2Dimensional localization of acoustic waves in random perturbation of periodic media.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2­Dimensional localization of acoustic waves in random perturbation of periodic media. Hatem NAJAR to the spectral properties of the relevant self­adjoint di#erential operator. As far as the acoustic waves, electromagnetic or acoustic) waves in a periodic me­ dia perturbed by random impurities. See [7, 8, 9, 10

  14. Long-range propagation of finite-amplitude acoustic waves in an ocean waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Wave Equation NPE 7 is used to propagate a finite-amplitude acoustic wave field. Second, this codeLong-range propagation of finite-amplitude acoustic waves in an ocean waveguide Kae¨lig Castor for T-wave formation. © 2004 Acoustical Society of America. DOI: 10.1121/1.1756613 PACS numbers: 43

  15. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

    2011-10-02

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  16. Analytical Approximation for 2-D Nonlinear Periodic Deep Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleh Tanveer

    2013-09-20

    A recently developed method has been extended to a nonlocal equation arising in steady water wave propagation in two dimensions. We obtain analyic approximation of steady water wave solution in two dimensions with rigorous error bounds for a set of parameter values that correspond to heights slightly smaller than the critical. The wave shapes are shown to be analytic. The method presented in quite general and does not assume smallness of wave height or steepness and can be readily extended to other interfacial problems involving Laplace's equation.

  17. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner}, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 \\times 10^-9, 1.1 \\times 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 15...

  18. Traveling Waves Solutions for Bistable Differential-Difference Equations with Periodic Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Christopher E.; Van Vleck, Erik

    2001-10-05

    on the underlying lattice as well as on time. For the case of spatially periodic diffusion we obtain analytic solutions for the traveling wave problem using a piecewise linear nonlinearity. The formula for the wave forms is implicitly defined in the general periodic...

  19. Local energy decay and Strichartz estimates for the wave equation with time-periodic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petkov, Vesselin

    Local energy decay and Strichartz estimates for the wave equation with time-periodic perturbations(z) = (U(T, 0) - z)-1 , (x) C 0 (Rn ), where U(t, s) is the propagator related to the wave equation) and T > 0 is the period. Assuming that R(z) has no poles z with |z| 1, we establish a local energy decay

  20. Floquet engineering of long-range p-wave superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mónica Benito; Álvaro Gómez-León; Victor Bastidas; Tobias Brandes; Gloria Platero

    2015-01-12

    Floquet Majorana Fermions appear as steady states at the boundary of time-periodic topological phases of matter. In this work, we theoretically study the main features of these exotic topological phases in the periodically driven one-dimensional Kitaev model. By controlling the ac fields, we can predict new topological phase transitions that should give rise to signatures of Majorana states in experiments. Moreover, the knowledge of the time-dependence of these Majorana states allows one to manipulate them. Our work contains a complete analysis of the monochromatic driving in different frequency regimes.

  1. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

  2. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, a C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, a N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C

    2007-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1.0E-8 Hz/s to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from Short Fourier Transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as "StackSlide", averages normalized power from each SFT. A "weighted Hough" scheme is also developed and used, and which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as "PowerFlux", is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitationa...

  3. Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially-saturated sand in the sonic frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

    2002-06-17

    Extensional wave attenuation and velocity measurements on a high permeability Monterey sand were performed over a range of gas saturations for imbibition and degassing conditions. These measurements were conducted using extensional wave pulse propagation and resonance over a 1 - 9 kHz frequency range for a hydrostatic confining pressure of 8.3 MPa. Analysis of the extensional wave data and the corresponding X-ray CT images of the gas saturation show strong attenuation resulting from the presence of the gas (QE dropped from 300 for the dry sand to 30 for the partially-saturated sand), with larger attenuation at a given saturation resulting from heterogeneous gas distributions. The extensional wave velocities are in agreement with Gassmann theory for the test with near-homogeneous gas saturation and with a patchy saturation model for the test with heterogeneous gas saturation. These results show that partially-saturated sands under moderate confining pressure can produce strong intrinsic attenuation for extensional waves.

  4. Emergence of unsteady dark solitary waves from coalescing spatially-periodic patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Tom

    Emergence of unsteady dark solitary waves from coalescing spatially-periodic patterns Thomas J of the defocussing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In this paper the interest is in a mechanism for the emergence is on the periodic state at innity as the generator. It is shown that a natural mechanism for the emergence

  5. The periodic standing-wave approximation: eigenspectral computations for linear gravity and nonlinear toy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Beetle; Benjamin Bromley; Richard H. Price

    2006-02-08

    The periodic standing wave approach to binary inspiral assumes rigid rotation of gravitational fields and hence helically symmetric solutions. To exploit the symmetry, numerical computations must solve for ``helical scalars,'' fields that are functions only of corotating coordinates, the labels on the helical Killing trajectories. Here we present the formalism for describing linearized general relativity in terms of helical scalars and we present solutions to the mixed partial differential equations of the linearized gravity problem (and to a toy nonlinear problem) using the adapted coordinates and numerical techniques previously developed for scalar periodic standing wave computations. We argue that the formalism developed may suffice for periodic standing wave computations for post-Minkowskian computations and for full general relativity.

  6. Relations for a periodic array of flap-type wave energy converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renzi, Emiliano

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the interaction of plane incident waves with a wave farm in the open ocean. The farm consists of a periodic array of large flap-type wave energy converters. A linear inviscid potential-flow model, already developed by the authors for a single flap in a channel, is considered. Asymptotic analysis of the wave field allows to obtain new expressions of the reflection, transmission and radiation coefficients of the system. It is shown that, unlike a line of heaving buoys, an array of flap-type converters is able to exploit resonance of the system transverse modes in order to attain high capture factor levels. Relations between the hydrodynamic coefficients are derived and applied for optimising the power output of the wave farm.

  7. Entrainment of marginally stable excitation waves by spatially extended sub-threshold periodic forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph M. Starobin; Vivek Varadarajan

    2011-06-02

    We analyze the effects of spatially extended periodic forcing on the dynamics of one-dimensional excitation waves. Entrainment of unstable primary waves has been studied numerically for different amplitudes and frequencies of additional sub-threshold stimuli. We determined entrainment regimes under which excitation blocks were transformed into consistent 1:1 responses. These responses were spatially homogeneous and synchronized in the entire excitable medium. Compared to primary pulses, pulses entrained by secondary stimulations were stable at considerably shorter periods which decreased at higher amplitudes and greater number of secondary stimuli. Our results suggest a practical methodology for stabilization of excitation in reaction-diffusion media with regions of reduced excitability.

  8. Experimental study of a compact P-band coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator with three periods slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Liang; Qian Baoliang; Ge Xingjun; Zhang Xiaoping; Jin Zhenxing [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2012-08-15

    A compact P-band coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator with three periods slow wave structure was investigated experimentally. The experimental results show that the frequency of the P-band coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator is 897 MHz and the microwave power is 1.47 GW with an efficiency of about 32% in the case in which the diode voltage is 572 kV, the beam current is 8.0 kA, and the guide magnetic field is about 0.86 T. In addition, the device can generate a 3.14 GW microwave radiation as the guide magnetic field increases to 1.2 T at the diode voltage of 997 kV and the beam current of 15.3 kA. The experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained earlier by numerical simulations.

  9. Surface-emitting terahertz quantum cascade lasers with continuous-wave power in the tens of milliwatt range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Gangyi, E-mail: gangyi.xu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France); Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Li, Lianhe; Giles Davies, A.; Linfield, Edmund H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 2JT (United Kingdom); Isac, Nathalie; Halioua, Yacine; Colombelli, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.colombelli@u-psud.fr [Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-03-03

    We demonstrate efficient surface-emitting terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers with continuous wave output powers of 20–25?mW at 15?K and maximum operating temperatures of 80–85?K. The devices employ a resonant-phonon depopulation active region design with injector, and surface emission is realized using resonators based on graded photonic heterostructures (GPHs). GPHs can be regarded as energy wells for photons and have recently been implemented through grading the period of the photonic structure. In this paper, we show that it is possible to keep the period constant and grade instead the lateral metal coverage across the GPH. This strategy ensures spectrally single-mode operation across the whole laser dynamic range and represents an additional degree of freedom in the design of confining potentials for photons.

  10. Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially saturated sand in the sonic frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

    2001-08-10

    Extensional wave attenuation and velocity measurements on a high permeability Monterey sand were performed over a range of gas saturations for imbibition and degassing conditions. These measurements were conducted using extensional wave pulse propagation and resonance over a 1-9 kHz frequency range for a hydrostatic confining pressure of 8.3 MPa. Analysis of the extensional wave data and the corresponding X-ray CT images of the gas saturation show strong attenuation resulting from the presence of the gas (Q{sub E} dropped from 300 for the dry sand to 30 for the partially-saturated sand), with larger attenuation at a given saturation resulting from heterogeneous gas distributions. The extensional wave velocities are in agreement with Gassmann theory for the test with near-homogeneous gas saturation and with a patchy saturation model for the test with heterogeneous gas saturation. These results show that partially-saturated sands under moderate confining pressure can produce strong intrinsic attenuation for extensional waves.

  11. MAGNETIC ROSSBY WAVES IN THE SOLAR TACHOCLINE AND RIEGER-TYPE PERIODICITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Carbonell, Marc; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.e E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.e

    2010-02-01

    Apart from the eleven-year solar cycle, another periodicity around 155-160 days was discovered during solar cycle 21 in high-energy solar flares, and its presence in sunspot areas and strong magnetic flux has been also reported. This periodicity has an elusive and enigmatic character, since it usually appears only near the maxima of solar cycles, and seems to be related with a periodic emergence of strong magnetic flux at the solar surface. Therefore, it is probably connected with the tachocline, a thin layer located near the base of the solar convection zone, where a strong dynamo magnetic field is stored. We study the dynamics of Rossby waves in the tachocline in the presence of a toroidal magnetic field and latitudinal differential rotation. Our analysis shows that the magnetic Rossby waves are generally unstable and that the growth rates are sensitive to the magnetic field strength and to the latitudinal differential rotation parameters. Variation of the differential rotation and the magnetic field strength throughout the solar cycle enhance the growth rate of a particular harmonic in the upper part of the tachocline around the maximum of the solar cycle. This harmonic is symmetric with respect to the equator and has a period of 155-160 days. A rapid increase of the wave amplitude could give rise to a magnetic flux emergence leading to observed periodicities in solar activity indicators related to magnetic flux.

  12. Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2010-02-03

    The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO), in NM, can detect photon bounces from retro-reflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference - only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations/turbulence (gravitational waves) in the flow of the dynamical 3-space relative to local systems/observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an effective "gravitational wave" detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave/turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

  13. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; Kim, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Sauter, O.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; et al

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different depositionmore »position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (?N~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.« less

  14. Time asymptotics of the Schroedinger wave function in time-periodic potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Costin; R. D. Costin; J. L. Lebowitz

    2006-08-13

    We study the transition to the continuum of an initially bound quantum particle in $\\RR^d$, $d=1,2,3$, subjected, for $t\\ge 0$, to a time periodic forcing of arbitrary magnitude. The analysis is carried out for compactly supported potentials, satisfying certain auxiliary conditions. It provides complete analytic information on the time Laplace transform of the wave function. From this, comprehensive time asymptotic properties (Borel summable transseries) follow. We obtain in particular a criterion for whether the wave function gets fully delocalized (complete ionization). This criterion shows that complete ionization is generic and provides a convenient test for particular cases. When satisfied it implies absence of discrete spectrum and resonances of the associated Floquet operator. As an illustration we show that the parametric harmonic perturbation of a potential chosen to be any nonzero multiple of the characteristic function of a measurable compact set has this property.

  15. The periodic standing-wave approximation: computations in full general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napoleon Hernandez; Richard H. Price

    2008-12-23

    The periodic standing wave method studies circular orbits of compact objects coupled to helically symmetric standing wave gravitational fields. From this solution an approximation is extracted for the strong field, slowly inspiralling motion of binary black holes and binary neutron stars. Previous work on this project has developed a method using a few multipoles of specially adapted coordinates well suited both to the radiation and the source regions. This method had previously been applied to linear and nonlinear scalar field models, to linearized gravity, and to a post-Minkowski approximation. Here we present the culmination of this approach: the application of the method in full general relativity. The fundamental equations had previously been developed and the challenge presented by this step is primarily a computational one which was approached with an innovative technique. The numerical results of these computations are compared with the corresponding results from linearized and post-Minkowksi computations.

  16. Generation of continuous-wave broadband Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen beams using periodically-poled lithium niobate waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-ichiroh Yoshino; Takao Aoki; Akira Furusawa

    2006-09-15

    Continuous-wave light beams with broadband Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlation (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen beams) are created with two independent squeezed vacua generated by two periodically-poled lithium niobate waveguides and a half beam splitter.

  17. Radio Wave 'Messengers' of Periodic Gravitational Radiation and the Problem of Gravitationally Induced Nonlinearity in Electrodynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balakin; Z. G. Murzakhanov; G. V. Kisun'ko

    2005-11-10

    We discuss a gravitationally induced nonlinearity in hierarchic systems. We consider the generation of extremely low-frequency radio waves with a frequency of the periodic gravitational radiation; the generation is due to an induced nonlinear self-action of electromagnetic radiation in the vicinity of the gravitational-radiation source. These radio waves are a fundamentally new type of response of an electrodynamic system to gravitational radiation. That is why we here use an unconventional term: radio-wave messengers of periodic gravitational radiation.

  18. Quantum simulator for the Hubbard model with long-range Coulomb interactions using surface acoustic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Byrnes; Patrik Recher; Na Young Kim; Shoko Utsunomiya; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2006-08-09

    A practical experimental scheme for a quantum simulator of strongly correlated electrons is proposed. Our scheme employs electrons confined in a two dimensional electron gas in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction. Two surface acoustic waves are then induced in the GaAs substrate, which create a two dimensional ``egg-carton'' potential. The dynamics of the electrons in this potential is described by a Hubbard model with long-range Coulomb interactions. The state of the electrons in this system can be probed via its conductance and noise properties. This allows the identification of a metallic or insulating state. Numerical estimates for the parameters appearing in the effective Hubbard model are calculated using the proposed experimental system. These calculations suggest that observations of quantum phase transition phenomena of the electrons in the potential array are within experimental reach.

  19. QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Ofman, Leon

    2012-07-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  20. Search for periodic gravitational radiation with the ALLEGRO gravitational wave detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Mauceli; M. P. McHugh; W. O. Hamilton; W. W. Johnson; A. Morse

    2000-07-11

    We describe the search for a continuous signal of gravitational radiation from a rotating neutron star in the data taken by the ALLEGRO gravitational wave detector in early 1994. Since ALLEGRO is sensitive at frequencies near 1 kHz, only neutron stars with spin periods near 2 ms are potential sources. There are no known sources of this typ e for ALLEGRO, so we directed the search towards both the galactic center and the globular clus ter 47 Tucanae. The analysis puts a constraint of roughly $8 \\times 10^{-24}$ at frequencies near 1 kHz on the gravitational strain emitted from pulsar spin-down in either 47 Tucanae or the galactic center.

  1. Architecture, implementation and parallelization of the software to search for periodic gravitational wave signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevorg Poghosyan; Sanchit Matta; Achim Streit; Micha? Bejger; Andrzej Królak

    2014-10-14

    The parallelization, design and scalability of the \\sky code to search for periodic gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars is discussed. The code is based on an efficient implementation of the F-statistic using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. To perform an analysis of data from the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors' network, which will start operating in 2015, hundreds of millions of CPU hours will be required - the code utilizing the potential of massively parallel supercomputers is therefore mandatory. We have parallelized the code using the Message Passing Interface standard, implemented a mechanism for combining the searches at different sky-positions and frequency bands into one extremely scalable program. The parallel I/O interface is used to escape bottlenecks, when writing the generated data into file system. This allowed to develop a highly scalable computation code, which would enable the data analysis at large scales on acceptable time scales. Benchmarking of the code on a Cray XE6 system was performed to show efficiency of our parallelization concept and to demonstrate scaling up to 50 thousand cores in parallel.

  2. Short-Period Waves That Heat the Corona Detected at the 1999 Eclipse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay M. Pasachoff; Bryce A. Babcock; Kevin D. Russell; Daniel B. Seaton

    2002-02-12

    As a part of a study of the cause of solar coronal heating, we searched for high-frequency (~1 Hz) intensity oscillations in coronal loops in the [Fe XIV] coronal green line. We summarize results from observations made at the 11 August 1999 total solar eclipse from Ramnicu-Valcea, Romania, through clear skies. We discuss the image reduction and analysis through two simultaneous series of coronal CCD images digitized at 10 Hz for a total time of about 140 s. One series of images was taken through a 3.6 A filter isolating the 5303 A [Fe XIV] coronal green line and the other through a 100 A filter in the nearby K-corona continuum. Previous observations, described in Pasachoff et al. (2000), showed no evidence for oscillations in the [Fe XIV] green line at a level great than 2% of coronal intensity. We describe several improvements made over the 1998 eclipse that led to increased image clarity and sensitivity. The corona was brighter in 1999 with the solar maximum, further improving the data. We use Fourier analysis to search in the [Fe XIV] channel for intensity oscillations in loops at the base of the corona. Such oscillations in the 1-Hz range are predicted as a result of density fluctuations from the resonant absorption of MHD waves. The dissipation of a significant amount of mechanical energy from the photosphere into the corona through this mechanism could provide sufficient energy to hear the corona. A Monte-Carlo model of the data suggests the presence of enhanced power, particularly in the 0.75-1.0 Hz range, and we conclude that MHD waves remain a viable method for coronal heating.

  3. The matrix sign function for solving surface wave problems in homogeneous and laterally periodic elastic half-spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Norris; A. L. Shuvalov; A. A. Kutsenko

    2013-03-20

    The matrix sign function is shown to provide a simple and direct method to derive some fundamental results in the theory of surface waves in anisotropic materials. It is used to establish a shortcut to the basic formulas of the Barnett-Lothe integral formalism and to obtain an explicit solution of the algebraic matrix Riccati equation for the surface impedance. The matrix sign function allows the Barnett-Lothe formalism to be readily generalized for the problem of finding the surface wave speed in a periodically inhomogeneous half-space with material properties that are independent of depth. No partial wave solutions need to be found; the surface wave dispersion equation is formulated instead in terms of blocks of the matrix sign function of i times the Stroh matrix.

  4. Efficient generation of highly squeezed light and second harmonic wave with periodically poled MgO:LiNbO_3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genta Masada; Tsuyoshi Suzudo; Yasuhiro Satoh; Hideki Ishizuki; Takunori Taira; Akira Furusawa

    2009-12-21

    We report on effective generation of continuous-wave squeezed light and second harmonics with a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO$_{\\mathrm{3}}$ (PPMgLN) crystal which enables us to utilize the large nonlinear optical coefficient $d_{\\mathrm{33}}$. We achieved the squeezing level of $-7.60 \\pm 0.15$dB at 860 nm by utilizing a subthreshol optical parametric oscillator with a PPMgLN crystal. We also generated 400 mW of second harmonics at 430 nm from 570 mW of fundamental waves with 70% of conversion efficiency by using a PPMgLN crystal inside an external cavity.

  5. Waves and the equilibrium range at Ocean Weather Station P J. Thomson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 2013; accepted 29 September 2013; published 8 November 2013. [1] Wave and wind measurements energy spectra. Observations are consistent with a local balance between wind input and breaking dissipation, as described by Philips (1985). The measurements include direct covariance wind stress estimates

  6. Comment on "Mode Conversion of Waves In The Ion-Cyclotron Frequency Range in Magnetospheric Plasmas"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun

    2014-02-28

    Recently, Kazakov and Fulop [1] studied mode conversion (MC) at the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance in planetary magnetospheric plasmas by simplifying the dispersion relation of the fast wave (FW) modes to describe a cutoff-resonance (CR) pair near the IIH resonance, which can be reduced to a Budden problem. They suggested that when the IIH resonance frequency (?S) approaches the crossover frequency (?cr), and the parallel wavenumber (k?) is close to the critical wavenumber k? ?(?S = ?cr), MC can be efficient for arbitrary heavy ion density ratios. In this Comment, we argue that (a) the FW dispersion relation cannot be simplified to the CR pair especially near ?cr because in many parameter regimes there is a cutoff-resonance-cutoff (CRC) triplet that completely changes the wave absorption; and (b) the maximum MC efficiency does not always occur near k? ?#25; k???.

  7. Effects of internal waves on low frequency, long range, acoustic propagation in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinshan

    2007-01-01

    This thesis covers a comprehensive analysis of long-range, deep-ocean, low-frequency, sound propagation experimental results obtained from the North Pacific Ocean. The statistics of acoustic fields after propagation through ...

  8. Study of transmission line attenuation in broad band millimeter wave frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B.; Austin, M. E.; Ellis, R. F.

    2013-10-15

    Broad band millimeter wave transmission lines are used in fusion plasma diagnostics such as electron cyclotron emission (ECE), electron cyclotron absorption, reflectometry and interferometry systems. In particular, the ECE diagnostic for ITER will require efficient transmission over an ultra wide band, 100 to 1000 GHz. A circular corrugated waveguide transmission line is a prospective candidate to transmit such wide band with low attenuation. To evaluate this system, experiments of transmission line attenuation were performed and compared with theoretical loss calculations. A millimeter wave Michelson interferometer and a liquid nitrogen black body source are used to perform all the experiments. Atmospheric water vapor lines and continuum absorption within this band are reported. Ohmic attenuation in corrugated waveguide is very low; however, there is Bragg scattering and higher order mode conversion that can cause significant attenuation in this transmission line. The attenuation due to miter bends, gaps, joints, and curvature are estimated. The measured attenuation of 15 m length with seven miter bends and eighteen joints is 1 dB at low frequency (300 GHz) and 10 dB at high frequency (900 GHz), respectively.

  9. Approximations to wave propagation through doubly-periodic arrays of scatterers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    periodic media in many physical contexts that include acoustics, elasticity, electromagnetic theory fluid. The fundamental assumptions behind these approximations are that kL 1 and a/L 1 (and hence ka 1

  10. frequency scattered energy or the pulse distortion of short-period body waves, preferably in situations where the scattered energy precedes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    frequency scattered energy or the pulse distortion of short-period body waves, preferably in situations where the scattered energy precedes, rather than follows, the main seismic arrival, so, the imperfect account of mantle and core structure, the simpli- fied theoretical modelling of wave propagation

  11. A Numerical Method for Computing Time-Periodic Solutions in Dissipative Wave Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jianke

    . Then this equation is computed in the combined spatiotemporal domain as a boundary value problem by Newton:420­455 C 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company. #12;A Numerical Method for Computing Time gain or loss), these coherent structures generally exist as continuous families, parameterized

  12. Precise atmospheric parameters for the shortest-period binary white dwarfs: gravitational waves, metals, and pulsations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Dufour, P.; Bergeron, P.; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.

    2014-10-10

    We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 61 low-mass white dwarfs and provide precise atmospheric parameters, masses, and updated binary system parameters based on our new model atmosphere grids and the most recent evolutionary model calculations. For the first time, we measure systematic abundances of He, Ca, and Mg for metal-rich, extremely low mass white dwarfs and examine the distribution of these abundances as a function of effective temperature and mass. Based on our preliminary results, we discuss the possibility that shell flashes may be responsible for the presence of the observed He and metals. We compare stellar radii derived from our spectroscopic analysis to model-independent measurements and find good agreement except for white dwarfs with T {sub eff} ? 10,000 K. We also calculate the expected gravitational wave strain for each system and discuss their significance to the eLISA space-borne gravitational wave observatory. Finally, we provide an update on the instability strip of extremely low mass white dwarf pulsators.

  13. Nonlinear periodic waves solutions of the nonlinear self-dual network equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laptev, Denis V. Bogdan, Mikhail M.

    2014-04-15

    The new classes of periodic solutions of nonlinear self-dual network equations describing the breather and soliton lattices, expressed in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions have been obtained. The dependences of the frequencies on energy have been found. Numerical simulations of soliton lattice demonstrate their stability in the ideal lattice and the breather lattice instability in the dissipative lattice. However, the lifetime of such structures in the dissipative lattice can be extended through the application of ac driving terms.

  14. Two-state on-off intermittency caused by unstable dimension variability in periodically forced drift waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galuzio, P. P.; Lopes, S. R.; Viana, R. L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Parana (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Certain high-dimensional dynamical systems present two or more attractors characterized by different energy branches. For some parameter values the dynamics oscillates between these two branches in a seemingly random fashion, a phenomenon called two-state on-off intermittency. In this work we show that the dynamical mechanism underlying this intermittency involves the severe breakdown of hyperbolicity of the attractors through a mechanism known as unstable dimension variability. We characterize the parametric evolution of this variability using statistical properties of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents. As a model system that exhibits this behavior we consider periodically forced and damped drift waves. In this spatiotemporal example there is a low-dimensional chaotic attractor that is created by an interior crisis, already presenting unstable dimension variability.

  15. Quasi-optical theory of relativistic surface-wave oscillators with one-dimensional and two-dimensional periodic planar structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 ; Malkin, A. M.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2013-11-15

    Within the framework of a quasi-optical approach, we develop 2D and 3D self-consistent theory of relativistic surface-wave oscillators. Presenting the radiation field as a sum of two counter-propagating wavebeams coupled on a shallow corrugated surface, we describe formation of an evanescent slow wave. Dispersion characteristics of the evanescent wave following from this method are in good compliance with those found from the direct cst simulations. Considering excitation of the slow wave by a sheet electron beam, we simulate linear and nonlinear stages of interaction, which allows us to determine oscillation threshold conditions, electron efficiency, and output coupling. The transition from the model of surface-wave oscillator operating in the ?-mode regime to the canonical model of relativistic backward wave oscillator is considered. We also described a modified scheme of planar relativistic surface-wave oscillators exploiting two-dimensional periodic gratings. Additional transverse propagating waves emerging on these gratings synchronize the emission from a wide sheet rectilinear electron beam allowing realization of a Cherenkov millimeter-wave oscillators with subgigawatt output power level.

  16. Accelerating observers measure the period of the oscillations taking place in an acoustic wave (non-longitudinal case)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Popescu; Bernhard Rothenstein

    2006-08-01

    We consider a scenario that involves a stationary source of acoustic waves located at the origin of the K(XOY) inertial reference frame and a receiver that performs the hyperbolic motion at a constant altitude. The observer measures the proper reception time of successive wave crests. We investigate its dependence on the propagation speed of the wave and on the altitude at which the motion takes place.

  17. Eigenfrequency correction of Bloch-Floquet waves in a thin periodic bi-material strip with cracks lying on perfect and imperfect interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vellender; G. S. Mishuris

    2011-07-29

    We analyse an asymptotic low-dimensional model of anti-plane shear in a thin bi-material strip containing a periodic array of interfacial cracks. Both ideal and non-ideal interfaces are considered. We find that the previously derived asymptotic models display a degree of inaccuracy in predicting standing wave eigenfrequencies and suggest an improvement to the asymptotic model to address this discrepancy. Computations demonstrate that the correction to the standing wave eigenfrequencies greatly improve the accuracy of the low-dimensional model.

  18. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  19. Frozen light in periodic metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Figotin; I. Vitebskiy

    2006-09-16

    Wave propagation in spatially periodic media, such as photonic crystals, can be qualitatively different from any uniform substance. The differences are particularly pronounced when the electromagnetic wavelength is comparable to the primitive translation of the periodic structure. In such a case, the periodic medium cannot be assigned any meaningful refractive index. Still, such features as negative refraction and/or opposite phase and group velocities for certain directions of light propagation can be found in almost any photonic crystal. The only reservation is that unlike hypothetical uniform left-handed media, photonic crystals are essentially anisotropic at frequency range of interest. Consider now a plane wave incident on a semi-infinite photonic crystal. One can assume, for instance, that in the case of positive refraction, the normal components of the group and the phase velocities of the transmitted Bloch wave have the same sign, while in the case of negative refraction, those components have opposite signs. What happens if the normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity vanishes? Let us call it a "zero-refraction" case. At first sight, zero normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity implies total reflection of the incident wave. But we demonstrate that total reflection is not the only possibility. Instead, the transmitted wave can appear in the form of an abnormal grazing mode with huge amplitude and nearly tangential group velocity. This spectacular phenomenon is extremely sensitive to the frequency and direction of propagation of the incident plane wave. These features can be very attractive in numerous applications, such as higher harmonic generation and wave mixing, light amplification and lasing, highly efficient superprizms, etc.

  20. Two-and three-dimensional double-sandbar system behaviour under intense wave forcing and a mesomacro tidal range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­macro tidal range R. Almar a,b,Ã, B. Castelle a,b , B.G. Ruessink c , N. Se´ne´chal a,b , P. Bonneton a,b , V­macro tidal environment Storm impact Nearshore Video imaging Short-term morphodynamics Truc Vert Beach a b s t r a c t Five weeks of hourly, 10-min time-exposure video images were used to analyze the meso­macro-tidal

  1. Propagation and refraction of chemical waves generated by local periodic forcing in a reaction-diffusion model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Lingfa

    City, Utah 84720, USA Lingfa Yang, Anatol M. Zhabotinsky, and Irving R. Epstein* Department on regional and global pollution has raised concern worldwide 6 . Global air pollution may be related to LPF by chemicals that arise from daily periodic urban activity and are transmitted from cities to remote areas

  2. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-07-16

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  3. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  4. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe in the Range 0.1 Hz to 1 Hz using the Apollo Seismic Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms

    2014-10-11

    In this paper, we describe an analysis of Apollo era lunar seismic data that places an upper limit on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.1\\,Hz -- 1\\,Hz. We find that because the Moon's ambient noise background is much quieter than that of the Earth, significant improvements over an Earth based analysis were made. We find an upper limit of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}<1.2\\times 10^{5}$, which is three orders of magnitude smaller than a similar analysis of a global network of broadband seismometers on Earth and the best limits in this band to date. We also discuss the benefits of a potential Earth-Moon correlation search and compute the time-dependent overlap reduction function required for such an analysis. For this search, we find an upper limit an order of magnitude larger than the Moon-Moon search.

  5. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe in the Range 0.1 Hz to 1 Hz using the Apollo Seismic Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an analysis of Apollo era lunar seismic data that places an upper limit on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.1\\,Hz -- 1\\,Hz. We find that because the Moon's ambient noise background is much quieter than that of the Earth, significant improvements over an Earth based analysis were made. We find an upper limit of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}<1.2\\times 10^{5}$, which is three orders of magnitude smaller than a similar analysis of a global network of broadband seismometers on Earth and the best limits in this band to date. We also discuss the benefits of a potential Earth-Moon correlation search and compute the time-dependent overlap reduction function required for such an analysis. For this search, we find an upper limit an order of magnitude larger than the Moon-Moon search.

  6. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Zhao Junwei; Ofman, Leon

    2011-07-20

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  7. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  8. A field expansions method for scattering by periodic multilayered media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malcolm, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of acoustic and electromagnetic waves with periodic structures plays an important role

  9. Effect of grating period on the excitation of multiple surface-plasmon-polariton waves guided by the interface of a metal grating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    photovoltaics,4-7 photo- electrochemical cells,8 solar fuel production,9 and solar thermal photovoltaics.10 Both plasmon-polariton wave, photonic crystal, grating-coupled configuration, photovoltaics 1. INTRODUCTION being a viable choice for enhancement of light harvesting in solar cells, because incident s

  10. An idealised experimental model of ocean surface wave transmission by an ice floe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennetts, Luke; Meylan, Michael; Cavaliere, Claudio; Babanin, Alexander; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    An experimental model of transmission of ocean waves by an ice floe is presented. Thin plastic plates with different material properties and thicknesses are used to model the floe. Regular incident waves with different periods and steepnesses are used, ranging from gently-sloping to storm-like conditions. A wave gauge is used to measure the water surface elevation in the lee of the floe. The depth of wave overwash on the floe is measured by a gauge in the centre of the floe's upper surface. Results show transmitted waves are regular for gently-sloping incident waves but irregular for storm-like incident waves. The proportion of the incident wave transmitted is shown to decrease as incident wave steepness increases, and to be at its minimum for an incident wavelength equal to the floe length. Further, a trend is noted for transmission to decrease as the mean wave height in the overwash region increases.

  11. Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomsovic, Steve

    Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure 2004 Acoustic wave fields propagating long ranges through the ocean are refracted As acoustic waves propagate long ranges through the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities

  12. S wave velocity structure below central Mexico using highresolution surface wave tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Robert W.

    to the coast and found significant difference between the two paths in the period range of 5 to 35 s. [4 regions; they also show a wellresolved lowvelocity zone just below the active part of the Trans Mexican zone. This knowledge is also critical in understanding amplification of seismic waves as they propagate

  13. Gravitational wave generation in power-law inflationary models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo M. Sá; Alfredo B. Henriques

    2008-06-06

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves in power-law inflationary models. The energy spectrum of the gravitational waves is calculated using the method of continuous Bogoliubov coefficients. We show that, by looking at the interval of frequencies between 10^(-5) and 10^5 Hz and also at the GHz range, important information can be obtained, both about the inflationary period itself and about the thermalization regime between the end of inflation and the beginning of the radiation-dominated era. We thus deem the development of gravitational wave detectors, covering the MHz/GHz range of frequencies, to be an important task for the future.

  14. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

    2011-04-01

    We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

  15. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    , known as parametric sub- harmonic instability, results generally when a disturbance of one frequency imparts energy to disturbances of half that frequency.13,14 Generally, a plane periodic internal wave, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  16. Down-hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

    1982-10-28

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  17. A Periodically Varying Luminous Quasar at z=2 from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey: A Candidate Supermassive Black Hole Binary in the Gravitational Wave-Driven Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tingting; Heinis, Sebastien; Magnier, Eugene A; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth; Flewelling, Heather; Huber, Mark; Hodapp, Klaus W; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Tonry, John L; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) should be an inevitable consequence of the hierarchical growth of massive galaxies through mergers, and the strongest sirens of gravitational waves (GWs) in the cosmos. And yet, their direct detection has remained elusive due to the compact (sub-parsec) orbital separations of gravitationally bound SMBHBs. Here we exploit a theoretically predicted signature of a SMBHB in the time domain: periodic variability caused by a mass accretion rate that is modulated by the binary's orbital motion. We report our first significant periodically varying quasar detection from the systematic search in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Medium Deep Survey. Our SMBHB candidate, PSO J334.2028+01.4075, is a luminous radio-loud quasar at $z=2.060$, with extended baseline photometry from the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey, as well as archival spectroscopy from the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey. The observed period ($542 \\pm 15$ days) and estimated black hole mass ($\\log (M_{\\rm BH}/M_\\odot) = 9.97 \\p...

  18. On the wave energy potential of Western Black Sea shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galabov, Vasko

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we evaluate the approaches to estimate the wave energy potential of the western Black Sea shelf with numerical models. For the purpose of our evaluation and due to the lack of long time series of measurements in the selected area of the Black Sea, we compare the modeled mean wave power flux output from the SWAN wave model with the only available long term measurements from the buoy of Gelendzhik for the period 1997-2003 (with gaps). The forcing meteorological data for the numerical wave models for the selected years is extracted from the ERA Interim reanalysis of ECMWF (European Centre for Medium range Forecasts). For the year 2003 we also compare the estimated wave power with the modeled by SWAN, using ALADIN regional atmospheric model winds. We try to identify the shortcomings and limitations of the numerical modeling approach to the evaluation of the wave energy potential in Black Sea.

  19. Mean-field analysis of quantum phase transitions in a periodic optical superlattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhar, Arya; Singh, Manpreet; Pai, Ramesh V.; Das, B. P.

    2011-09-15

    We analyze the various phases exhibited by a system of ultracold bosons in a periodic optical superlattice using the mean-field decoupling approximation. We investigate for a wide range of commensurate and incommensurate densities. We find the gapless superfluid phase, the gapped Mott insulator phase, and gapped insulator phases with distinct density wave orders.

  20. Trimodal steady water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

    2013-10-31

    We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

  1. MHD waves in sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sych, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The review addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, height localization with the mechanism of cut-off frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy is shown. The initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks are discussed. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves. A short review of theoretical models of sunspot oscillations is provided.

  2. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-04-10

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/d..delta... Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation.

  3. Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

  4. 2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand of waves. A #12;2011 Waves - 2 A standing wave is caused by superposing two similar (same frequency

  5. On the local properties of highly nonlinear unsteady gravity water waves. Part 2. Dynamics and onset of breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelemy, X; Peirson, W L; Fedele, F; Allis, M; Dias, F

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the classical, but as yet unresolved problem of predicting the breaking onset of 2D and 3D irrotational gravity water waves. This study focuses on domains with flat bottom topography and conditions ranging from deep to intermediate depth (depth to wavelength ratio between 1 and 0.2). Using a fully-nonlinear boundary element model, our initial calculations investigated geometric, kinematic and energetic differences between maximally recurrent and marginally breaking waves in focusing wave groups. Maximallyrecurrent waves are clearly separated from marginally-breaking waves by their energy fluxes localized near the crest region. Specifically, tracking the local ratio of energy flux velocity to crest speed at the crest of the tallest wave in the evolving group provides a robust breaking onset threshold parameter. Warning of imminent breaking onset was found to depend on the strength of breaking, but was detectable only up to half a carrier wave period prior to a breaking event.

  6. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  7. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  8. Bathymetric evolution of sand bed forms under partially standing waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landry, Blake Jude

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a large wave flume where the interaction between water waves and a movable sand bed were investigated. Monochromatic and poly- chromatic waves of specified amplitudes and period were generated ...

  9. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  10. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission by a plate with quasi-periodic surface ridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chunhui; Ke, Manzhu Ye, Yangtao; Xu, Shengjun; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, an acoustic system with broadband asymmetric transmission is designed and fabricated, which consists of a water-immersed aluminum plate engraved with quasi-periodically-patterned ridges on single surface. It demonstrates that when the acoustic waves are launched into the system from the structured side, they can couple into the Lamb modes in the plate efficiently and attain a high transmission; on the contrary, when the waves are incident from the opposite flat side, the coupling is weak, and the transmission is low. Superior to systems with periodic patterning, this quasi-periodically-patterned system has a broad working frequency range due to the collective contributions from the multiple diffractions specific to the structure.

  11. Measuring the rotation period distribution of field M-dwarfs with Kepler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuillan, Amy; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2013-01-01

    We have analysed 10 months of public data from the Kepler space mission to measure rotation periods of main-sequence stars with masses between 0.3 and 0.55 M_sun. To derive the rotational period we introduce the autocorrelation function and show that it is robust against phase and amplitude modulation and residual instrumental systematics. Of the 2483 stars examined, we detected rotation periods in 1570 (63.2%), representing an increase of a factor ~ 30 in the number of rotation period determination for field M-dwarfs. The periods range from 0.37-69.7 days, with amplitudes ranging from 1.0-140.8 mmags. The rotation period distribution is clearly bimodal, with peaks at ~ 19 and ~ 33 days, hinting at two distinct waves of star formation, a hypothesis that is supported by the fact that slower rotators tend to have larger proper motions. The two peaks of the rotation period distribution form two distinct sequences in period-temperature space, with the period decreasing with increasing temperature, reminiscent of ...

  12. Electronic dispersion from long-range atomic ordering and periodic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1115498 Report Number(s): SAND2013-9152C 479790 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: AVS 60th...

  13. Electronic dispersion from long-range atomic ordering and periodic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article)at the Linac CoherentArticle)ofpotentials in

  14. Electronic dispersion from long-range atomic ordering and periodic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article)at the Linac CoherentArticle)ofpotentials

  15. Electronic dispersion from long-range atomic ordering and periodic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article)at the Linac

  16. Wave Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Carcione, F. Cavallini, Simulation of waves in porn-viscoelastic rocks Saturated by immiscible ?uids. Numerical evidence ofa second slow wave,]. Comput.

  17. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Mayu; Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ?30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ?6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  18. The Effects of Wave Energy Converters on a Monochromatic Wave Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    in wave energy converters as a possible means of providing renewable energy, the effects of a wave energy The interest in renewable energies is currently increasing due to the reported rise in global temperature and mean wave period of wave energy fields. There is tremendous energy potential in the ocean. Solar energy

  19. Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrison; Neil (Santa Fe, NM), Singleton; John (Los Alamos, NM), Migliori; Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    2008-08-05

    A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

  20. EVIDENCE FOR THE WAVE NATURE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-20

    Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves have been found for about 15 years. However, significant controversy remains over their physical natures and origins. In this paper, we report an EUV wave that was accompanied by an X1.9 flare and a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME). Using high temporal and spatial resolution observations taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory, we are able to investigate the detailed kinematics of the EUV wave. We find several arguments that support the fast-mode wave scenario. (1) The speed of the EUV wave (570 km s{sup -1}) is higher than the sound speed of the quiet-Sun corona. (2) Significant deceleration of the EUV wave (-130 m s{sup -2}) is found during its propagation. (3) The EUV wave resulted in the oscillations of a loop and a filament along its propagation path, and a reflected wave from the polar coronal hole is also detected. (4) Refraction or reflection effect is observed when the EUV wave was passing through two coronal bright points. (5) The dimming region behind the wavefront stopped to expand when the wavefront started to become diffuse. (6) The profiles of the wavefront exhibited a dispersive nature, and the magnetosonic Mach number of the EUV wave derived from the highest intensity jump is about 1.4. In addition, triangulation indicates that the EUV wave propagated within a height range of about 60-100 Mm above the photosphere. We propose that the EUV wave observed should be a nonlinear fast-mode magnetosonic wave that propagated freely in the corona after it was driven by the CME expanding flanks during the initial period.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic waves in two-dimensional prominences embedded in coronal arcades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Díaz, A. J.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2013-11-20

    Solar prominence models used so far in the analysis of MHD waves in two-dimensional structures are quite elementary. In this work, we calculate numerically magnetohydrostatic models in two-dimensional configurations under the presence of gravity. Our interest is in models that connect the magnetic field to the photosphere and include an overlying arcade. The method used here is based on a relaxation process and requires solving the time-dependent nonlinear ideal MHD equations. Once a prominence model is obtained, we investigate the properties of MHD waves superimposed on the structure. We concentrate on motions purely two-dimensional, neglecting propagation in the ignorable direction. We demonstrate how, by using different numerical tools, we can determine the period of oscillation of stable waves. We find that vertical oscillations, linked to fast MHD waves, are always stable and have periods in the 4-10 minute range. Longitudinal oscillations, related to slow magnetoacoustic-gravity waves, have longer periods in the range of 28-40 minutes. These longitudinal oscillations are strongly influenced by the gravity force and become unstable for short magnetic arcades.

  2. Wave Motion Unit code: MATH35012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    MATH35012 Wave Motion Unit code: MATH35012 Credit Rating: 10 Unit level: Level 3 Teaching period This course unit aims to elucidate some of the physical properties of important types of wave motion and their mathematical descriptions. Overview Wave motion occurs in the oceans, atmosphere and in the earth. Problems

  3. Photonic-magnonic crystals: Multifunctional periodic structures for magnonic and photonic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K?os, J. W. Krawczyk, M.; Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate the properties of a photonic-magnonic crystal, a complex multifunctional one-dimensional structure with magnonic and photonic band gaps in the GHz and PHz frequency ranges for spin waves and light, respectively. The system consists of periodically distributed dielectric magnetic slabs of yttrium iron garnet and nonmagnetic spacers with an internal structure of alternating TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} layers which form finite-size dielectric photonic crystals. We show that the spin-wave coupling between the magnetic layers, and thus the formation of the magnonic band structure, necessitates a nonzero in-plane component of the spin-wave wave vector. A more complex structure perceived by light is evidenced by the photonic miniband structure and the transmission spectra in which we have observed transmission peaks related to the repetition of the magnetic slabs in the frequency ranges corresponding to the photonic band gaps of the TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} stack. Moreover, we show that these modes split to very high sharp (a few THz wide) subpeaks in the transmittance spectra. The proposed novel multifunctional artificial crystals can have interesting applications and be used for creating common resonant cavities for spin waves and light to enhance the mutual influence between them.

  4. Ultrasonic beam propagation in periodic structures: verifying the existence of sonic crystals in triangular structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Orduna-Malea

    2013-05-17

    When waves are propagated through a medium with scatters and these elements are positioned periodically, as in the crystal structures, multiple scattering leads to a phenomenon known as banded structures. This means that waves can propagate in a certain frequency range, according to rules of dispersion, while in other frequency ranges the propagation is cancelled. The first are called allowed bands and the last deaf bands. This work part in order to verify the existence of forbidden bands in the zone of ultrasonic frequency to triangular structures formed by cylinders (hollow and solid) of different diameters (8 and 16mm.). The results indicate that the triangular structure has selective attenuation zones, obtaining results similar to those theoretically predicted for the two main directions of symmetry (0 and 30).

  5. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr\\Hoczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO Science Run and the second and third Virgo Science Runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ~2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semi-major axes of the orbit from ~0.6e-3 ls to ~6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3e-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for ci...

  6. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio. The Sound Waves simulation becomes the source of an analogical mapping to Radio Waves. Concepts Radio Waves 1 - Sound Waves references water waves 2 - Water is analogy for Sound Waves 3 - Radio

  7. RANGE-ENERGY TABLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Particles. II. PROTON RANGE-ENERGY DATA Stopping Medium: Be2301 III. PION RANGE-ENERGY DATA Mev. Pion Kinetic Energy2301 IV. DEUTERON RANGE-ENERGY DATA Deuteron Kinetic Energy

  8. HIGH FREQUENCY PERTURBATION OF CNOIDAL WAVES IN KDV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdogan, Mehmet

    HIGH FREQUENCY PERTURBATION OF CNOIDAL WAVES IN KDV M. B. ERDOGAN, N. TZIRAKIS, AND V. ZHARNITSKY. The interaction of a periodic soli- tary wave (cnoidal wave) with high frequency radiation of finite energy (L2 -norm) is studied. It is proved that the interaction of low frequency component (cnoidal wave) and high

  9. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial...

  10. Nonlinear three-mode interaction and drift-wave turbulence in a tokamak edge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, A.M.; Caldas, I.L.; Lopes, S.R.; Viana, R.L.; Horton, W.; Morrison, P.J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    A three-wave interaction model with quadratic nonlinearities and linear growth/decay rates is used to investigate the occurrence of drift-wave turbulence driven by pressure gradients in the edge plasma of a tokamak. Model parameters are taken from a typical set of measurements of the floating electrostatic potential in the tokamak edge region. Some aspects of the temporal dynamics exhibited by the three-wave interaction model are investigated, with special emphasis on a chaotic regime found for a wide range of the wave decay rate. An intermittent transition from periodic to chaotic behavior is observed and some statistical properties, such as the interburst and laminar length interval durations, are explored.

  11. Two-wave interaction in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Zaqarashvili; B. Roberts

    2006-02-24

    The weakly nonlinear interaction of sound and linearly polarised Alfv{\\'e}n waves propagating in the same direction along an applied magnetic field is studied. It is found that a sound wave is coupled to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave with double period and wavelength when the sound and Alfv{\\'e}n speeds are equal. The Alfv{\\'e}n wave drives the sound wave through the ponderomotive force, while the sound wave returns energy back to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave through the parametric (swing) influence. As a result, the two waves alternately exchange their energy during propagation. The process of energy exchange is faster for waves with stronger amplitudes. The phenomenon can be of importance in astrophysical plasmas, including the solar atmosphere and solar wind.

  12. Standing Waves in a Two-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Model with the Short-Wave Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    Standing Waves in a Two-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Model with the Short-Wave Instability Milos 25, 1998; In Final Form: October 19, 1998 Various patterns of standing waves are found beyond with rotational symmetry in systems with circular geometry. We also find standing waves consisting of periodic

  13. Tuning gain and bandwidth of traveling wave tubes using metamaterial beam-wave interaction structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, Robert Polizzi, Anthony

    2014-10-14

    We employ metamaterial beam-wave interaction structures for tuning the gain and bandwidth of short traveling wave tubes. The interaction structures are made from metal rings of uniform cross section, which are periodically deployed along the length of the traveling wave tube. The aspect ratio of the ring cross sections is adjusted to control both gain and bandwidth. The frequency of operation is controlled by the filling fraction of the ring cross section with respect to the size of the period cell.

  14. Short-Period RF Undulator for a SASE Nanometer source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2001-12-21

    Analysis is described towards development of a RF undulator with a period < 1 cm, an undulator parameter K of the order of unity, and a gap greater than 2.25 mm. The application for the undulator is for a SASE source to produce 1 nm wavelength radiation using a low energy electron beam in the range 1-2 GeV. Particle orbit calculations in a conventional standing-wave resonator configuration show that the presence of a co-propagating component of RF field can cause deleterious motion for the undulating electrons that can seriously degrade their radiation spectrum. To obviate this problem, resonator designs were devised in which only the counter-propagating field components interact with the particles. Two resonator configurations with the same undulator parameter K = 0.4 have been devised and are described in this report.

  15. Vacuum Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  16. Dispersion extraction with near-field measurements in periodic waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , R. D. Meade, and J. N. Winn, Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light (Princeton University. Joannopoulos, "Guided and defect modes in periodic dielectric wave-guides," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 12, 1267

  17. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-05-26

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  18. Nonlinear three-wave interaction in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pushkina, N I

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear interaction of three acoustic waves in a sandy sediment is studied in the frequency range where there is a considerable wave velocity dispersion. The possibility of an experimental observation of the generation of a sound wave by two pump waves propagating at an angle to each other is estimated.

  19. Nonlinear three-wave interaction in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. I. Pushkina

    2015-03-18

    Nonlinear interaction of three acoustic waves in a sandy sediment is studied in the frequency range where there is a considerable wave velocity dispersion. The possibility of an experimental observation of the generation of a sound wave by two pump waves propagating at an angle to each other is estimated.

  20. Time-periodic universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  1. Modulated Wave Trains in Lattice Differential Systems H. J. Hupkes a,, B. Sandstede a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hupkes, Hermen Jan

    Modulated Wave Trains in Lattice Differential Systems H. J. Hupkes a,, B. Sandstede a a Brown spatially periodic structures with different wave numbers: the corresponding modulated wave train is time sinks is proved that connect wave trains with almost identical wave number. The main difficulty

  2. Simulation and design optimization for linear wave phenomena on metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saà-Seoane, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Periodicity can change materials properties in a very unintuitive way. Many wave propagation phenomena, such as waveguides, light bending structures or frequency filters can be modeled through finite periodic structures ...

  3. Gravity Capillary Standing Water Waves Pietro Baldi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomann, Laurent

    Gravity Capillary Standing Water Waves Pietro Baldi Universit`a di Napoli Federico II Joint work with Thomas Alazard (ENS Paris) Pienza, 29 October 2014 Pietro Baldi Gravity Capillary Standing Water Waves construct small amplitude, standing solutions of Sobolev reg. (standing := periodic in time and space

  4. High-frequency surface acoustic wave propagation in nanaostructures characterized by coherent extreme ultraviolet beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siemens, M.

    2009-01-01

    measurement of surface acoustic waves in thin metal filmsthe generation of surface acoustic waves of high frequency,”and S. M. Cherif, “Surface acoustic waves in the ghz range

  5. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    130 SAW Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . .QuasiStatic MEE Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General MEE Wave Solution . . . . . . . . . . . .

  6. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions B. R. Sutherland fluid, vertically propagating internal gravity waves of moderately large amplitude can become unstable, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  7. First Lasing of Volume FEL (VFEL) at Wavelength Range $?\\sim $ 4-6 mm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Baryshevsky; K. Batrakov; A. Gurinovich; I. Ilienko; A. Lobko; V. Moroz; P. Sofronov; V. Stolyarsky

    2001-07-18

    First lasing of volume free electron laser (VFEL) is described. The generating system consists of two metal diffraction grating with different spatial periods. The first grating creates the conditions for Smith Purcell emission mechanism. The second grating provides the distributed feedback for emitted wave. The length of diffraction grating is 10 cm. Electron beam pulse with a time duration $\\tau \\sim$ 10 ms has a sinusoidal form with the amplitude varied from 1 to ~10 kV. The measured microwave power reached the value of about 3-4 W in mm wavelength range. The generation stops at threshold current value. When the current tends to the threshold value, the region of generation tends to a narrow band near to 5 kV. At higher current values the radiation appears in electron energy range 5 - 7.5 KeV.

  8. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy

    2013-01-01

    Encyclopedic article covering shallow water wave models used in oceanography and atmospheric science. Sections: Definition of the Subject; Introduction and Historical Perspective; Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations; Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions; Numerical Methods; Water Wave Experiments and Observations; Future Directions, and Bibliography.

  9. , SOUTHWEST .. Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , under other conditions of weather and topography, on a small group of fires, control effort of them in the short period between September 25 and October 4. The loss of 16 lives can be attrib- uted to the fire activity. More than 700 homes and other structures were burned, and fire damage and suppression

  10. Classical Propagation of Light in Spatio-Temporal Periodic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrov, B S; Findikoglu, A T; Bishop, A R; Kostadinov, I Z

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media where the dielectric constants undergo rapid temporal periodic modulation. Both spatially homogeneous and periodic media are studied. Fast periodic temporal modulation of the dielectric constant of a homogeneous medium leads to existence of photonic band-gap like phenomena. In the presence of both spatial and tem- poral periodicity the electromagnetic spectrum is described in a four-dimensional cube, defining an effective Brillouin zone. In the case of incommensurability between space and time periodicities, completely dispersed point spectra exist.

  11. Traveling water waves with critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailo Aasen; Kristoffer Varholm

    2015-08-19

    We establish the existence of small-amplitude uni- and bimodal steady periodic gravity waves with an affine vorticity distribution. The solutions describe waves with critical layers and an arbitrary number of crests and troughs in each minimal period. Our bifurcation argument differs slightly from earlier theory, and under certain conditions we prove that the waves found are different from the ones in previous investigations. An important part of the analysis is a fairly complete description of the small-amplitude solutions. Finally, we investigate the asymptotic behavior of solutions on the local bifurcation set.

  12. Electromagnetic guided waves on linear arrays of spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic guided waves on linear arrays of spheres C M Linton, V Zalipaev, and I Thompson electromagnetic waves propagating along one-dimensional arrays of dielec- tric spheres are studied. The quasi. There have been previous studies of electromagnetic surface waves guided by periodic arrays, but these have

  13. Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation B. R. Sutherland topography. We have chosen to use periodic, finite­amplitude hills which are representative of the Earth upon internal waves generated by flow over rough topography. 1 Introduction Internal waves propagate

  14. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER ARNAUD ROUGIREL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER MODEL ARNAUD ROUGIREL Abstract. In a context where for buoy-type ocean wave energy converter. The simplest model for this scheme is a non autonomous piecewise and periodic solutions, and compare the energy performance of this novel WEC with respect to the one of wave

  15. Unimodal wave trains and solitons in convex FPU chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Herrmann

    2009-01-23

    We consider atomic chains with nearest neighbour interactions and study periodic and homoclinic travelling waves which are called wave trains and solitons, respectively. Our main result is a new existence proof which relies on the constrained maximisation of the potential energy and exploits the invariance properties of an improvement operator. The approach is restricted to convex interaction potentials but refines the standard results as it provides the existence of travelling waves with unimodal and even profile functions. Moreover, we discuss the numerical approximation and complete localization of wave trains, and show that wave trains converge to solitons when the periodicity length tends to infinity.

  16. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wavemore »disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.« less

  17. 5-minute Solar Oscillations and Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guglielmi, Anatol; Dovbnya, Boris

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we study impact of the photospheric 5-minute oscillations on the ion cyclotron waves in the solar wind. We proceed from the assumption that the ion cyclotron waves in solar wind are experiencing modulation with a characteristic period of 5 minutes under the influence of Alfven waves driven by photospheric motions. The theory presented in our paper predicts a deep frequency modulation of the ion cyclotron waves. The frequency modulation is expected mainly from variations in orientation of the IMF lines. In turn, the variations in orientation are caused by the Alfven waves, propagating from the Sun. To test the theoretical predictions we have analyzed records of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF) geoelectromagnetic waves in order to find the permanent quasi-monochromatic oscillations of natural origin in the Pc1-2 frequency band (0.1-5 Hz), the carrier frequency of which varies with time in a wide range. As a result we found the so-called "serpentine emission" (SE), which was observed in Antarct...

  18. Ultrasonic wave propagation in random and periodic particulate composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Benjamin Kyle

    1996-01-01

    of experimental observations. Polyester specimens were manufactured containing layers of spherical inclusions. The specimens tested included lead layers with low area fractions, glass and steel layers, multiple particle layers, and specimens containing multiple...

  19. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  20. Wave variability and wave spectra for wind generated gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretschneider, Charles L.

    1959-01-01

    A series of experiments of forces on a fixed vertical truncated column due to Stokes 5th order like waves were done in a wave tank. An effort was made to generate the waves as close as possible to theoretical Stokes 5th order waves. A systematic...

  1. High frequency perturbation of cnoidal waves in KdV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Erdo?an; N. Tzirakis; V. Zharnitsky

    2011-03-21

    The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with periodic boundary conditions is considered. The interaction of a periodic solitary wave (cnoidal wave) with high frequency radiation of finite energy ($L^2$-norm) is studied. It is proved that the interaction of low frequency component (cnoidal wave) and high frequency radiation is weak for finite time in the following sense: the radiation approximately satisfies Airy equation.

  2. Fourier series and periodicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donal F. Connon

    2014-12-07

    A large number of the classical texts dealing with Fourier series more or less state that the hypothesis of periodicity is required for pointwise convergence. In this paper, we highlight the fact that this condition is not necessary.

  3. Holding Period Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and the 30-day waiting period has ended. DOE is preparing a Record of Decision to announce and explain its chosen project alternative...

  4. QM/MM description of periodic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, K

    2015-01-01

    A QM/MM implementation for periodic systems is reported. This is done for the case of molecules and for systems with two and three-dimensional periodicity, which is suitable to model electrolytes in contact with electrodes. Tests on different water-containing systems, ranging from the water dimer up to liquid water indicate the correctness of the scheme. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed, as a possible direction to study realistic systems.

  5. RANGE-ENERGY TABLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Mev gm/ era Mev gm/crn" Mev-cnf/gm 5. 817 x 10" 1. 685 x 10"2301 RANGE OF DEUTERONS IN CARBON J T Mev R gm/cm - dT "dTi T Mev R gm/cm - dT dF Mev- Mev-cn^gm cm/gm 5. 517 x lu" 3.

  6. Possible new wave phenomena in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerzy Szwed

    2009-08-10

    We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well-known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than currently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of the wave nature of information coding.

  7. Background atmospheric acoustic waves from 0.01 to 0.1 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishida, Kiwamu

    Background atmospheric acoustic waves from 0.01 to 0.1 Hz K. Nishida(1), Y. Fukao (2), S. Watada (1 observation of them. In at- tempt to detect the long period acoustic waves, we installed a cross array continuous sampling records in a time period. Acoustic waves traveled from around northwest direction from 0

  8. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  9. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  10. Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves. Alexander Figotin \\Lambda Department, 1997 Abstract We consider classical acoustic waves in a medium described by a position dependent mass the existence of localized waves, i.e., finite energy solutions of the acoustic equations with the property

  11. Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

  12. Accurate evaluation of pionium wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suebka, P.; Yan, Y.

    2004-09-01

    A suitable numerical approach based on Sturmian functions is employed to solve the pionium problem for both local and nonlocal potentials. The approach accounts for both the short-ranged strong interaction and the long-ranged Coulomb force and provides accurately the wave function and binding energy of pionium. It is found that the ground-state pionium wave function in realistic pion-pion strong interactions might be considerably different from the hydrogen-like one at a small distance.

  13. Numerical analysis of radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohno, Haruhiko

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic plasma waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are routinely used in magnetic fusion experiments to heat plasmas and drive currents. However, many experiments have revealed that wave energy ...

  14. Design and Fabrication of a Long-range Surface Plasmon Polariton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    Design and Fabrication of a Long-range Surface Plasmon Polariton Wave Guide for near-infrared light Diplomarbeit von Johannes Trapp #12;#12;Design and Fabrication of a Long-range Surface Plasmon Polariton Wave I would like to thank Philipp Altpeter for his patience to explain to me the variety of machinery

  15. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  16. Long Range Development Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S CLogin HelpLoisLong Range

  17. Millimeter-wave circuits and pulse compression radar baseband/analog signal processing blocks in silicon processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parlak, Mehmet; Parlak, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    imaging and showed that radio waves could be re?ected fromwaves, speci?cally radio waves, to determine the range,antenna, transmits pulses of radio waves or microwaves which

  18. Studies of ICRF mode conversion with phase contrast imaging and full-wave simulations in Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujii, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    Radio frequency (rf) waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used for heating fusion plasmas. In a multi-ion-species plasma, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves and ion Bernstein ...

  19. Relativistic electron acceleration by oblique whistler waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Peter H.; School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 ; Pandey, Vinay S.; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2013-11-15

    Test-particle simulations of electrons interacting with finite-amplitude, obliquely propagating whistler waves are carried out in order to investigate the acceleration of relativistic electrons by these waves. According to the present findings, an efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons requires a narrow range of oblique propagation angles, close to the whistler resonance cone angle, when the wave amplitude is held constant at relatively low value. For a constant wave propagation angle, it is found that a range of oblique whistler wave amplitudes permits the acceleration of relativistic electrons to O(MeV) energies. An initial distribution of test electrons is shown to form a power-law distribution when plotted in energy space. It is also found that the acceleration is largely uniform in electron pitch-angle space.

  20. Dispersion equation for water waves with vorticity and Stokes waves on flows with counter-currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Kozlov; Nikolay Kuznetsov

    2014-06-05

    The two-dimensional free-boundary problem of steady periodic waves with vorticity is considered for water of finite depth. We investigate how flows with small-amplitude Stokes waves on the free surface bifurcate from a horizontal parallel shear flow in which counter-currents may be present. Two bifurcation mechanisms are described: for waves with fixed Bernoulli's constant and fixed wavelength. In both cases the corresponding dispersion equations serve for defining wavelengths from which Stokes waves bifurcate. Sufficient conditions guaranteeing the existence of roots of these equations are obtained. Two particular vorticity distributions are considered in order to illustrate general results.

  1. Derivation of transformation equations for the parameters that characterize a plane acoustic wave without using phase invariance and Lorentz-Einstein transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Rothenstein

    2005-06-20

    We show that the transformation equations for the parameters that characterize a plane acoustic wave: period, (frequency), wave vector, wave length and phase velocity can be derived without using phase invariance and Lorentz-Einstein transformation

  2. Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains of sausage symmetry in cylindrical waveguides of the solar corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shestov, S; Kuzin, S

    2015-01-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves guided along the magnetic field by plasma non-uniformities, in particular coronal loops, fibrils and plumes, are known to be highly dispersive, which leads to the formation of quasi-periodic wave trains excited by a broadband impulsive driver, e.g. a solar flare. We investigated effects of cylindrical geometry on the fast sausage wave train formation. We performed magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of fast magnetoacoustic perturbations of a sausage symmetry, propagating from a localised impulsive source along a field-aligned plasma cylinder with a smooth radial profile of the fast speed. The wave trains are found to have pronounced period modulation, with the longer instant period seen in the beginning of the wave train. The wave trains have also a pronounced amplitude modulation. Wavelet spectra of the wave trains have characteristic tadpole features, with the broadband large-amplitude heads preceding low-amplitude quasi-monochromatic tails. The mean period of the wave train...

  3. Particle and Wave: Developing the Quantum Wave Accompanying a Classical Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Herzenberg

    2008-12-04

    The relationship between classical and quantum mechanics is explored in an intuitive manner by the exercise of constructing a wave in association with a classical particle. Using special relativity, the time coordinate in the frame of reference of a moving particle is expressed in terms of the coordinates in the laboratory frame of reference in order to provide an initial spatiotemporal function to work from in initiating the development of a quantum wave. When temporal periodicity is ascribed to the particle, a provisional spatiotemporal function for a particle travelling at constant velocity manifests itself as an running wave characterized by parameters associated with the moving particle. A wave description for bidirectional motion is generated based on an average time coordinate for a combination of oppositely directed elementary running waves, and the resulting spatiotemporal function exhibits wave behavior characteristic of a standing wave. Ascribing directional orientation to the intrinsic periodicity of the particle introduces directional sub-states; variations in the relative number of sub-states as a function of angle in combined states lead to spatially varying magnitudes for the associated waves. Further analysis leads to full mathematical expression for all waves representing free particle motion. A generalization for particles subject to force fields enables us to develop a governing differential equation identical in form to the Schroedinger equation.

  4. Wave Energy Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity.

  5. Wave Control Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    focussing: in crossing seas due to coastal or submarine convergences. Moreover, (rogue) wave energy devices maker to create the highest rogue wave? geometry and dynamo in a new rogue wave energy device? maximum

  6. On the Generation, Propagation, and Reflection of Alfven Waves from the Solar Photosphere to the Distant Heliosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Cranmer; A. A. van Ballegooijen

    2004-10-26

    We present a comprehensive model of the global properties of Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere and fast solar wind. Linear non-WKB wave transport equations are solved from the photosphere to 4 AU, and for wave periods ranging from 3 seconds to 3 days. We derive a radially varying power spectrum of kinetic and magnetic energy fluctuations for waves propagating in both directions along a superradially expanding magnetic flux tube. This work differs from previous models in 3 major ways. (1) In the chromosphere and low corona, the successive merging of flux tubes on granular and supergranular scales is described using a 2D magnetostatic model of a network element. Below a critical merging height the waves are modeled as thin-tube kink modes, and we assume that all of the kink-mode wave energy is transformed into volume-filling Alfven waves above the merging height. (2) The frequency spectrum of horizontal motions is specified only at the photosphere based on prior analyses of G-band bright point kinematics. Everywhere else the amplitudes of outward and inward propagating waves are computed with no free parameters. We find that the wave amplitudes in the corona agree well with off-limb nonthermal line widths. (3) Nonlinear turbulent damping is applied to the results of the linear model using a phenomenological loss term. A single choice for the normalization of the turbulent outer-scale length produces both the right amount of damping at large distances (to agree with in situ measurements) and the right amount of heating in the extended corona (to agree with empirical wind acceleration models). In the corona, the modeled heating rate differs by more than an order of magnitude from a rate based on isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence.

  7. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, Stephen H. (East Syracuse, NY)

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  8. New Exact Solutions of a Generalized Shallow Water Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijan Bagchi; Supratim Das; Asish Ganguly

    2010-07-01

    In this work an extended elliptic function method is proposed and applied to the generalized shallow water wave equation. We systematically investigate to classify new exact travelling wave solutions expressible in terms of quasi-periodic elliptic integral function and doubly-periodic Jacobian elliptic functions. The derived new solutions include rational, periodic, singular and solitary wave solutions. An interesting comparison with the canonical procedure is provided. In some cases the obtained elliptic solution has singularity at certain region in the whole space. For such solutions we have computed the effective region where the obtained solution is free from such a singularity.

  9. Phases of holographic d-wave superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krikun, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We study different phases in the holographic model of d-wave superconductor. These are described by solutions to the classical equations of motion found in different ansatze. Apart from the known homogeneous d-wave superconducting phase we find three new solutions. Two of them represent two distinct families of the spatially modulated solutions, which realize the charge density wave phases in the dual theory. The third one is the new homogeneous phase with nonzero anapole moment. These phases are relevant to the physics of cuprate high-Tc superconductor in pseudogap region. While the d-wave phase preserves translation, parity and time reversal symmetry, the striped phases break translations spontaneously. Parity and time-reversal are preserved when combined with discrete half-periodic shift of the wave. In anapole phase translation symmetry is preserved, but parity and time reversal are spontaneously broken. All of the considered solutions brake the global $U(1)$. Thermodynamical treatment shows that in the s...

  10. INTERFERENCE FRINGES OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES AROUND SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao Hui; Yang, Ming-Hsu; Liang, Zhi-Chao

    2012-10-20

    Solar acoustic waves are scattered by a sunspot due to the interaction between the acoustic waves and the sunspot. The sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave. The scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave around the sunspot. The interference fringes between the scattered wave and the incident wave are visible in the intensity of the total wave because the coherent time of the incident wave is of the order of a wave period. The strength of the interference fringes anti-correlates with the width of temporal spectra of the incident wave. The separation between neighboring fringes increases with the incident wavelength and the sunspot size. The strength of the fringes increases with the radial order n of the incident wave from n = 0 to n = 2, and then decreases from n = 2 to n = 5. The interference fringes play a role analogous to holograms in optics. This study suggests the feasibility of using the interference fringes to reconstruct the scattered wavefields of the sunspot, although the quality of the reconstructed wavefields is sensitive to the noise and errors in the interference fringes.

  11. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore »intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10?³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  12. Wave-Packet Revivals for Quantum Systems with Nondegenerate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Bluhm; Alan Kostelecky; Bogdan Tudose

    1996-09-26

    The revival structure of wave packets is examined for quantum systems having energies that depend on two nondegenerate quantum numbers. For such systems, the evolution of the wave packet is controlled by two classical periods and three revival times. These wave packets exhibit quantum beats in the initial motion as well as new types of long-term revivals. The issue of whether fractional revivals can form is addressed. We present an analytical proof showing that at certain times equal to rational fractions of the revival times the wave packet can reform as a sum of subsidiary waves and that both conventional and new types of fractional revivals can occur.

  13. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  14. Wind/Wave Misalignment in the Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barj, L.; Stewart, S.; Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-02-01

    Wind resources far from the shore and in deeper seas have encouraged the offshore wind industry to look into floating platforms. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is developing a new technical specification for the design of floating offshore wind turbines that extends existing design standards for land-based and fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. The work summarized in this paper supports the development of best practices and simulation requirements in the loads analysis of floating offshore wind turbines by examining the impact of wind/wave misalignment on the system loads under normal operation. Simulations of the OC3-Hywind floating offshore wind turbine system under a wide range of wind speeds, significant wave heights, peak-spectral periods and wind/wave misalignments have been carried out with the aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool FAST [4]. The extreme and fatigue loads have been calculated for all the simulations. The extreme and fatigue loading as a function of wind/wave misalignment have been represented as load roses and a directional binning sensitivity study has been carried out. This study focused on identifying the number and type of wind/wave misalignment simulations needed to accurately capture the extreme and fatigue loads of the system in all possible metocean conditions considered, and for a down-selected set identified as the generic US East Coast site. For this axisymmetric platform, perpendicular wind and waves play an important role in the support structure and including these cases in the design loads analysis can improve the estimation of extreme and fatigue loads. However, most structural locations see their highest extreme and fatigue loads with aligned wind and waves. These results are specific to the spar type platform, but it is expected that the results presented here will be similar to other floating platforms.

  15. Development of Seismic Isolation Systems Using Periodic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Yiqun; Mo, Yi-Lung; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Stokoe, II, Kenneth H.; Perkins, Judy; Tang, Yu

    2014-12-10

    Advanced fast nuclear power plants and small modular fast reactors are composed of thin-walled structures such as pipes; as a result, they do not have sufficient inherent strength to resist seismic loads. Seismic isolation, therefore, is an effective solution for mitigating earthquake hazards for these types of structures. Base isolation, on which numerous studies have been conducted, is a well-defined structure protection system against earthquakes. In conventional isolators, such as high-damping rubber bearings, lead-rubber bearings, and friction pendulum bearings, large relative displacements occur between upper structures and foundations. Only isolation in a horizontal direction is provided; these features are not desirable for the piping systems. The concept of periodic materials, based on the theory of solid-state physics, can be applied to earthquake engineering. The periodic material is a material that possesses distinct characteristics that prevent waves with certain frequencies from being transmitted through it; therefore, this material can be used in structural foundations to block unwanted seismic waves with certain frequencies. The frequency band of periodic material that can filter out waves is called the band gap, and the structural foundation made of periodic material is referred to as the periodic foundation. The design of a nuclear power plant, therefore, can be unified around the desirable feature of a periodic foundation, while the continuous maintenance of the structure is not needed. In this research project, three different types of periodic foundations were studied: one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional. The basic theories of periodic foundations are introduced first to find the band gaps; then the finite element methods are used, to perform parametric analysis, and obtain attenuation zones; finally, experimental programs are conducted, and the test data are analyzed to verify the theory. This procedure shows that the periodic foundation is a promising and effective way to mitigate structural damage caused by earthquake excitation.

  16. Electromagnetic Siegert states for periodic dielectric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friends R. Ndangali; Sergei V. Shabanov

    2011-08-09

    The formalism of Siegert states to describe the resonant scattering in quantum theory is extended to the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves on periodic dielectric arrays. The excitation of electromagnetic Siegert states by an incident wave packet and their decay is studied. The formalism is applied to develop a theory of coupled electromagnetic resonances arising in the electromagnetic scattering problem for two such arrays separated by a distance 2h (or, generally, when the physical properties of the scattering array depend on a real coupling parameter h). Analytic properties of Siegert states as functions of the coupling parameter h are established by the Regular Perturbation Theorem which is an extension the Kato-Rellich theorem to the present case. By means of this theorem, it is proved that if the scattering structure admits a bound state in the radiation continuum at a certain value of the coupling parameter h, then there always exist regions within the structure in which the near field can be amplified as much as desired by adjusting the value of h. This establishes a rather general mechanism to control and amplify optical nonlinear effects in periodically structured planar structures possessing a nonlinear dielectric susceptibility.

  17. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms Joseph T. Maestasa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms Joseph T. Maestasa) Department wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long- range shock propagation using a wave waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. VC 2014 Acoustical Society of America. [http

  18. Emergent hyperuniformity in periodically-driven emulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joost H. Weijs; Raphaël Jeanneret; Rémi Dreyfus; Denis Bartolo

    2015-04-28

    We report the emergence of large-scale hyperuniformity in microfluidic emulsions. Upon periodic driving confined emulsions undergo a first-order transition from a reversible to an irreversible dynamics. We evidence that this dynamical transition is accompanied by structural changes at all scales yielding macroscopic yet finite hyperuniform structures. Numerical simulations are performed to single out the very ingredients responsible for the suppression of density fluctuations. We show that as opposed to equilibrium systems the long-range nature of the hydrodynamic interactions are not required for the formation of hyperuniform patterns, thereby suggesting a robust relation between reversibility and hyperuniformity which should hold in a broad class of periodically driven materials.

  19. Unipolar half-cycle pulse generation in asymmetrical media with a periodic subwavelength structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Xiaohong; Yang Weifeng; Zeng Zhinan; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2010-11-15

    We present a method to generate an extremely short unipolar half-cycle pulse based on resonant propagation of a few-cycle pulse through asymmetrical media with periodic subwavelength structure. Moreover, single- and few-cycle gap solitons with different frequencies are found to split from one incident few-cycle ultrashort pulse. These solitons with various frequencies provide evidence for the generation of different parametric waves during the strong light-matter coupling in asymmetrical media under the extreme nonlinear optics condition. Because of the pulse self-shaping process during the course of resonant propagation, the generated low-frequency sideband and another broadband continuum sideband ranging from the visible to the near-infrared regime couple together, which results in the generation of the subfemtosecond unipolar half-cycle pulse. A time-frequency analysis is preformed which corroborates the mechanism. The generated unipolar half-cycle pulse might be utilized to control and probe the ultrafast electronic dynamics.

  20. The Feasibility of Using Black Widow Pulsars in Pulsar Timing Arrays for Gravitational Wave Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bochenek, Christopher; Demorest, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the past five years, approximately one third of the 65 pulsars discovered by radio observations of Fermi unassociated sources are black widow pulsars (BWPs). BWPs are binary millisecond pulsars with companion masses ranging from 0.01-0.1 solar masses which often exhibit radio eclipses. The bloated companions in BWP systems exert small torques on the system causing the orbit to change on small but measurable time scales. Because adding parameters to a timing model reduces sensitivity to a gravitational wave (GW) signal, the need to fit many orbital frequency derivatives to the timing data is potentially problematic for using BWPs to detect GWs with pulsar timing arrays. Using simulated data with up to four orbital frequency derivatives, we show that fitting for orbital frequency derivatives absorbs less than 5% of the low frequency spectrum expected from a stochastic gravitational wave background signal. Furthermore, this result does not change with orbital period. Therefore, we suggest that if timing syste...

  1. Time-periodic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrose , D.M.; Wilkening, Jon

    2008-04-01

    We present a spectrally accurate numerical method for finding non-trivial time-periodic solutions of non-linear partial differential equations. The method is based on minimizing a functional (of the initial condition and the period) that is positive unless the solution is periodic, in which case it is zero. We solve an adjoint PDE to compute the gradient of this functional with respect to the initial condition. We include additional terms in the functional to specify the free parameters, which, in the case of the Benjamin-Ono equation, are the mean, a spatial phase, a temporal phase and the real part of one of the Fourier modes at t = 0. We use our method to study global paths of non-trivial time-periodic solutions connecting stationary and traveling waves of the Benjamin-Ono equation. As a starting guess for each path, we compute periodic solutions of the linearized problem by solving an infinite dimensional eigenvalue problem in closed form. We then use our numerical method to continue these solutions beyond the realm of linear theory until another traveling wave is reached (or until the solution blows up). By experimentation with data fitting, we identify the analytical form of the solutions on the path connecting the one-hump stationary solution to the two-hump traveling wave. We then derive exact formulas for these solutions by explicitly solving the system of ODE's governing the evolution of solitons using the ansatz suggested by the numerical simulations.

  2. Big Flippin' Wave Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Verdes, Campus Point, Coal Oil Point (Sands) Waves propagate perpendicular to isobaths (lines of constant

  3. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves nonlinear waves. Throughout the theory is based on the traditional assumptions that water is inviscid

  4. Infragravity waves over topography: generation, dissipation, and reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, James M. (James McArthur)

    2006-01-01

    Ocean surface infragravity waves (periods from 20 to 200 s) observed along the southern California coast are shown to be sensitive to the bottom topography of the shelf region, where propagation is linear, and of the ...

  5. Electromagnetic wave propagation in random waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo Alonso; Liliana Borcea

    2013-10-18

    We study long range propagation of electromagnetic waves in random waveguides with rectangular cross-section and perfectly conducting boundaries. The waveguide is filled with an isotropic linear dielectric material, with randomly fluctuating electric permittivity. The fluctuations are weak, but they cause significant cumulative scattering over long distances of propagation of the waves. We decompose the wave field in propagating and evanescent transverse electric and magnetic modes with random amplitudes that encode the cumulative scattering effects. They satisfy a coupled system of stochastic differential equations driven by the random fluctuations of the electric permittivity. We analyze the solution of this system with the diffusion approximation theorem, under the assumption that the fluctuations decorrelate rapidly in the range direction. The result is a detailed characterization of the transport of energy in the waveguide, the loss of coherence of the modes and the depolarization of the waves due to cumulative scattering.

  6. Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM PERIODICALLY STRATIFIED from Periodically Stratified Media with Interfacial Slip, Geophysical Prospecting 31 phase propagation in some other direction. INTRODUCTION Geophysical media often exhibit anisotropic

  7. Ball Packings with Periodic Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Connelly; Jeffrey D. Shen; Alexander D. Smith

    2013-01-04

    We call a periodic ball packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space periodically (strictly) jammed with respect to a period lattice if there are no nontrivial motions of the balls that preserve the period (that maintain some period with smaller or equal volume). In particular, we call a packing consistently periodically (strictly) jammed if it is periodically (strictly) jammed on every one of its periods. After extending a well-known bar framework and stress condition to strict jamming, we prove that a packing with period Lambda is consistently strictly jammed if and only if it is strictly jammed with respect to Lambda and consistently periodically jammed. We next extend a result about rigid unit mode spectra in crystallography to characterize periodic jamming on sublattices. After that, we prove that there are finitely many strictly jammed packings of m unit balls and other similar results. An interesting example shows that the size of the first sublattice on which a packing is first periodically unjammed is not bounded. Finally, we find an example of a consistently periodically jammed packing of low density \\delta = \\frac{4 \\pi}{6 \\sqrt{3} + 11} + \\epsilon ~ 0.59, where \\epsilon is an arbitrarily small positive number. Throughout the paper, the statements for the closely related notions of periodic infinitesimal rigidity and affine infinitesimal rigidity for tensegrity frameworks are also given.

  8. Beat Cepheid Period Ratios from OPAL Opacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Morgan; D. L. Welch

    1997-06-26

    The discovery of a large number of beat Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud in the MACHO survey, provides an opportunity to compare the characteristics of such Cepheids over a range of metallicities. We produced a large grid of linear nonadiabatic pulsation models using the OPAL opacity tables and with compositions corresponding to those of the Milky Way, and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Using the relationship between the period ratio and the main pulsation period, we are able to define a range of models which correspond to the observed beat Cepheids, and thereby constrain the physical characteristics of the LMC beat Cepheids. We are also able to make some predictions about the nature of the yet-to-be-discovered SMC beat Cepheids.

  9. Magneto-Acoustic Wave Oscillations in Solar Spicules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ajabshirizadeh; E. Tavabi; S. Koutchmy

    2008-06-09

    Some observations suggest that solar spicules show small amplitude and high frequency oscillations of magneto-acoustic waves, which arise from photospheric granular forcing. We apply the method of MHD seismology to determine the period of kink waves. For this purposes, the oscillations of a magnetic cylinder embedded in a field-free environment is investigated. Finally, diagnostic diagrams displaying the oscillatory period in terms of some equilibrium parameters are provided to allow a comparison between theoretical results and those coming from observations.

  10. EXCITATION OF LOW-FREQUENCY WAVES IN THE SOLAR WIND BY NEWBORN INTERSTELLAR PICKUP IONS H{sup +} AND He{sup +} AS SEEN BY VOYAGER AT 4.5 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, Colin J.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A. [Physics Department, Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Murphy, Neil [Space and Astrophysical Plasmas Group, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA (United States); Schwadron, Nathan A., E-mail: cjl46@unh.ed, E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.ed, E-mail: Phil.Isenberg@unh.ed, E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.go, E-mail: nathanas@bu.ed [Center for Space Physics, Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-12-01

    We report the observation of a spectral enhancement in the magnetic field fluctuations measured by the MAG instrument on the Voyager 2 spacecraft during 4.5 hr on DOY 7, 1979 at a heliocentric radial position of 4.5 AU. This time period is contained within a solar wind rarefaction when the large-scale interplanetary magnetic field was nearly radial. The frequency range and polarization of the enhanced fluctuations are consistent with waves generated by newly ionized interstellar H{sup +} and He{sup +}. We show sunward propagation of the waves via a cross-helicity analysis. We compare the observation with a theoretical model and find reasonable agreement given the model assumptions. This event is the first indication of pickup ion-generated waves seen at Voyager. It is also the first identification of pickup He{sup +} waves by any spacecraft.

  11. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  12. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, legal representative, Carol (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  13. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  14. Nonlinear acoustic wave generation in a three-phase seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kukarkin, A B; Zhileikin, Ya M

    2015-01-01

    Generation of an acoustic wave by two pump sound waves is studied in a three-phase marine sediment that consists of a solid frame and the pore water with air bubbles in it. To avoid shock-wave formation the interaction is considered in the frequency range where there is a significant amount of sound velocity dispersion. Nonlinear equations are obtained to describe the interaction of acoustic waves in the presence of air bubbles. An expression for the amplitude of the generated wave is obtained and numerical analysis of its dependence on distance and on the resonance frequency of bubbles is performed.

  15. Nonlinear acoustic wave generation in a three-phase seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Kukarkin; N. I. Pushkina; Ya. M. Zhileikin

    2015-03-03

    Generation of an acoustic wave by two pump sound waves is studied in a three-phase marine sediment that consists of a solid frame and the pore water with air bubbles in it. To avoid shock-wave formation the interaction is considered in the frequency range where there is a significant amount of sound velocity dispersion. Nonlinear equations are obtained to describe the interaction of acoustic waves in the presence of air bubbles. An expression for the amplitude of the generated wave is obtained and numerical analysis of its dependence on distance and on the resonance frequency of bubbles is performed.

  16. Saving and Using Encountered Information: Implications for Electronic Periodicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Cathy

    Saving and Using Encountered Information: Implications for Electronic Periodicals Catherine C of a focus on electronic publications, we undertook an exploratory study of how people saved and used study participants had examples of materials they had deliberately saved from periodicals, ranging from

  17. Effective range function below threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Deloff

    2000-06-26

    We demonstrate that the kernel of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, associated with interactions consisting of a sum of the Coulomb plus a short range nuclear potential, below threshold becomes degenerate. Taking advantage of this fact, we present a simple method of calculating the effective range function for negative energies. This may be useful in practice since the effective range expansion extrapolated to threshold allows to extract low-energy scattering parameters: the Coulomb-modified scattering length and the effective range.

  18. Nonlinear waves and coherent structures in the quantum single-wave model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzenov, Stephan I. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Marinov, Kiril B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Starting from the von Neumann-Maxwell equations for the Wigner quasi-probability distribution and for the self-consistent electric field, the quantum analog of the classical single-wave model has been derived. The linear stability of the quantum single-wave model has been studied, and periodic in time patterns have been found both analytically and numerically. In addition, some features of quantum chaos have been detected in the unstable region in parameter space. Further, a class of standing-wave solutions of the quantum single-wave model has also been found, which have been observed to behave as stable solitary-wave structures. The analytical results have been finally compared to the exact system dynamics obtained by solving the corresponding equations in Schrodinger representation numerically.

  19. Nonlinear extraordinary wave in dense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Turikov, V. A. [Russian University of Peoples’ Friendship (Russian Federation)] [Russian University of Peoples’ Friendship (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    Conditions for the propagation of a slow extraordinary wave in dense magnetized plasma are found. A solution to the set of relativistic hydrodynamic equations and Maxwell’s equations under the plasma resonance conditions, when the phase velocity of the nonlinear wave is equal to the speed of light, is obtained. The deviation of the wave frequency from the resonance frequency is accompanied by nonlinear longitudinal-transverse oscillations. It is shown that, in this case, the solution to the set of self-consistent equations obtained by averaging the initial equations over the period of high-frequency oscillations has the form of an envelope soliton. The possibility of excitation of a nonlinear wave in plasma by an external electromagnetic pulse is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  20. Range corrections in Proton Halo Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryberg, Emil; Hammer, H -W; Platter, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the effects of finite-range corrections in halo effective field theory for S-wave proton halo nuclei. We calculate the charge radius to next-to-leading order and the astrophysical S-factor for low-energy proton capture to fifth order in the low-energy expansion. As an application, we confront our results with experimental data for the S-factor for proton capture on Oxygen-16 into the excited $1/2^+$ state of Fluorine-17. Our low-energy theory is characterized by a systematic low-energy expansion, which can be used to quantify an energy-dependent model error to be utilized in data fitting. Finally, we show that the existence of proton halos is suppressed by the need for two fine tunings in the underlying theory.

  1. Relativistic Quaternionic Wave Equation II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II J. Math. Phys.Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II Charles Schwartzcomponent quaternionic wave equation recently introduced. A

  2. Evidence of surface acoustic wave band gaps in the phononic crystals created on thin plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    Evidence of surface acoustic wave band gaps in the phononic crystals created on thin plates Xinya acoustic wave SAW band gaps. In this letter, we report a new type of phononic crystals manufactured Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2167794 The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic composite

  3. Temporal evolution of neutral, thermospheric winds and plasma response using PFISR measurements of gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadas, Sharon

    forces caused by the dissipation of SEward-propagating GWs excited by mountain wave breaking near wave (GW) propagates upwards in the thermo- sphere, its amplitude grows rapidly until it reaches its drag and wave-induced diffusion. Ion drag is unimportant during the night for GWs with periods less

  4. Mirror-mode storms: STEREO observations of protracted generation of small amplitude waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Mirror-mode storms: STEREO observations of protracted generation of small amplitude waves C. T. Luhmann (2009), Mirror-mode storms: STEREO observations of protracted generation of small amplitude waves observes mirror-mode storms, periods in which small amplitude waves suddenly appear and persist for hours

  5. Internal wave generation from rough topography D. A. Aguilar and B. R. Sutherlanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal wave generation from rough topography D. A. Aguilar and B. R. Sutherlanda Department examine internal wave generation above and in the lee of finite-amplitude periodic topography having various degrees of roughness. We show that internal waves are generated not only by flow over the hills

  6. Equal energy phase space trajectories in resonant wave interactions O. Yaakobia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    Equal energy phase space trajectories in resonant wave interactions O. Yaakobia and L. Friedlandb interacting wave systems with nonlinear frequency/ wave vector shifts is discussed. The corresponding these parameters vary in time or space. It is shown that the oscillation periods of two equal energy trajectories

  7. Surface current effects on the fetch-limited growth of wave energy Brian K. Haus1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Surface current effects on the fetch-limited growth of wave energy Brian K. Haus1 Received 5 the fetch-limited growth of wind wave energy over a region with significant lateral shear of the current. Both the near-surface currents and wave energy and period were mapped over the highly sheared inshore

  8. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  9. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long WaveShort Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave­Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW 1Ã , Hiu Ning CHAN 1 online June 11, 2013) The long wave­short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution equations

  10. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. Significant interactions and energy transfer can1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase

  11. Internal Wave Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Manikandan S.

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous and significant means of momentum and energy transport in the oceans, atmosphere, and astrophysical bodies. Here, we show that internal wave propagation in nonuniform density stratifications, ...

  12. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

  13. Gravitational Waves on Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2004-03-12

    We consider a gravitational wave of arbitrary frequency incident on a normal or a super-conductor. The gravitationally induced fields inside the conductor are derived. The outward propagating EM waves are calculated for a low frequency wave on a small sphere and for a high frequency wave incident on a large disk. We estimate for both targets the GW to EM conversion efficiencies and also the magnitude of the superconductor's phase perturbation.

  14. do you know your RANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Garlyn O.

    1957-01-01

    need a good knowledge of range man- asemen2 b~f~re m~kjng CID?E CD~~B~~DDS DY range plots as is required in Part 111. An ex- ample of Part I11 is on page 12. The four range plots are placed just exactly like placing a class of livestock at a stock... good cover of native grass. Grass is a product which is harvested and marketed as meat, ~uool, mohair and wildlife. When you market animals you are paid for the number of poz~nds rather than the number of head you sell. By practicing good range m...

  15. Bragg grating rogue wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degasperis, Antonio; Aceves, Alejandro B

    2015-01-01

    We derive the rogue wave solution of the classical massive Thirring model, that describes nonlinear optical pulse propagation in Bragg gratings. Combining electromagnetically induced transparency with Bragg scattering four-wave mixing, may lead to extreme waves at extremely low powers.

  16. Wave Particles Cem Yuksel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    Wave Particles Cem Yuksel Computer Science Texas A&M University Donald H. House Visualization captured from our real-time simulation system (approximately 100,000 wave particles) Abstract We present a new method for the real-time simulation of fluid sur- face waves and their interactions with floating

  17. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  18. The lack of long-range periodicity and related grain boundaries in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    rates, heat has to be rapidly extracted, which restricted the material's geometry in one dimension magnetic properties. Jan Schroers and Neil Paton* Liquidmetal Technologies Lake Forest, California M years ago, a German scientist discovered during cooling tin with a rate of roughly a trillion Kelvins

  19. The evolution of oscillator wave functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Andrews

    2015-09-20

    We consider some of the methods that can be used to reveal the general features of how wave functions evolve with time in the harmonic oscillator. We first review the periodicity properties over each multiple of a quarter of the classical period of oscillation. Then we show that any wave function can be simply transformed so that its centroid, defined by the expectation values of position and momentum, remains at rest at the center of the oscillator. This implies that we need only consider the evolution of this restricted class of wave functions; the evolution of all others can be reduced to these. The evolution of the spread in position $\\Delta_x$ and momentum $\\Delta_p$ throws light on energy and uncertainty and on squeezed and coherent states. Finally we show that any wave function can be transformed so that $\\Delta_x$ and $\\Delta_p$ do not change with time and that the evolution of all wave functions can easily be found from the evolution of those at rest at the origin with unchanging $\\Delta_x$ and $\\Delta_p$.

  20. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OBSERVED ABOVE A QUIET-SUN REGION IN A DARK CAVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiajia; Zhou Zhenjun; Wang Yuming; Liu Rui; Liao Chijian; Shen Chenglong; Zheng Huinan; Miao Bin; Su Zhenpeng; Wang, S.; Wang Bin E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-10-20

    Waves play a crucial role in diagnosing the plasma properties of various structures in the solar corona and coronal heating. Slow magnetoacoustic (MA) waves are one of the important types of magnetohydrodynamic waves. In past decades, numerous slow MA waves were detected above active regions and coronal holes, but were rarely found elsewhere. Here, we investigate a 'tornado'-like structure consisting of quasi-periodic streaks within a dark cavity at about 40-110 Mm above a quiet-Sun region on 2011 September 25. Our analysis reveals that these streaks are actually slow MA wave trains. The properties of these wave trains, including phase speed, compression ratio, and kinetic energy density, are similar to those of the reported slow MA waves, except that the period of these waves is about 50 s, much shorter than the typical reported values (3-5 minutes).

  1. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  2. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  3. Synoptic Responses to Mountain Gravity Waves Encountering Directional Critical Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Francois

    Synoptic Responses to Mountain Gravity Waves Encountering Directional Critical Levels ARMEL MARTIN the synoptic response to mountain gravity waves (GWs) absorbed at directional critical levels. The model in the midtroposphere. First, the authors consider the case of an idealized mountain range such that the orographic

  4. Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad to study the sensitivity of dam-breach flood waves to breach-outflow hydrograph volume, peak discharge the channel. A dam-breach Froude number is defined to enable analysis through a wide range of site and flow

  5. Range Searching in Categorical Data: Colored Range Searching on Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.

    , gsat @cs.duke.edu ¾ AT&T Labs, Shannon Laboratory, 180 Park Ave., Florham Park, NJ 07932. muthu each stock has a category that is the industry sector it belongs to, and we consider a range

  6. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  7. Wave Packets in Discrete Quantum Phase Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang Young Bang; Micheal S Berger

    2008-11-06

    The properties of quantum mechanics with a discrete phase space are studied. The minimum uncertainty states are found, and these states become the Gaussian wave packets in the continuum limit. With a suitably chosen Hamiltonian that gives free particle motion in the continuum limit, it is found that full or approximate periodic time evolution can result. This represents an example of revivals of wave packets that in the continuum limit is the familiar free particle motion on a line. Finally we examine the uncertainty principle for discrete phase space and obtain the correction terms to the continuum case.

  8. Matter-wave chaos with a cold atom in a standing-wave laser field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Prants

    2012-01-01

    Coherent motion of cold atoms in a standing-wave field is interpreted as a propagation in two optical potentials. It is shown that the wave-packet dynamics can be either regular or chaotic with transitions between these potentials after passing field nodes. Manifestations of de Broglie-wave chaos are found in the behavior of the momentum and position probabilities and the Wigner function. The probability of those transitions depends on the ratio of the squared detuning to the Doppler shift and is large in that range of the parameters where the classical motion is shown to be chaotic.

  9. Wave localization as a manifestation of ray chaos in underwater acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iomin; Yu. Bliokh

    2007-06-03

    Wave chaos is demonstrated by studying a wave propagation in a periodically corrugated wave-guide. In the limit of a short wave approximation (SWA) the underlying description is related to the chaotic ray dynamics. In this case the control parameter of the problem is characterized by the corrugation amplitude and the SWA parameter. The considered model is fairly suitable and tractable for the analytical analysis of a wave localization length. The number of eigenmodes characterized the width of the localized wave packet is estimated analytically.

  10. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  11. JOURNALOF GEOPHYSICALRESEARCH,VOL. 91, NO. AS, PAGES8895-8907, AUGUST1, 1986 ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRUCTURE OF STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRUCTURE OF STANDING WAVES IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE L. J. Cahill, Jr., 1N. G. Lin,1, 2 M. J 1 spacecraft provided observations of toroidal standing wave oscilla- tions of magnetic shells the standing wave periods calculated were reasonably close to, but somewhat less than, the observed periods

  12. Low Frequency Scattering Resonance Wave in Strong Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yinbin

    2015-01-01

    Multiple scattering of wave in strong heterogeneity can cause resonance-like wave phenomenon where signal exhibits low frequency, high intensity, and slowly propagating velocity. For example, long period event in volcanic seismology and surface plasmon wave and quantum Hall effect in wave-particle interactions. Collective behaviour in a many-body system is usually thought to be the source for generating the anomaly. However, the detail physical mechanism is not fully understood. Here I show by wave field modeling for microscopic bubble cloud model and 1D heterogeneity that the anomaly is related to low frequency scattering resonance happened in transient regime. This low frequency resonance is a kind of wave coherent scattering enhancement phenomenon in strongly-scattered small-scale heterogeneity. Its resonance frequency is inversely proportional to heterogeneous scale and contrast and will further shift toward lower frequency with random heterogeneous scale and velocity fluctuations. Low frequency scatterin...

  13. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S.; Haas, F.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  14. Predicting Millimeter Wave Radar Spectra for Autonomous Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose, Ebi

    Millimeter Wave (MMW) radars are currently used as range measuring devices in applications such as automotive driving aids (Langer and Jochem, 1996), (Rohling and Mende, 1996), the mapping of mines (Brooker et al., 2005) ...

  15. A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Adam London

    2008-06-20

    The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

  16. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  17. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Mariko [Department of Astronomy, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8521 (Japan); Saio, Hideyuki [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Hachisu, Izumi [Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ?} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (? 1.3 M {sub ?}) WDs with very high accretion rates (? 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  18. Experimental Measurements and Numerical Prediction of the Effect of Waves on Mooring Line Forces for a Container Ship Moored to Pile Supported and Solid Wall Docks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luai, Andres B

    2013-05-03

    The conditions of a moored container ship are examined by a physical model in a wave basin and by a numerical simulation. Each condition, wave period, significant wave height and wave direction, was isolated and tested for a 50:1 scale model of a...

  19. Multimessenger Search for Sources of Gravitational Waves and High-Energy Neutrinos: Results for Initial LIGO-Virgo and IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Macías, O; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Teši?, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; :,; Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a multimessenger search for coincident signals from the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories and the partially completed IceCube high-energy neutrino detector, including periods of joint operation between 2007-2010. These include parts of the 2005-2007 run and the 2009-2010 run for LIGO-Virgo, and IceCube's observation periods with 22, 59 and 79 strings. We find no significant coincident events, and use the search results to derive upper limits on the rate of joint sources for a range of source emission parameters. For the optimistic assumption of gravitational-wave emission energy of $10^{-2}$ M$_\\odot$c$^2$ at $\\sim 150$ Hz with $\\sim 60$ ms duration, and high-energy neutrino emission of $10^{51}$ erg comparable to the isotropic gamma-ray energy of gamma-ray bursts, we limit the source rate below $1.6 \\times 10^{-2}$ Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also examine how combining information from gravitational waves and neutrinos will aid discovery in the advanced gravitational-wave d...

  20. Low-frequency waves in asymmetric magnetized relativistic pair plasma M. Gedalin,1P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melrose, Don

    to produce the outgoing radio waves (in the108 ­1010 Hz frequency range) through some form of plasma been proposed. The particle energy is then either transformed directly into radio waves which produce the escaping radio waves through some additional, probably non-linear mechanism (Melrose 1993

  1. Numerical Study of Unsteady Detonation Wave Propagation in a Supersonic Combustion Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Numerical Study of Unsteady Detonation Wave Propagation in a Supersonic Combustion Chamber T.H. Yi, of which each mode has unique features and operation ranges: an ejector aug- mented pulsed detonation rocket (PDR) mode, a pulsed normal detonation wave engine (NDWE) mode, an oblique detonation wave engine

  2. Electromagnetic Wave Power Observed Near the Moon during Terrestrial Bow Shock Crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fillingim, Matthew

    Electromagnetic Wave Power Observed Near the Moon during Terrestrial Bow Shock Crossings and Its (?) noise (cf. Nakagawa et al., 2011) 3. Large increase in magnetic field strength and wave power at the bow are evident in the plasma and magnetic field data Increase in wave power over a broad range of f i t h i p

  3. Quasi-bound states in periodically driven scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Landa

    2015-06-29

    We present an approach for obtaining eigenfunctions of periodically driven time-dependent Hamiltonians. Assuming an approximate scale separation between two spatial regions where different potentials dominate, we derive an explicit expansion for scattering problems with mixed cylindrical and spherical symmetry, by matching wavefunctions of a periodic linear drive in the exterior region to solutions of an arbitrary interior potential expanded in spherical waves. Using this method we study quasi-bound states of a square-well potential in three dimensions subject to an axial driving force. In the nonperturbative regime we show how eigenfunctions develop an asymptotic dressing of different partial waves, accompanied by large periodic oscillations in the angular momentum and a nonmonotonous dependence of the decay rate on the drive strength. We extend these results to the strong driving regime near a resonant intersection of the quasi-energy surfaces of two bound states of different symmetry. Our approach can be applied to general quantum scattering problems of particles subject to periodic fields.

  4. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some findings and outstanding problems are also presented. Keywords: dusty plasmas, dust acoustic waves PACS: 52

  5. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  6. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  7. REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE PARTICLES A Dissertation by Cem Yuksel Submitted to the Office of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE, Valerie E. Taylor August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;iii ABSTRACT Real-time Water Waves

  8. GN Wave theory and TEBEM for Wave-Body Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GN Wave theory and TEBEM for Wave-Body Interaction Dr. BinBin Zhao and Professor Wenyang Duan of simulating irregular nonlinear water wave interaction with arbitrary floating bodies, the Green-Naghdi wave corners. The results show that the high-level GN theory can predict wave transformation over uneven seabed

  9. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  10. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandra Andi?

    2008-10-13

    High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20mHz) have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences are taken using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis is performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observe the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10mHz to 13mHz. We also observe propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in regions where magnetic structures are present.

  11. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  12. Short range radio locator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information. 5 figs.

  13. Short range radio locator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers to sample the ether for the radar pulse. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information.

  14. An Autonomous Adaptive Scheduling Agent for Period Searching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric S. Saunders; Tim Naylor; Alasdair Allan

    2008-01-24

    We describe the design and implementation of an autonomous adaptive software agent that addresses the practical problem of observing undersampled, periodic, time-varying phenomena using a network of HTN-compliant robotic telescopes. The algorithm governing the behaviour of the agent uses an optimal geometric sampling technique to cover the period range of interest, but additionally implements proactive behaviour that maximises the optimality of the dataset in the face of an uncertain and changing operating environment.

  15. Changing dynamics of spontaneous waves during retinal development: a novel panretinal perspective achieved with the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) 4,096 electrodes array 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, Matthias; Sernagor, Evelyne; Maccione, Alessandro; Gandolfo, Mauro; Eglen, Stephen; Berdondini, Luca

    2010-07-02

    The developing retina exhibits spontaneous waves of activity spreading across the ganglion cell layer. These waves are present only during a limited perinatal period, and they are known to play important roles during the ...

  16. Estimation of Heavy Ion Densities From Linearly Polarized EMIC Waves At Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-02-24

    Linearly polarized EMIC waves are expected to concentrate at the location where their wave frequency satisfies the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance condition as the result of a mode conversion process. In this letter, we evaluate absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance in the Earth geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of helium and azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers in dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentration, it only occurs for a limited range of azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Our results suggest that, at L = 6.6, linearly polarized EMIC waves can be generated via mode conversion from the compressional waves near the crossover frequency. Consequently, the heavy ion concentration ratio can be estimated from observations of externally generated EMIC waves that have polarization.

  17. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Wave Energy ­ challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Risø-R-1608(EN) 161 #12;© Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  18. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  19. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wider range of suppliers. As working circles beyond the size of a single National Forest have recently. Alternatives for expansion of working circles must be assessed in light of present Forest Service timber management policy and the impacts of timber supply. These alternates include (a) combination of National

  20. Density waves in the Calogero model - revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardek, V. Feinberg, J. Meljanac, S.

    2010-03-15

    The Calogero model bears, in the continuum limit, collective excitations in the form of density waves and solitary modulations of the density of particles. This sector of the spectrum of the model was investigated, mostly within the framework of collective-field theory, by several authors, over the past 15 years or so. In this work we shall concentrate on periodic solutions of the collective BPS-equation (also known as 'finite amplitude density waves'), as well as on periodic solutions of the full static variational equations which vanish periodically (also known as 'large amplitude density waves'). While these solutions are not new, we feel that our analysis and presentation add to the existing literature, as we explain in the text. In addition, we show that these solutions also occur in a certain two-family generalization of the Calogero model, at special points in parameter space. A compendium of useful identities associated with Hilbert transforms, including our own proofs of these identities, appears in Appendix A. In Appendix B we also elucidate in the present paper some fine points having to do with manipulating Hilbert-transforms, which appear ubiquitously in the collective field formalism. Finally, in order to make this paper self-contained, we briefly summarize in Appendix C basic facts about the collective field formulation of the Calogero model.

  1. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

  2. Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

  3. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01

    Nasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughNemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialconstitute pressure wave energy and/or shear wave energy.

  4. A Wave-Pipelined Router Architecture Using Ternary Associative Memory Jose G. Delgado-Frias* Jabulani Nyathi* Laxmi Bhuyant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyathi, Jabulani

    A Wave-Pipelined Router Architecture Using Ternary Associative Memory Jose G. Delgado University Abstract In this paper a wave-pipelining scheme is used to increase the per- formance of a router not occur. The results of the study show that wave-pipelining helps to reduce the clock period. 1

  5. Implementation of an F-statistic all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Virgo VSR1 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Borkowski, K; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorosh, O; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S

    2014-01-01

    We present an implementation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic to carry out the first search in data from the Virgo laser interferometric gravitational wave detector for periodic gravitational waves from a priori unknown, isolated rotating neutron stars. We searched a frequency $f_0$ range from 100 Hz to 1 kHz and the frequency dependent spindown $f_1$ range from $-1.6\\,(f_0/100\\,{\\rm Hz}) \\times 10^{-9}\\,$ Hz/s to zero. A large part of this frequency - spindown space was unexplored by any of the all-sky searches published so far. Our method consisted of a coherent search over two-day periods using the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic, followed by a search for coincidences among the candidates from the two-day segments. We have introduced a number of novel techniques and algorithms that allow the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm in the coherent part of the search resulting in a fifty-fold speed-up in computation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic with respect to the algorithm used in the other pipelines. No ...

  6. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Fred J. (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  7. Coronal transverse magnetohydrodynamic waves in a solar prominence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Okamoto; S. Tsuneta; T. E. Berger; K. Ichimoto; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; S. Nagata; K. Shibata; T. Shimizu; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-01-13

    Solar prominences are cool 10$^4$ Kelvin plasma clouds supported in the surrounding 10$^6$ Kelvin coronal plasma by as-yet undetermined mechanisms. Observations from \\emph{Hinode} show fine-scale threadlike structures oscillating in the plane of the sky with periods of several minutes. We suggest these transverse magnetohydrodynamic waves may represent Alfv\\'en waves propagating on coronal magnetic field lines and these may play a role in heating the corona.

  8. Some criteria for the symmetry of stratified water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-03-05

    This paper considers two-dimensional stably stratified steady periodic gravity water waves with surface profiles monotonic between crests and troughs. We provide sufficient conditions under which such waves are necessarily symmetric. This is done by first exploiting some elliptic structure in the governing equations to show that, in certain size regimes, a maximum principle holds. This then forms the basis for a method of moving planes argument.

  9. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  10. Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases Robin Kaiser and Mark D. Havey Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases #12;39 E xperimental developments permit in the transport proper- ties of electromagnetic radiation in strongly scattering random media. Even in weakly

  11. CATCHING THE FOURTH WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    CATCHING THE FOURTH WAVE YOU MAY HAVE RIDDEN THEM YOURSELF -- the swells that develop farther out beyond Toffler, the fourth wave -- biologi- cal intelligence and medical technology -- is on the horizon second and fourth nationally in terms of cities that receive the most research funds from the National

  12. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  13. Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Lepri; Arkady Pikovsky

    2014-10-29

    We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: the same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analysed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a "chaotic diode", where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

  14. Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepri, Stefano; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2014-12-01

    We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: The same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analyzed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a “chaotic diode,” where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

  15. Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

    2014-04-03

    Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

  16. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, Samuel C. (Knoxville, TN)

    1984-01-01

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  17. Rayleigh WaveInternal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave­Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear­generation of inter­ nal waves in the atmosphere

  18. Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear-generation of inter- nal waves in the atmosphere

  19. An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave Abstract In this paper, we derive an unsteady refraction­diffraction model for narrowbanded water waves for use in computing coupled wave­current motion in the nearshore. The end result is a variable

  20. Small-amplitude capillary-gravity water waves: exact solutions and particle motion beneath such waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delia Ionescu-Kruse

    2011-06-20

    Two-dimensional periodic surface waves propagating under the combined influence of gravity and surface tension on water of finite depth are considered. Within the framework of small-amplitude waves, we find the exact solutions of the nonlinear differential equation system which describes the particle motion in the considered case, and we describe the possible particle trajectories. The required computations involve elliptic integrals of the first kind, the Legendre normal form and a solvable Abel differential equation of the second kind. Some graphs of the results are included.

  1. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizard, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    model lies with the simple wave energy conservation law itthe recirculation of wave energy introduces interference e?particles, the tertiary-wave energy may be negative and thus

  2. Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil of CWP is on seismic modeling, imaging and inversion methods, as well as on improving the accuracy

  3. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-51 A TWO-DIMENSIONAL LAKE WAVE PREDICTION SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the overlake wind forecast. 1. INTRODUCTION Wave forecasts on the Great Lakes have been automatically produced (Model Output Statistics or MOS) wind forecasts as input to Bretschneider's empirical equations forecast pro- gram. In this way, a range of wind forecasts could be used to generate a range of wave

  4. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa (Albuquerque, NM); Sackos, John Theodore (Albuquerque, NM); Bradley, Bart Davis (Albuquerque, NM); Nellums, Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  5. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Andrea; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-01-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of $soliton$ $turbulence$ in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a $dense$ $soliton$ $gas$, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation, a $completely$ $integrable$ $soliton$ $system$: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic/quasiperiodic boundary conditions the $ergodic$ $solutions$ of KdV are exactly solvable by $finite$ $gap$ $theory$ (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as $\\sim\\omega^{-1}$. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter $densely$ $packed$ $soliton$ $wave$ $trains$ from the data. We apply ...

  6. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  7. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  8. Partial-wave and helicity operators for the scattering of two hadrons in lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen J. Wallace

    2015-06-17

    Partial-wave operators for lattice QCD are developed in order to facilitate the identification of the spins of two-hadron scattering states corresponding to zero total momentum. Taking the periodic boundary conditions for lattice states into account, orthogonal sets of partial-wave operators for orbital angular momentum are identified. When combined with the intrinsic spins of the hadrons, orthogonal sets of parent operators for total angular momentum $J$ and projection $M$ are obtained. The parent operators are subduced to irreducible representations of the octahedral group in order to obtain descendant operators for use in lattice calculations. The descendant operators retain orthogonality with respect to $J$. The spin of a state can be identified by the spin of parent operators that dominate creation of the state. For nonzero total momentum, operators are developed for a range of helicities and they are subduced to irreducible representations corresponding to the different directions of total momentum. Sets of operators that include a sufficient range of helicities allow identification of spin $J$ when a state couples to operators with helicities less than or equal to $J$, but not to operators with higher helicities.

  9. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branch; Darren W. (Albuquerque, NM), Meyer; Grant D. (Ithaca, NY), Craighead; Harold G. (Ithaca, NY)

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  10. Diagonalization of pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-21

    A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

  11. Modulated wave trains in generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinksi equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the stability of periodic wave trains in a generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinski (gKS) equation. This equation is useful to describe the weak instability of low frequency perturbations for thin film flows down an inclined ramp. We provide a set of equations, namely Whitham's modulation equations, that determines the behaviour of low frequency perturbations of periodic wave trains. As a byproduct, we relate the spectral stability in the small wavenumber regime to properties of the modulation equations. This stability is always critical since 0 is a 0-Floquet number eigenvalue associated to translational invariance.

  12. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  13. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  14. Analytic aspects of periodic instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charbonneau, Benoit, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    The main result is a computation of the Nahm transform of a SU(2)-instanton over R x T³, called spatially-periodic instanton. It is a singular monopole over T³, a solution to the Bogomolny equation, whose rank is computed ...

  15. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  16. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

    2009-05-05

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  17. Range Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFU Elektronik GmbHRahusRamkyRange Fuels Jump

  18. Range Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎Wind Farm Jump to:Randsburg,Range

  19. Gravitation Wave Emission from Radio Pulsars Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Regimbau; J. A. de Freitas Pacheco

    2000-05-02

    We report a new pulsar population synthesis based on Monte Carlo techniques, aiming to estimate the contribution of galactic radio pulsars to the continuous gravitational wave emission. Assuming that the rotation periods of pulsars at birth have a Gaussian distribution, we find that the average initial period is 290 ms. The number of objects with periods equal to or less than 0.4 s, and therefore capable of being detected by an interferometric gravitational antenna like VIRGO, is of the order of 5100-7800. With integration times lasting between 2 and 3 yr, our simulations suggest that about two detections should be possible, if the mean equatorial ellipticity of the pulsars is $\\epsilon$ =10$^{-6}$. A mean ellipticity an order of magnitude higher increases the expected number of detections to 12-18, whereas for $\\epsilon < 10^{-6}$, no detections are expected

  20. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy A.M.

    . Water Wave Experiments and Observations VII. Future Directions VIII. Bibliography Glossary Deep water A surface wave is said to be in deep water if its wavelength is much shorter than the local water depthShallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer

  1. Long wave expansions for water waves over random topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Long wave expansions for water waves over random topography Anne de Bouard1 , Walter Craig2 interacting with the random bottom. We show that the resulting influence of the random topography is expressed numbers: 76B15, 35Q53, 76M50, 60F17 Keywords :Water waves, random topography, long wave asymptotics #12

  2. On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

    2008-04-05

    If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

  3. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spinneken, Johannes Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  4. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  5. Evolution of Rogue Waves in Interacting Wave Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Grönlund; B. Eliasson; M. Marklund

    2009-04-03

    Large amplitude water waves on deep water has long been known in the sea faring community, and the cause of great concern for, e.g., oil platform constructions. The concept of such freak waves is nowadays, thanks to satellite and radar measurements, well established within the scientific community. There are a number of important models and approaches for the theoretical description of such waves. By analyzing the scaling behavior of freak wave formation in a model of two interacting waves, described by two coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations, we show that there are two different dynamical scaling behaviors above and below a critical angle theta_c of the direction of the interacting waves below theta_c all wave systems evolve and display statistics similar to a wave system of non-interacting waves. The results equally apply to other systems described by the nonlinear Schroedinger equations, and should be of interest when designing optical wave guides.

  6. LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS Lab VII - 1 In this lab, you will solve problems in ways that take-like behavior. These conditions may be less familiar to you than the conditions for which geometrical optics

  7. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  8. Surface wave interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  9. Relativistic quaternionic wave equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, C

    2006-01-01

    Schrodinger ?time dependent? equation, ? 1 and ? 2 , then?TCP?. The current conservation equation ?3.2? is still truefor this extended wave equation ?8.1?, however, Eq. ?6.7?

  10. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  11. Modeling a nonperturbative spinor vacuum interacting with a strong gravitational wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Dzhunushaliev; Vladimir Folomeev

    2015-03-15

    We consider the propagation of strong gravitational waves interacting with a nonperturbative vacuum of spinor fields. To described the latter, we suggest an approximate model. The corresponding Einstein equation has the form of the Schr\\"odinger equation. Its gravitational-wave solution is analogous to the solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for an electron moving in a periodic potential. The general solution for the periodic gravitational waves is found. The analog of the Kronig-Penney model for gravitational waves is considered. It is shown that the suggested gravitational-wave model permits the existence of weak electric charge and current densities concomitant with the gravitational wave. Based on this observation, a possible experimental verification of the model is suggested.

  12. Beyond periodic orbits: An example in nonhydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dando, P.A.; Monteiro, T.S.; Delande, D.; Taylor, K.T. (Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom) Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France) Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom))

    1995-02-13

    The spectrum of hydrogen in a magnetic field is a paradigm of quantum chaos and may be analyzed accurately by periodic-orbit-type theories. In nonhydrogenic atoms, the core induces pure quantum effects, especially additional spectral modulations, which cannot be analyzed reliably in terms of classical orbits and their stability parameters. Provided core-scattered waves are included consistently, core-scattered modulations as well as corrected amplitudes for primitive orbits are in excellent agreement with quantum results. We consider whether these systems correspond to quantum chaos.

  13. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    Waves in Magnetoelectric Materials . . . Need forApplication of Multiferroic Materials to Receive AntennaMaterials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. The use of chirped pulse millimeter-wave spectroscopy in chemical dynamics and kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaver, Rachel Glyn

    2013-01-01

    .Chirped-pulse millimeter wave (CPmmW) spectroscopy is a revolutionary technique that has taken advantage of advances in electronics to give high signal to noise broadband rotational spectra in a very short period of time ...

  15. Wind waves in shallow microtidal basins and the dynamic equilibrium of tidal flats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    resuspension by wind waves and is applied to the Venice lagoon, Italy. Model results show that the equilibrium becomes emergent, the inundation period decreases, so that less sediment deposits leading to a reduction

  16. Solitary and shock waves in magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Abdukerim, Nuriman; Xie, Bai-Song

    2014-02-15

    An Ohm's law for electron-positron (EP) plasma is obtained. In the framework of EP magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate nonrelativistic nonlinear waves' solutions in a magnetized EP plasma. In the collisionless limit, quasistationary propagating solitary wave structures for the magnetic field and the plasma density are obtained. It is found that the wave amplitude increases with the Mach number and the Alfvén speed. However, the dependence on the plasma temperature is just the opposite. Moreover, for a cold EP plasma, the existence range of the solitary waves depends only on the Alfvén speed. For a hot EP plasma, the existence range depends on the Alfvén speed as well as the plasma temperature. In the presence of collision, the electromagnetic fields and the plasma density can appear as oscillatory shock structures because of the dissipation caused by the collisions. As the collision frequency increases, the oscillatory shock structure becomes more and more monotonic.

  17. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1?mT to 1?mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5?nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300?nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  18. All-dielectric three-dimensional broadband Eaton lens with large refractive index range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Ming; Yong Tian, Xiao, E-mail: leoxyt@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ling Wu, Ling; Chen Li, Di [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-03-03

    We proposed a method to realize three-dimensional (3D) gradient index (GRIN) devices requiring large refractive index (RI) range with broadband performance. By combining non-resonant GRIN woodpile photonic crystals structure in the metamaterial regime with a compound liquid medium, a wide RI range (1–6.32) was fulfilled flexibly. As a proof-of-principle for the low-loss and non-dispersive method, a 3D Eaton lens was designed and fabricated based on 3D printing process. Full-wave simulation and experiment validated its omnidirectional wave bending effects in a broad bandwidth covering Ku band (12?GHz–18?GHz)

  19. Parametric instability of a monochromatic Alfven wave: Perpendicular decay in low beta plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Shan, Lican; Wang, Shui; Li, Xing

    2013-07-15

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the parametric decay of a monochromatic Alfven wave in low beta plasma. Both the linearly and left-hand polarized pump Alfven waves are considered in the paper. For the linearly polarized pump Alfven wave, either a parallel or obliquely propagating wave can lead to the decay along the perpendicular direction. Initially, the parametric decay takes place along the propagating direction of the pump wave, and then the decay occurs in the perpendicular direction. With the increase of the amplitude and the propagating angle of the pump wave (the angle between the propagating direction of the pump wave and the ambient magnetic field), the spectral range of the excited waves becomes broad in the perpendicular direction. But the effects of the plasma beta on the spectral range of the excited waves in perpendicular direction are negligible. However, for the left-hand polarized pump Alfven wave, when the pump wave propagates along the ambient magnetic field, the parametric decay occurs nearly along the ambient magnetic field, and there is no obvious decay in the perpendicular direction. Significant decay in the perpendicular direction can only be found when the pump wave propagates obliquely.

  20. Wind-wave measurements in a shallow estuary: Trinity Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupuis, Keith Wade

    2009-05-15

    do not recreate the observed spectral shape for the steady and unsteady conditions. However, the total wave energy is represented in the unsteady conditions. In both the steady and unsteady cases, the wave period is underpredicted by one-half times...

  1. A search of the Orion spur for continuous gravitational waves using a "loosely coherent" algorithm on data from LIGO interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. V. Amariutei; M. Andersen; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; G. Ashton; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; V. Branco; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; M. D. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. R. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. Gonzalez; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; J. Hoelscher-Obermaier; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang; E. A. Huerta; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh

    2015-10-14

    We report results of a wideband search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars within the Orion spur towards both the inner and outer regions of our Galaxy. As gravitational waves interact very weakly with matter, the search is unimpeded by dust and concentrations of stars. One search disk (A) is $6.87^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $20^\\textrm{h}10^\\textrm{m}54.71^\\textrm{s}+33^\\circ33'25.29"$, and the other (B) is $7.45^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $8^\\textrm{h}35^\\textrm{m}20.61^\\textrm{s}-46^\\circ49'25.151"$. We explored the frequency range of 50-1500 Hz and frequency derivative from $0$ to $-5\\times 10^{-9}$ Hz/s. A multi-stage, loosely coherent search program allowed probing more deeply than before in these two regions, while increasing coherence length with every stage. Rigorous followup parameters have winnowed initial coincidence set to only 70 candidates, to be examined manually. None of those 70 candidates proved to be consistent with an isolated gravitational wave emitter, and 95% confidence level upper limits were placed on continuous-wave strain amplitudes. Near $169$ Hz we achieve our lowest 95% CL upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ of $6.3\\times 10^{-25}$, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of $3.4\\times 10^{-24}$ for all polarizations and sky locations.

  2. EVIDENCE FOR THE PHOTOSPHERIC EXCITATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Shelyag, S., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Main Physics Building, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, County Antrim BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-01

    Observing the excitation mechanisms of incompressible transverse waves is vital for determining how energy propagates through the lower solar atmosphere. We aim to show the connection between convectively driven photospheric flows and incompressible chromospheric waves. The observations presented here show the propagation of incompressible motion through the quiet lower solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the chromosphere. We determine photospheric flow vectors to search for signatures of vortex motion and compare results to photospheric flows present in convective simulations. Further, we search for the chromospheric response to vortex motions. Evidence is presented that suggests incompressible waves can be excited by the vortex motions of a strong magnetic flux concentration in the photosphere. A chromospheric counterpart to the photospheric vortex motion is also observed, presenting itself as a quasi-periodic torsional motion. Fine-scale, fibril structures that emanate from the chromospheric counterpart support transverse waves that are driven by the observed torsional motion. A new technique for obtaining details of transverse waves from time-distance diagrams is presented and the properties of transverse waves (e.g., amplitudes and periods) excited by the chromospheric torsional motion are measured.

  3. Note on the stability of viscous roll-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, Blake; Noble, Pascal; Rodrigues, L Miguel; Zumbrun, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The viscous shallow water equations with bottom drag are used to study the stability of roll-waves. In [17], the authors provided a set of spectral assumptions under which periodic wave trains of rather general viscous conservation laws were proved to be nonlinearly stable. Here, we focus on the spectral stability of viscous roll-waves and give a {\\it complete} description of the set of stable roll-waves from their onset at Froude number $\\approx 2$ up to the infinite-Froude limit. This paper is a physically oriented companion paper that extracts the physically relevant content from the rather long and technical paper [6]. We formulate stability results at the onset of the hydrodynamic instability and provide numerical results for intermediate and large Froude numbers. In particular, stable roll-waves at onset have asymptotically large periods whereas there are no stable roll-waves for large Froude numbers. Moreover, the stability region in parameter space for intermediate Froude numbers seems to be governed ...

  4. Linear and Non-Linear Landau Resonance of Kinetic Alfv\\'en Waves: Consequences for Electron Distribution and Wave Spectrum in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudakov, Leonid; Ganguli, Gurudas; Crabtree, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic Alfven wave turbulence in solar wind is considered and it is shown that non-Maxwellian electron distribution function has a significant effect on the dynamics of the solar wind plasmas. Linear Landau damping leads to the formation of a plateau in the parallel electron distribution function which diminishes the Landau damping rate significantly. Nonlinear scattering of waves by plasma particles is generalized to short wavelengths and it is found that for the solar wind parameters this scattering is the dominant process as compared to three wave decay and coalescence in the wave vector range . Incorporation of these effects lead to the steepening of the wave spectrum between the inertial and the dissipation ranges with a spectral index between 2 and 3. This region can be labeled as the scattering range. Such steepening has been observed in the solar wind plasmas.

  5. Evidence for wave heating of the quiet-sun corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2014-11-10

    We have measured the energy and dissipation of Alfvénic waves in the quiet Sun. A magnetic field model was used to infer the location and orientation of the magnetic field lines along which the waves are expected to travel. The waves were measured using spectral lines to infer the wave amplitude. The waves cause a non-thermal broadening of the spectral lines, which can be expressed as a non-thermal velocity v {sub nt}. By combining the spectroscopic measurements with this magnetic field model, we were able to trace the variation of v {sub nt} along the magnetic field. At each footpoint of the quiet-Sun loops, we find that waves inject an energy flux in the range of 1.3-5.5 × 10{sup 5} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. At the minimum of this range, this amounts to more than 80% of the energy needed to heat the quiet Sun. We also find that these waves are dissipated over a region centered on the top of the loops. The position along the loop where the damping begins is strongly correlated with the length of the loop, implying that the damping mechanism depends on the global loop properties rather than on local collisional dissipation.

  6. Effect of long-range transport on local PM10 concentrations in the UK 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverland, Iain J; Tunes, Trygve; Heal, Mathew R; Sozanska, Malgorzata; Elton, Robert A; Agius, Raymond M

    2000-01-01

    This study describes the effects of long-range transport of secondary airborne particles on local PM10 levels in Edinburgh (UK) during the period 1 January to 31 March 1996. Air mass back trajectories for each day were ...

  7. Short-range correlations and neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; O. Civitarese; J. Suhonen; J. Toivanen

    2007-01-18

    In this work we report on the effects of short-range correlations upon the matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay. We focus on the calculation of the matrix elements of the neutrino-mass mode of neutrinoless double beta decays of 48Ca and 76Ge. The nuclear-structure components of the calculation, that is the participant nuclear wave functions, have been calculated in the shell-model scheme for 48Ca and in the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) scheme for 76Ge. We compare the traditional approach of using the Jastrow correlation function with the more complete scheme of the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM). Our results indicate that the Jastrow method vastly exaggerates the effects of short-range correlations on the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

  8. Gravitational-wave Detection With Matter-wave Interferometers Based On Standing Light Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongfeng Gao; Peng Ju; Baocheng Zhang; Mingsheng Zhan

    2011-03-25

    We study the possibility of detecting gravitational-waves with matter-wave interferometers, where atom beams are split, deflected and recombined totally by standing light waves. Our calculation shows that the phase shift is dominated by terms proportional to the time derivative of the gravitational wave amplitude. Taking into account future improvements on current technologies, it is promising to build a matter-wave interferometer detector with desired sensitivity.

  9. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  10. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Several results from numerical investigation of nonlinear waves connected to blood flow in an elastic tube of variable radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka I

    2015-01-01

    We investigate flow of incompressible fluid in a cylindrical tube with elastic walls. The radius of the tube may change along its length. The discussed problem is connected to the blood flow in large human arteries and especially to nonlinear wave propagation due to the pulsations of the heart. The long-wave approximation for modeling of waves in blood is applied. The obtained model Korteweg-deVries equation possessing a variable coefficient is reduced to a nonlinear dynamical system of 3 first order differential equations. The low probability of arising of a solitary wave is shown. Periodic wave solutions of the model system of equations are studied and it is shown that the waves that are consequence of the irregular heart pulsations may be modeled by a sequence of parts of such periodic wave solutions.

  12. Wide-range lock-in amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNeilly, David R. (Maryville, TN)

    1985-01-01

    A lock-in amplifier is provided which allows detection of a signal buried in noise without preprocessing of the input signal. An analog signal multiplier is used to obtain a dc output which is the product of the signal being detected and a high-purity sine wave signal. A reference signal of a known selectable frequency is applied to a sine-wave generator to generate the sine wave of the same frequency. The sine wave is applied to a multiplier through a phase shift arrangement to allow the detection of both amplitude of the detected signal and the phases relative to the reference signal. The multiplier output is filtered by a low-pass filter to eliminate unwanted frequency components from the output signal.

  13. Wide-range lock-in amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNeilly, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A lock-in amplifier is provided which allows detection of a signal buried in noise without preprocessing of the input signal. An analog signal multiplier is used to obtain a dc output which is the product of the signal being detected and a high-purity sine wave signal. A reference signal of a known selectable frequency is applied to a sine-wave generator to generate the sine wave of the same frequency. The sine wave is applied to a multiplier through a phase shift arrangement to allow the detection of both amplitude of the detected signal and the phases relative to the reference signal. The multiplier output is filtered by a low-pass filter to eliminate unwanted frequency components from the output signal.

  14. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  15. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  16. In-phase waves: Their behavior, internal stratification and fabric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheel, R.J. (Brock Univ., St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences); Udri, A. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Geologie)

    1993-03-01

    Experiments were conducted in 0.305m wide, 9m long recirculating sediment flume on a bed of quartz sand (mean diameter of 0.18mm). The experiments included eight runs over the following range of conditions: 0.0605m [<=] depth [<=] 0.068m, 0.51m/s [<=] mean flow velocity [<=] 0.90m/s and 0.63 [<=] Froze Number (F) [<=] 1.1. For F < 0.83 dunes were the dominant bedform and these became longer and lower as F increased. At F = 0.83 the bed was nominally plane but locally and temporarily developed low in-phase waves or dunes. Post-run bed profiles showed symmetrical bedwaves with average length (L) of 0.26m and average height (H) of 0.005m. A complete cycle was characterized by: increased height of bed and water surface waves [r arrow] upstream migration [r arrow] breaking or decay [r arrow] planing of bed surface [r arrow] growth of new in-phase waves (initially migrating downstream and then remaining stationary during continued vertical growth). Each in-phase wave normally behaved independently of other waves although less commonly a breaking wave would trigger breaking of the next downstream wave. For F > 1.0 in-phase waves behaved as described above but a breaking wave would more commonly cause breaking of other waves. With increasing F it became more common for waves to break and rebuild quickly without complete planing of the bed surface. However, complete cycles occurred frequently with the following significant differences: (1) the upstream-migrating antidune developed upstream slopes that approached 25[degree]; (2) planing was accomplished by the rapid migration of a low, asymmetrical bedform through the antidune trough.

  17. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band-gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g. cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be cancelled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime.

  18. An integrable evolution equation for surface waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kraenkel; H. Leblond; M. A. Manna

    2011-01-30

    In order to describe the dynamics of monochromatic surface waves in deep water, we derive a nonlinear and dispersive system of equations for the free surface elevation and the free surface velocity from the Euler equations in infinite depth. From it, and using a multiscale perturbative methods, an asymptotic model for small-aspect-ratio waves is derived. The model is shown to be completely integrable. The Lax pair, the first conserved quantities as well as the symmetries are exhibited. Theoretical and numerical studies reveal that it supports periodic progressive Stokes waves which peak and break in finite time. Comparison between the limiting wave solution of the asymptotic model and classical irrotational results is performed.

  19. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  20. A search of the Orion spur for continuous gravitational waves using a "loosely coherent" algorithm on data from LIGO interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D V; Andersen, M; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Ashton, G; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Branco, V; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M D; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J M; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Germain, V; Ghosh, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez, J; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hoelscher-Obermaier, J; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F

    2015-01-01

    We report results of a wideband search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars within the Orion spur towards both the inner and outer regions of our Galaxy. As gravitational waves interact very weakly with matter, the search is unimpeded by dust and concentrations of stars. One search disk (A) is $6.87^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $20^\\textrm{h}10^\\textrm{m}54.71^\\textrm{s}+33^\\circ33'25.29"$, and the other (B) is $7.45^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $8^\\textrm{h}35^\\textrm{m}20.61^\\textrm{s}-46^\\circ49'25.151"$. We explored the frequency range of 50-1500 Hz and frequency derivative from $0$ to $-5\\times 10^{-9}$ Hz/s. A multi-stage, loosely coherent search program allowed probing more deeply than before in these two regions, while increasing coherence length with every stage. Rigorous followup parameters have winnowed initial coincidence set to only 70 candidates, to be examined manually. None of those 70 candidates proved to be consistent with an isolated gravitational wave em...

  1. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  2. Thermoplastic waves in magnetars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields, which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  3. Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indrebo, Ann Kristin

    2001-01-01

    runup. Laboratory measurements of irregular waves interfering with vertical platform cylinders were used to obtain the Weibull coefficients necessary for the analytical model. Six data sets with different configurations where the wave elevation...

  4. Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuksel, Cem

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

  5. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  6. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    combiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .solutions . . . . . . . . mm-wave imaging for medical and

  7. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Retinal Wave Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Underlying Retinal Wave Generation By Kevin J Ford AUnderlying Retinal Wave Generation By Kevin J Ford Doctor ofwith age, so does the wave generation mechanism. The most

  8. Guided wave monitoring of prestressing tendons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucera, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    and applications of ultrasonic waves. CRC series in pure andStrands by Guided Stress Waves, ASCE Journal of Materials inin Cable Stays via Guided Wave Magnetostrictive Ultrasonics,

  9. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

  10. Super compact equation for water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyachenko, A I; Zakharov, V E

    2015-01-01

    We derive very simple compact equation for gravity water waves which includes nonlinear wave term (`a la NLSE) and advection term (may results in wave breaking).

  11. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  12. Oscillatory Instabilities of Standing Waves in One-Dimensional Nonlinear Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Maria Morgante; Magnus Johansson; Georgios Kopidakis; Serge Aubry

    2000-05-31

    In one-dimensional anharmonic lattices, we construct nonlinear standing waves (SWs) reducing to harmonic SWs at small amplitude. For SWs with spatial periodicity incommensurate with the lattice period, a transition by breaking of analyticity versus wave amplitude is observed. As a consequence of the discreteness, oscillatory linear instabilities, persisting for arbitrarily small amplitude in infinite lattices, appear for all wave numbers Q not equal to zero or \\pi. Incommensurate analytic SWs with |Q|>\\pi/2 may however appear as 'quasi-stable', as their instability growth rate is of higher order.

  13. Detection of electromagnetic waves using charged MEMS structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datskos, Panos G [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Tobin, Jacob D [ORNL; Bowland, Landon T [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We describe micromechanical structures that are capable of sensing both electrostatic fields and electromagnetic fields over a wide frequency range. Typically, sensing of electromagnetic waves is achieved with electrically conducting antennas, which despite the many advantages do not exhibit high sensitivity over a broad frequency range. An important aspect of our present work is that, in contrast to traditional antennas, the dimensions of micromechanical oscillators sensitive to electromagnetic waves can be much smaller than the wavelength. We characterized the micromechanical oscillators and measured responses to electric fields and estimated the performance limits by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio theoretically and experimentally.

  14. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Model study of waves generated by convection with direct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Model study of waves generated circulation, structure and stability on a global scale. Gravity waves can be generated by convection, the authors examine an event on January 12, 2003, when convective waves were clearly generated by a period

  15. Generating Electromagnetic Waves from Gravity Waves in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Hogan; S. O'Farrell

    2009-05-18

    Examples of test electromagnetic waves on a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker(FLRW) background are constructed from explicit perturbations of the FLRW space-times describing gravitational waves propagating in the isotropic universes. A possible physical mechanism for the production of the test electromagnetic waves is shown to be the coupling of the gravitational waves with a test magnetic field, confirming the observation of Marklund, Dunsby and Brodin [Phys.Rev. D62,101501(R) (2000)].

  16. Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Donald Eugene

    1962-01-01

    WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

  17. Parameter estimation on gravitational waves from neutron-star binaries with spinning components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farr, Ben; Farr, Will M; Haster, Carl-Johan; Middleton, Hannah; Cannon, Kipp; Graff, Philip B; Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Pankow, Chris; Price, Larry R; Sidery, Trevor; Singer, Leo P; Urban, Alex L; Vecchio, Alberto; Veitch, John; Vitale, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Inspiraling binary neutron stars are expected to be one of the most significant sources of gravitational-wave signals for the new generation of advanced ground-based detectors. Advanced LIGO will begin operation in 2015 and we investigate how well we could hope to measure properties of these binaries should a detection be made in the first observing period. We study an astrophysically motivated population of sources (binary components with masses $1.2~\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$-$1.6~\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ and spins of less than $0.05$) using the full LIGO analysis pipeline. While this simulated population covers the observed range of potential binary neutron-star sources, we do not exclude the possibility of sources with parameters outside these ranges; given the existing uncertainty in distributions of mass and spin, it is critical that analyses account for the full range of possible mass and spin configurations. We find that conservative prior assumptions on neutron-star mass and spin lead to average fractional uncertain...

  18. LONG WAVE EXPANSIONS FOR WATER WAVES OVER RANDOM TOPOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LONG WAVE EXPANSIONS FOR WATER WAVES OVER RANDOM TOPOGRAPHY ANNE DE BOUARD 1 , WALTER CRAIG 2 with the ran­ dom bottom. We show that the resulting influence of the random topography is expressed in terms of bottom topography a#ects the equations describing the limit of solutions in the long wave regime. We

  19. Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived from hydrodynamics and the adia- batic relation between pressure and density. The equation for conservation of mass, Euler's equation (Newton's 2nd Law), and the adiabatic equation of state are respec

  20. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  1. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  2. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  3. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  4. Target Tracking with Limited Sensing Range in Autonomous Mobile Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to evaluated performance and demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed strategy. Index Terms--Mobile Sensor, such as infrared or ultrasonic waves. When the target is within the sensing range of the sensors, it can, passive infrared (PIR) sensors can detect the 1The work is partially supported by NSFC under Grants

  5. Antennas in the optical range will improve the efficiency of light-emitting devices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novotny, Lukas

    Antennas in the optical range will improve the efficiency of light-emitting devices. The purpose of optical antennas is to convert the energy of free propagat- ing radiation to localized energy, and vice versa. Although this is similar to what radio wave and microwave antennas do, optical antennas exploit

  6. Spectroscopy of formaldehyde in the 30140-30790cm^-1 range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motsch, Michael; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Schmitt, Michael; Meerts, W Leo; Pinkse, Pepijn W H; Rempe, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Room-temperature absorption spectroscopy of formaldehyde has been performed in the 30140-30790cm^-1 range. Using tunable ultraviolet continuous-wave laser light, individual rotational lines are well resolved in the Doppler-broadened spectrum. Making use of genetic algorithms, the main features of the spectrum are reproduced. Spectral data is made available as Supporting Information.

  7. Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

  8. Efficient Evaluation of Doubly Periodic Green Functions in 3D Scattering, Including Wood Anomaly Frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar P. Bruno; Stephen P. Shipman; Catalin Turc; Stephanos Venakides

    2013-07-04

    We present efficient methods for computing wave scattering by diffraction gratings that exhibit two-dimensional periodicity in three dimensional (3D) space. Applications include scattering in acoustics, electromagnetics and elasticity. Our approach uses boundary-integral equations. The quasi-periodic Green function is a doubly infinite sum of scaled 3D free-space outgoing Helmholtz Green functions. Their source points are located at the nodes of a periodicity lattice of the grating. For efficient numerical computation of the lattice sum, we employ a smooth truncation. Super-algebraic convergence to the Green function is achieved as the truncation radius increases, except at frequency-wavenumber pairs at which a Rayleigh wave is at exactly grazing incidence to the grating. At these "Wood frequencies", the term in the Fourier series representation of the Green function that corresponds to the grazing Rayleigh wave acquires an infinite coefficient and the lattice sum blows up. At Wood frequencies, we modify the Green function by adding two types of terms to it. The first type adds weighted spatial shifts of the Green function to itself with singularities below the grating; this yields algebraic convergence. The second-type terms are quasi-periodic plane wave solutions of the Helmholtz equation. They reinstate (with controlled coefficients) the grazing modes, effectively eliminated by the terms of first type. These modes are needed in the Green function for guaranteeing the well-posedness of the boundary-integral equation that yields the scattered field. We apply this approach to acoustic scattering by a doubly periodic 2D grating near and at Wood frequencies and scattering by a doubly periodic array of scatterers away from Wood frequencies.

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 58, NO. 5, MAY 2010 1273 Automated Broadband High-Dynamic-Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the dynamic range is 106 dB, limited by carrier phase noise. A single-tone cancellation formula is developed with respect to system linearity. Feedforward cancellation and consideration of electro- magnetic radiation coupling and reverse-wave isolation effects extends the dynamic range of spectrum and vector analyzers

  10. Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

    2012-01-05

    We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

  11. Ulysses observations of magnetic waves due to newborn interstellar pickup ions. II. Application of turbulence concepts to limiting wave energy and observability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-06-01

    The low-frequency magnetic waves that arise from the isotropization of newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) are reasonably well described by linear and quasi-linear kinetic theory in so far as those theories predict the wave frequency and polarization in the spacecraft frame. Those theories fail to describe the scarce observability of the waves. Quasilinear theory predicts that the wave power should accumulate over long periods of time as the relatively weak kinetic instability slowly adds power to the observed spectrum. At the same time it has been argued that the same wave energy must serve as a secondary source of thermal ion heating in the outer heliosphere once the initial turbulence is depleted. To the extent that turbulent transport of the wave energy acts against the spectrally confined accumulation of wave energy, turbulence should be a limiting factor in observability. We argue that turbulence does limit the observability of the waves and we use turbulence theory to predict the observed wave energy. We compare this prediction against a database of 502 wave observations attributed to newborn interstellar PUIs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft.

  12. The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeder, Michael J.; Lane, Todd P.; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen

    2013-09-27

    All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection. The wave activity is strongest in the lower stratosphere below 22 km and, during the suppressed monsoon period, is modulated with a 3-4-day period. The concentration of the wave activity in the lower stratosphere is consistent with the properties of the environment in which these waves propagate, whereas its 3-4-day modulation is explained by the variation of the convection activity in the TWP-ICE domain. At low rainfall intensity the wave activity increases as rainfall intensity increases. At high values of rainfall intensity, however, the wave activity associated with deep convective clouds is independent of the rainfall intensity. The convection and gravity waves observed during TWP-ICE are simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. These simulations are compared with radiosonde observations described above and are used to determine some of the properties of convectively generated gravity waves. The gravity waves appear to be well simulated by the model. The model is used to explore the relationships between the convection, the gravity waves and cirrus.

  13. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California, State and Federal Agencies and their expectations in respect to potential wave power deployments Jim a huge amount of wave measurement data from various data sources Asfaw Beyene of the Department

  14. Water wave interactions Walter Craig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomann, Laurent

    Water wave interactions Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics ´EquationsMaster University) Water wave interactions 25 janvier 2011 1 / 34 #12;Joint work with: Philippe Guyenne University, Killam Research Fellows Program, Fields Institute Walter Craig (McMaster University) Water wave

  15. Extreme wave impinging and overtopping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2009-06-02

    This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

  16. 2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NHESSD 2, 7017­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  17. 2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker will produce nothing noteworthy. But, if the phase relationship is correct, standing waves can be formed

  18. Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Bakhtiari, Sasan (Bolingbrook, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Dieckman, Stephen L. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

  19. Excitation of surface waves by a short laser pulse in a conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uryupin, S A [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Frolov, A A [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-31

    We have studied the possibility of exciting surface waves in a conductor, which is irradiated by a focused femtosecond laser pulse incident along the normal to the surface. The time-dependent ponderomotive force is shown to lead to the excitation of surface waves in the terahertz frequency range. It is also shown that the total energy and the pulse amplitude of the surface waves increases with increasing effective electron collision frequency. (terahertz radiation)

  20. Scattering of radio frequency waves by blobs in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis

    2013-05-15

    The density fluctuations and blobs present in the edge region of magnetic fusion devices can scatter radio frequency (RF) waves through refraction, reflection, diffraction, and coupling to other plasma waves. This, in turn, affects the spectrum of the RF waves and the electromagnetic power that reaches the core of the plasma. The usual geometric optics analysis of RF scattering by density blobs accounts for only refractive effects. It is valid when the amplitude of the fluctuations is small, of the order of 10%, compared to the background density. In experiments, density fluctuations with much larger amplitudes are routinely observed, so that a more general treatment of the scattering process is needed. In this paper, a full-wave model for the scattering of RF waves by a blob is developed. The full-wave approach extends the range of validity well beyond that of geometric optics; however, it is theoretically and computationally much more challenging. The theoretical procedure, although similar to that followed for the Mie solution of Maxwell's equations, is generalized to plasmas in a magnetic field. Besides diffraction and reflection, the model includes coupling to a different plasma wave than the one imposed by the external antenna structure. In the model, it is assumed that the RF waves interact with a spherical blob. The plasma inside and around the blob is cold, homogeneous, and imbedded in a uniform magnetic field. After formulating the complete analytical theory, the effect of the blob on short wavelength electron cyclotron waves and longer wavelength lower hybrid waves is studied numerically.

  1. Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since radar involves the transmission, propagation and scattering of EM waves by various is the electrostatic force between two point charges. #12;Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves Electric fields

  2. Resonant Combinatorial Frequency Generation Induced by a PT-symmetric Periodic Layered Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shramkova, Oksana V

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction of waves in PT-symmetric periodic stacks with an embedded nonlinear anisotropic dielectric layer illuminated by plane waves of two tones is examined. The three-wave interaction technique is applied to study the nonlinear processes. It is shown that the intensity of the three-wave mixing process can be significantly enhanced in resonant cavities based on PT-symmetric periodic structures, especially as the pumping wave frequency is near the coherent perfect absorber-lasing resonances. The main mechanisms and properties of the combinatorial frequency generation and emission from the stacks are illustrated by the simulation results and the effect of the layer arrangement in PT-symmetric walls of resonator on the stack nonlinear response is discussed. The enhanced efficiency of the frequency conversion at Wolf-Bragg resonances is demonstrated. It has been shown that Wolf-Bragg resonances of very high orders may lead to the global maxima and nulls of the scattered field. The analysis of th...

  3. Parameterised Electromagnetic Scattering Solutions for a Range of Incident Wave Angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    reduction in the computational costs. Reduced--order approximations operate in two stages. In an initial off of these computations are stored. In an on­line stage, specified outputs of interest are computed at low cost for new in determining the scattering width distribution for a new design. Computational methods can provide assistance

  4. S-wave scattering lengths and effective ranges for collisions of ground state Be atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, M.J.

    Jamieson,M.J. Cheung,A.S.C. Ouerdane,H. Jeung,G.H. Geum,N. Journal of Physics B, Volume 40 pp 3497-3504

  5. The Generation of Coronal Loop Waves below the Photosphere by p-Mode Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley W. Hindman; Rekha Jain

    2008-05-13

    Recent observations of coronal-loop waves by TRACE and within the corona as a whole by CoMP clearly indicate that the dominant oscillation period is 5 minutes, thus implicating the solar p modes as a possible source. We investigate the generation of tube waves within the solar convection zone by the buffeting of p modes. The tube waves--in the form of longitudinal sausage waves and transverse kink waves--are generated on the many magnetic fibrils that lace the convection zone and pierce the solar photosphere. Once generated by p-mode forcing, the tube waves freely propagate up and down the tubes, since the tubes act like light fibers and form a waveguide for these magnetosonic waves. Those waves that propagate upward pass through the photosphere and enter the upper atmosphere where they can be measured as loop oscillations and other forms of propagating coronal waves. We treat the magnetic fibrils as vertically aligned, thin flux tubes and compute the energy flux of tube waves that can generated and driven into the upper atmosphere. We find that a flux in excess of 10^5 ergs/cm^2/s can be produced, easily supplying enough wave energy to explain the observations. Furthermore, we compute the associated damping rate of the driving p modes and find that the damping is significant compared to observed line widths only for the lowest order p modes.

  6. Chiral Heat Wave and wave mixing in chiral media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chernodub, M N

    2015-01-01

    We show that a hot rotating fluid of relativistic chiral fermions possesses a new gapless collective excitation associated with coherent propagation of energy density and chiral density waves along the axis of rotation. This excitation, which we call the Chiral Heat Wave, emerges due to a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. At finite density the Chiral Heat Wave couples to the Chiral Vortical Wave while in the presence of an external magnetic field it mixes with the Chiral Magnetic Wave. We find that the coupled waves - which are coherent fluctuations of the vector, axial and energy currents - have generally different velocities compared to the velocities of the individual waves. We also demonstrate that rotating chiral systems subjected to external magnetic field possess non-propagating metastable thermal excitations, the Dense Hot Spots.

  7. Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records of Swiss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records 2014 #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Index 1 Long-period pulses in records 2 Motivation for the study 3 Developed program 4 Results #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed

  8. Interrogation of a long-period grating using a mechanically scannable arrayed waveguide grating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jianping

    ); published July 16, 2008 A novel technique to interrogate a long-period grating (LPG) using a mechanically of the LPG is measured. An interrogation system with a resolution of 10 pm at a speed of 10 Hz-period-grating (LPG) sensors have found exten- sive applications ranging from temperature monitor- ing, mechanical

  9. Efficient Solvers for Nonlinear Time-Periodic Eddy Current F. Bachinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoeberl, Joachim

    Efficient Solvers for Nonlinear Time-Periodic Eddy Current Problems F. Bachinger U. Langer J. Sch-periodic eddy current problems, ranging from the description of the nonlinearity to an efficient solution setup, the magnetic field and the thereby generated eddy currents hardly penetrate into conducting

  10. Two Problems in Computational Wave Dynamics: Klemp-Wilhelmson Splitting at Large Scales and Wave-Wave Instabilities in Rotating Mountain Waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viner, Kevin Carl

    2011-02-22

    IN COMPUTATIONAL WAVE DYNAMICS: KLEMP-WILHELMSON SPLITTING AT LARGE SCALES AND WAVE-WAVE INSTABILITIES IN ROTATING MOUNTAIN WAVES A Dissertation by KEVIN CARL VINER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences TWO PROBLEMS IN COMPUTATIONAL WAVE DYNAMICS: KLEMP-WILHELMSON SPLITTING AT LARGE SCALES AND WAVE-WAVE INSTABILITIES IN ROTATING MOUNTAIN WAVES A Dissertation...

  11. Plate damage identification using wave propagation and impedance methods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wait, J. R. (Jeannette R.); Park, G. H. (Gyu Hae); Sohn, H. (Hoon); Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates an integrated approach for identifying structural damage in an aluminum plate. Piezoelectric (PZT) materials are used to actuatehense the dynamic response of the structure. Two damage identification techniques are integrated in this study, including Lamb wave propagations and impedance methods. In Lamb wave propagations, one PZT launches an elastic wave through the structure, and responses are measured by an array of PZT sensors. The changes in both wave attenuation and reflection are used to detect and locate the damage. The impedance method monitors the variations in structural mechanical impedance, which is coupled with the electrical impedance of the PZT. Both methods operate in high frequency ranges at which there are measurable changes in structural responses even for incipient damage such as small cracks or loose connections. This paper summarizes two methods used for damage identification, experimental procedures, and additional issues that can be used as a guideline for future investigations.

  12. Gravitational waves from gamma-ray pulsar glitches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stopnitzky, Elan; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    We use data from pulsar gamma-ray glitches recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope as input to theoretical models of gravitational wave signals the glitches might generate. We find that the typical peak amplitude of the gravity wave signal from gamma-ray pulsar glitches lies between 10{sup –23} and 10{sup –35} in dimensionless units, with peak frequencies in the range of 1 to 1000 Hz, depending on the model. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for all gamma-ray glitches, and discuss detectability with current gravity wave detectors. Our results indicate that the strongest predicted signals are potentially within reach of current detectors, and that pulsar gamma-ray glitches are promising targets for gravity wave searches by current and next-generation detectors.

  13. Fully Coupled Electromechanical Elastodynamic Model for Guided Wave Propagation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2013-01-01

    Physics-based computational models play a key role in the study of wave propagation for structural health monitoring (SHM) and the development of improved damage detection methodologies. Due to the complex nature of guided waves, accurate and efficient computation tools are necessary to investigate the mechanisms responsible for dispersion, coupling, and interaction with damage. In this paper, a fully coupled electromechanical elastodynamic model for wave propagation in a heterogeneous, anisotropic material system is developed. The final framework provides the full three dimensional displacement and electrical potential fields for arbitrary plate and transducer geometries and excitation waveform and frequency. The model is validated theoretically and proven computationally efficient. Studies are performed with surface bonded piezoelectric sensors to gain insight into the physics of experimental techniques used for SHM. Collocated actuation of the fundamental Lamb wave modes is modeled over a range of frequenc...

  14. A Periodic Solution to Impulsive Logistic Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyong-Chol Kim; Hyong-Chol O; Sang-Mun Kim; Chol Kim

    2014-03-28

    In this paper is provided a new representation of periodic solution to the impulsive Logistic equation considered in [7].

  15. Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Showalter, Kenneth

    Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves P. Junga the threshold of pat- tern formation, noise can sustain locally coherent pat- terns. The patterns exhibit of nonequilibrium statistical phys- ics, noise has been recognized to play an important role in the formation

  16. ISABE-2005-1214 Optimum Applications of Four-Port Wave Rotors for Gas Turbines Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Norbert

    1 ISABE-2005-1214 Optimum Applications of Four-Port Wave Rotors for Gas Turbines Enhancement Emmett investigations on wave rotor applications for gas turbines have been published, among them conceptual, analytical in the gas turbine industry. The results and conclusions are derived from a wide- range multi

  17. Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan June 26, 2014 For a couple of years now, we have been waiting to get started on the next nuclear physics long range plan (LRP). What does that mean?...

  18. Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles Spencer Bloch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloch, Spencer

    K0(X) = CHp (X)Q Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3, 2014 Albert) CHp(X, n) := H-n(Zp(X, ·)). Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3, 2014 ) - Zp (X) CHp(X, n) := H-n(Zp(X, ·)). Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3

  1. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cabaret; P. Béquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

    2015-01-09

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  2. Transmission of a quantum state in a periodically poled nonlinear crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjit Singh

    2010-05-03

    Theoretical calculations on transmission of quantum states such as Schr\\"{o}dinger cat (SC) states are considered in a periodically poled nonlinear crystal (PPNC). Combinations of various initial states (SC, coherent (C),and vacuum (V)) of light waves at frequencies $\\omega_{e}$ and $3\\omega_{e}$ at the input of a PPNC are studied. It is shown that the transmission and interference between superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states can be achieved by using a PPNC. Visualization and analyzes of transmission and interference processes are demonstrated with the help of reduced Wigner quasi-probability distribution functions of considered light waves.

  3. Soliton Staircases and Standing Strain Waves in Confined Colloidal Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Hang Chui; Surajit Sengupta; Kurt Binder

    2009-12-07

    We show by computer simulation of a two-dimensional crystal confined by corrugated walls that confinement can be used to impose a controllable mesoscopic superstructure of predominantly mechanical elastic character. Due to an interplay of the particle density of the system and the width D of the confining channel, "soliton staircases" can be created along both parallel confining boundaries, that give rise to standing strain waves in the entire crystal. The periodicity of these waves is of the same order as D. This mechanism should be useful for structure formation in the self-assembly of various nanoscopic materials.

  4. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  5. Fractional Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

    2011-08-31

    In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

  6. wave velocity group velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    -11 3.5e-11 4e-11 4.5e-11 5e-11 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 location(nm) temperature(K) wave location 15 20 25 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 numberdensity(a.u.) frequency (THz) Summary Model Simulation Results Context. - Seitz and Koehler (1956) solve Boltzmann transport equations Monte Carlo approach is used to· 90 100 3e

  7. DNA waves and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

    2010-12-23

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

  8. Simulations of table-top watt-class 1?THz radiation sources with two-section periodic structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Weihao, E-mail: liuwhao@ustc.edu.cn; Xu, Zhengyuan [School of Information Science and Technology, and Optical Wireless Communication and Network Center, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China)

    2014-01-07

    Two types of terahertz sources with two-section periodical waveguide structure are studied by simulations. The operation frequency of the rear section (section-II) is the fourth harmonic of that of the front section (section-I), and section-II can operate both in the forward wave region and backward wave region. The critical factor that may affect the proper functioning of this kind of sources—overbunching—is discussed, and the corresponding solutions are proposed. These sources, with millimeter in length, can generate 1?THz wave radiation with power over 1?W, so, they are promising table-top and relatively high power terahertz sources.

  9. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S.

    2014-02-18

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

  10. Short-range correlations in isospin symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter: a microscopic perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Sammarruca

    2014-12-05

    Short-range correlations in nuclear and neutron matter are examined through the properties of the correlated wave function obtained by solving the Bethe-Goldstone equation. Tensor correlations are explored through the dominant tensor-driven transition and central correlations through the singlet and triplet S waves. Predictions from a popular meson-theoretic nucleon-nucleon potential employed in the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach are compared with those from two- and three-body high-quality chiral interactions in Brueckner G-matrix calculations. Short-range correlations in symmetric matter are remarkably stronger than in neutron matter. It is found that short-range correlations are very model dependent and have a large impact on the symmetry energy above normal density.

  11. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: Wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argonov, V. Yu.

    2014-11-15

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field can suppress packet splitting for some atoms whose specific velocities are in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. We also demonstrate that the modulated field can not only trap but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensemble having wide initial velocity and energy distributions. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while the trapped atoms have a narrow energy distribution.

  12. On the so-called rogue waves in the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y Charles

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of a rogue water wave is still unknown. One popular conjecture is that the Peregrine wave solution of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) provides a mechanism. A Peregrine wave solution can be obtained by taking the infinite spatial period limit to the homoclinic solutions. In this article, from the perspective of the phase space structure of these homoclinic orbits in the infinite dimensional phase space where the NLS defines a dynamical system, we exam the observability of these homoclinic orbits (and their approximations). Our conclusion is that these approximate homoclinic orbits are the most observable solutions,and they should correspond to the most common deep ocean waves rather than the rare rogue waves. We also discuss other possibilities for the mechanism of a rogue wave: rough dependence on initial data or finite time blow up.

  13. On the so-called rogue waves in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Charles Li

    2015-11-02

    The mechanism of a rogue water wave is still unknown. One popular conjecture is that the Peregrine wave solution of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) provides a mechanism. A Peregrine wave solution can be obtained by taking the infinite spatial period limit to the homoclinic solutions. In this article, from the perspective of the phase space structure of these homoclinic orbits in the infinite dimensional phase space where the NLS defines a dynamical system, we exam the observability of these homoclinic orbits (and their approximations). Our conclusion is that these approximate homoclinic orbits are the most observable solutions,and they should correspond to the most common deep ocean waves rather than the rare rogue waves. We also discuss other possibilities for the mechanism of a rogue wave: rough dependence on initial data or finite time blow up.

  14. Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kuridze; T. V. Zaqarashvili

    2007-03-19

    Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

  15. Semiclassical wave functions and energy spectra in polygon billiards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Giller

    2014-12-01

    A consistent scheme of semiclassical quantization in polygon billiards by wave function formalism is presented. It is argued that it is in the spirit of the semiclassical wave function formalism to make necessary rationalization of respective quantities accompanied the procedure of the semiclassical quantization in polygon billiards. Unfolding rational polygon billiards (RPB) into corresponding Riemann surfaces (RS) periodic structures of the latter are demonstrated with 2g independent periods on the respective multitori with g as their genuses. However it is the two dimensional real space of the real linear combinations of these periods which is used for quantizing RPB. A class of doubly rational polygon billiards (DRPB) is distinguished for which these real linear relations are rational and their semiclassical quantization by wave function formalism is presented. It is shown that semiclassical quantization of both the classical momenta and the energy spectra are determined completely by periodic structure of the corresponding RS. Each RS is then reduced to elementary polygon patterns (EPP) as its basic periodic elements. Each such EPP can be glued to a torus of genus g. Semiclassical wave functions (SWF) are then constructed on EPP. The SWF for DRPB appear to be exact. They satisfy the Dirichlet, the Neumannn or the mixed boundary conditions. Not every mixing is allowed however and a respective incompleteness of SWF is discussed. Dens families of DRPB are used for approximate semiclassical quantization of RPB. General rational polygons are quantized by approximating them by DRPB. An extension of the formalism to irrational polygons is described as well. The semiclassical approximations constructed in the paper are controlled by general criteria of the eigenvalue theory. A relation between the superscar solutions and SWF constructed in the paper is also discussed.

  16. Detection of superimposed periodic signals using wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Otazu; M. Ribo; M. Peracaula; J. M. Paredes; J. Nunez

    2002-02-05

    In this paper we present a wavelet based algorithm that is able to detect superimposed periodic signals in data with low signal-noise ratio. In this context, the results given by classical period determination methods highly depend on the intrinsic characteristics of each periodic signal, like amplitude or profile. It is then difficult to detect the different periods present in the data set. The results given by the wavelet based method for period determination we present here are independent of the characteristics of the signals.

  17. Gravity surface wave turbulence in a laboratory flume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Denissenko; Sergei Lukaschuk; Sergey Nazarenko

    2006-11-08

    We present experimental results for water wave turbulence excited by piston-like programmed wavemakers in a water flume with horisontal dimensions 6x12x1.5 meters. Our main finding is that for a wide range of excitation amplitudes the energy spectrum has a power-law scaling, $E_\\omega \\sim \\omega^{-\

  18. An acoustic wave equation based on viscoelasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Hanyga

    2014-01-30

    An acoustic wave equation for pressure accounting for viscoelastic attenuation is derived from viscoelastic equations of motion. It is assumed that the relaxation moduli are completely monotonic. The acoustic equation differs significantly from the equations proposed by Szabo (1994) and in several other papers. Integral representations of dispersion and attenuation are derived. General properties and asymptotic behavior of attenuation and dispersion in the low and high frequency range are studied. The results are compatible with experiments. The relation between the asymptotic properties of attenuation and wavefront singularities is examined. The theory is applied to some classes of viscoelastic models and to the quasi-linear attenuation reported in seismology.

  19. Detection of electromagnetic waves using MEMS antennas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL] [ORNL; Tobin, [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bowland, Landon T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and characterization of simple micromechanical structures that are capable of sensing static electric time varying electromagnetic fields. Time varying electric field sensing is usually achieved using an electromagnetic antenna and a receiver. However, these antenna-based approaches do not exhibit high sensitivity over a broad frequency (or wavelength) range. An important aspect of the present work is that, in contrast to traditional antennas, the dimensions of these micromechanical oscillators can be much smaller than the wavelength of the electromagnetic wave. We characterized the fabricated micromechanical oscillators by measuring their responses to time varying electric and electromagnetic fields.

  20. MAGNETIC HELICITY IN THE DISSIPATION RANGE OF STRONG IMBALANCED TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markovskii, S. A.; Vasquez, Bernard J. E-mail: bernie.vasquez@unh.edu

    2013-05-01

    Hybrid numerical simulations of freely decaying two-dimensional turbulence are presented. The background magnetic field is perpendicular to the simulation plane, which eliminates linear kinetic Alfven waves from the system. The net magnetic helicity of the initial fluctuations at large scales is zero. The turbulence is set to be imbalanced in the sense that the net cross-helicity is not zero. As the turbulence evolves, it develops nonzero magnetic helicity at smaller scales, in the proton kinetic range. In the quasi-steady state of evolution, the magnetic helicity spectrum has a peak consistent with the solar wind observations. The peak position depends on the plasma beta and correlates with a sharp decline of the cross-helicity spectrum.

  1. Laser-Ranging Long Baseline Differential Atom Interferometers for Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    High sensitivity differential atom interferometers are promising for precision measurements in science frontiers in space, including gravity field mapping for Earth science studies and gravitational wave detection. We propose a new configuration of twin atom interferometers connected by a laser ranging interferometer (LRI-AI) to provide precise information of the displacements between the two AI reference mirrors and a means to phase-lock the two independent interferometer lasers over long distances, thereby further enhancing the feasibility of long baseline differential atom interferometers. We show that a properly implemented LRI-AI can achieve equivalent functionality to the conventional differential atom interferometer measurement system. LRI-AI isolates the laser requirements for atom interferometers and for optical phase readout between distant locations, thus enabling optimized allocation of available laser power within a limited physical size and resource budget. A unique aspect of LRI-AI also enables...

  2. Design of a low-cost underwater acoustic modem for short- range sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Bridget

    2010-01-01

    Radio Frequency Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nov 1967. [36] T. Shelley, Radio waves transmit informationMicrowave IR FM AM Long radio waves Radio waves Wavelength (

  3. Long-range memory and multifractality in gold markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mali, Provash

    2015-01-01

    Long-range correlation and fluctuation in the gold market time series of world's two leading gold consuming countries, namely China and India, are studied. For both the market series during the period 1985-2013 we observe a long-range persistence of memory in the sequences of maxima (minima) of returns in successive time windows of fixed length, but the series as a whole are found to be uncorrelated. Multifractal analysis for these series as well as for the sequences of maxima (minima) is carried out in terms of the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) method. We observe a weak multifractal structure for the original series that is mainly originated from the fat-tailed probability distribution function of the values, and the multifractal nature of the original time series is enriched into their sequences of maximal (minimal) returns. A quantitative measure of multifractality is provided by using a set of "complexity parameters".

  4. Abstract--A hybrid wave-pipeline multiplier architecture is described in this paper. Mathematical analysis is provided to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Frias, José G.

    Abstract-- A hybrid wave-pipeline multiplier architecture is described in this paper. Mathematical analysis is provided to show the performance gains possible with hybrid wave-pipeline over conventional pipeline architectures. The clock period in conventional pipeline scheme is proportional to the maximum

  5. THE DECAYING LONG-PERIOD OSCILLATION OF A STELLAR MEGAFLARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anfinogentov, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Mathioudakis, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Kowalski, A. F.

    2013-08-20

    We analyze and interpret the oscillatory signal in the decay phase of the U-band light curve of a stellar megaflare observed on 2009 January 16 on the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. The oscillation is well approximated by an exponentially decaying harmonic function. The period of the oscillation is found to be 32 minutes, the decay time about 46 minutes, and the relative amplitude 15%. As this observational signature is typical of the longitudinal oscillations observed in solar flares at extreme ultraviolet and radio wavelengths, associated with standing slow magnetoacoustic waves, we suggest that this megaflare may be of a similar nature. In this scenario, macroscopic variations of the plasma parameters in the oscillations modulate the ejection of non-thermal electrons. The phase speed of the longitudinal (slow magnetoacoustic) waves in the flaring loop or arcade, the tube speed, of about 230 km s{sup -1} would require a loop length of about 200 Mm. Other mechanisms, such as standing kink oscillations, are also considered.

  6. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data B. Abbott,15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, David B.

    . Billingsley,15 R. Biswas,50 E. Black,15 K. Blackburn,15 L. Blackburn,18 D. Blair,49 B. Bland,16 J. Bogenstahl. Kozak,15 B. Krishnan,1 P. Kwee,14 P. K. Lam,4 M. Landry,16 B. Lantz,31 A. Lazzarini,15 B. Lee,49 M. Lei

  7. Ultrasonic wave propagation through a layer of spherical inclusions with random of periodic arrangements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Nathan Allan

    1994-01-01

    (NDE) of materials has become an important means by which the properties of materials can be determined. With the increase in the use of composites as structural elements, the value of these NDE techniques has increased. In order to perform...

  8. A Novel Low-Loss Slow-Wave CPW Periodic Structure for Filter Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    matched. The structure is applied to realize a miniature lowpass filter one-tenth the size of conventional, such as by drilling holes in the substrate or by etching patterns in the microstrip ground plane [8]. Because

  9. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  10. SOLITARY-WAVE AND MULTI-PULSED TRAVELING-WAVE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-00-81

    ential equations which model waves in a horizontal water channel traveling in ... undisturbed water depth and ? lies in [0,1]. ..... We content ourselves with.

  11. Plane wave solution for elastic wave scattering by a heterogeneous ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-05-28

    tory ultrasonic transmission tests across a synthetic fracture with known, regular geometry, Myer et al. 19855 found good agreement between measured waves ...

  12. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Nearshore Wave Propagation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Converter Effects on Nearshore Wave Propagation Jesse Roberts 1 , Grace Chang *2 , Craig Jones *3 Sandia National Laboratories 1515 Eubank SE, Albuquerque, NM 87123 USA 1...

  13. Deep-water gravity waves: nonlinear theory of wave groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mindlin, I M

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear initial-boundary value problem on deep-water gravity waves of finite amplitude is solved approximately (up to small terms of higher order) assuming that the waves are generated by an initial disturbance to the water and the horizontal dimensions of the initially disturbed body of the water are much larger than the magnitude of the free surface displacement. A numerable set of specific free surface waves is obtained in closed form and it is shown that free surface waves produced by an arbitrary initial disturbance to the water is a combination (not superposition: the waves are nonlinear) of the specific waves. A set of dispersive wave packets is found with one-to-one correspondence between the packets and positive integers, say, packet numbers, such that any initial free surface displacement gradually disintegrates into a number (limited or unlimited, depending on initial conditions) of the wave packets. The greater the packet number, the shorter the wavelength of the packet's carrier wave component,...

  14. Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and cost-effective electricity from clean energy resources, including water. Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which generate power from waves, tides, or...

  15. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Spencer

    2010-01-01

    and ?tting a straight line. Radio waves are refracted signi?We note that while radio waves are refracted downward inwaves, similar to radio waves, propagate with small (

  16. Acoustic wave propagation through a supercooled liquid: A normal mode analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Matsuoka; Hideyuki Mizuno; Ryoichi Yamamoto

    2012-10-17

    The mechanism of acoustic wave propagation in supercooled liquids is not yet fully understood since the vibrational dynamics of supercooled liquids are strongly affected by their amorphous inherent structures. In this paper, the acoustic wave propagation in a supercooled model liquid is studied by using normal mode analysis. Due to the highly disordered inherent structure, a single acoustic wave is decomposed into many normal modes in broad frequency range. This causes the rapid decay of the acoustic wave and results in anomalous wavenumber dependency of the dispersion relation and the rate of attenuation.

  17. LIGO and the Search for Gravitational Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Norna A.

    2006-10-16

    Gravitational waves, predicted to exist by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity but as yet undetected, are expected to be emitted during violent astrophysical events such as supernovae, black hole interactions and the coalescence of compact binary systems. Their detection and study should lead to a new branch of astronomy. However the experimental challenge is formidable: ground-based detection relies on sensing displacements of order 10{sup -18} m over a frequency range of tens of hertz to a few kHz. There is currently a large international effort to commission and operate long baseline interferometric detectors including those that comprise LIGO - the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory - in the USA. In this talk I will give an introduction to the topic of gravitational wave detection and in particular review the status of the LIGO project which is currently taking data at its design sensitivity. I will also look to the future to consider planned improvements in sensitivity for such detectors, focusing on Advanced LIGO, the proposed upgrade to the LIGO project.

  18. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  19. Elements of Radio Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank G. Borg; Ismo Hakala; Jukka Määttälä

    2007-12-24

    We present a summary of the basic properties of the radio wave generation, propagation and reception, with a special attention to the gigahertz bandwidth region which is of interest for wireless sensor networks. We also present some measurement results which use the so-called RSSI indicator in order to track how the field strength varies with position and distance of the transceivers. We hope the paper may be useful to anyone who looks for a quick review of the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory with application to antennas.

  20. A dimension-breaking phenomenon for water waves with weak surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark D. Groves; Shu-Ming Sun; Erik Wahlén

    2014-11-10

    It is well known that the water-wave problem with weak surface tension has small-amplitude line solitary-wave solutions which to leading order are described by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The present paper contains an existence theory for three-dimensional periodically modulated solitary-wave solutions which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of propagation and are periodic in the transverse direction; they emanate from the line solitary waves in a dimension-breaking bifurcation. In addition, it is shown that the line solitary waves are linearly unstable to long-wavelength transverse perturbations. The key to these results is a formulation of the water wave problem as an evolutionary system in which the transverse horizontal variable plays the role of time, a careful study of the purely imaginary spectrum of the operator obtained by linearising the evolutionary system at a line solitary wave, and an application of an infinite-dimensional version of the classical Lyapunov centre theorem.

  1. Development of a coherent vacuum ultraviolet source at 104108 nm generated by four-wave sum frequency mixing in Hg vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    Development of a coherent vacuum ultraviolet source at 104­108 nm generated by four-wave sum-harmonic generation and four-wave mixing in a gas- eous nonlinear medium.8­11 Two tunable outputs from a pulsed dye ultraviolet VUV light source in the 104­108 nm range has been developed by utilizing four-wave sum frequency

  2. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N. [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); Adámek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-15

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  3. Range Design Criteria- June 4, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document contains the currently-approved firearms "Range Design Criteria" referred to on DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations

  4. EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NEVADA – Environmental cleanup experts spent the last weeks of summer on the Tonopah Test Range addressing contaminated equipment and debris at two historical nuclear testing locations.

  5. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ?{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ?{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  6. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  7. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  8. Random wave functions and percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bogomolny; C. Schmit

    2007-08-31

    Recently it was conjectured that nodal domains of random wave functions are adequately described by critical percolation theory. In this paper we strengthen this conjecture in two respects. First, we show that, though wave function correlations decay slowly, a careful use of Harris' criterion confirms that these correlations are unessential and nodal domains of random wave functions belong to the same universality class as non critical percolation. Second, we argue that level domains of random wave functions are described by the non-critical percolation model.

  9. A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliá, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Reaching ~3.35 x 10^-25 at ~150 Hz, those upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  10. Connection between effective-range expansion and nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Yarmukhamedov; D. Baye

    2011-02-08

    Explicit relations between the effective-range expansion and the nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay $B\\to A+a$ are derived for an arbitrary orbital momentum together with the corresponding location condition for the ($A+a$) bound-state energy. They are valid both for the charged case and for the neutral case. Combining these relations with the standard effective-range function up to order six makes it possible to reduce to two the number of free effective-range parameters if an ANC value is known from experiment. Values for the scattering length, effective range, and form parameter are determined in this way for the $^{16}$O+$p$, $\\alpha+t$ and $\\alpha+^3$He collisions in partial waves where a bound state exists by using available ANCs deduced from experiments. The resulting effective-range expansions for these collisions are valid up to energies larger 5 MeV.

  11. Pricing Conspicuous Consumption Products in Recession Periods ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-26

    cally used in chemical engineering, e.g., to avoid irreversible reactions in ... Our basic problem is based on an economic setting with a recession period followed.

  12. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockridge, P. (National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  13. Gravitational wave diagnosis of a circumbinary disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimitake Hayasaki; Kent Yagi; Takahiro Tanaka; Shin Mineshige

    2012-01-13

    When binary black holes are embedded in a gaseous environment, a rotating disk surrounding them, the so-called circumbinary disk, will be formed. The binary exerts a gravitational torque on the circumbinary disk and thereby the orbital angular momentum is transferred to it, while the angular momentum of the circumbinary disk is transferred to the binary through the mass accretion. The binary undergoes an orbital decay due to both the gravitational wave emission and the binary-disk interaction. This causes the phase evolution of the gravitational wave signal. The precise measurement of the gravitational wave phase thus may provide information regarding the circumbinary disk. In this paper, we assess the detectability of the signature of the binary-disk interaction using the future space-borne gravitational wave detectors such as DECIGO and BBO by the standard matched filtering analysis. We find that the effect of the circumbinary disk around binary black holes in the mass range $6M_sun\\le{M}\\lesssim3\\times10^3M_sun$ is detectable at a statistically significant level in five year observation, provided that gas accretes onto the binary at a rate greater than $\\dot{M}\\sim1.4\\times10^{17} [gs^{-1}] j^{-1}(M/10M_sun)^{33/23}$ with 10% mass-to-energy conversion efficiency, where j represents the efficiency of the angular momentum transfer from the binary to the circumbinary disk. We show that $O(0.1)$ coalescence events are expected to occur in sufficiently dense molecular clouds in five year observation. We also point out that the circumbinary disk is detectable, even if its mass at around the inner edge is by over 10 orders of magnitude less than the binary mass.

  14. Universal Quantum Transducers based on Surface Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin J. A. Schuetz; Eric M. Kessler; Geza Giedke; Lieven M. K. Vandersypen; Mikhail D. Lukin; J. Ignacio Cirac

    2015-10-06

    We propose a universal, on-chip quantum transducer based on surface acoustic waves in piezo-active materials. Because of the intrinsic piezoelectric (and/or magnetostrictive) properties of the material, our approach provides a universal platform capable of coherently linking a broad array of qubits, including quantum dots, trapped ions, nitrogen-vacancy centers or superconducting qubits. The quantized modes of surface acoustic waves lie in the gigahertz range, can be strongly confined close to the surface in phononic cavities and guided in acoustic waveguides. We show that this type of surface acoustic excitations can be utilized efficiently as a quantum bus, serving as an on-chip, mechanical cavity-QED equivalent of microwave photons and enabling long-range coupling of a wide range of qubits.

  15. Observational evidence for travelling wave modes bearing distance proportional shifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guruprasad, V

    2015-01-01

    Discrepancies of range between the Space Surveillance Network radars and the Deep Space Network in tracking the 1998 earth flyby of NEAR, and between ESA's Doppler and range data in Rosetta's 2009 flyby, reveal a consistent excess delay, or lag, equal to instantaneous one-way travel time in the telemetry signals. These lags readily explain all details of the flyby anomaly, and are shown to be symptoms of chirp d'Alembertian travelling wave solutions, relating to traditional sinusoidal waves by a rotation of the spectral decomposition due to the clock acceleration caused by the Doppler rates during the flybys. The lags thus relate to special relativity, but yield distance proportional shifts like those of cosmology at short range.

  16. Observational evidence for travelling wave modes bearing distance proportional shifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Guruprasad

    2015-07-18

    Discrepancies of range between the Space Surveillance Network radars and the Deep Space Network in tracking the 1998 earth flyby of NEAR, and between ESA's Doppler and range data in Rosetta's 2009 flyby, reveal a consistent excess delay, or lag, equal to instantaneous one-way travel time in the telemetry signals. These lags readily explain all details of the flyby anomaly, and are shown to be symptoms of chirp d'Alembertian travelling wave solutions, relating to traditional sinusoidal waves by a rotation of the spectral decomposition due to the clock acceleration caused by the Doppler rates during the flybys. The lags thus relate to special relativity, but yield distance proportional shifts like those of cosmology at short range.

  17. Seismic waves in rocks with fluids and fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14

    Seismic wave propagation through the earth is often stronglyaffected by the presence of fractures. When these fractures are filledwith fluids (oil, gas, water, CO2, etc.), the type and state of the fluid(liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the response of theseismic waves. This paper summarizes recent work on methods ofdeconstructing the effects of fractures, and any fluids within thesefractures, on seismic wave propagation as observed in reflection seismicdata. One method explored here is Thomsen's weak anisotropy approximationfor wave moveout (since fractures often induce elastic anisotropy due tononuniform crack-orientation statistics). Another method makes use ofsome very convenient fracture parameters introduced previously thatpermit a relatively simple deconstruction of the elastic and wavepropagation behavior in terms of a small number of fracture parameters(whenever this is appropriate, as is certainly the case for small crackdensities). Then, the quantitative effects of fluids on thesecrack-influence parameters are shown to be directly related to Skempton scoefficient B of undrained poroelasticity (where B typically ranges from0 to 1). In particular, the rigorous result obtained for the low crackdensity limit is that the crack-influence parameters are multiplied by afactor (1 ? B) for undrained systems. It is also shown how fractureanisotropy affects Rayleigh wave speed, and how measured Rayleigh wavespeeds can be used to infer shear wave speed of the fractured medium.Higher crack density results are also presented by incorporating recentsimulation data on such cracked systems.

  18. ENERGY CONTENT AND PROPAGATION IN TRANSVERSE SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Soler, R. [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: tom.vandoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-10

    Recently, a significant amount of transverse wave energy has been estimated propagating along solar atmospheric magnetic fields. However, these estimates have been made with the classic bulk Alfven wave model which assumes a homogeneous plasma. In this paper, the kinetic, magnetic, and total energy densities and the flux of energy are computed for transverse MHD waves in one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube models with a piecewise constant or continuous radial density profile. There are fundamental deviations from the properties for classic bulk Alfven waves. (1) There is no local equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy. (2) The flux of energy and the velocity of energy transfer have, in addition to a component parallel to the magnetic field, components in the planes normal to the magnetic field. (3) The energy densities and the flux of energy vary spatially, contrary to the case of classic bulk Alfven waves. This last property has the important consequence that the energy flux computed with the well known expression for bulk Alfven waves could overestimate the real flux by a factor in the range 10-50, depending on the flux tube equilibrium properties.

  19. Standing wave instabilities in a chain of nonlinear coupled oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Maria Morgante; Magnus Johansson; Georgios Kopidakis; Serge Aubry

    2001-11-15

    We consider existence and stability properties of nonlinear spatially periodic or quasiperiodic standing waves (SWs) in one-dimensional lattices of coupled anharmonic oscillators. Specifically, we consider Klein-Gordon (KG) chains with either soft (e.g., Morse) or hard (e.g., quartic) on-site potentials, as well as discrete nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) chains approximating the small-amplitude dynamics of KG chains with weak inter-site coupling. The SWs are constructed as exact time-periodic multibreather solutions from the anticontinuous limit of uncoupled oscillators. In the validity regime of the DNLS approximation these solutions can be continued into the linear phonon band, where they merge into standard harmonic SWs. For SWs with incommensurate wave vectors, this continuation is associated with an inverse transition by breaking of analyticity. When the DNLS approximation is not valid, the continuation may be interrupted by bifurcations associated with resonances with higher harmonics of the SW. Concerning the stability, we identify one class of SWs which are always linearly stable close to the anticontinuous limit. However, approaching the linear limit all SWs with nontrivial wave vectors become unstable through oscillatory instabilities, persisting for arbitrarily small amplitudes in infinite lattices. Investigating the dynamics resulting from these instabilities, we find two qualitatively different regimes for wave vectors smaller than or larger than pi/2, respectively. In one regime persisting breathers are found, while in the other regime the system rapidly thermalizes.

  20. Discrete wave turbulence of rotational capillary water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Constantin; Elena Kartashova; Erik Wahlén

    2010-05-12

    We study the discrete wave turbulent regime of capillary water waves with constant non-zero vorticity. The explicit Hamiltonian formulation and the corresponding coupling coefficient are obtained. We also present the construction and investigation of resonance clustering. Some physical implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  1. Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yi-Chiuan, E-mail: YCChen@math.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shyan-Shiou, E-mail: sschen@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Juan-Ming, E-mail: jmyuan@pu.edu.tw [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-15

    Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

  2. WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, John R.

    2012-01-01

    A LiBRARY ANL WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITYof Califomia. To be in WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE~HOMENTUMExpress1ons for the wave-energy density and wave-momentum

  3. On the spatial scales of wave heating in the solar chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave energy has been proposed as a viable heating mechanism in the solar chromospheric plasma. Here, we use a simplified one-dimensional model of the chromosphere to theoretically investigate the physical processes and the spatial scales that are required for the efficient dissipation of Alfv\\'en waves and slow magnetoacoustic waves. We consider the governing equations for a partially ionized hydrogen-helium plasma in the single-fluid MHD approximation and include realistic wave damping mechanisms that may operate in the chromosphere, namely Ohmic and ambipolar magnetic diffusion, viscosity, thermal conduction, and radiative losses. We perform an analytic local study in the limit of small amplitudes to approximately derive the lengthscales for critical damping and efficient dissipation of MHD wave energy. We find that the critical dissipation lengthscale for Alfv\\'en waves depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and ranges from 10~m to 1~km for realistic field ...

  4. Formulating and Implementing Profiling over Adaptive Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, Tim

    be implemented for range-adaptive profiling. RAP can be used on various profiles, such as PCs, load values may easily be lost in a sea of data. We present range-adaptive profiling (RAP) as a new and general value locality. We propose two methods of implementation of RAP, one in software and the other

  5. Dynamic control of spin wave spectra using spin-polarized currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu Tang, Xiaoli; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong; Fangohr, Hans

    2014-09-15

    We describe a method of controlling the spin wave spectra dynamically in a uniform nanostripe waveguide through spin-polarized currents. A stable periodic magnetization structure is observed when the current flows vertically through the center of nanostripe waveguide. After being excited, the spin wave is transmitted at the sides of the waveguide. Numerical simulations of spin-wave transmission and dispersion curves reveal a single, pronounced band gap. Moreover, the periodic magnetization structure can be turned on and off by the spin-polarized current. The switching process from full rejection to full transmission takes place within less than 3?ns. Thus, this type magnonic waveguide can be utilized for low-dissipation spin wave based filters.

  6. Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

    2013-01-28

    Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

  7. Using a Bore-Soliton-Splash to understand Rogue Waves, Tsunamis & Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    & new experiments, in portable BSS wave tank or Roombeek channel [7]. 7 New Wave Energy Device [2]. · Clarify connection Bore-Soliton-Splash with rogue waves and tsunamis. · New wave energy device

  8. Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape-off layer of NSTX and NSTX-U Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full wave simulations of fast wave heating...

  9. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  10. Effective range from tetramer dissociation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadizadeh, M R; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2012-01-01

    The shifts in the four-body recombination peaks, due to lowest order range corrections in the zero range results close to the unitary limit, are obtained and used to extract the corresponding effective range of a given atomic system. From the experimental values of the tetramer dissociation positions of an ultracold gas of cesium atoms close to broad Feshbach resonances, the effective ranges are extracted, with a weighted average given by 3.9$\\pm 0.8 R_{{vdW}}$, where $R_{{vdW}}$ is the van der Waals length scale. This result is consistent with the van der Waals potential tail for the $Cs_2$ system. The method can be generally applied to other cold atom experimental setups to determine the corresponding effective range.

  11. Elements of a continuous-wave borehole radar. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, T.W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysical Technology Dept.

    1997-08-01

    The theory is developed for the antenna array for a proposed continuous-wave, ground-penetrating radar for use in a borehole, and field measurements are presented. Accomplishments include the underground measurement of the transmitting beam in the azimuth plane, active azimuth-steering of the transmitting beam, and the development of a range-to-target algorithm. The excellent performance of the antenna array supports the concept of a continuous-wave borehole radar. A field-prototype should be developed for use in both geothermal zones and for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas.

  12. Stable blowup for wave equations in odd space dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland Donninger; Birgit Schörkhuber

    2015-04-03

    We consider semilinear wave equations with focusing power nonlinearities in odd space dimensions $d \\geq 5$. We prove that for every $p > \\frac{d+3}{d-1}$ there exists an open set of radial initial data in $H^{\\frac{d+1}{2}} \\times H^{\\frac{d-1}{2}}$ such that the corresponding solution exists in a backward lightcone and approaches the ODE blowup profile. The result covers the entire range of energy supercritical nonlinearities and extends our previous work for the three-dimensional radial wave equation to higher space dimensions.

  13. Finite-range model potentials for resonant interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bimalendu Deb

    2015-12-04

    We show that it is possible to model two-body resonant interactions at low energy with a class of finite-range potentials based on the methods of Jost and Kohn. These potentials are expressed in terms of the effective range $r_0$ and the $s$-wave scattering length $a_s$. We derive continuum solutions of these potentials. By writing $V_{\\pm}(r) = V_{0}(r) + V_{\\pm}^{\\epsilon}(r)$, where the sign +(-) refers to positive(negative) scattering length, $ V_{0}(r)$ is of the form of P\\"{o}schl-Teller potential and $V_{\\pm}^{\\epsilon}$ is expressed as a power series of the small parameter $\\epsilon = (\\sqrt{1 - 2 r_0/a_s})^{-1} - 1 $ when $a_s$ is large, we derive Green function of $V_{0}(r)$. Using the Green function, solutions of $V_{\\pm}(r)$ for $|a_s| >\\!> r_0$ can be obtained numerically by treating $V_{\\pm}^{\\epsilon}(r)$as a perturbation. We describe the threshold behavior of scattering phase shift for $V_{0}(r)$. This study may be important for developing a better understanding of physics of strongly interacting ultracold atomic gases with tunable interactions.

  14. Design of Millimeter-Wave Power Ampliers in Silicon /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalantari, Nader

    2013-01-01

    1.1 Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier . . . . . . . . . .ported mm-wave power amplifiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GHz Tapered Constructive Wave Power 3.1 Traveling Wave Power

  15. Spatial and temporal modulation of internal waves and thermohaline structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Sylvia T

    2010-01-01

    timescale, the internal wave energy cascade that concludes2 addresses the internal wave energy cascade and its spatialto as the internal wave energy cascade. Internal waves

  16. Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Abstract Surface minerals of active geothermal systems have been mapped using visible-short wave infrared and mid wave and long wave imaging...

  17. RING EDGE WAVES AND THE MASSES OF NEARBY SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, John W.; Porco, Carolyn C. [CICLOPS/Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Tiscareno, Matthew S. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Moons embedded in gaps within Saturn's main rings generate waves on the gap edges due to their gravitational disturbances. These edge waves can serve as diagnostics for the masses and, in some cases, orbital characteristics of the embedded moons. Although N-body simulations of the edges are far better in inferring masses from edge morphology, the long run-times of this technique often make it impractical. In this paper, we describe a faster approach to narrow the range of masses to explore with N-body simulations, to explore the multidimensional parameter space of edge/moon interactions, and to guide the planning of spacecraft observations. Using numerical, test-particle models and neglecting particle-particle interactions, we demonstrate that the simple analytic theory of the edge waves applies well to Pan in the Encke Gap but breaks down for smaller moons/gaps like Daphnis in the Keeler Gap. Fitting an analytic model to our simulation results allows us to suggest an improved relationship between moon-mass and edge wave amplitude. Numerical methods also grant freedom to explore a wider range of moon and ring orbits than the circular, coplanar case considered by analytic theory. We examine how pre-encounter inclinations and eccentricities affect the properties of the edge waves. In the case where the moon or ring-edge particle orbits initially have eccentric radial variations that are large compared to the gap width, there is considerable variation in edge wave amplitude depending on the orbital phase of the encounter. Inclined moons also affect the edge wave amplitude, potentially significantly, as well as generate vertical waves on the gap-edges. Recent Cassini images acquired as Saturn approaches equinox and the Sun's elevation on the ringplane is extremely low have revealed long shadows associated with the Keeler gap edge waves created by the embedded moon Daphnis. We interpret these as being cast by {approx}1 km high vertical structure in the waves created by Daphnis' out-of-plane perturbations on the ring particles.

  18. Inference and Visualization of Periodic Sequences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ying

    2011-10-21

    are evenly spaced in time. The period is estimated by a "leave-out-one-cycle" version of cross-validation (CV) and complements the periodogram, a widely used tool for period estimation. The CV method is computationally simple and implicitly penalizes...

  19. Periodic cellular automata and Bethe ansatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsuo Kuniba; Akira Takenouchi

    2006-01-07

    We review and generalize the recent progress in a soliton cellular automaton known as the periodic box-ball system. It has the extended affine Weyl group symmetry and admits the commuting transfer matrix method and the Bethe ansatz at q=0. Explicit formulas are proposed for the dynamical period and the number of states characterized by conserved quantities.

  20. The Solar Activity in the Miocene Period In this Subthesis we study the solar activity in the Miocene (or Triassic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rays, short­wave radiations, the solar constant). One of the longest series of data is the records of UV and X­ray radi­ ation also show a strong correlation between the radiative energy flux and solarThe Solar Activity in the Miocene Period In this Subthesis we study the solar activity

  1. Low-energy expansion formula for one-dimensional Fokker-Planck and Schrödinger equations with periodic potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toru Miyazawa

    2011-12-26

    We study the low-energy behavior of the Green function for one-dimensional Fokker-Planck and Schr\\"odinger equations with periodic potentials. We derive a formula for the power series expansion of reflection coefficients in terms of the wave number, and apply it to the low-energy expansion of the Green function.

  2. Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-10-21

    An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

  3. Creating Wave-Focusing Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2008-05-16

    Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

  4. Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter-examines existing wave run-up data for regular, irregular and solitary waves on smooth, impermeable plane slopes. A simple physical argument is used to derive a new wave run-up equation in terms of a dimensionless wave

  5. Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag in directionally effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag in directionally sheared flow. Quarterly Journal;AcceptedArticle Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag

  6. Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri approve the attached thesis Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri Principal

  7. Plasma wave measurements with STEREO S/WAVES: Calibration, potential model, and preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Plasma wave measurements with STEREO S/WAVES: Calibration, potential model, and preliminary results] The S/WAVES experiments on the two STEREO spacecraft measure waves, both in situ plasma waves and remotely generated waves such as Type II and Type III solar bursts. A part of the experiment is aimed

  8. Characterizing Composition Modulations in InAs/AIAs Short-Period Superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Jones, E.D.; Lee, S.R.; Mascarenhas, A.; Millunchick, J. Mirecki; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.

    1999-04-26

    The formation of quantum wires has much interest due to their novel electronic properties which may lead to enhanced optoelectronic device performance and greater photovoltaic efficiencies. One method of forming these structures is through spontaneous lateral modulation found during the epitaxial growth of III/V alloys. In this paper, we report and summarize our investigations on the formation of lateral moduation in the MBE grown InAlAs/InP(001) system. This system was grown as a short-period superlattice where n-monolayers of InAs are deposited followed by m-Monolayers of AlAs (with n and m~2) and this sequence is repeated to grown a low strain InAlAs ternary alloy on InP(001) that exhibits lateral modulation. Films were grown under a variety of condition (growth temperature, effective alloy composition, superlattice period, and growth rate). These films have been extensively analyzed using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microcharacterization, in addition to photon-based spectroscopes. Here we present results of several microstructural characterizations using a wide range of TEM-based techniques, and compare them to results from the other methods to obtain a unified understanding of composition modulation. Two strong points consistently emerge: 1) The lateral modulation wavelength is insensitive to growth temperature and effective alloy composition, but the strength of the lateral modulation is greatest near an effective alloy composition of In(0.46)Al(0.54)As, which corresponds to a slightly tensile global strain with respect to InP. 2) The composition variation for the strongly modulated films is as much as 0.38 InAs mole fraction. In addition, for these strongly modulated films, the modulation wave is asymmetric showing strongly peaked, narrower InAs-rich regions separated by flat AlAs-rich regions. We discuss these results and their possible implications in addition to detailing the techniques used to obtain them.

  9. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-13

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  10. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  11. Frequency and damping rate of fast sausage waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farahani, S. Vasheghani; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Goossens, M.; Hornsey, C.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the frequency and damping rate of fast axisymmetric waves that are subject to wave leakage for a one-dimensional magnetic cylindrical structure in the solar corona. We consider the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dispersion relation for axisymmetric MHD waves superimposed on a straight magnetic cylinder in the zero ? limit, similar to a jet or loop in the solar corona. An analytic study accompanied by numerical calculations has been carried out to model the frequency, damping rate, and phase speed of the sausage wave around the cut-off frequency and in the long wavelength limit. Analytic expressions have been obtained based on equations around the points of interest. They are linear approximations of the dependence of the sausage frequency on the wave number around the cut-off wavelength for both leaky and non-leaky regimes and in the long wavelength limit. Moreover, an expression for the damping rate of the leaky sausage wave has been obtained both around the cut-off frequency and in the long wavelength limit. These analytic results are compared with numerical computations. The expressions show that the complex frequencies are mainly dominated by the density ratio. In addition, it is shown that the damping eventually becomes independent of the wave number in the long wavelength limit. We conclude that the sausage mode damping directly depends on the density ratios of the internal and external media where the damping declines in higher density contrasts. Even in the long wavelength limit, the sausage mode is weakly damped for high-density contrasts. As such, sausage modes could be observed for a significant number of periods in high-density contrast loops or jets.

  12. Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2007-11-14

    The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

  13. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  14. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  15. Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

    1984-01-01

    would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thefeature of cross-field wave-energy transport, previous con-

  16. Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    2012-01-01

    Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear ...

  17. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01

    Nasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughNemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialS. , 2009. Acoustic wave-energy management in composite

  18. Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

    1984-01-01

    would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

  19. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01

    mode of pressure wave and energy transfer into shearmode of pressure wave and energy transfer into shear mode ItNasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management through

  20. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

    2014-05-07

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800?nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600?nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300?nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100?nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.