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1

Property:Wave Period Range(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Period Range(s) Wave Period Range(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wave Period Range(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Wave Period Range(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 2.1 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 +

2

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + C Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + 2.3 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 4.0 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 3.0 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 3.0 +

3

On periodic wave functions of Schrödinger operators on Cayley trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the paper we define periodic wave functions for a (discrete) Schr\\"odinger operator on a Cayley tree. This periodicity depends on a subgroup of a group representation of the Cayley tree. For any subgroup of finite index we give a criterion for eigenvalues of the Schr\\"odinger operator under which there are periodic wave functions. For a normal subgroup of infinite index we describe a class of periodic wave functions.

Fumio Hiroshima; Utkir Rozikov

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

4

Doppler Sonar and Surface Waves: Range and Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance limitations of an acoustic Doppler sonar system are explored and compared with anticipated requirements for the measurement of surface wave directional/frequency spectra. To obtain measurements to a range D requires a delay ?t ...

Jerome A. Smith

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Numerical Model Studies of Long-Period Edge Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical modeling study of aspects of the generation and propagation of long-period edge waves along a continental shelf is described. The numerical model is based on the traditional shallow-water dynamics. A scale analysis indicates that ...

F. A. Shillington; D. Van Foreest

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

Barsotti, Lisa

7

Fano-Type Resonance of Waves in Periodic Slabs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate Fano-type anomalous transmission of energy of plane waves across lossless slab scatterers with periodic structure in the presence of non-robust guided modes. Our approach is based on rigorous analytic perturbation of the scattering problem near a guided mode and applies to very general structures, continuous and discrete.

Natalia Ptitsyna; Stephen P. Shipman; Stephanos Venakides

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

Nonlinear, stationary electrostatic ion cyclotron waves: Exact solutions for solitons, periodic waves, and wedge shaped waveforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of fully nonlinear stationary electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is further developed. The existence of two fundamental constants of motion; namely, momentum flux density parallel to the background magnetic field and energy density, facilitates the reduction of the wave structure equation to a first order differential equation. For subsonic waves propagating sufficiently obliquely to the magnetic field, soliton solutions can be constructed. Importantly, analytic expressions for the amplitude of the soliton show that it increases with decreasing wave Mach number and with increasing obliquity to the magnetic field. In the subsonic, quasi-parallel case, periodic waves exist whose compressive and rarefactive amplitudes are asymmetric about the 'initial' point. A critical 'driver' field exists that gives rise to a soliton-like structure which corresponds to infinite wavelength. If the wave speed is supersonic, periodic waves may also be constructed. The aforementioned asymmetry in the waveform arises from the flow being driven towards the local sonic point in the compressive phase and away from it in the rarefactive phase. As the initial driver field approaches the critical value, the end point of the compressive phase becomes sonic and the waveform develops a wedge shape. This feature and the amplitudes of the compressive and rarefactive portions of the periodic waves are illustrated through new analytic expressions that follow from the equilibrium points of a wave structure equation which includes a driver field. These expressions are illustrated with figures that illuminate the nature of the solitons. The presently described wedge-shaped waveforms also occur in water waves, for similar 'transonic' reasons, when a Coriolis force is included.

McKenzie, J. F. [Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics, Durban University of Technology, Steve Biko Campus, Durban 4001 (South Africa); School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag: X54001, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Doyle, T. B. [Materials Research Division, iThemba LABS, P.O.Box 722, Somerset West, 7129, South Africa and School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag: X54001, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Rajah, S. S. [Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics, Durban University of Technology, Steve Biko Campus, Durban 4001 (South Africa)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Long Period Swell Wave Events on the Norwegian Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave records obtained by Waverider and heave/pitch/roll data buoys on the Norwegian continental shelf have been analysed in order to gain information on spectral characteristics (bandwidth, peak frequency, significant wave height and direction) ...

B. Gjevik; O. Rygg; H. E. Krogstad; A. Lygre

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

2011-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analytical Approximation for 2-D Nonlinear Periodic Deep Water Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently developed method has been extended to a nonlocal equation arising in steady water wave propagation in two dimensions. We obtain analyic approximation of steady water wave solution in two dimensions with rigorous error bounds for a set of parameter values that correspond to heights slightly smaller than the critical. The wave shapes are shown to be analytic. The method presented in quite general and does not assume smallness of wave height or steepness and can be readily extended to other interfacial problems involving Laplace's equation.

Saleh Tanveer

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 x 10^-9, 1.1 x 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 152.5 Hz, we can exclude the presence of signals with h0 greater than 7.6 x 10^-25 with a 90% confidence level.

J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; Y. Bao; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; C. Bond; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endröczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; B. F. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. A. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gelencser; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Keitel; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. K. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; J. Kline; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 \\times 10^-9, 1.1 \\times 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 15...

Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner}, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Interior Reflections of a Periodically Forced Equatorial Kelvin Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully three-dimensional, wind-forced equatorial model is used to study the effects of the strong near- surface equatorial pycnocline on energy transmission into the deep ocean. The equatorial Kelvin waves forced by a patch of zonal wind ...

Lewis M. Rothstein; Dennis W. Moore; Julian P. McCreary

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves ...

Jaeger, E. F.

16

The Einstein@Home search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for periodic gravitational waves, from sources such as isolated rapidly-spinning neutron stars, was carried out using 510 hours of data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4). The search was for quasi-monochromatic waves in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1500 Hz, with a linear frequency drift f-dot (measured at the solar system barycenter) in the range -f/tau < f-dot < 0.1 f/tau, where the minimum spin-down age tau was 1000 years for signals below 300 Hz and 10000 years above 300 Hz. The main computational work of the search was distributed over approximately 100000 computers volunteered by the general public. This large computing power allowed the use of a relatively long coherent integration time of 30 hours, despite the large parameter space searched. No statistically significant signals were found. The sensitivity of the search is estimated, along with the fraction of parameter space that was vetoed because of contamination by instrumental artifacts. In the 100 Hz to 200 Hz band, more tha...

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Amin, R; Anderson, D P; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bastarrika, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Brunet, G; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casebolt, T; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Clark, D; Clark, J; Cokelaer, T; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cutler, R M; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Duke, I; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Echols, C; Eer, A; Ehrens, P; Ely, G; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Flasch, K; Fotopoulos, N; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayama, K; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Kozhevatov, I; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leindecker, N; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lin, H; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandic, V; Mrka, S; Mrka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D; McKenzie, K; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Petrie, T; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Principe, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sanchodela Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S W; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, L C; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ulmen, J; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Van Den Broeck, C; vander Sluys, M; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Dissipation Range of Wind-Wave Spectra Observed on a Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on an interpretation of a field experiment it is argued that, due to breaking of wind waves in deep water, the dissipation of energy is restricted to a range of frequencies ? > ?g, much higher than the frequency ?m of the dominant waves. In ...

C. Hansen; K. B. Katsaros; S. A. Kitaigorodskii; S. E. Larsen

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Spectrum of geomagnetic activity in the period range 560 days: possible lunar inuences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectrum of geomagnetic activity in the period range 5±60 days: possible lunar in¯uences J. StrÏ es (if any) is not mediated by geomag- netic activity. Key words. Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism á Time Introduction Geomagnetic activity displays various regular and irregular variations. These have been

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Error Climatology of the 80-Wave Medium-Range Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatology of the once-daily (0000 UTC) 1000-hPa error fields of the National Meteorological Center's 80-wave Medium-Range Forecast (MRF) model is studied. An analysis of the error field has been conducted over the contiguous United States and ...

David R. Walker; Robert E. Davis

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Synoptic-Scale Wave of 6–9-Day Period in the Atlantic Tropical Troposphere during Summer 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the ECMWF analyses, this study documents a tropospheric synoptic-scale wave in the tropical Atlantic during summer 1981. It has a 6–9-day period and a westward velocity of about 8.5° longitude per day. The wave structure has features ...

P. de Felice; A. Viltard; J. Oubuih

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range  

SciTech Connect

Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

Investigation of electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in L-4 and ACT-1  

SciTech Connect

Electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were studied in the Princeton L-4 and ACT-1 devices for approximately ten years, from 1975 to 1985. The investigation began in the L-4 linear device, looking for the parametric excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion-species plasmas. In addition, this investigation verified multi-ion-species effects on the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave dispersion religion including the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Finite-Larmor-radius modification of the wave dispersion relation was also observed, even for ion temperatures of T{sub i} {approx} 1/40 eV. Taking advantage of the relatively high field and long device length of L-4, the existence of the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CES ICW) was verified. With the arrival of the ACT-1 toroidal device, finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) waves were studied in a relatively collisionless warm-ion hydrogen plasma. Detailed investigations of ion Bernstein waves (IBW) included the verification of mode-transformation in their launching, their wave propagation characteristics, their absorption, and the resulting ion heating. This basic physics activity played a crucial role in developing a new reactor heating concept termed ion Bernstein wave heating. Experimental research in the lower hybrid frequency range confirmed the existence of FLR effects near the lower hybrid resonance, predicted by Stix in 1965. In a neon plasma with a carefully placed phased wave exciter, the neutralized ion Bernstein wave was observed for the first time. Using a fastwave ICRF antenna, two parasitic excitation processes for IBW -- parametric instability and density-gradient-driven excitation -- were also discovered. In the concluding section of this paper, a possible application of externally launched electrostatic waves is suggested for helium ash removal from fusion reactor plasmas.

Ono, Masayuki

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Investigation of electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in L-4 and ACT-1  

SciTech Connect

Electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were studied in the Princeton L-4 and ACT-1 devices for approximately ten years, from 1975 to 1985. The investigation began in the L-4 linear device, looking for the parametric excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion-species plasmas. In addition, this investigation verified multi-ion-species effects on the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave dispersion religion including the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Finite-Larmor-radius modification of the wave dispersion relation was also observed, even for ion temperatures of T[sub i] [approx] 1/40 eV. Taking advantage of the relatively high field and long device length of L-4, the existence of the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CES ICW) was verified. With the arrival of the ACT-1 toroidal device, finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) waves were studied in a relatively collisionless warm-ion hydrogen plasma. Detailed investigations of ion Bernstein waves (IBW) included the verification of mode-transformation in their launching, their wave propagation characteristics, their absorption, and the resulting ion heating. This basic physics activity played a crucial role in developing a new reactor heating concept termed ion Bernstein wave heating. Experimental research in the lower hybrid frequency range confirmed the existence of FLR effects near the lower hybrid resonance, predicted by Stix in 1965. In a neon plasma with a carefully placed phased wave exciter, the neutralized ion Bernstein wave was observed for the first time. Using a fastwave ICRF antenna, two parasitic excitation processes for IBW -- parametric instability and density-gradient-driven excitation -- were also discovered. In the concluding section of this paper, a possible application of externally launched electrostatic waves is suggested for helium ash removal from fusion reactor plasmas.

Ono, Masayuki.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA  

SciTech Connect

We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ofman, Leon, E-mail: weiliu@lmsal.com [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washingtom, DC 20064 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Control of energetic ion confinement by ion cyclotron range of frequency waves  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that ICRF waves can induce fast convective radial transport of energetic ions in a tokamak geometry without affecting the background ion transport. Spatially inhomogeneous ICRF waves with directional parallel wave vectors are needed; otherwise, a net parallel flow of the energetic ions has to be present. 8 refs.

Chang, C.S. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences)

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations  

SciTech Connect

Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-{sup 3}He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of {approx}50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Green, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

A study of obliquely propagating longitudinal shear waves in a periodic laminate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic purpose of this work is to demonstrate, by quite simple and explicit calculation, the possibility that a simple laminate composed of ordinary materials can display the kind of response associated with a "metamaterial". Specifically, a wave of Floquet--Bloch type is analyzed, taking careful account of the requirements of causality and passivity. Then, the generation of such a wave by transmission, from ordinary homogeneous material, into a half-space composed of the laminate is considered. As is well-known for any dispersive material, phase velocity is distinct from group velocity, and information is carried by the latter. Thus, in line with the discussion of photonic crystals by Notomi [1], refraction is considered in terms of the group velocity. Negative refraction appears never to occur, if the interface between ordinary material and composite is parallel to the interfaces in the composite but negative refraction is possible, over an appreciable frequency range, if the interface between ordinary material and composite is orthogonal to the interface in the composite.

John Willis

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

GENERATION OF QUASI-PERIODIC WAVES AND FLOWS IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BY OSCILLATORY RECONNECTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the long-term evolution of an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube emerging into a gravitationally stratified coronal hole environment and report on the resulting oscillations and outflows. We perform 2.5-dimensional nonlinear numerical simulations, generalizing the models of McLaughlin et al. and Murray et al. We find that the physical mechanism of oscillatory reconnection naturally generates quasi-periodic vertical outflows, with a transverse/swaying aspect. The vertical outflows consist of both a periodic aspect and evidence of a positively directed flow. The speed of the vertical outflow (20-60 km s{sup -1}) is comparable to those reported in the observational literature. We also perform a parametric study varying the magnetic strength of the buoyant flux tube and find a range of associated periodicities: 1.75-3.5 minutes. Thus, the mechanism of oscillatory reconnection may provide a physical explanation to some of the high-speed, quasi-periodic, transverse outflows/jets recently reported by a multitude of authors and instruments.

McLaughlin, J. A.; Verth, G. [School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R., E-mail: james.a.mclaughlin@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: gary.verth@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Periodic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

04 04 by C.G. Wohl (LBNL). Adapted from the Commission of Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances, "Atomic Weights of the Elements 1995," Pure and Applied Chemistry 68, 2339 (1996), and G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra, "The 1993 Mass Evaluation," Nucl. Phys. A565, 1 (1993). The atomic number (top left) is the number of protons in the nucleus. The atomic mass (bottom) is weighted by isotopic abundances in the Earth's surface. For a new determination of atomic masses, not weighted by abundances, see G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl. Phys. A729, 337 (2003). Atomic masses are relative to the mass of the carbon-12 isotope, defined to be exactly 12 unified atomic mass units (u). Errors range from 1 to 9 in the last digit quoted. Relative isotopic abundances often vary considerably, both in natural and commercial samples. A number in parentheses is the mass of the longest-lived

31

Lee vorticity Production by Large-Scale Tropical Mountain Ranges. Part II: A Mechanism for the Production of African Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanism that acts to produce vorticity in the lee of large-scale mountain ranges embedded in an easterly flow in a stably stratified rotating atmosphere is investigated as it applies to the production of westward-propagating African waves. ...

Joel B. Mozer; Joseph A. Zehnder

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

On the Theory of the Equilibrium Range in the Spectrum of Wind-Generated Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that an exact analog of Kolmogoroff's spectrum in a random field of weekly nonlinear surface gravity waves gives a spectral form for frequency spectra S(?) ??4 in close agreement with the results of recent observational studies. The ...

S. A. Kitaigorodskii

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Generation of Annual-Period Rossby Waves in the South Atlantic Ocean by the Wind Stress Curl  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of first-mode annual-period baroclinic Rossby waves generated by the observed wind stress curl in a numerical model of the South Atlantic and Southwest Indian oceans are presented. The forcing wind field for the area 15°–51°S, 45°W–...

Christopher J. C. Reason; Lawrence A. Mysak; Patrick F. Cummins

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Observation of wave-packet propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in a tokamak plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental observation of wave-packet propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in a tokamak plasma is reported. Studies were carried out in the Caltech Research Tokamak (Phys. Fluids {bold 23}, 614 (1980)) in a pure hydrogen plasma and in a regime where fast-wave damping was sufficiently small to permit multiple toroidal transits of the wave packet. Waves were launched by exciting a small loop antenna with a short burst of radio-frequency current and were detected with shielded magnetic probes. Probe scans revealed a large increase in wave-packet amplitude at smaller minor radii, and the packet velocity was found to be independent of radial position. Measurement of the packet transit time yielded direct information about the wave group velocity. Packet velocity was investigated as a function of the fundamental excitation frequency, plasma density, and toroidal magnetic field. Results are compared with the predictions of a cold plasma model that includes a vacuum layer at the edge.

Greene, G.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (USA)); Gould, R.W. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Partial-wave analysis of elastic {sup 4}He{sup 4}He scattering in the energy range 40-50 MeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A partial-wave analysis of elastic {sup 4}He{sup 4}He scattering is performed in the energy range 40-50 MeV.

Dubovichenko, S. B. [Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: sergey@dubovichenko.net

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Upper limits on the strength of periodic gravitational waves from PSR J1939+2134  

SciTech Connect

The first science run of the LIGO and GEO gravitational wave detectors presented the opportunity to test methods of searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars. Here we present new direct upper limits on the strength of waves from the pulsar PSR J1939+2134 using two independent analysis methods, one in the frequency domain using frequentist statistics and one in the time domain using Bayesian inference. Both methods show that the strain amplitude at Earth from this pulsar is less than a few times 10{sup -22}.

B. Allen et al.

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30  

SciTech Connect

On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Oceanic Rossby Wave Dynamics and the ENSO Period in a Coupled Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical ocean wave dynamics associated with the El Nińo–Southern Oscillation cycle in a coupled model are examined. The ocean–atmosphere model consists of statistical atmosphere coupled to a simple reduced gravity model of the tropical Pacific ...

Ben P. Kirtman

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 104.0 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 4.6 Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 1.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 12' by 12' concrete slabs anchored to flume walls

40

Effects of internal waves on low frequency, long range, acoustic propagation in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis covers a comprehensive analysis of long-range, deep-ocean, low-frequency, sound propagation experimental results obtained from the North Pacific Ocean. The statistics of acoustic fields after propagation through ...

Xu, Jinshan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Implications of an f?4 Equilibrium Range for Wind-Generated Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of an f?5 equilibrium range was hypothesized for middle to high frequencies for a well-developed sea generated by the physical parameters of gross sea state in the pioneering work of Phillips. Various experimental studies since then,...

D. Resio; W. Perrie

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 33.5 Beam(m) 21.3 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 1.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 1.8 Wave Period Range(s) 1.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sand/sediment

43

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin 2 Wave Basin 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Length(m) 48.8 Beam(m) 26.5 Depth(m) 2.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Built to client specifications, currently rigid concrete over gravel fill

44

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheets Wave Basin Sheets Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sheets Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Rhode Island Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 30.0 Beam(m) 3.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $750(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.0 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Pre-programmed for regular and irregular waves, but wavemaker is capable of any input motion. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

45

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

46

DeFrees Large Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Large Wave Basin Large Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Large Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 32.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 64 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled 4m hydraulic wave paddle stroke allows a series of solitary waves to be generated; arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes

47

DeFrees Small Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Small Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 15.0 Beam(m) 0.8 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 30 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled hydraulic paddle, arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 1:10 sloping glass with dissipative horsehair covering if needed

48

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 15.2 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Special Physical Features Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control sys

49

High Range Resolution Radar Measurements of the Speed Distribution of Breaking Events in Wind-Generated Ocean Waves: Surface Impulse and Wave Energy Dissipation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of X-band radar measurements, backscattered from the sea surface at near grazing incidence with very high spatial and temporal resolution (30 cm in range and 2000-Hz pulse repetition frequency) in moderate wind conditions, are dominated by ...

O. M. Phillips; F. L. Posner; J. P. Hansen

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

51

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

52

Climate Simulations of African Easterly Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional structure and propagation characteristics of African easterly waves for the 1986–94 period are studied with June–August European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analyses, National Centers for ...

John C. Fyfe

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OTRC Wave Basin OTRC Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name OTRC Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (OTRC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 5.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $300/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 25 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.6 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description GEDAP 3D wave generation software, 48 hinged flap wave generator

54

1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ft Wave Flume Facility -ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

55

11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 77.4 Beam(m) 3.4 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

56

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 10-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

57

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Flume Facility Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 6-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 105.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

58

THE EFFECT OF A TWISTED MAGNETIC FIELD ON THE PERIOD RATIO P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} OF NONAXISYMMETRIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a zero-beta cylindrical compressible thin magnetic flux tube modeled as a twisted core surrounded by a magnetically twisted annulus, with both embedded in a straight ambient external field. The dispersion relation is derived and solved analytically and numerically to obtain the frequencies of the nonaxisymmetric MHD waves. The main result is that the twisted magnetic annulus does affect the period ratio P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} of the kink modes. For the kink modes, the magnetic twist in the annulus region can achieve deviations from P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} = 2 of the same order of magnitude as in the observations. Furthermore, the effect of the internal twist on the fluting modes is investigated.

Karami, K. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahari, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: K.Bahari@razi.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

High-Height Long-Period Ocean Waves Generated by a Severe Storm in the Northeast Pacific Ocean during February 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unusally severe storms occurred in the northeast Pacific Ocean between January and March 1983, and waves from these storms caused extensive erosion and damage along the U.S. west coast. Wave conditions as measured by eight data buoys are ...

Marshall D. Earle; Kathryn A. Bush; Glenn D. Hamilton

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

MHL 2D Wind/Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL 2D Wind/Wave MHL 2D Wind/Wave Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL 2D Wind/Wave Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 35.1 Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Removable beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 20.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

University of Iowa Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University of Iowa Wave Basin University of Iowa Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 40.0 Beam(m) 20.0 Depth(m) 3.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Towed 3DPIV; contactless motion tracking; free surface measurement mappingv Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Fully programmable for regular or irregular waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Trusses overlaid with lattice and matting Channel/Tunnel/Flume

63

Nonlinear whistler wave scattering in space plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the evolution of nonlinear scattering of whistler mode waves by kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) in time and two spatial dimensions is studied analytically. The authors suggest this nonlinear process as a mechanism of kinetic Alfven wave generation in space plasmas. This mechanism can explain the dependence of Alfven wave generation on whistler waves observed in magnetospheric and ionospheric plasmas. The observational data show a dependence for the generation of long periodic pulsations Pc5 on whistler wave excitation in the auroral and subauroral zone of the magnetosphere. This dependence was first observed by Ondoh T.I. For 79 cases of VLF wave excitation registered by Ondoh at College Observatory (L=64.6 N), 52 of them were followed by Pc5 geomagnetic pulsation generation. Similar results were obtained at the Loparskaia Observatory (L=64 N) for auroral and subauroral zone of the magnetosphere. Thus, in 95% of the cases when VLF wave excitation occurred the generation of long periodic geomagnetic pulsations Pc5 were observed. The observations also show that geomagnetic pulsations Pc5 are excited simultaneously or insignificantly later than VLF waves. In fact these two phenomena are associated genetically: the excitation of VLF waves leads to the generation of geomagnetic pulsations Pc5. The observations show intensive generation of geomagnetic pulsations during thunderstorms. Using an electromagnetic noise monitoring system covering the ULF range (0.01-10 Hz) A.S. Fraser-Smith observed intensive ULF electromagnetic wave during a large thunderstorm near the San-Francisco Bay area on September 23, 1990. According to this data the most significant amplification in ULF wave activity was observed for waves with a frequency of 0.01 Hz and it is entirely possible that stronger enhancements would have been measured at lower frequencies.

Yukhimuk, V.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

WAVE REFLE TOR  

electromagnetic wave travels through the rods along their axes it receives a 1/4 period of phase delay be- ... delay, creating positive interference that effectively

65

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Trimodal steady water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Periodic Materials and Interference Lithography for Photonics ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

02/28/2011 - Periodic Materials and Interference Lithography for Photonics, ... photonic crystals (electromagnetic wave propagation) and phononic crystals ...

69

Wave Dragon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overtopping Wave Devices Wave Dragon ApSLtd HWETTEI - Workshop October 26-28, 2005, Washington, DC Hydrokinetic Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop the Wave...

70

Range imaging laser radar  

SciTech Connect

A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

Scott, Marion W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Factors Affecting the Accuracy of SHOWEX HF Radar Wave Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean Surface Current Radar (OSCR) HF radar measurements of ocean waves and currents were made during the Shoaling Waves Experiment (SHOWEX) in the fall of 1999. During some periods, at some locations, good quality wave measurements were ...

Lucy R. Wyatt; Guennadi Liakhovetski; Hans C. Graber; Brian K. Haus

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Resonant Planetary Waves in a Spherical Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global model of planetary wave propagation in a spherical atmosphere is used to examine the spectrum of free or resonant planetary waves of the solstitial stratosphere. These free modes are located by forcing the model with a weak periodic ...

Mark R. Schoeberl; John H. E. Clark

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS  

SciTech Connect

Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Wave Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.)

78

Energy Dissipation of Unsteady Wave Breaking on Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy dissipation for unsteady deep-water breaking in wave groups on following and opposing currents, including partial wave-blocking conditions, was investigated by detailed laboratory measurements. A range of focusing wave conditions, ...

Aifeng Yao; Chin H. Wu

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Diffraction of Kelvin Waves and Bores at Coastal Bends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bends in coastal mountain ranges may diffract propagating atmospheric Kelvin waves and trapped coastal currents. Analytic solutions exist for the diffraction of both linear Kelvin waves and linear nonrotating gravity waves. Within the context of ...

William C. Skamarock; Joseph B. Klemp; Richard Rotunno

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Medium- and Long-Range Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to short and extended range forecasts, predictions for periods beyond 5 days use time-averaged, midtropospheric height fields as their primary guidance. As time ranges are increased to 3O- and 90-day outlooks, guidance increasingly ...

A. James Wagner

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ship Waves and Lee Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional internal trapped lee wave modes produced by an isolated obstacle in a stratified fluid are shown to have dynamics analogous to surface ship waves on water of finite depth. Two models which allow for vertical trapping of wave ...

R. D. Sharman; M. G. Wurtele

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

Harrison, Neil (Santa Fe, NM); Singleton, John (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

83

Decay of a Near-Inertial Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decay of a downward propagating near-inertial wave was observed over four days. During this short period, the energy of the near-inertial wave decreased by 70%. The shear layers produced by the wave were regions of enhanced turbulent ...

Dave Hebert; J. N. Moum

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mixing in Symmetric Holmboe Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct simulations are used to study turbulence and mixing in Holmboe waves. Previous results showing that mixing in Holmboe waves is comparable to that found in the better-known Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) billows are extended to cover a range of ...

W. D. Smyth; J. R. Carpenter; G. A. Lawrence

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Variational Wave Data Assimilation in a Third-Generation Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adjoint of the wave model WAM, which runs operationally performing global wave forecast at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, has been constructed. In this model, the nonlinear interactions are described by the discrete ...

Miriam M. De Las Heras; Gerrit Burgers; Peter A. E. M. Janssen

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

First search for gravitational waves from the youngest known neutron star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for periodic gravitational waves from the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. The search coherently analyzes data in a 12-day interval taken from the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory. It searches gravitational wave frequencies from 100 to 300 Hz, and covers a wide range of first and second frequency derivatives appropriate for the age of the remnant and for different spin-down mechanisms. No gravitational wave signal was detected. Within the range of search frequencies, we set 95% confidence upper limits of 0.7--1.2e-24 on the intrinsic gravitational wave strain, 0.4--4e-4 on the equatorial ellipticity of the neutron star, and 0.005--0.14 on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations of the neutron star. These direct upper limits beat indirect limits derived from energy conservation and enter the range of theoretical predictions involving crystalline exotic matter or runaway r-modes. This is the first gravitational wave search to present upper limits on r-modes.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M. Abernathy; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; M. Aronsson; Y. Aso; S. Aston; D. E. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; J. Bauchrowitz; B. Behnke; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; R. Bondarescu; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; M. Boyle; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; M. Brinkmann; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. Capano; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; C. Cepeda; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; C. A. Costa; D. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; K. Danzmann; K. Das; B. Daudert; G. Davies; A. Davis; E. J. Daw; T. Dayanga; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; P. Devanka; S. Dhurandhar; I. Di Palma; M. Díaz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; S. Dorsher; E. S. D. Douglas; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; J. Dueck; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; R. Engel; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; L. S. Finn; M. Flanigan; K. Flasch; S. Foley; C. Forrest; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. A. Garofoli; I. Gholami; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; C. Graef; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; P. Hall; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Howell; D. Hoyland; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh--Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; H. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; D. Kozak; T. Krause; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; G. Kuehn; J. Kullman; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; M. Landry; M. Lang; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; J. Leong; I. Leonor; J. Li; H. Lin; P. E. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; J. Luan; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lück; A. Lundgren; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; C. Mak; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; S. Márka; Z. Márka; E. Maros; I. W. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. A. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. J. A. McKechan; G. Meadors; M. Mehmet; T. Meier; A. Melatos; A. C. Melissinos; G. Mendell; D. F. Menéndez; R. A. Mercer; L. Merill; S. Meshkov; C. Messenger; M. S. Meyer; H. Miao; J. Miller; Y. Mino; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; B. Moe; S. D. Mohanty; S. R. P. Mohapatra; D. Moraru; G. Moreno; T. Morioka; K. Mors; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; A. Mullavey; H. Müller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. G. Murray; T. Nash; R. Nawrodt; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; D. Nolting; E. Ochsner; J. O'Dell; G. H. Ogin; R. G. Oldenburg; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; C. Osthelder; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; A. Page; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; M. Pareja; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; L. Pekowsky; S. Penn; C. Peralta; A. Perreca; M. Pickenpack; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; V. Predoi; L. R. Price; M. Prijatelj; M. Principe; R. Prix; L. Prokhorov; O. Puncken; V. Quetschke; F. J. Raab; T. Radke; H. Radkins; P. Raffai; M. Rakhmanov; B. Rankins; V. Raymond; C. M. Reed; T. Reed; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen

2010-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

Applications Guide for Guided Wave Inspection Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, long-range ultrasonic guided wave technology has been emerging as a quick and economical method of obtaining a comprehensive view of the condition of piping systems, tubing, and other components (including areas that are difficult to access) by launching and detecting waves from a remote accessible location. This report describes how ultrasonic guided waves can be applied for various components and systems. Guidance on surface preparation, generation of various wave modes, and interpreta...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

Preliminary Assessment and Use of ERS-1 Altimeter Wave Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The satellite ERS-1, launched in July 1991, carries a radar altimeter that provides collocated measurements of significant wave height and wind speed over the oceans. During the calibration period, significant wave height and wind speed ...

S. J. Foreman; M. W. Holt; S. Kelsall

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Low-Latitude Reflection of Rossby Wave Trains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nonlinear reflection of an isolated Rossby wave train at a low-latitude wave-breaking region is contrasted with the more familiar longitudinally periodic case. General theoretical arguments for nonlinear reflection based on absorptivity ...

G. Brunet; P. H. Haynes

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alfven Waves in the Lower Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of oscillatory phenomena associated with a large bright-point group that is 430,000 square kilometers in area and located near the solar disk center. Wavelet analysis reveals full-width half-maximum oscillations with periodicities ranging from 126 to 700 seconds originating above the bright point and significance levels exceeding 99%. These oscillations, 2.6 kilometers per second in amplitude, are coupled with chromospheric line-of-sight Doppler velocities with an average blue shift of 23 kilometers per second. A lack of cospatial intensity oscillations and transversal displacements rules out the presence of magneto-acoustic wave modes. The oscillations are a signature of Alfven waves produced by a torsional twist of +/-22 degrees. A phase shift of 180 degrees across the diameter of the bright point suggests that these torsional Alfven oscillations are induced globally throughout the entire brightening. The energy flux associated with this wave mode is sufficient to heat the solar coro...

Jess, D B; Erdelyi, R; Crockett, P J; Keenan, F P; Christian, D J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Wave propagation in photonic crystals and metamaterials: Surface waves, nonlinearity and chirality  

SciTech Connect

Photonic crystals and metamaterials, both composed of artificial structures, are two interesting areas in electromagnetism and optics. New phenomena in photonic crystals and metamaterials are being discovered, including some not found in natural materials. This thesis presents my research work in the two areas. Photonic crystals are periodically arranged artificial structures, mostly made from dielectric materials, with period on the same order of the wavelength of the working electromagnetic wave. The wave propagation in photonic crystals is determined by the Bragg scattering of the periodic structure. Photonic band-gaps can be present for a properly designed photonic crystal. Electromagnetic waves with frequency within the range of the band-gap are suppressed from propagating in the photonic crystal. With surface defects, a photonic crystal could support surface modes that are localized on the surface of the crystal, with mode frequencies within the band-gap. With line defects, a photonic crystal could allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves along the channels. The study of surface modes and waveguiding properties of a 2D photonic crystal will be presented in Chapter 1. Metamaterials are generally composed of artificial structures with sizes one order smaller than the wavelength and can be approximated as effective media. Effective macroscopic parameters such as electric permittivity {epsilon}, magnetic permeability {mu} are used to characterize the wave propagation in metamaterials. The fundamental structures of the metamaterials affect strongly their macroscopic properties. By designing the fundamental structures of the metamaterials, the effective parameters can be tuned and different electromagnetic properties can be achieved. One important aspect of metamaterial research is to get artificial magnetism. Metallic split-ring resonators (SRRs) and variants are widely used to build magnetic metamaterials with effective {mu} < 1 or even {mu} < 0. Varactor based nonlinear SRRs are built and modeled to study the nonlinearity in magnetic metamaterials and the results will be presented in Chapter 3. Negative refractive index n is one of the major target in the research of metamaterials. Negative n can be obtained with a metamaterial with both {epsilon} and {mu} negative. As an alternative, negative index for one of the circularly polarized waves could be achieved with metamaterials having a strong chirality ?. In this case neither {epsilon} nor {mu} negative is required. My work on chiral metamaterials will be presented in Chapter 4.

Wang, Bingnan

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accurate prediction of wave runup on deepwater offshore platform columns is of great importance for design engineers. Although linear predictive models are commonly used in the design and analysis process, many of the important effects are of higher order, and thus can only be accounted for by complex nonlinear models that better reflect the physics of the problem. This study presents a two-parameter Weibull distribution function that utilizes empirical coefficients to model the surface wave runup. Laboratory measurements of irregular waves interfering with vertical platform cylinders were used to obtain the Weibull coefficients necessary for the analytical model. Six data sets with different configurations where the wave elevation was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis and spectral analysis were utilized to characterize and interpret the time series data. The analysis focused on interpreting the tails of the probability distributions by carefully fitting the analytical model to the measured model data. The main conclusion of this study is that the two-parameter Weibull model can be used to accurately model the wave runup on platform cylinders for the experimental data investigated in this study.

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Active period Sleep period Active period Sleep period Fig. 1. Sleep-awake cycles of SMAC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cycle Active period Sleep period Active period Sleep period SYNC usage DATA usage time Fig. 1 Yang and Wendi Heinzelman Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester duty cycles. Since a smaller duty cycle leads to a longer network lifetime but lower throughput

Heinzelman, Wendi

94

RADIO RANGING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

Nieset, R.T.

1961-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

High accuracy periodic solutions to the Sivashinsky equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work is the accurate calculation of periodic solutions to the Sivashinsky equation, which models dynamics of the long wave instability of laminar premixed flame. A highly accurate computational algorithm was developed in both one and ...

V. Karlin; V. Maz'ya; G. Schmidt

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

PERIODIC MOTION IN HIGH-SYMMETRIC FLOW Lennaert van Veen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is supplied by fixing the smallest wave number components of velocity. The smallest wave number corresponding to a nonzero velocity component is kf = |kf | = 11 and the energy of these fixed components is Ef = 3PERIODIC MOTION IN HIGH-SYMMETRIC FLOW Lennaert van Veen Department of Mechanical Engineering

van Veen, Lennaert

97

Equatorial Kelvin Waves: A UARS MLS View  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to compare two periods of Kelvin wave activity during different stages of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation. The analysis is carried out ...

Pablo O. Canziani; James R. Holton; Evan Fishbein; Lucien Froidevaux; Joe W. Waters

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Wave Extremes in the Northeast Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to compute 100-yr return value estimates of significant wave height using a new hindcast developed by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute. This regional hindcast covers the northeast Atlantic and spans the period ...

Ole Johan Aarnes; Řyvind Breivik; Magnar Reistad

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Atmospheric Gravity Waves and Aircraft Turbulence Encounters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe aircraft turbulence-atmospheric gravity wave events which occurred during a 2-day period over the Continental Divide. The waves are observed by two microbarograph networks an each side of the divide and last for several hours at a ...

A. J. Bedard Jr.; F. Canavero; F. Einaudi

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Statistics of Extreme Waves in Random Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves traveling through random media exhibit random focusing that leads to extremely high wave intensities even in the absence of nonlinearities. Although such extreme events are present in a wide variety of physical systems and the statistics of the highest waves is important for their analysis and forecast, it remains poorly understood in particular in the regime where the waves are highest. We suggest a new approach that greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis and calculate the scaling and the distribution of the highest waves valid for a wide range of parameters.

Jakob J. Metzger; Ragnar Fleischmann; Theo Geisel

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Oceanic Internal Waves Are Not Weak Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the oceanic internal wave field is too energetic by roughly two orders of magnitude to be treated theoretically as an assemblage of weakly interacting waves. This may be seen both from recent weak wave theoretical calculations ...

Greg Holloway

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Long range dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion of long range dependence is discussed from a variety of points of view, and a new approach is suggested. A number of related topics is also discussed, including connections with non-stationary processes, with ergodic theory, self-similar processes ... Keywords: large deviations, long range dependence, rare events

Gennady Samorodnitsky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

On the Damping of Free Coastal-Trapped Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A perturbative method is presented for estimating the decay time of subinertial coastal-trapped waves under a wide range of conditions where damping is relatively weak. Bottom friction is sometimes much more important than “long-wave” results ...

K. H. Brink

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Short-period global atmospheric waves revealed by nightglow observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The night-time emissions of OH (6-2) and the O2 Atmospheric System (0-1) have been observed at Maimaga (63.1° N, 129.6° E) during the winters of 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 and revealed steady-frequency atmospheric oscillations near the mesopause ...

Natalia Karpova; Gustav Shved; Svetlana Ermolenko; Petr Ammosov; Galina Gavrilyeva; Elena Savenkova

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Effect of Current Shear on Topographic Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topographic Rossby waves are long-period waves which occur on continental slopes. In this paper we examine the effect of a mean current on these waves, when the current is directed along the isobaths and has a linear shear in the transverse ...

I. L. Collings; R. Grimshaw

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Topology optimization for the design of periodic microstructures composed of electromagnetic materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electromagnetic structures that incorporate certain structural periodicities are known to display special behavior when subjected to electromagnetic waves, and can be designed to have specific functions such as inhibiting the intrusion of electromagnetic ... Keywords: Electromagnetic field, Periodic boundary, Topology optimization

Tsuyoshi Nomura; Shinji Nishiwaki; Kazuo Sato; Koichi Hirayama

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Unimodal wave trains and solitons in convex FPU chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider atomic chains with nearest neighbour interactions and study periodic and homoclinic travelling waves which are called wave trains and solitons, respectively. Our main result is a new existence proof which relies on the constrained maximisation of the potential energy and exploits the invariance properties of an improvement operator. The approach is restricted to convex interaction potentials but refines the standard results as it provides the existence of travelling waves with unimodal and even profile functions. Moreover, we discuss the numerical approximation and complete localization of wave trains, and show that wave trains converge to solitons when the periodicity length tends to infinity.

Michael Herrmann

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

Trajectory eigenmodes of an orbiting wave source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resonances usually result from wave superpositions in cavities where they are due to the wave spatio-temporal folding imposed by the boundaries. These energy accumulations are the signature of the cavity eigenmodes. Here we study a situation in which wave superposition results from the motion of a source emitting sustained overlapping waves. It is found that resonances can be produced in an unbounded space, the boundary conditions being now defined by the trajectory. When periodic trajectories are investigated, it is found that for a discrete subset of orbits, resonant wave modes are excited. Trajectory eigenmodes thus emerge. These modes have three attributes. Their associated resonant wave fields are the Fourier transform of the source's trajectory. They are non-radiative and they satisfy the perimeter Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule.

Emmanuel Fort; Yves Couder

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Calculation of Extreme Wave Loads on Coastal Highway Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal bridges are exposed to severe wave, current and wind forces during a hurricane. Most coastal bridges are not designed to resist wave loads in such extreme situations, and there are no existing analytical methods to calculate wave loads on coastal highway bridges. This study focuses on developing a new scheme to estimate the extreme wave loads on bridges for designing purpose. In order to do this, a 2D wave velocity potential model (2D Model) is set up for the deterministic analysis of wave force on bridge decks. 2D Model is a linear wave model, which has the capability of calculating wave velocity potential components in time domain based on wave parameters such as wave height, wave period and water depth, and complex structural geometries. 2D Model has Laplace equation as general equation. The free surface boundary, incoming and outgoing wave boundary conditions are linearized, decomposed first, and then solved by the finite difference method. Maximum wave forces results calculated by the linear 2D Model are compared with results from CFD software Flow3D that is using Navier Stokes theory up to the 5th order; and 2D Model is validated by comparing results with experiment data. A case study is conducted for calculating extreme wave forces on I-10 Bridge across Escambia Bay, Florida during Hurricane Ivan in September 2004.SWAN model is adapted to investigate the parameters of wave heights and wave periods around bridge sites. SWAN model has the capability of predicting or hindcasting significant wave heights and wave periods as long as the domain and input parameters are given. The predicted significant wave heights are compared with measurements by Buoy Station 42039 and 42040 nearest to Escambia Bay. A new prediction equation of maximum uplift wave forces on bridge decks is developed in terms of wave height, wave period, water depth, bridge width, water clearance and over top water load. To develop the equations, the relationship is investigated between maximum uplift wave forces and wave parameters, water clearance, green water effects and bridge width. 2D Model is used for up to 1886 cases with difference parameters. Flow3D model is adopted to determine coefficients of water clearance and green water effects, which cannot be calculated by 2D Model.

Meng, Bo

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

RADIO RANGING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

Bogle, R.W.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

High dynamic range imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current display devices can display only a limited range of contrast and colors, which is one of the main reasons that most image acquisition, processing, and display techniques use no more than eight bits per color channel. This course outlines recent ...

Paul Debevec; Erik Reinhard; Greg Ward; Sumanta Pattanaik

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Wave–Wave Interaction of Unstable Baroclinic Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two slightly unstable baroclinic waves in the two-layer Phillips model are allowed to interact with each other as well as the mean flow. A theory for small dissipation rates is developed to examine the role of wave–wave interaction in the ...

Joseph Pedlosky; Lorenzo M. Polvani

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Budget Period 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Budget Period 1 Budget Period 1 Budget Period 2 Budget Period 3 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% PMC123.1 - Budget Justification for SF 424A Budget 0 Additional Explanations/Comments (as necessary) *IMPORTANT: In the space provided below (or as an attachment) provide a complete explanation and the full calculations used to derive the total indirect costs. If the total indirect costs are a cumulative amount of more than one calculation or rate application, the explanation and calculations should identify all rates used, along with the base they were applied to (and how the base was derived), and a total for each (along with grand total). The rates and how they are applied should not be averaged to get one indirect cost percentage. NOTE: The indirect rate should be applied to both the Federal Share and Recipient Cost Share.

114

Study on wave impact force prediction of different shore connecting structure based on improved BP neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the advanced Neural Network technology was introduced to the field of the wave impact force prediction. A three-layered BP neural network is employed and the units of input layer are wave style, wave period, incident wave height, relative ... Keywords: BP, prediction, shore connecting structure, wave impact force

Xiaoguo Zhou; Shuguang Luan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Notices This document is intended for the exclusive use of elements of the Department of Energy (DOE), to include the National Nuclear Security Administration, their contractors, and other government agencies/individuals authorized to use DOE facilities. DOE disclaims any and all liability for personal injury or property damage due to use of this document in any context by any organization, group, or individual, other than during official government activities. Local DOE management is responsible for the proper execution of firearms-related programs for

116

The Sandia Wave Reflector  

The Sandia wave reflector is a magnetic conductor for wireless transmissions near 433 MHz. The device reflects perpendicular electromagnetic waves in-phase and suppresses surface waves resulting in improved gain performance and effective operation ...

117

Geostrophic Shock Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organized depth discontinuities involving a balance between steepening and dissipation are usually referred to as shock waves. An analytical “educed gravity” model is used to examine a special kind of shock wave. The wave under study is a depth ...

Doron Nof

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Thunderstorm Bow Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thunderstorm solitary gust or bow wave, observed by Doviak and Ge, is examined from the viewpoint of boundary layer wave theory. It is concluded that all its well defined characteristics are consistently modeled as a bow wave of ducted ...

G. Chimonas; Carmen J. Nappo

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Real-Time Quality Control of Wave Observations in the North Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of ocean wave data in new data assimilation techniques prompted the development of a real-time quality control system for wave height and wave period observations. Over the North Sea, a relatively large number of wave observations, as ...

María Paula Etala; Gerrit Burgers

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

On the Heating of the Solar Corona and the Acceleration of the Low-Speed Solar Wind by Acoustic Waves Generated in Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate possibilities of solar coronal heating by acoustic waves generated not at the photosphere but in the corona, aiming at heating in the mid- to low-latitude corona where the low-speed wind is expected to come from. Acoustic waves of period tau ~ 100s are triggered by chromospheric reconnection, one model of small scale magnetic reconnection events recently proposed by Sturrock. These waves having a finite amplitude eventually form shocks to shape sawtooth waves (N-waves), and directly heat the surrounding corona by dissipation of their wave energy. Outward propagation of the N-waves is treated based on the weak shock theory, so that the heating rate can be evaluated consistently with physical properties of the background coronal plasma without setting a dissipation length in an ad hoc manner. We construct coronal structures from the upper chromosphere to the outside of 1AU for various inputs of the acoustic waves having a range of energy flux of F_{w,0} = (1-20) times 10^5 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} and a period of tau = 60-300s. The heating by the N-wave dissipation effectively works in the inner corona and we find that the waves of F_{w,0} >= 2 times 10^5 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} and tau >= 60s could maintain peak coronal temperature, T_{max} > 10^6 K. The model could also reproduce the density profile observed in the streamer region. However, due to its short dissipation length, the location of T_{max} is closer to the surface than the observation, and the resultant flow velocity of the solar wind is lower than the observed profile of the low-speed wind. The cooperations with other heating and acceleration sources with the larger dissipation length are inevitable to reproduce the real solar corona.

Takeru Ken Suzuki

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Model of the Air–Sea Momentum Flux and Breaking-Wave Distribution for Strongly Forced Wind Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under high-wind conditions, breaking surface waves likely play an important role in the air–sea momentum flux. A coupled wind–wave model is developed based on the assumption that in the equilibrium range of surface wave spectra the wind stress is ...

Tobias Kukulka; Tetsu Hara; Stephen E. Belcher

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Periodic load balancing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiprocessor load balancing aims to improve performance by moving jobs from highly loaded processors to more lightly loaded processors. Some schemes allow only migration of new jobs upon arrival, while other schemes allow migration of ... Keywords: heavy traffic diffusion approximations, load balancing, periodic load balancing, reflected Brownian motion, resource sharing, transient behavior

Gísli Hjálmtýsson; Ward Whitt

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Lunar Laser Ranging Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data provides science results: gravitational physics and ephemeris information from the orbit, lunar science from rotation and solid-body tides, and Earth science. Sensitive tests of gravitational physics include the Equivalence Principle, limits on the time variation of the gravitational constant G, and geodetic precession. The equivalence principle test is used for an accurate determination of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter \\beta. Lunar ephemerides are a product of the LLR analysis used by current and future spacecraft missions. The analysis is sensitive to astronomical parameters such as orbit, masses and obliquity. The dissipation-caused semimajor axis rate is 37.9 mm/yr and the associated acceleration in orbital longitude is -25.7 ''/cent^2, dominated by tides on Earth with a 1% lunar contribution. Lunar rotational variation has sensitivity to interior structure, physical properties, and energy dissipation. The second-degree lunar Love numbers are detected; k_2 has an accuracy of 11%. Lunar tidal dissipation is strong and its Q has a weak dependence on tidal frequency. A fluid core of about 20% the Moon's radius is indicated by the dissipation data. Evidence for the oblateness of the lunar fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary is getting stronger. This would be independent evidence for a fluid lunar core. Moon-centered coordinates of four retroreflectors are determined. Station positions and motion, Earth rotation variations, nutation, and precession are determined from analyses. Extending the data span and improving range accuracy will yield improved and new scientific results. Adding either new retroreflectors or precise active transponders on the Moon would improve the accuracy of the science results.

James G. Williams; Dale H. Boggs; Slava G. Turyshev; J. Todd Ratcliff

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Derivation of transformation equations for the parameters that characterize a plane acoustic wave without using phase invariance and Lorentz-Einstein transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the transformation equations for the parameters that characterize a plane acoustic wave: period, (frequency), wave vector, wave length and phase velocity can be derived without using phase invariance and Lorentz-Einstein transformation

Bernhard Rothenstein

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

Energy Flux and Generation of Diurnal Shelf Waves along Vancouver Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations along the west coast of Vancouver Island reveal among diurnal-period currents due to a tidally driven continental shelf wave superimposed upon a Kelvin wave. The energy flux of this system is investigated here. It is shown ...

William R. Crawford

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN TWO-RIBBON FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate that disturbances observed to propagate along the axis of the arcade in two-ribbon solar flares at the speed of a few tens of km s{sup -1}, well below the Alfven and sound speeds, can be interpreted in terms of slow magnetoacoustic waves. The waves can propagate across the magnetic field, parallel to the magnetic neutral line, because of the wave-guiding effect due to the reflection from the footpoints. The perpendicular group speed of the perturbation is found to be a fraction of the sound speed, which is consistent with observations. The highest value of the group speed grows with the increase in the ratio of the sound and Alfven speeds. For a broad range of parameters, the highest value of the group speed corresponds to the propagation angle of 25 deg. - 28 deg. to the magnetic field. This effect can explain the temporal and spatial structure of quasi-periodic pulsations observed in two-ribbon flares.

Nakariakov, V. M. [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Zimovets, I. V., E-mail: V.Nakariakov@warwick.ac.uk [Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya Street 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Effective Rate Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiscal Year 2014 Fiscal Year 2014 Effective Rate Period As of Beginning of the FY 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Mid-Year Changes (if applicable) 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement $73,441,557 CV-F13 Base Resource Revenue Requirement $69,585,875 First Preference Revenue Requirement $3,855,682

130

Fundamental Guided Wave Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental Guided Wave Metrology. Summary: ... The program is focused on fundamental measurement research for microwave parameters. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

On occult period maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the "occult" period maps into ball quotients which exist for the moduli spaces of cubic surfaces, cubic threefolds, non-hyperelliptic curves of genus three and four. These were constructed in the work of Allcock/Carlson/Toledo, Looijenga/Swierstra, and Kondo. We interpret these maps as morphisms into moduli spaces of polarized abelian varieties of Picard type, and show that these morphisms, whose initial construction is transcendental, are defined over the natural field of definition of the spaces involved. This paper is extracted from section 15 of our paper arXiv:0912.3758, and differs from it only in some points of exposition.

Kudla, Stephen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Shock Dynamics in Layered Periodic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions of constant-coefficient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coefficients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

David I Ketcheson; Randall J. LeVeque

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

An Experiment on the Nonbreaking Surface-Wave-Induced Vertical Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixing induced by nonbreaking surface waves was investigated in a wave tank by measuring the thermal destratification rate of the water column. One experiment without waves and four experiments with waves of amplitudes ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 cm ...

Dejun Dai; Fangli Qiao; Wojciech Sulisz; Lei Han; Alexander Babanin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Downward Wave Coupling between the Stratosphere and Troposphere: The Importance of Meridional Wave Guiding and Comparison with Zonal-Mean Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of downward wave coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere in both hemispheres is analyzed using the 40-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40) dataset. Downward wave coupling occurs ...

Tiffany A. Shaw; Judith Perlwitz; Nili Harnik

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Watching Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the vicinity of merging neutron strar binaries or supernova remnants, gravitational waves can interact with the prevailing strong magnetic fields. The resulting partial conversion of gravitational waves into electromagnetic (radio) waves might prove to be an indirect way of detecting gravitational waves from such sources. Another interesting interaction considered in this article is the excitation of magnetosonic plasma waves by a gravitational wave passing through the surrounding plasma. The transfer of gravitational wave energy into the plasma might help to fuel the `fireball' of electromagnetic radiation observed in gamma ray bursts. In the last section of the article, a dispersion relation is derived for such magnetosonic plasma waves driven by a gravitational wave.

Joachim Moortgat

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Long-Wave Infrared Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared: Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features

137

Equatorial Atmospheric Waves and Their Association to Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equatorial wave systems and their relationships with convective activity are analyzed in the western and central Pacific regions during the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) intensive observation periods. The study uses ...

P. Pires; J-L. Redelsperger; J-P. Lafore

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Direct Observations of Coherent Backscatter of Radar Waves in Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous work, it was argued that a source of radar coherent scatter occurs in the direction perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation because of the presence of grids of enhanced particle concentrations with spatial periodicities in ...

A. R. Jameson; A. B. Kostinski

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Global Estimates of Extreme Wind Speed and Wave Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-term dataset of satellite altimeter measurements of significant wave height and wind speed, spanning 23 years, is analyzed to determine extreme values corresponding to a 100-yr return period. The analysis considers the suitability of both ...

J. Vinoth; I. R. Young

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A study of the gravitational wave form from pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present analytical and numerical studies of the Fourier transform (FT) of the gravitational wave (GW) signal from a pulsar,taking into account the rotation of the Earth for a one day observation period.

S. R. Valluri; F. A. Chishtie; R. G. Biggs; M. Davison; Sanjeev V. Dhurandhar; B. S. Sathyaprakash

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Infragravity Edge Wave Observations on Two California Beaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavenumber-frequency spectra of the infragravity (periods 20-200 sec) wave velocity field in the surf zone of two California beaches are estimated. Because the longshore arrays of biaxial electromagnetic current meters are relatively short (...

Joan Oltman-Shay; R. T. Guza

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Avoided-Level-Crossing Spectroscopy with Dressed Matter Waves  

SciTech Connect

We devise a method for probing resonances of macroscopic matter waves in shaken optical lattices by monitoring their response to slow parameter changes, and show that such resonances can be disabled by particular choices of the driving amplitude. The theoretical analysis of this scheme reveals far-reaching analogies between dressed atoms and time periodically forced matter waves.

Eckardt, Andre [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Holthaus, Martin [Institut fuer Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Automation Schemes for FPGA Implementation of Wave-Pipelined Circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating frequencies of combinational logic circuits can be increased using Wave-Pipelining (WP), by adjusting the clock periods and clock skews. In this article, Built-In Self-Test (BIST) and System-on-Chip (SOC) approaches are proposed for automating ... Keywords: CORDIC, DAA, FPGA, SOC, pipelining, wave-pipelining

G. Seetharaman; B. Venkataramani

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gravity Waves from Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravity waves generated by severe thunderstorms in the eastern Ohio-Pennsylvania area were recorded by an array of microbarovariographs at Palisades, New York and by standard microbarographs across northeastern United States. The waves were ...

Nambath K. Balachandran

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Propagating MHD waves in coronal holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronal holes are the coolest and darkest regions of the solar atmosphere, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. During the years of the solar minima, coronal holes are generally confined to the Sun's polar regions, while at solar maxima they can also be found at lower latitudes. Waves, observed via remote sensing and detected in-situ in the wind streams, are most likely responsible for the wind and several theoretical models describe the role of MHD waves in the acceleration of the fast solar wind. This paper reviews the observational evidences of detection of propa- gating waves in these regions. The characteristics of the waves, like periodicities, amplitude, speed provide input parameters and also act as constraints on theoretical models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration.

Banerjee, D; Teriaca, L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Waves at 200 mb during GATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 200 mb data set obtained during the GATE experiment of the 1974 summer for the period 15 June-23 September and covering the global tropics 25°S to 45°N has been analyzed to determine the presence of certain wave modes in the tropical ...

Colin A. Depradine

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Water waves over strongly undulating bottom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-dimensional free-surface potential flows of an ideal fluid over a strongly inhomogeneous bottom are investigated with the help of conformal mappings. Weakly-nonlinear and exact nonlinear equations of motion are derived by the variational method for arbitrary seabed shape parameterized by an analytical function. The band structure of linear waves over periodic bottoms is calculated.

Ruban, V P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Quantitative enhancement of fatigue crack monitoring by imaging surface acoustic wave reflection in a space-cycle-load domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface wave acoustic method is applied to the in-situ monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and evolution on tension specimens. A small low-frequency periodic loading is also applied, resulting in a nonlinear modulation of reflected pulses. The acoustic wave reflections are collected for: each experimental cycle; a range of applied tension and modulation load levels; and a range of spatial propagation positions, and are presented in image form to aid pattern identification. Salient features of the image are then extracted and processed to evaluate the initiation time of the crack and its subsequent size evolution until sample failure. Additionally, a method for enhancing signal to noise ratio in Ti-6242 alloy samples is demonstrated.

Connolly, G. D.; Rokhlin, S. I. [Ohio State University, Edison Joining Technology Center, 1248 Arthur E Adams Drive, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Effect of Wave Breaking on the Wave Energy Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of wave breaking on the wave energy spectral shape is examined. The Stokes wave-breaking criterion is first extended to random waves and a breaking wave model is established in which the elevation of breaking waves is expressed in ...

C. C. Tung; N. E. Huang

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Evolution with size in a locally periodic system: Scattering and deterministic maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the evolution of the wave function with the system size in a locally periodic structure. In particular we analyse the dependence of the wave function with the number of unit cells, which also reflects information about its spatial behaviour in the system. We reduce the problem to a nonlinear map and find an equivalence of its energy regions of single periodicity and of weak chaos, with the forbidden and allowed bands of the fully periodic system, respectively. At finite size the wave function decays exponentially with system size, as well as in space, when the energy lies inside a region of single periodicity, while for energies in the weak chaotic region never decays. At the transition between those regions the wave function still decays but in a $q$-exponential form; we found that the decay length is a half of the mean free path, which is larger than the lattice constant.

V. Dominguez-Rocha; M. Martinez-Mares

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Higher Fourier Harmonics of the Directional Distribution of an Equilibrium Wave Field under Steady Wind Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, directional wave spectra have been obtained by applying the two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D FFT) to the three-dimensional spatial topography of ocean surface waves collected by an airborne scanning laser ranging system during ...

David W. Wang; Paul A. Hwang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Synoptic Setting and Possible Energy Sources for Mesoscale Wave Disturbances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen case studies of mesoscale wave disturbances (characterized by either a singular wave of depression or wave packets with periods of 1–4 h, horizontal wavelengths of 50–500 km, and surface pressure perturbation amplitudes of 0.2–7.0 mb) ...

Louis W. Uccellini; Steven E. Koch

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the Northern Cascade Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Hook, Reference Librarian, University of Idaho Library,Moscow, Idaho 83844-2350, (208) 885-6066.Robert D. Hook University of Idaho, USA Fred Beckey. Range

Hook, Robert D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Periodicity estimation of Dynamic Textures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic Textures (DTs) are image sequences of natural events like fire, smoke, water etc., that possesses regular motion patterns. Periodicity is a widely used tool to analyse regular structures of periodic one dimensional signals as well as two dimensional ... Keywords: co-occurrence matrix, dynamic textures, image sequences, image texture analysis, motion patterns, natural events, periodicity estimation, temporal textures

Khalid Zaman Bijon; Ahmed Hasan; Ashfaqur Rahman; Manzur Murshed

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Short-range force between two Higgs bosons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The $S$-wave scattering length and the effective range of the Higgs boson in Standard Model are studied using effective-field-theory approach. After incorporating the first-order electroweak correction, the short-range force between two Higgs bosons remains weakly attractive for $M_H=126$ GeV. It is interesting to find that the force range is about two order-of-magnitude larger than the Compton wavelength of the Higgs boson, almost comparable with the typical length scale of the strong interaction.

Feng Feng; Yu Jia; Wen-Long Sang

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

MHK Technologies/Wave Water Pump WWP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pump WWP Pump WWP < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Water Pump WWP.gif Technology Profile Primary Organization Renewable Energy Wave Pumps Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Description The Water Wave Pump WWP is a point absorber that uses a submerged water pump to lift a small quantity of water to a higher head collect it in a piping network and feed it to a hydro turbine to produce power Mooring Configuration Gravity base installed at the sea bed Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions The REWP can pump water to a hgih head fro waves ranging between 1 2 meters to waves in excess of 4 meters high It self adjusts to varyilng sea levels and wave hights It resists storms safe to navigation as red floats are clearly seen during the day and red flashing lights during the night It does not disturb marine life or shore line scenic view

157

Periodic long-range transport in a large volume dc glow discharge dusty plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Lett. 68, 313 1992 . 4 M. Horanyi and D. A. Mendis, J. Geophys. Res. 294, 357 1985 . 5 D. A. Mendis

Thomas Jr., Edward

158

Continuous two-wave lasing in microchip Nd : YAG lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous two-wave lasing was obtained in microchip end-pumped Nd:YAG lasers at the wavelengths of 1061.5 and 1064.17 nm at room temperature. Laser wave intensities were studied as functions of crystal temperature and pump power. The ranges of parameters were determined in which the two-wave lasing occurs and the reasons for such lasing were established. A model is suggested, which adequately describes the experimental results obtained. (control of radiation parameters)

Ievlev, Ivan V; Koryukin, Igor' V; Lebedeva, Yu S; Khandokhin, Pavel A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Detectability of gravitational waves from phase transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravitational waves potentially represent our only direct probe of the universe when it was less than one second old. In particular, first-order phase transitions in the early universe can generate a stochastic background of gravitational waves which may be detectable today. We briefly summarize the physical sources of gravitational radiation from phase transitions and present semianalytic expressions for the resulting gravitational wave spectra from three distinct realistic sources: bubble collisions, turbulent plasma motions, and inverse-cascade helical magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Using phenomenological parameters to describe phase transition properties, we determine the region of parameter space for which gravitational waves can be detected by the proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The electroweak phase transition is detectable for a wide range of parameters.

Kahniashvili, Tina [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); CCPP, New York University, 4 Washington Plaza, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6 (Canada); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Kosowsky, Arthur [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Gogoberidze, Grigol [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Maravin, Yurii [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Homogenization for Periodic Heterogeneous Materials with Arbitrary Position-Dependent Material Properties  

SciTech Connect

We present a rigorous homogenization approach for efficient computation of a class of physical problems in a one-dimensional periodic heterogeneous material. This material is represented by a spatially periodic array of unit cells with a length of e. More specifically, the method is applied to the diffusion, heat conduction, and wave propagation problems. Heterogeneous materials can have arbitrary position-dependent continuous or discontinuous materials properties (for example heat conductivity) within the unit cell. The final effective model includes both effective properties at the leading order and high-order contributions due to the microscopic heterogeneity. A dimensionless heterogeneity parameter ß is defined to represent high-order contributions, shown to be in the range of [-1/12, 0], and has a universal expression for all three problems. Both effective properties and heterogeneity parameter ß are independent of e, the microscopic scale of heterogeneity. The homogenized solution describing macroscopic variations can be obtained from the effective model. Solution with sub-unit-cell accuracy can be constructed based on the homogenized solution and its spatial derivatives. The paper represents a general approach to obtain the effective model for arbitrary periodic heterogeneous materials with position-dependent properties.

Xu Zhi-Jie

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electrically Dressed Ultralong-Range Polar Rydberg Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the impact of an electric field on the structure of ultralong-range polar diatomic Rydberg molecules. Both the s-wave and p-wave interactions of the Rydberg electron and the neutral ground state atom are taken into account. In the presence of the electric field the angular degree of freedom between the electric field and the internuclear axis acquires vibrational character and we encounter two-dimensional oscillatory adiabatic potential energy surfaces with an antiparallel equilibrium configuration. The electric field allows to shift the corresponding potential wells in such a manner that the importance of the p-wave interaction can be controlled and the individual wells are energetically lowered at different rates. As a consequence the equilibrium configuration and corresponding energetically lowest well move to larger internuclear distances for increasing field strength. For strong fields the admixture of non-polar molecular Rydberg states leads to the possibility of exciting the large angula...

Kurz, Markus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Resonant Forcing of Mixed Layer Inertial Motions by Atmospheric Easterly Waves in the Northeast Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westward-propagating atmospheric easterly waves contribute to much of the variability of the low-level wind fields within the northeast tropical Pacific. With the dominant period of these waves (3–5 days) close to the local inertial period (2.4 ...

John B. Mickett; Yolande L. Serra; Meghan F. Cronin; Matthew H. Alford

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nonlinear fan instability of electromagnetic waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the linear and nonlinear stages of the fan instability, considering electromagnetic waves of the whistler frequency range interacting resonantly with energetic electron fluxes in magnetized plasmas. The main attention is paid to determine the wave-particle interaction processes that can lead to the excitation of intense electromagnetic waves by nonequilibrium particle distributions involving suprathermal tails, and to explain under what conditions and through what mechanisms they can occur, develop, and saturate. This paper presents and discusses two main processes: (i) the linear fan instability and (ii) the nonlinear process of dynamical resonance merging, which can significantly amplify the energy carried by linearly destabilized waves after they saturate due to particle trapping. This study consists of (i) determining analytically and numerically, for parameters typical of space and laboratory plasmas, the linear growth rates of whistlers excited by suprathermal particle fluxes through the fan instability, as well as the corresponding thresholds and the physical conditions at which the instability can appear, (ii) building a theoretical self-consistent 3D model and a related numerical code for describing the nonlinear evolution of the wave-particle system, and (iii) performing numerical simulations to reveal and characterize the nonlinear amplification process at work, its conditions of development, and its consequences, notably in terms of electromagnetic wave radiation. The simulations show that when the waves have reached sufficient energy levels owing to the linear fan instability, they saturate by trapping particles and due to the complex dynamics of these particles in the electromagnetic fields, the resonant velocities' domains of the waves overlap and merge, meanwhile a strong increase of the wave energy occurs.

Krafft, C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France) and University Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Volokitin, A. [Space Research Institute (IKI), 117997, 84/32 Profsoyuznaya Str., Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

WAVE REFLE TOR  

owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. SAND # 2013-8893 P WAVE REFLE TOR

166

RFI Comments - Wave Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These attacks, such as those planted by rootkits ... PwC leveraged the power of TPMs to ... Wave EMBASSY® Remote Administration Server (ERAS) has ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy Basics: Wave Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

168

Collapse of Alfven waves  

SciTech Connect

The growth rates are calculated for the collapse of Alfven waves in a low-..beta.. plasma. The relationship to rf heating is discussed.(AIP)

Erokhin, N.S.; Moiseev, S.S.; Mukhin, V.V.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wave localization as a manifestation of ray chaos in underwater acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave chaos is demonstrated by studying a wave propagation in a periodically corrugated wave-guide. In the limit of a short wave approximation (SWA) the underlying description is related to the chaotic ray dynamics. In this case the control parameter of the problem is characterized by the corrugation amplitude and the SWA parameter. The considered model is fairly suitable and tractable for the analytical analysis of a wave localization length. The number of eigenmodes characterized the width of the localized wave packet is estimated analytically.

A. Iomin; Yu. Bliokh

2007-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

170

Horizontal and Vertical Structure of Cross-Equatorial Wave Propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational evidence of interhemispheric wave propagation through the equatorial upper-tropospheric mean westerlies in the eastern Pacific Ocean is found in nine years (1980/81 to 1988/89) of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ...

Robert A. Tomas; Peter J. Webster

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dynamic Excitation of Internal Gravity Waves in the Equatorial Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is proposed that shear instability of the upper flank of the equatorial undercurrent may generate, under a broad range of conditions, downward propagating internal gravity waves (IGW) of large amplitude. The generation mechanism is shown to ...

B. R. Sutherland

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Coupling light to periodic nanostructures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes coupling of light to periodic structures. A material is patterned with a regular pattern on a length scale comparable to the wavelength… (more)

Driessen, Eduard Frans Clemens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Free-Wave Energy Dissipation in Experimental Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several transient wave trains containing an isolated plunging or spilling breaker at a prescribed location were generated in a two-dimensional wave flume using an energy focusing technique. Surface elevation measurements of each transient wave ...

Eustorgio Meza; Jun Zhang; Richard J. Seymour

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shutdown Planning Shutdown Planning Planning Templates Shutdown Planning Schedules: Current Shutdown Schedule Archives: 2006 - 2013 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule: 2014 Archives: 2013 | 2012 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule (Fiscal Year 2014) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2013-3 2014-1 2014-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

175

Orientation dynamics of weakly Brownian particles in periodic viscous flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution equations for the orientation distribution of axisymmetric particles in periodic flows are derived in the regime of small but non-zero Brownian rotations. The equations are based on a multiple time scale approach that allows fast computation of the relaxation processes leading to statistical equilibrium. The approach has been applied to the calculation of the effective viscosity of a thin disk suspension in gravity waves.

Piero Olla

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Resonantly Forced Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow, rotating layer of fluid that supports Rossby waves is subjected to turbulent friction through an Ekman layer at the bottom and is driven by a wave that exerts a shear stress on the upper boundary and for which the phase approximate ...

John Miles

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Property:Current Velocity Range(m/s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Range(m/s) Velocity Range(m/s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Current Velocity Range(m/s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Current Velocity Range(m/s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 3.2 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 0.0 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 0.0 +

178

Adaptively parallelizing distributed range queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of how to best parallelize range queries in a massive scale distributed database. In traditional systems the focus has been on maximizing parallelism, for example by laying out data to achieve the highest throughput. However, ...

Ymir Vigfusson; Adam Silberstein; Brian F. Cooper; Rodrigo Fonseca

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

180

Discontinuous bifurcations of periodic solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of bifurcations of periodic solutions in discontinuous systems. It is explained how jumps in the fundamental solution matrix lead to jumps of the Floquet multipliers of periodic solutions. A Floquet multiplier of ... Keywords: Bifurcation, Discontinuous, Dry friction, Stick-slip

R. I. Leine; D. H. Van Campen

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Wave Mechanics without Probability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of monochromatic electromagnetic waves in stationary media is shown to be ruled by a frequency dependent function, which we call Wave Potential, encoded in the structure of the Helmholtz equation. Contrary to the common belief that the very concept of "ray trajectory" is reserved to the eikonal approximation, a general and exact ray-based Hamiltonian treatment, reducing to the eikonal approximation in the absence of Wave Potential, shows that its presence induces a mutual, perpendicular ray-coupling, which is the one and only cause of any typically wave-like phenomenon, such as diffraction and interference. Recalling, then, that the time-independent Schroedinger and Klein-Gordon equations (associating stationary "matter waves" to mono-energetic particles) are themselves Helmholtz-like equations, the exact, ray-based treatment developed for classical electromagnetic waves is extended - without resorting to statistical concepts - to the exact, trajectory-based Hamiltonian dynamics of mono-energetic point-like particles, both in the non-relativistic and in the relativistic case. The trajectories turn out to be perpendicularly coupled, once more, by an exact, stationary, energy-dependent Wave Potential, coinciding in the form, but not in the physical meaning, with the statistical, time-varying, energy-independent "Quantum Potential" of Bohm's theory, which views particles, just like the standard Copenhagen interpretation, as traveling wave-packets. These results, together with the connection which is shown to exist between Wave Potential and Uncertainty Principle, suggest a novel, non-probabilistic interpretation of Wave Mechanics.

Adriano Orefice; Raffaele Giovanelli; Domenico Ditto

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

The road to gravitational-wave astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational-wave astronomy is an area of great promise, yet to be realized. While we are waiting for the first (undisputed!) direct detection of these elusive waves it is useful to take stock and consider the challenges that need to be met if we want this field to reach its full potential. This write-up provides a brief introduction to some of the key ideas and the current state-of-play, and lists a range of modelling questions that need to be considered in the future.

Andersson, N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Wave Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

turn, rotates a turbine. Specially built seagoing vessels can also capture the energy of offshore waves. These floating platforms create electricity by funneling waves through...

184

Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Add description List of Wave Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveEnergy&oldid267203" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

185

Evaluation of a Wind-Wave System for Ensemble Tropical Cyclone Wave Forecasting. Part II: Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wind-wave forecast system, designed with the intention of generating unbiased ensemble wave forecasts for extreme wind events, is assessed. Wave hindcasts for 12 tropical cyclones (TCs) are forced using a wind analysis produced from a ...

Steven M. Lazarus; Samuel T. Wilson; Michael E. Splitt; Gary A. Zarillo

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

Rogers, S.C.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

Rogers, Samuel C. (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

wave | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281559 Varnish cache server wave Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. Source Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Date Released December 05th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

190

Impact of Breaking Wave Form Drag on Near-Surface Turbulence and Drag Coefficient over Young Seas at High Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of breaking waves on near-surface wind turbulence and drag coefficient are investigated using large-eddy simulation. The impact of intermittent and transient wave breaking events (over a range of scales) is modeled as localized form ...

Nobuhiro Suzuki; Tetsu Hara; Peter P. Sullivan

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Correlated magnetic reversal in periodic stripe patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetization reversal in a periodic magnetic stripe array has been studied with a combination of direct and reciprocal space methods: Kerr microscopy and polarized neutron scattering. Kerr images show that during magnetization reversal over a considerable magnetic-field range a ripple domain state occurs in the stripes with magnetization components perpendicular to the stripes. Quantitative analysis of polarized neutron specular reflection, Bragg diffraction, and off-specular diffuse scattering provides a detailed picture of the mean magnetization direction in the ripple domains as well as longitudinal and transverse fluctuations, and reveals a strong correlation of those components over a number of stripes.

Theis-Broehl, Katharina; Toperverg, Boris P.; Leiner, Vincent; Westphalen, Andreas; Zabel, Hartmut; McCord, Jeffrey; Rott, Karsten; Brueckl, Hubert [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01169 Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics, University Bielefeld, Universitaetsstr. 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A study of the gravitational wave form from pulsars II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present analytical and numerical studies of the Fourier transform (FT) of the gravitational wave (GW) signal from a pulsar, taking into account the rotation and orbital motion of the Earth. We also briefly discuss the Zak-Gelfand Integral Transform. The Zak-Gelfand Integral Transform that arises in our analytic approach has also been useful for Schrodinger operators in periodic potentials in condensed matter physics (Bloch wave functions).

S. R. Valluri; J. J. Drozd; F. A. Chishtie; R. G. Biggs; M. Davison; S. V. Dhurandhar; B. S. Sathyaprakash

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

Forced Trench Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general theory for forced barotropic long trench waves in the presence of linear bottom friction is presented. Two specific forcing mechanisms are considered: (i) transverse fluctuations in a western boundary current as it flows across a trench,...

Lawrence A. Mysak; Andrew J. Willmott

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiation of Electron in the Field of Plane Light Wave  

SciTech Connect

Results of integration of a Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave are presented in the paper. It is shown that electron velocities in the field of the wave are almost periodic functions of time. For calculations of angular spectrum of electron radiation intensity expansion of the electromagnetic field in a wave zone into generalized Fourier series was used. Expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum are presented in the paper. Derived results are illustrated for electron and laser beam parameters of NSC KIPT X-ray generator NESTOR. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity.

Zelinsky, A.; Drebot, I.V.; Grigorev, Yu.N.; Zvonareva, O.D.; /Kharkov, KIPT; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

198

Range Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Range Fuels Name Range Fuels Address 11101 W. 120th Avenue Place Broomfield, Colorado Zip 80021 Sector Biomass Product Uses a thermochemical process to turn biomass into synthetic gas and then fuel Website http://www.rangefuels.com/ Coordinates 39.915572°, -105.122053° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.915572,"lon":-105.122053,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

199

Ocean Surface Wave Measurement Using a Steerable High-Frequency Narrow-Beam Ground Wave Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground wave radar is emerging as an important tool for routine monitoring of ocean surface conditions and for ship and sea-ice surveillance at ranges well beyond the line-of-sight horizon that limits conventional systems. A major Canadian advance ...

E. W. Gill; M. L. Khandekar; R. K. Howell; J. Walsh

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

WaveTurbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave CRAIG C. EPIFANIO AND TINGTING QIAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-breaking calculations. Of particular interest are the turbulent heat and momentum fluxes in the breaking wave fluxes on grid spacing is considered by computing a series of ensembles with grid spacings ranging from L are mostly resolved, but with increasing grid spacing, the resolved-scale fluxes decline

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Range gated strip proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

202

Range gated strip proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Design Considerations for Monopile Founded Offshore Wind Turbines Subject to Breaking Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of offshore wind farms utilize monopile substructures. As these wind farms are typically located in water depths less than 30 meters, the effect of breaking waves on these structures is of great concern to design engineers. This research investigation examines many of the practical considerations and alternative ways of estimating breaking wave forces. A survey of existing European wind farms is used to establish a realistic range of basic design parameters. Based upon this information a parametric study was pursued and a series of realistic design scenarios were evaluated. Comparisons include the sensitivity to the wave force model as well as to analytical and numerical wave theories used to evaluate the wave kinematics. In addition, the effect of different kinematics stretching techniques for linear waves is addressed. Establishing whether the bathymetry will induce spilling or plunging wave breaking is critical. Spilling wave breaking can be addressed using existing wave and wave force theories; however for plunging wave breaking an additional impact force must be introduced. Dimensionless design curves are used to display pertinent trends across the full range of design cases considered. This research study provides insight into the evaluation of the maximum breaking wave forces and overturning moment for both spilling and plunging breaking waves as a function of bottom slope.

Owens, Garrett 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

PERSISTENT DOPPLER SHIFT OSCILLATIONS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURES OF ALFVENIC WAVES AND RECURRING UPFLOWS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using data obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we have performed a survey of obvious and persistent (without significant damping) Doppler shift oscillations in the corona. We have found mainly two types of oscillations from February to April in 2007. One type is found at loop footpoint regions, with a dominant period around 10 minutes. They are characterized by coherent behavior of all line parameters (line intensity, Doppler shift, line width, and profile asymmetry), and apparent blueshift and blueward asymmetry throughout almost the entire duration. Such oscillations are likely to be signatures of quasi-periodic upflows (small-scale jets, or coronal counterpart of type-II spicules), which may play an important role in the supply of mass and energy to the hot corona. The other type of oscillation is usually associated with the upper part of loops. They are most clearly seen in the Doppler shift of coronal lines with formation temperatures between one and two million degrees. The global wavelets of these oscillations usually peak sharply around a period in the range of three to six minutes. No obvious profile asymmetry is found and the variation of the line width is typically very small. The intensity variation is often less than 2%. These oscillations are more likely to be signatures of kink/Alfven waves rather than flows. In a few cases, there seems to be a {pi}/2 phase shift between the intensity and Doppler shift oscillations, which may suggest the presence of slow-mode standing waves according to wave theories. However, we demonstrate that such a phase shift could also be produced by loops moving into and out of a spatial pixel as a result of Alfvenic oscillations. In this scenario, the intensity oscillations associated with Alfvenic waves are caused by loop displacement rather than density change. These coronal waves may be used to investigate properties of the coronal plasma and magnetic field.

Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover St., Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Innes, Davina E.; Peter, Hardi, E-mail: htian@ucar.edu [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

Stevens, Fred J. (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

207

High-temperature thermodynamics of strongly interacting s-wave and p-wave Fermi gases in a harmonic trap  

SciTech Connect

We theoretically investigate the high-temperature thermodynamics of a strongly interacting trapped Fermi gas near either s-wave or p-wave Feshbach resonances, using a second-order quantum virial expansion. The second virial coefficient is calculated based on the energy spectrum of two interacting fermions in a harmonic trap. We consider both isotropic and anisotropic harmonic potentials. For the two-fermion interaction, either s-wave or p-wave, we use a pseudopotential parametrized by a scattering length and an effective range. This turns out to be the simplest way of encoding the energy dependence of the low-energy scattering amplitude or phase shift. This treatment of the pseudopotential can be easily generalized to higher partial-wave interactions. We discuss how the second virial coefficient and thermodynamics are affected by the existence of these finite-range interaction effects. The virial expansion result for a strongly interacting s-wave Fermi gas has already been proved very useful. In the case of p-wave interactions, our results for the high-temperature equation of state are applicable to future high-precision thermodynamic measurements for a spin-polarized Fermi gas near a p-wave Feshbach resonance.

Peng Shiguo [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia); Li Shiqun [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Drummond, Peter D.; Liu Xiaji [Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Diffraction of surface wave on conducting rectangular wedge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffraction of a surface wave on a rectangular wedge with impedance faces is studied using the Sommerfeld-Malyuzhinets technique. An analog of Landau's bypass rule in the theory of plasma waves is introduced for selection of a correct branch of the Sommerfeld integral, and the exact solution is given in terms of imaginary error function. The formula derived is valid both in the near-field and far-wave zones. It is shown that a diffracted surface wave is completely scattered into freely propagating electromagnetic waves and neither reflected nor transmitted surface waves are generated in case of bare metals which have positive real part of surface impedance. The scattered waves propagate predominantly at a grazing angle along the direction of propagation of the incident surface wave and mainly in the upper hemisphere regarding the wedge face. The profile of radiated intensity is nonmonotonic and does not resemble the surface wave profile which exponentially evanesces with the distance from the wedge face. Comparison with experiments carried out in the terahertz spectral range at Novosibirsk free electron laser has shown a good agreement of the theory and the experiments.

Igor A. Kotelnikov; Vasily V. Gerasimov; Boris A. Knyazev

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Harmonic launching of ion Bernstein waves via mode transformation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ion Bernstein wave excitation and propagation via finite ion-Larmor-radium mode-transformation are investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies omega less than or equal to 4..cap omega../sub i/, with modest ion temperatures (T/sub i/ less than or equal to 10 eV), the finite-Larmor-radius effect removes the wave singularity at lower-hybrid resonance layer, enabling an externally initiated electron plasma wave to transform continuously into an ion Bernstein wave. In an ACT-1 hydrogen plasma (T/sub e/ approx. = 2.5 eV, T/sub i/ less than or equal to 2.0 eV), externally excited ion Bernstein waves have been observed for omega less than or equal to 2..cap omega../sub i/ as well as for omega less than or equal to 3..cap omega../sub i/. The finite ion-Larmor-radius mode transformation process resulting in strong ion Bernstein wave excitation has been experimentally verified. Detailed measurements of the wave dispersion relation and of the wave-packet trajectory show excellent agreement with theory. The dependence of the excited ion Bernstein wave on the antenna phasing, the plasma density, and on the neutral pressure (T/sub i/) is also investigated.

Ono, M.; Wong, K.L.; Wurden, G.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition {omega}wave frequency, k{sub ||} is the local parallel component of the wave vector, and v{sub te} is the local electron thermal speed. This excited slow wave may be related to the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave that propagates for frequencies above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency in warm plasmas or to a high frequency version of a kinetic Alfven wave. This slow wave, if physically real, would provide another path for rf power absorption in tokamaks and ST devices.

Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, 1066 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Berry, L. A.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Smithe, D. N. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2) 2) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2011-3 2012-1 2012-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

212

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1) 1) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2010-3 2011-1 2011-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

213

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3) 3) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2012-3 2013-1 2013-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

214

Extended-range tiltable micromirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sperm whales are found throughout the world's oceans in deep waters to the edge of the ice at both poles (Leatherwood and Reeves 1983; Rice 1989; Whitehead 2002). Sperm whales throughout the world exhibit a geographic social structure where females and juveniles of both sexes occur in mixed groups and inhabit tropical and subtropical waters. Males, as they mature, initially form bachelor groups but eventually become more socially isolated and more wide-ranging, inhabiting temperate and polar waters as well (Whitehead 2003). Sperm whales were commercially hunted in the Caribbean Sea by American whalers from sailing vessels until the early 1900s

Puerto Rico; U. S. Virgin Isl; S Stock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

Dr. Adam London

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

THE INDUCTION PERIOD IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a plant is illuminated, its rate of photosynthesis is at first low and gradually increases until it becomes constant. This induction period was first observed by Osterhout and Haas (1918) for UIva and independently confirmed by Warburg (1920) with Chlorella. It has

L. Smith

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Stability of Underwater Periodic Locomotion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of periodic swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed periodic heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that periodic locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping. We obtain closed-form solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) periodic locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This suggests that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.

Fangxu Jing; Eva Kanso

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

None

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Prediction of turbulence control for arbitrary periodic spanwise wall movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to generalize the well-known spanwise-oscillating-wall technique for drag reduction, non-sinusoidal oscillations of a solid wall are considered as a means to alter the skin-friction drag in a turbulent channel flow. A series of Direct Numerical Simulations is conducted to evaluate the control performance of nine different temporal waveforms, in addition to the usual sinusoid, systematically changing the wave amplitude and the period for each waveform. The turbulent average spanwise motion is found to coincide with the laminar Stokes solution that is constructed, for the generic waveform, through harmonic superposition. This allows us to define and compute, for each waveform, a new penetration depth of the Stokes layer which correlates with the amount of turbulent drag reduction, and eventually to predict both turbulent drag reduction and net energy saving rate for arbitrary waveforms. Among the waveforms considered, the maximum net energy saving rate is obtained by the sinusoidal wave at its optimal ...

Cimarelli, Andrea; Hasegawa, Yosuke; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Quadrio, Maurizio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

MHK Technologies/Multi Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Multi Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Leancon Wave Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Leancon Real Sea Test Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description MAWEC is an OWC wave energy converter that works differently from other OWCs in that it concurrently utilizes pressure and suck. This gives the wanted effect that the vertical force on the WEC is zero when the WEC stretches over more than one wave length. The device is V-shaped and oriented perpendicular to wave direction. The device consists of a number of vertical air tubes, and when a wave passes, air is pushed into a pressure channel that sucks air out of the suck channel. During one wave period each tube (120 in total) goes through a sequence where air is first pushed into a pressure channel when the wave is rising and is later sucked from the pressure channel when the wave is falling. In this situation there is constant pressure in the pressure channel and the air flow through the turbines is constant.

222

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

Tuck, J.L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee' s Summit, MO)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee' s Summit, MO)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Detonation wave velocity and curvature of brass encased PBXN-111  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detonation velocities and wave front curvatures were measured for PBXN-111 charges encased in 5 mm thick brass tubes. In all the experiments (charge diameters from 19 to 47 mm) the brass case affected the detonation properties of PBXN-111. Steady detonation waves propagated in brass encased charges with diameters as small as 19 mm, which is about half of the unconfined failure diameter. The radii of curvature of the detonation waves at the center of the wave fronts ranged from 52 to 141 mm for charge diameters of 25 to 47 mm. The angles between the detonation wave fronts and the brass/charge interfaces were between 72 and 74 degrees. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Forbes, J.W.; Lemar, E.R. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division, Silver Spring, Maryland 20903-5640 (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ultrasonic shear wave couplant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL); Lanham, Ronald N. (Lockport, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ultrasonic shear wave couplant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Expanding impulsive gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explicitly demonstrate that the known solutions for expanding impulsive spherical gravitational waves that have been obtained by a "cut and paste" method may be considered to be impulsive limits of the Robinson-Trautman vacuum type N solutions. We extend these results to all the generically distinct subclasses of these solutions in Minkowski, de Sitter and anti-de Sitter backgrounds. For these we express the solutions in terms of a continuous metric. Finally, we also extend the class of spherical shock gravitational waves to include a non-zero cosmological constant.

J. Podolsky; J. B. Griffiths

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

231

Wave–Turbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain wave are considered through an ensemble of high-resolution (essentially large-eddy simulation) wave-breaking calculations. Of particular interest are the turbulent heat and momentum fluxes ...

Craig C. Epifanio; Tingting Qian

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Effects of Long Waves on Wind-Generated Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed to explain the observation made in several laboratory experiments that short wind-generated waves are suppressed by a train of long, mechanically generated waves. A sheltering mechanism is responsible for generation of the ...

Gang Chen; Stephen E. Belcher

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Maslov indices for periodic orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that there is a generalization of the Conley-Zehnder index for periodic trajectories of a classical Hamiltonian system $(Q, \\omega, H)$ from the case $Q = T^*R^n$ to arbitrary symplectic manifolds. As it turns out, it is precisely this index which appears as a Maslov phase in the trace formulas by Gutzwiller and Duistermaat-Guillemin. Contribution presented at the XIX ICGTMP Salamanca June 92.

Meinrenken, E

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

STEREO QUADRATURE OBSERVATIONS OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE AND DRIVER OF A GLOBAL CORONAL WAVE  

SciTech Connect

We present the first observations of a global coronal wave ('EIT wave') from the two STEREO satellites in quadrature. The wave's initiation site was at the disk center in STEREO-B and precisely on the limb in STEREO-A. These unprecedented observations from the STEREO Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging (EUVI) instruments enable us to gain insight into the wave's kinematics, initiation, and three-dimensional structure. The wave propagates globally over the whole solar hemisphere visible to STEREO-B with a constant velocity of {approx}263 +- 16 km s{sup -1}. From the two STEREO observations, we derive a height of the wave in the range of {approx}80-100 Mm. Comparison of the wave kinematics with the early phase of the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME) structure indicates that the wave is initiated by the CME lateral expansion, and then propagates freely with a velocity close to the fast magnetosonic speed in the quiet solar corona.

Kienreich, I. W.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M., E-mail: ines.kienreich@uni-graz.a, E-mail: mat@igam.uni-graz.a, E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.a [Institute of Physics/IGAM, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Search for gravitational wave bursts in LIGO's third science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts in data from the three LIGO interferometric detectors during their third science run. The search targets subsecond bursts in the frequency range 100-1100 Hz for which no waveform model is assumed, and has a sensitivity in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude of hrss ~ 10^{-20} / sqrt(Hz). No gravitational wave signals were detected in the 8 days of analyzed data.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nonlinear stability of viscous roll waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extending results of Oh--Zumbrun and Johnson--Zumbrun for parabolic conservation laws, we show that spectral stability implies nonlinear stability for spatially periodic viscous roll wave solutions of the one-dimensional St. Venant equations for shallow water flow down an inclined ramp. The main new issues to be overcome are incomplete parabolicity and the nonconservative form of the equations, which leads to undifferentiated quadratic source terms that cannot be handled using the estimates of the conservative case. The first is handled by treating the equations in the more favorable Lagrangian coordinates, for which one can obtain large-amplitude nonlinear damping estimates similar to those carried out by Mascia--Zumbrun in the related shock wave case, assuming only symmetrizability of the hyperbolic part. The second is handled by the observation that, similarly as in the relaxation and detonation cases, sources occurring in nonconservative components experience greater decay comparable to that experienced b...

Johnson, Matthew; Noble, Pascal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

EVIDENCE FOR THE PHOTOSPHERIC EXCITATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC WAVES  

SciTech Connect

Observing the excitation mechanisms of incompressible transverse waves is vital for determining how energy propagates through the lower solar atmosphere. We aim to show the connection between convectively driven photospheric flows and incompressible chromospheric waves. The observations presented here show the propagation of incompressible motion through the quiet lower solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the chromosphere. We determine photospheric flow vectors to search for signatures of vortex motion and compare results to photospheric flows present in convective simulations. Further, we search for the chromospheric response to vortex motions. Evidence is presented that suggests incompressible waves can be excited by the vortex motions of a strong magnetic flux concentration in the photosphere. A chromospheric counterpart to the photospheric vortex motion is also observed, presenting itself as a quasi-periodic torsional motion. Fine-scale, fibril structures that emanate from the chromospheric counterpart support transverse waves that are driven by the observed torsional motion. A new technique for obtaining details of transverse waves from time-distance diagrams is presented and the properties of transverse waves (e.g., amplitudes and periods) excited by the chromospheric torsional motion are measured.

Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Shelyag, S., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Main Physics Building, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, County Antrim BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Chaotic shock waves of a Bose-Einstein condensate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that the well-known Smale-horseshoe chaos exists in the time evolution of the one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) driven by the time-periodic harmonic or inverted-harmonic potential. A formally exact solution of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation is constructed, which describes the matter shock waves with chaotic or periodic amplitudes and phases. When the periodic driving is switched off and the number of condensed atoms is conserved, we obtained the exact stationary states and non-stationary states. The former contains the stable non-propagated shock wave, and in the latter the shock wave alternately collapses and grows for the harmonic trapping or propagates with exponentially increased shock-front speed for the antitrapping. It is revealed that existence of chaos play a role for suppressing the blast of matter wave. The results suggest a method for preparing the exponentially accelerated BEC shock waves or the stable stationary states.

Wenhua Hai; Qianquan Zhu; Shiguang Rong

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Total Resonant Transmission and Reflection by Periodic Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resonant scattering of plane waves by a periodic slab under conditions close to those that support a guided mode is accompanied by sharp transmission anomalies. For two-dimensional structures, we establish sufficient conditions, involving structural symmetry, under which these anomalies are characterized by total transmission and total reflection at frequencies separated by an arbitrarily small amount. The loci of total reflection and total transmission are real-analytic curves in frequency-wavenumber space that intersect quadratically at a single point corresponding to the guided mode. A single anomaly or multiple anomalies can be excited by the interaction with a single guided mode.

Stephen P. Shipman; Hairui Tu

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

COPIES: Iron Range Legislative Delegation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dear Legislators: We are pleased to present the annual report on our research regarding the health status of taconite workers and Iron Range community air quality. This report, as in the past, details the progress made by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and the Natural Resources Research Institute (NRRI) in all research areas, including occupational exposure, mortality and incidence studies, the respiratory health survey of taconite workers and spouses and the environmental study of airborne particles. In addition, this report contains specific information regarding the assessment of mesothelioma as it pertains to exposure to mineral fibers, referred to as elongate mineral particles (EMP). For this report, the EMP measurement is a standard technique that identifies those fibers (EMP) considered long (over 5 microns). Although the research team felt this was the most important exposure to be assessed with the cases of mesothelioma, in the next several months there will be additional analyses that may provide further insight, including exposure to short EMP, silica and respirable dust. A final report is planned for the end of the year when all components are expected to be completed.

Sen Tony Lourey; Rep Tim Mahoney; Rep Sheldon Johnson; Rep David Dill; Rep Mary Murphy; Sen Tom Bakk; Rep John Persell; Rep Tom Anzelc; Sen Tom Saxhaug; Rep Carly Melin; Rep Jason Metsa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pulsed wave interconnect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulsed wave interconnect is proposed for global interconnect applications. Signals are represented by localized wavepackets that propagate along the interconnect lines at the local speed of light to trigger the receivers. Energy consumption is reduced ... Keywords: CMOS, VLSI, high-speed interconnect, nonlinear transmission line, pulse compression, soliton, wafer-scale-integration

Pingshan Wang; Gen Pei; Edwin Chih-Chuan Kan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Deflagration Wave Profiles  

SciTech Connect

Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

244

Distinguishing Propagating Waves and Standing Modes: An Internal Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines high-frequency (0.1-0.5 cph) internal waves, waves previously characterized by the Garrett and Munk spectral fits (GM72, GM75, GM79) as being vertically symmetric propagating waves (or equivalently “smeared” standing modes—...

M. Benno Blumenthal; Melbourne G. Briscoe

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Wave Activity Diagnostics Applied to Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave activity diagnostics are calculated for four different baroclinic wave life cycles, including the LC1 and LC2 cases studied by Thorncroft, Hoskins, and McIntyre. The wave activity is a measure of the disturbance relative to some zonally ...

Gudrun Magnusdottir; Peter H. Haynes

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Evolution of a Random Directional Wave and Freak Wave Occurrence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of a random directional wave in deep water was studied in a laboratory wave tank (50 m long, 10 m wide, 5 m deep) utilizing a directional wave generator. A number of experiments were conducted, changing the various spectral ...

Takuji Waseda; Takeshi Kinoshita; Hitoshi Tamura

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Wave Breaking Dissipation in the Wave-Driven Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If wave breaking modifies the Lagrangian fluid paths by inducing an uncertainty in the orbit itself and this uncertainty on wave motion time scales is observable as additive noise, it is shown that within the context of a wave–current interaction ...

Juan M. Restrepo

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Two-Dimensional Simulations of Mountain Waves Observed during the PYREX Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional numerical simulations of mountain waves observed during the Pyrenees Experiment have been performed. Two intensive observing periods (IOP) have been simulated, IOP 3, which lasted less than one day, and IOP 9, which lasted two and ...

Ahmed Elkhalfi; Marc Georgelin; Evelyne Richard

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Gravity Wave Breaking over the Central Alps: Role of Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of gravity waves excited by the complex terrain of the central Alps during the intensive observational period (IOP) 8 of the Mesoscale Alpine Programme (MAP) is studied through the analysis of aircraft in situ measurements, ...

Qingfang Jiang; James D. Doyle

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Validation of the Space–Time Variability of African Easterly Waves Simulated by the CNRM GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of the Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques (CNRM) general circulation model (GCM) to properly simulate the space–time variability of the African easterly waves (AEWs) has been examined over the period 1982–88. The relative ...

J. P. Céron; J. F. Guérémy

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Composite View of Surface Signatures and Interior Properties of Nonlinear Internal Waves: Observations and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface signatures and interior properties of large-amplitude nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) in the South China Sea (SCS) were measured during a period of weak northeast wind (2 m s?1) using shipboard marine radar, an acoustic Doppler current ...

Ming-Huei Chang; Ren-Chieh Lien; Yiing Jang Yang; Tswen Yung Tang; Joe Wang

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Systematic Search for Trapped Equatorial Waves in the GATE Velocity Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moored current meter data taken over a 60-day period during GATE (GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment) near the equator at 28°W, have been systematically searched for vertically propagating equatorially trapped waves. Three independent tests ...

A. M. Horigan; R. H. Weisberg

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Forced Shelf Wave Dynamics for a Discontinuous Shelf Width: Application to Vancouver Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine barotropic nondivergent shelf waves generated on an exponential continental shelf that has an abrupt change in width. Three types of forcing are considered: 1) a tidal period volume flux through a gap in the coastline located ...

Andrew J. Willmott; Richard E. Thomson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Properties of Rossby Waves in the North Atlantic Estimated from Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses satellite observations of sea surface height (SSH) to detect westward-propagating anomalies, presumably baroclinic Rossby waves, in the North Atlantic and to estimate their period, wavelength, amplitude, and phase speed. Detection ...

Vladimir Osychny; Peter Cornillon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Intense Lee-Wave Rotor Event of Sierra Rotors IOP 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-amplitude lee-wave rotor event observationally documented during Sierra Rotors Project Intensive Observing Period (IOP) 8 on 24–26 March 2004 in the lee of the southern Sierra Nevada is examined. Mountain waves and rotors occurred over ...

Vanda Grubiši?; Brian J. Billings

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Six Impossible Things: Fractional Charge From Laughlin's Wave Function  

SciTech Connect

The Laughlin's wave function is found to be the zero-energy ground state of a {delta}-function Hamiltonian. The finite negative value of the ground state energy which is 91 per cent of Wigner value, can be obtained only when Coulomb correlations are introduced. The Laughlin's wave function is of short range and it overlaps with that of the exact wave functions of small (number of electrons 2 or 5) systems. (i) It is impossible to obtain fractional charge from Laughlin's wave function. (ii) It is impossible to prove that the Laughlin's wave function gives the ground state of the Coulomb Hamiltonian. (iii) It is impossible to have particle-hole symmetry in the Laughlin's wave function. (iv) It is impossible to derive the value of m in the Laughlin's wave function. The value of m in {psi}{sub m} can not be proved to be 3 or 5. (v) It is impossible to prove that the Laughlin's state is incompressible because the compressible states are also likely. (vi) It is impossible for the Laughlin's wave function to have spin. This effort is directed to explain the experimental data of quantum Hall effect in GaAs/AlGaAs.

Shrivastava, Keshav N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

Increase in the period of waves traveling over large distances : with applications to tsunamis, swell, and seismic surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the tsunami from the Aleutian earthquake of 1st April,c ohhe tsunami Prom the Aleutian earthmake oi' 1st April

Munk, Walter H

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Increase in the period of waves traveling over large distances : with applications to tsunamis, swell, and seismic surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25) seduce to tho wall-horn Porn aoco~ding .to wkiieh the ~oan now be written in the Porn If the bottom profile along

Munk, Walter H

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Numerical Dispersion of Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When atmospheric gravity waves are simulated in numerical models, they are not only dispersive for physical but also for numerical reasons. Their wave properties (e.g., damping or propagation speed and direction) can depend on grid spacing as ...

Guido Schroeder; K. Heinke Schlünzen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Sodium Nightglow and Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oscillations in intensity of NaD nightglow attributed to mesospheric gravity waves have bean studied. Fractional atmospheric density perturbations have been obtained by means of the linear gravity waves theory of Hines. Values of other parameters ...

A. Molina

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Diffusive Transport by Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple conceptual model of the relationship between advective transport by breaking waves and diffusive transport is derived. line model postulates that the displacement of fluid parcels by a breaking wave is analogous to molecular diffusion (...

Kenneth P. Bowman

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Spectral Wave–Turbulence Decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of wave–turbulence decomposition is introduced, for which the only instrument required is one high-frequency pointwise velocity sensor. This is a spectral method that assumes equilibrium turbulence and no wave–turbulence interaction. ...

Jeremy D. Bricker; Stephen G. Monismith

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Implementation of barycentric resampling for continuous wave searches in gravitational wave data  

SciTech Connect

We describe an efficient implementation of a coherent statistic for searches of continuous gravitational wave from neutron stars. The algorithm works by transforming the data taken by a gravitational wave detector from a moving Earth bound frame to one that sits at the Solar System barycenter. Many practical difficulties arise in the implementation of this algorithm, some of which have not been discussed previously. These difficulties include constraints of small computer memory, discreteness of the data, losses due to interpolation, and gaps in real data. This implementation is considerably more efficient than previous implementations of these kinds of searches on Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave (LIGO) detector data. The speed-up factors range from 10, when applied to Einstein-Home, to about 2000 for targeted searches which integrate over months of data.

Patel, Pinkesh; Dupuis, Rejean; Betzwieser, Joseph [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Siemens, Xavier [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Long-Range Neutron Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neutron detector designed for detecting neutron sources at distances of 50 to 100 m has been constructed and tested. This detector has a large surface area (1 m{sup 2}) to enhance detection efficiency, and it contains a collimator and shielding to achieve direction sensitivity and reduce background. An unusual feature of the detector is that it contains no added moderator, such as polyethylene, to moderate fast neutrons before they reach the {sup 3}He detector. As a result, the detector is sensitive mainly to thermal neutrons. The moderator-free design reduces the weight of the detector, making it more portable, and it also aids in achieving directional sensitivity and background reduction. Test results show that moderated fission-neutron sources of strength about 3 x 10{sup 5} n/s can be detected at a distance out to 70 m in a counting time of 1000 s. The best angular resolution of the detector is obtained at distances of 30 m or less. As the separation .distance between the source and detector increases, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the measured signal increases with a resultant decrease in the ability to detect the direction to a distant source. Applications for which the long-range detector appears to be suitable include detecting remote neutron sources (including sources in moving vehicles) and monitoring neutron storage vaults for the intrusion of humans and the effects they make on the detected neutron signal. Also, the detector can be used to measure waste for the presence of transuranic material in the presence of high gamma-ray background. A test with a neutron source (3 x 10{sup 5} n/s) in a vehicle showed that the detector could readily measure an increase in count rate at a distance of 10 m for vehicle speeds up to 35 mph (the highest speed tested). These results. indicate that the source should be detectable at this distance at speeds up to 55 mph.

AJ Peurrung; DC Stromswold; RR Hansen; PL Reeder; DS Barnett

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Negative-mass Instability in Nonlinear Plasma Waves  

SciTech Connect

The negative-mass instability (NMI), previously found in ion traps, appears as a distinct regime of the sideband instability in nonlinear plasma waves with trapped particles. As the bounce frequency of these particles decreases with the bounce action, bunching can occur if the action distribution is inverted in trapping islands. In contrast to existing theories that also infer instabilities from the anharmonicity of bounce oscillations, spatial periodicity of the islands turns out to be unimportant, and the particle distribution can be unstable even if it is at at the resonance. An analytical model is proposed which describes both single traps and periodic nonlinear waves and concisely generalizes the conventional description of the sideband instability in plasma waves. The theoretical results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations carried out for a regime accentuating the NMI effect.

I.Y. Dodin, P.F. Schmit, J. Rocks and N.J. Fisch

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Wave Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

D. Van Eester; E. Lerche

267

Gravitational waves and fundamental physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give an overview of the motivations for gravitational-wave research, concentrating on the aspects related to ``fundamental'' physics.

Michele Maggiore

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Gravitational Wave Sources: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With full?sensitivity operation of the first generation of gravitational wave detectors now just around the corner

Bernard F. Schutz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Increasing Wave Height in the North Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are indications that the mean significant wave height at Seven Stones Light Vessel has increased in the period 1960–85. This is of considerable interest for the design of offshore structures and for coastal defense. In this note, the ...

E. Bouws; D. Jannink; G. J. Komen

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Structure of Near-Inertial Waves during Ocean Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current meter data from two sites were analyzed for near-inertial motions generated by storm during the ten-month period of the Ocean Storms Experiment in the northeast Pacific Ocean. The most striking feature of the inertial wave response to ...

Hongbo Qi; Roland A. De Szoeke; Clayton A. Paulson; Charles C. Eriksen

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Observations of Wind-Generated Waves in Antarctic Fast Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of naturally induced propagating waves in the fast ice cover of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, were made during the austral winter of 1986 with a rosette of three wire strainmeters. The data, collected over a seven-month period and ...

G. B. Crocker; P. Wadhams

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Operational Forecasting and Detection of Mesoscale Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale gravity waves display periods of 1–4 h, have wavelengths of 50–500 km, and can have important effects upon the sensible weather. Real-time prediction, detection, and nowcasting of these mesoscale phenomena is shown to be feasible, due ...

Steven E. Koch; Christopher O’Handley

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Compression wave studies in Blair dolomite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dynamic compression wave studies have been conducted on Blair dolomite in the stress range of 0-7.0 GPa. Impact techniques were used to generate stress impulse input functions, and diffuse surface laser interferometry provided the dynamic instrumentation. Experimental particle velocity profiles obtained by this method were coupled with the conservation laws of mass and momentum to determine the stress-strain and stress-modulus constitutive properties of the material. Comparison between dynamic and quasistatic uniaxial stress-strain curves uncovered significant differences. Energy dissipated in a complete load and unload cycle differed by almost an order of magnitude and the longitudinal moduli differed by as much as a factor of two. Blair dolomite was observed to yield under dynamic loading at 2.5 GPa. Below 2.5 GPa the loading waves had a finite risetime and exhibited steady propagation. A finite linear viscoelastic constitutive model satisfactorily predicted the observed wave propagation. We speculate that dynamic properties of preexisting cracks provides a physical mechanism for both the rate dependent steady wave behavior and the difference between dynamic and quasistatic response.

Grady, D.E.; Hollenbach, R.E.; Schuler, K.W.; Callender, J.F.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy Loss by Breaking waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the frequency of wind wave breaking in deep water are combined with laboratory estimates of the rate of energy loss a from single breaking wave to infer the net rate of energy transfer to the mixed layer from breaking waves, as a ...

S. A. Thorpe

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Climatological Time Series with Periodic Correlation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many climatological time series display a periodic correlation structure. This paper examines three issues encountered when analyzing such time series: detection of periodic correlation, modeling periodic correlation, and trend estimation under ...

Robert Lund; Harry Hurd; Peter Bloomfield; Richard Smith

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Long-Wave Trapping by Oceanic Ridges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long waves are affected by bottom topography and under certain conditions may be trapped along topographical contours which then act as wave guides transmitting wave energy for great distances with little loss. This study examines waves trapped ...

Richard Paul Shaw; Wayne Neu

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part I: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Shear Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the emission of internal gravity waves from a local westerly shear layer is studied. Thermal and/or vorticity forcing of the shear layer with a wide range of frequencies and scales can lead to strong emission of gravity waves in ...

Nikolaos A. Bakas; Petros J. Ioannou

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: internal wave fine structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic wave fields propagating long ranges through the ocean are refracted by the inhomogeneities in the ocean's sound speed profile. Intuitively, for a given acoustic source frequency, the inhomogeneities become ineffective at refracting the field beyond a certain fine scale determined by the acoustic wavelength. On the other hand, ray methods are sensitive to infinitely fine features. Thus, it is possible to complicate arbitrarily the ray dynamics, and yet have the wave field propagate unchanged. This feature raises doubts about the ray/wave correspondence. Given the importance of various analyses relying on ray methods, a proper model should, at a minimum, exclude all of the fine structure that does not significantly alter the propagated wave field when the correspondence to the ray dynamics is integral. We develop a simple, efficient, smoothing technique to be applied to the inhomogeneities - a low pass filtering performed in the spatial domain - and give a characterization of its necessary extent as a function of acoustic source frequency. We indicate how the smoothing improves the ray/wave correspondence, and show that the so-called ``ray chaos'' problem remains above a very low frequency (about 15-25 Hz).

Katherine C. Hegewisch; Nicholas R. Cerruti; Steven Tomsovic

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Wave Packets and Life Cycles of Troughs in the Upper Troposphere: Examples from the Southern Hemisphere Summer Season of 1984/85  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, reanalysis data for the Southern Hemisphere summer season of 1984/85, produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, have been analyzed to examine wave packets and life cycles of baroclinic waves. A ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DNA waves and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

S-wave scattering lengths and effective ranges for collisions of ground state Be atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jamieson,M.J. Cheung,A.S.C. Ouerdane,H. Jeung,G.H. Geum,N. Journal of Physics B, Volume 40 pp 3497-3504

Jamieson, M.J.

283

Directional Distributions and Mean Square Slopes in the Equilibrium and Saturation Ranges of the Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field observations show that the crosswind component constitutes a significant portion of the ocean surface mean square slope. The average ratio between the crosswind and upwind mean square slope components is 0.88 in slick-covered ocean ...

Paul A. Hwang; David W. Wang

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially-saturated sand in the sonic frequency range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands can be viewed as an end-member of the spectrum of naturally-occurring granular materials, with tight

Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially saturated sand in the sonic frequency range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands can be viewed as an end-member of the spectrum of naturally-occurring granular materials, with tight

Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range lies at the west edge of the Great Basin, adjacent to the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. A basement complex of pre-Cenozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks is partly buried by approx.35 km^3 of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km^3 of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending order of abundance, and (2) < or =1.1 m.y., nearly equal amounts of basalt and

287

Detection of electromagnetic waves using charged MEMS structures  

SciTech Connect

We describe micromechanical structures that are capable of sensing both electrostatic fields and electromagnetic fields over a wide frequency range. Typically, sensing of electromagnetic waves is achieved with electrically conducting antennas, which despite the many advantages do not exhibit high sensitivity over a broad frequency range. An important aspect of our present work is that, in contrast to traditional antennas, the dimensions of micromechanical oscillators sensitive to electromagnetic waves can be much smaller than the wavelength. We characterized the micromechanical oscillators and measured responses to electric fields and estimated the performance limits by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio theoretically and experimentally.

Datskos, Panos G [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Tobin, Jacob D [ORNL; Bowland, Landon T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The influence of waves . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing interest in offshore wind resources, it has become increasingly important to establish and refine models for the interaction between wind and waves in order to obtain accurate models for the sea surface roughness. The simple Charnock relation that has been applied for open sea conditions does not work well in the shallow water near-coastal areas that are important for offshore wind energy. A model for the surface roughness of the sea has been developed based on this concept, using an expression for the Charnock constant as a function of wave age [1], and then relating the wave `age' to the distance to the nearest upwind coastline. The data used in developing these models originated partly from analysis of data from the Vindeby site, partly from previously published results. The scatter in the data material was considerable and consequently there is a need to test these models further by analysing data from sites exhibiting varying distances to the coast. Results from such analysis of recent data are presented for sites with distances to the coast varying from 10km to several hundreds of km. The model shows a good agreement also with this data.

Bernhard Lange; Jřrgen Hřjstrup

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Computing with almost periodic functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper develops a method for discrete computational Fourier analysis of functions defined on quasicrystals and other almost periodic sets. A key point is to build the analysis around the emerging theory of quasicrystals and diffraction in the setting on local hulls and dynamical systems. Numerically computed approximations arising in this way are built out of the Fourier module of the quasicrystal in question, and approximate their target functions uniformly on the entire infinite space. The methods are entirely group theoretical, being based on finite groups and their duals, and they are practical and computable. Examples of functions based on the standard Fibonacci quasicrystal serve to illustrate the method (which is applicable to all quasicrystals modeled on the cut and project formalism).

R. V. Moody; M. Nesterenko; J. Patera

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

Help:Range blocks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range blocks Jump to: navigation, search Range blocks are technical restrictions applied through Special:Blockip to a group of IP addresses that prevent them from editing, creating...

291

Tropical Storm Development from African Easterly Waves in the Eastern Atlantic: A Comparison of Two Successive Waves Using a Regional Model as Part of NASA AMMA 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two successive African easterly waves (AEWs) from August 2006 are analyzed utilizing observational data, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts reanalysis, and output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research–National ...

Edward K. Vizy; Kerry H. Cook

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Bakhtiari, Sasan (Bolingbrook, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Dieckman, Stephen L. (Downers Grove, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nighttime Valley Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a regular oscillation observed in nighttime drainage airflow in a valley under relatively light upper-level wind conditions. The period of these oscillations is about 20 minutes with at least one harmonic at about 10 minutes. ...

William M. Porch; William E. Clements; Richard L. Coulter

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The influence of an electromagnetic field on the wave-current interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the propagation of surface waves on a current in the presence of an electromagnetic field. A horizontal (vertical) field strengthens (weakens) the counter-current which blocks the waves. We compute the phase space diagrams (blocking velocities versus period of the waves) with and without surface tension. Three new dimensionless numbers are introduced to compare the relative strengths of gravity, surface tension and field effects. This work shows the importance of an electromagnetic field in order to design wave-breakers or in microfluidics applications.

Germain Rousseaux; Philippe Maďssa

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Magnetic field effect on stimulated Raman scattering of electromagnetic waves from nanoparticle lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of a static magnetic field on the Raman scattering of a millimeter pump wave propagating through periodic nanoparticles is studied. Formulas for the growth rate of the scattered electromagnetic wave and the electrostatic wave are derived and analyzed. It is found that the growth rate for the backscattering case is larger than that of forward scattering and the growth rate is increased by the static magnetic field. A resonance in the dispersion relation of the electromagnetic wave is found as a combination of the cyclotron and plasma frequency. However, no instability was found for this lower branch of the dispersion curve.

Chakhmachi, A. [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Generation of Coronal Loop Waves below the Photosphere by p-Mode Forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations of coronal-loop waves by TRACE and within the corona as a whole by CoMP clearly indicate that the dominant oscillation period is 5 minutes, thus implicating the solar p modes as a possible source. We investigate the generation of tube waves within the solar convection zone by the buffeting of p modes. The tube waves--in the form of longitudinal sausage waves and transverse kink waves--are generated on the many magnetic fibrils that lace the convection zone and pierce the solar photosphere. Once generated by p-mode forcing, the tube waves freely propagate up and down the tubes, since the tubes act like light fibers and form a waveguide for these magnetosonic waves. Those waves that propagate upward pass through the photosphere and enter the upper atmosphere where they can be measured as loop oscillations and other forms of propagating coronal waves. We treat the magnetic fibrils as vertically aligned, thin flux tubes and compute the energy flux of tube waves that can generated and driven into the upper atmosphere. We find that a flux in excess of 10^5 ergs/cm^2/s can be produced, easily supplying enough wave energy to explain the observations. Furthermore, we compute the associated damping rate of the driving p modes and find that the damping is significant compared to observed line widths only for the lowest order p modes.

Bradley W. Hindman; Rekha Jain

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice  

SciTech Connect

We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

298

WAVE DELAYING STRUCTURE FOR RECTANGULAR WAVE-GUIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to wave-guides and in particular describes wave delaying structure located within a wave-guide. The disclosed wave-guide has an elongated fiat metal sheet arranged in a central plane of the guide and formed with a series of transverse inductive slots such that each face presents an inductive impedance to the guide. The sheet is thickened in the area between slots to increase the self capacity of the slots. Experimental results indicate that in a wave-guide loaded in accordance with the invention the guided wavelength changes more slowly as the air wavelength is changed than the guided wavelength does in wave-guides loaded by means of corrugations.

Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Dain, J.

1956-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE  

SciTech Connect

All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection. The wave activity is strongest in the lower stratosphere below 22 km and, during the suppressed monsoon period, is modulated with a 3-4-day period. The concentration of the wave activity in the lower stratosphere is consistent with the properties of the environment in which these waves propagate, whereas its 3-4-day modulation is explained by the variation of the convection activity in the TWP-ICE domain. At low rainfall intensity the wave activity increases as rainfall intensity increases. At high values of rainfall intensity, however, the wave activity associated with deep convective clouds is independent of the rainfall intensity. The convection and gravity waves observed during TWP-ICE are simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. These simulations are compared with radiosonde observations described above and are used to determine some of the properties of convectively generated gravity waves. The gravity waves appear to be well simulated by the model. The model is used to explore the relationships between the convection, the gravity waves and cirrus.

Reeder, Michael J. [Monash University; Lane, Todd P. [University of Melbourne; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen [Monash University

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

300

Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressible Turbulence Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material Interfaces Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material Interfaces Lele.jpg Alternate Title: High-fidelity simulations of supersonic turbulent mixing and combustion Key Challenges: Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of isotropic turbulence interacting with a normal shock wave and turbulent multi-material mixing in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) Why it Matters: Shock/turbulence interaction is a fundamental phenomenon in fluid mechanics that occurs in a wide range of interesting problems in various disciplines, including supernova explosions, inertial confinement fusion, hypersonic flight and propulsion, and shock wave lithotripsy. Accomplishments: A novel solution-adaptive algorithm that applies different

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Flute waves at the ion Larmor radius scales  

SciTech Connect

The theory of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is discussed. Modified linear kinetic theory allows us to investigate RTI and flute waves with arbitrary perpendicular spatial scales compared to the ion Larmor radius. It is shown that in the linear limit a Fourier transform of these equations yields the dispersion relation which in the so-called Pade approximation corresponds to results of the kinetic theory. This analysis represents an extension of the previous study of the magnetic RTI obtained in the large wave scale approximation. It is shown that incorporation of the effects associated with wave scales of the order of the ion Larmor radius leads to a broader wave number range of the magnetic RTI.

Onishchenko, O. G. [Institute of Physics of the Earth, 10 B. Gruzinskaya, 123995 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

302

Gauge Interaction as Periodicity Modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to a geometrical interpretation of gauge invariance in terms of the formalism of field theory in compact space-time dimensions [arXiv:0903.3680]. In this formalism, the kinematic information of an interacting elementary particle is encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary of the theory through local transformations of the underlying space-time coordinates. Therefore, gauge interaction is described as invariance of the theory under local deformations of the boundary, the resulting local variations of field solution are interpreted as internal transformations, and the internal symmetries of the gauge theory turn out to be related to corresponding local space-time symmetries. In the case of local infinitesimal isometric transformations, Maxwell's kinematics and gauge invariance are inferred directly from the variational principle. Furthermore we explicitly impose periodic conditions at the boundary of the theory as semi-classical quantization condition in order to investigate the quantum behavior of gauge interaction. In the abelian case the result is a remarkable formal correspondence with scalar QED.

Donatello Dolce

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gravimagnetic shock waves and gravitational-wave experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Causes of the unsatisfactory condition of the gravitational-wave experiments are discussed and a new outlook at the detection of gravitational waves of astrophysical origin is proposed. It is shown that there are strong grounds for identifying the so-called giant pulses in the pulsar NP 0532 radiation with gravimagnetic shock waves (GMSW) excited in the neutron star magnetosphere by sporadic gravitational radiation of this pulsar.

Yu. G. Ignatyev

2011-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

Medium-Range, Monthly, and Seasonal Prediction for Europe and the Use of Forecast Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational probabilistic (ensemble) forecasts made at ECMWF during the European summer heat wave of 2003 indicate significant skill on medium (3–10 day) and monthly (10–30 day) time scales. A more general “unified” analysis of many medium-range, ...

Mark J. Rodwell; Francisco J. Doblas-Reyes

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Riding the Waves: Harnessing Ocean Wave Energy through ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The opportunities for ocean wave power to become a new, reliable and clean source of renewable energy will be discussed, as well as activities of ...

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

306

Iterated multidimensional wave conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

Brizard, A. J. [Dept. Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D. [Dept. Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Kaufman, A. N. [LBNL and Physics Dept., UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, A. S. [T-5, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zobin, N. [Dept. Mathematics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Gravity Waves in the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present numerical simulations of penetrative convection and gravity wave excitation in the Sun. Gravity waves are self-consistently generated by a convective zone overlying a radiative interior. We produce power spectra for gravity waves in the radiative region as well as estimates for the energy flux of gravity waves below the convection zone. We calculate a peak energy flux in waves below the convection zone to be three orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates for m=1. The simulations show that the linear dispersion relation is a good approximation only deep below the convective-radiative boundary. Both low frequency propagating gravity waves as well as higher frequency standing modes are generated; although we find that convection does not continually drive the standing g-mode frequencies.

Tamara M. Rogers; Gary A. Glatzmaier

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

On Variational Methods in the Physics of Plasma Waves  

SciTech Connect

A fi rst-principle variational approach to adiabatic collisionless plasma waves is described. The focus is made on one-dimensional electrostatic oscillations, including phase-mixed electron plasma waves (EPW) with trapped particles, such as Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes. The well known Whitham's theory is extended by an explicit calculation of the EPW Lagrangian, which is related to the oscillation-center energies of individual particles in a periodic fi eld, and those are found by a quadrature. Some paradigmatic physics of EPW is discussed for illustration purposes. __________________________________________________

I.Y. Dodin

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

309

Surface plasma wave excitation via laser irradiated overdense plasma foil  

SciTech Connect

A laser irradiated overdense plasma foil is seen to be susceptible to parametric excitation of surface plasma wave (SPW) and ion acoustic wave (IAW) on the ion plasma period time scale. The SPW is localised near the front surface of the foil while IAW extends upto the rear. The evanescent laser field and the SPW exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the IAW. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the laser induced oscillatory electron velocity to drive the SPW. At relativistic laser intensity, the growth rate is of the order of ion plasma frequency.

Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Role of Nonlinear Momentum Fluxes on the Evolution of Directional Wind-Wave Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has long been known that nonlinear wave–wave interactions produce stationary solutions related to constant energy flux through the equilibrium range when a deep-water spectrum follows an f?4 form, as has been verified in numerical studies in ...

Donald T. Resio; Charles E. Long; William Perrie

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Comparison between Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes in Observations and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, a formal comparison is made between gravity wave momentum fluxes in models and those derived from observations. Although gravity waves occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, the focus of this paper is on scales ...

Marvin A. Geller; M. Joan Alexander; Peter T. Love; Julio Bacmeister; Manfred Ern; Albert Hertzog; Elisa Manzini; Peter Preusse; Kaoru Sato; Adam A. Scaife; Tiehan Zhou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean wave energy is used to drive a buoyant instrument platform down a wire suspended from a surface float. At the lower terminus of the profiling range, the cam that rectifies wave vertical motion is released and the package, termed the ...

R. Pinkel; M. A. Goldin; J. A. Smith; O. M. Sun; A. A. Aja; M. N. Bui; T. Hughen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

D. Kuridze; T. V. Zaqarashvili

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

314

Detection of electromagnetic waves using MEMS antennas  

SciTech Connect

We describe the design, fabrication and characterization of simple micromechanical structures that are capable of sensing static electric time varying electromagnetic fields. Time varying electric field sensing is usually achieved using an electromagnetic antenna and a receiver. However, these antenna-based approaches do not exhibit high sensitivity over a broad frequency (or wavelength) range. An important aspect of the present work is that, in contrast to traditional antennas, the dimensions of these micromechanical oscillators can be much smaller than the wavelength of the electromagnetic wave. We characterized the fabricated micromechanical oscillators by measuring their responses to time varying electric and electromagnetic fields.

Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Tobin, [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bowland, Landon T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

End-point of the rp process and periodic gravitational wave emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The general end-point of the rp process in rapidly accreting neutron stars is believed to be a surface distribution of matter whose nuclear composition may depend on position. Its evolution during compression beyond the neutron-drip threshold density is determined by the presence of nuclear formation enthalpy minima at the proton closed shells. At threshold, a sequence of weak interactions with capture or emission of neutron pairs rapidly transform nuclei to the most accessible proton closed shell. Therefore, angular asymmetries in nuclear composition present in accreted matter at neutron drip are preserved during further compression to higher densities provided transition rates between closed shells are negligible. Although it has been confirmed that this condition is satisfied for predicted internal temperatures and for the formation enthalpy distribution used in this work, it would not be so if the true enthalpy differences between maxima and minima in the distribution were a factor of two smaller. For this reason, it does not appear possible to assert with any confidence that position-dependent surface composition can lead to significant angle-dependence of the equation of state and to potentially observable gravitational radiation. The effect of non-radial internal temperature gradients on angle-dependency of the equation of state is also not quantifiable.

P. B. Jones

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

SHORT PERIOD SURFACE WAVE DISPERSION ACROSS THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION: IMPROVEMENTS USING REGIONAL SEISMIC NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Nonproliferation Research and Development Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Contract No. 1 DE-FC52-05NA

Ritzwolle, Mike

317

Hamiltonian description of self-consistent wave-particle dynamics in a periodic structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of energy and momentum in the classical theory of radiating electrons has been a challenging problem since its inception. We propose a formulation of classical electrodynamics in Hamiltonian form that satisfies the Maxwell equations and the Lorentz force. The radiated field is represented with eigenfunctions using the Gel'fand $\\beta$-transform. The electron Hamiltonian is the standard one coupling the particles with the propagating fields. The dynamics conserves energy and excludes self-acceleration. A complete Hamiltonian formulation results from adding electrostatic action-at-a-distance coupling between electrons.

Frédéric André; Pierre Bernardi; Nikita M. Ryskin; Fabrice Doveil; Yves Elskens

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

318

Efficient Evaluation of Doubly Periodic Green Functions in 3D Scattering, Including Wood Anomaly Frequencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present efficient methods for computing wave scattering by diffraction gratings that exhibit two-dimensional periodicity in three dimensional (3D) space. Applications include scattering in acoustics, electromagnetics and elasticity. Our approach uses boundary-integral equations. The quasi-periodic Green function is a doubly infinite sum of scaled 3D free-space outgoing Helmholtz Green functions. Their source points are located at the nodes of a periodicity lattice of the grating. For efficient numerical computation of the lattice sum, we employ a smooth truncation. Super-algebraic convergence to the Green function is achieved as the truncation radius increases, except at frequency-wavenumber pairs at which a Rayleigh wave is at exactly grazing incidence to the grating. At these "Wood frequencies", the term in the Fourier series representation of the Green function that corresponds to the grazing Rayleigh wave acquires an infinite coefficient and the lattice sum blows up. At Wood frequencies, we modify the Green function by adding two types of terms to it. The first type adds weighted spatial shifts of the Green function to itself with singularities below the grating; this yields algebraic convergence. The second-type terms are quasi-periodic plane wave solutions of the Helmholtz equation. They reinstate (with controlled coefficients) the grazing modes, effectively eliminated by the terms of first type. These modes are needed in the Green function for guaranteeing the well-posedness of the boundary-integral equation that yields the scattered field. We apply this approach to acoustic scattering by a doubly periodic 2D grating near and at Wood frequencies and scattering by a doubly periodic array of scatterers away from Wood frequencies.

Oscar P. Bruno; Stephen P. Shipman; Catalin Turc; Stephanos Venakides

2013-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

319

Shock waves in thermal lensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review experimental investigation on spatial shock waves formed by the self-defocusing action of a laser beam propagation in a disordered thermal nonlinear media.

Gentilini, S; DeRe, E; Conti, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Diurnal Temperature Range Variability due to Land Cover and Airmass Types in the Southeast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and land use/land cover (LULC) in a portion of the Southeast. Temperature data for all synoptically weak days within a 10-yr period are gathered from the National ...

Kelsey N. Scheitlin; P. Grady Dixon

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Long-Range Tropospheric Transport of Pollution Aerosols into the Alaskan Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Noncrustal vanadium and manganese are used as chemical tracers for pollution-derived aerosols (collected over a period of four years in the near-surface air at Barrow, Alaska), in order to investigate tropospheric long-range transport of ...

Wolfgang E. Raatz; Glenn E. Shaw

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Further Exploratory Analysis of the Bridger Range Winter Cloud Seeding Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Further exploratory analysis of the Bridger Range Experiment was carried out with 6 h data blocks partitioned from the original 24 h experimental units. The analysis was limited to 6 h periods having a rawinsonde observation, Main Ridge ...

Arlin D. Super

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Evaluation of Probabilistic Medium-Range Temperature Forecasts from the North American Ensemble Forecast System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble temperature forecasts from the North American Ensemble Forecast System were assessed for quality against observations for 10 cities in western North America, for a 7-month period beginning in February 2007. Medium-range probabilistic ...

Doug McCollor; Roland Stull

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Further Evaluation of the National Meterological Center's Medium-Range Forecast Model Precpitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation forecasts made by the National Meteorological Center's medium-range forecast (MRF) model are evaluated for the period, 1 March 1987 to 31 March 1989. As shown by Roads and Maisel, the MRF model wet bias was substantially alleviated ...

John O. Roads; T. Norman Maisal; Jordan Alpert

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Skill of Operational Dynamical Models in Cyclone Prediction Out to Five-Days Range during ERICA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigating the skill of prediction of surface cyclones by operational models to ranges of five days, we studied the central and western North Atlantic region for the December 1988 through February 1989 period of the Experiment on Rapidly ...

Frederick Sanders

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

0.22 THz wideband sheet electron beam traveling wave tube amplifier: Cold test measurements and beam wave interaction analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe micro-fabrication, RF measurements, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation modeling analysis of the 0.22 THz double-vane half period staggered traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) circuit. The TWTA slow wave structure comprised of two sections separated by two sever ports loaded by loss material, with integrated broadband input/output couplers. The micro-metallic structures were fabricated using nano-CNC milling and diffusion bonded in a three layer process. The 3D optical microscopy and SEM analysis showed that the fabrication error was within 2-3 {mu}m and surface roughness was measured within 30-50 nm. The RF measurements were conducted with an Agilent PNA-X network analyzer employing WR5.1 T/R modules with a frequency range of 178-228 GHz. The in-band insertion loss (S{sub 21}) for both the short section and long section (separated by a sever) was measured as {approx}-5 dB while the return loss was generally around {approx}-15 dB or better. The measurements matched well with the S-matrix simulation analysis that predicted a 3 dB bandwidth of {approx}45 GHz with an operating frequency at 220 GHz. However, the measured S{sub 21} was {approx}3 dB less than the design values, and is attributed to surface roughness and alignment issues. The confirmation measurements were conducted over the full frequency band up to 270 GHz employing a backward wave oscillator (BWO) scalar network analyzer setup employing a BWO in the frequency range 190 GHz-270 GHz. PIC simulations were conducted for the realistic TWT output power performance analysis with incorporation of corner radius of 127 {mu}m, which is inevitably induced by nano-machining. Furthermore, the S{sub 21} value in both sections of the TWT structure was reduced to correspond to the measurements by using a degraded conductivity of 10% International Annealed Copper Standard. At 220 GHz, for an elliptic sheet electron beam of 20 kV and 0.25 A, the average output power of the tube was predicted to be reduced from 90 W (for ideal conductivity/design S-parameters) to 70 W (for the measured S-parameters/inferred conductivity) for an average input power of 50 mW. The gain of the tube remains reasonable: {approx}31.4 dB with an electronic efficiency of {approx}1.4%. The same analysis was also conducted for several frequencies between 190 GHz-260 GHz. This detailed realistic PIC analysis demonstrated that this nano-machined TWT circuit has slightly reduced S-parameters and output power from design, but within an acceptable range and still have promising output power, gain, and band width as required. Thus, we expect to meet the specifications of 1000 W-GHz for the darpa program goals.

Baig, Anisullah; Gamzina, Diana; Barchfeld, Robert; Domier, Calvin; Barnett, Larry R.; Luhmann, Neville C. Jr. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Equilibrium Wave Spectrum and Sea State Bias in Satellite Altimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a well-developed sea at equilibrium with a constant wind, the energy-containing range of the wavenumber spectrum for wind-generated gravity waves is approximated by a generalized power law ?(U2/g)2?k?4+2?Y(k,?), where Y is the angular spread ...

Roman E. Glazman; Meric A. Srokosz

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Gravity surface wave turbulence in a laboratory flume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present experimental results for water wave turbulence excited by piston-like programmed wavemakers in a water flume with horisontal dimensions 6x12x1.5 meters. Our main finding is that for a wide range of excitation amplitudes the energy spectrum has a power-law scaling, $E_\\omega \\sim \\omega^{-\

Petr Denissenko; Sergei Lukaschuk; Sergey Nazarenko

2006-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Adaptive high-resolution simulation of realistic gaseous detonation waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The numerical approximation of detonation waves in gaseous combustible mixtures is extremely demanding since a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. A dynamically adaptive high-resolution finite volume method is described that has enabled accurately resolved computational investigations of the transient behavior of regularly oscillating detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in realistic two-dimensional geometry.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fractal nature of medium-range order in metallic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atomic structure of metallic glasses has been a long-standing scientific mystery. Unlike crystalline metals, where long-range ordering is established by periodic stacking of fundamental building blocks known as unit cells, a metallic glass has no long-range translational order, although some degrees of short- and medium-range order do exist.1,2,3 Previous studies1,2,3,4 have identified solute-centered clusters, characterized by short-range order (SRO) in favor of unlike bonds, as the fundamental building blocks of metallic glasses. However, how these building blocks are connected or packed to form the medium range order (MRO) remains an open question.1,2,3 Here, based on neutron and x-ray diffraction experiments, we propose a new packing scheme - the self-similar packing of atomic clusters. We show that MRO has the characteristics of a fractal network with a dimension of 2.38, and is described by a power-law correlation function over the medium-range length scale. Our finding provides a new prospective of order in disordered materials and has broad implications for understanding the structure-property relationship in metallic glasses, particularly those involving change in length scales due to phase transformation and mechanical deformation.

Ma, Dong [ORNL; Stoica, Alexandru Dan [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wave-coherent airflow and critical layers over ocean waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of coherent measurements of winds and waves from data collected during the ONR HiRes program from R/P FLIP off the coast of northern California in June 2010 is presented. A suite of wind and wave measuring systems was deployed to ...

Laurent Grare; Luc Lenain; W. Kendall Melville

332

Observation of femtosecond laser-induced nanostructure-covered large scale waves on metals  

SciTech Connect

Following femtosecond (fs) laser pulse irradiation, we produce a type of periodic surface structure with a period tens of times greater than the laser wavelength and densely covered by an iterating pattern that consists of stripes of nanostructures and microscale cellular structures. The morphology of this large scale wave pattern crucially depends on laser fluence and the number of laser pulses, but not on the laser wavelength. Our study suggests that this large scale wave is initiated by fs laser induced surface unevenness followed by periodically distributed nonuniform surface heating from fs pulse irradiation.

Hwang, Taek Yong; Guo Chunlei [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mountain Waves over Mont Blanc: Influence of a Stagnant Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stationary mountain wave, embedded in southwesterly flow over Mont Blanc in the Alps, was observed simultaneously by three research aircraft and three types of remote sensing: GPS dropsondes, airborne light detecting and ranging (lidar), and ...

Ronald B. Smith; Steven Skubis; James D. Doyle; Adrian S. Broad; Christoph Kiemle; Hans Volkert

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Forward and adjoint simulations of seismic wave propagation on emerging large-scale GPU architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational seismology is an area of wide sociological and economic impact, ranging from earthquake risk assessment to subsurface imaging and oil and gas exploration. At the core of these simulations is the modeling of wave propagation in a complex ...

Max Rietmann; Peter Messmer; Tarje Nissen-Meyer; Daniel Peter; Piero Basini; Dimitri Komatitsch; Olaf Schenk; Jeroen Tromp; Lapo Boschi; Domenico Giardini

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

On the Accelerations in the Free Surface of Nonlinear Gravity-Capillary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The real and apparent accelerations in the free surface of nonlinear gravity-capillary waves are calculated over a wide range of wavelengths. It is shown that surface tension has hardly any effect on the results previously obtained for pure ...

S. J. Hogan

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Lower-Tropospheric Enhancement of Gravity Wave Drag in a Global Spectral Atmospheric Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of enhanced lower-tropospheric gravity wave drag induced by subgrid-scale orography on short- and medium-range forecasts as well as seasonal simulations are examined. This study reports on the enhanced performance of the scheme ...

Song-You Hong; Jung Choi; Eun-Chul Chang; Hoon Park; Young-Joon Kim

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Exploration and Validation of Wave-Height Measurement Using Multifrequency HF Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For operations across at a wide range of oceanographic conditions a radar system able to operate at more than one frequency is theoretically and experimentally recommended for robust wave measurement in recent years. In order to obtain more sea ...

Chen Zhao; Zezong Chen; Yanni Jiang; Lingang Fan; Gengfei Zeng

338

Evidence of Tropical Forcing of the 6.5-Day Wave from Lightning Observations over Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study employing observations and climatic reanalysis data is concerned with links between convection and the well-documented 6.5-day stratospheric global wave. Observations from a long-range lightning detection network, known as ZEUS, reveal an ...

Themis G. Chronis; Earle Williams; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Airborne Observations of Fetch-Limited Waves in the Gulf of Tehuantepec  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present airborne observations of fetch-limited waves during strong offshore winds in the Gulf of Tehuantepec. The measurements, collected over a wide range of fetches, include one- and two-dimensional surface wavenumber spectra and ...

Leonel Romero; W. Kendall Melville

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Long-Wave Dynamics of Sea Level Variations during Indian Ocean Dipole Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-wave dynamics of the interannual variations of the equatorial Indian Ocean circulation are studied using an ocean general circulation model forced by the assimilated surface winds and heat flux of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ...

Dongliang Yuan; Hailong Liu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transmission of a quantum state in a periodically poled nonlinear crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations on transmission of quantum states such as Schr\\"{o}dinger cat (SC) states are considered in a periodically poled nonlinear crystal (PPNC). Combinations of various initial states (SC, coherent (C),and vacuum (V)) of light waves at frequencies $\\omega_{e}$ and $3\\omega_{e}$ at the input of a PPNC are studied. It is shown that the transmission and interference between superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states can be achieved by using a PPNC. Visualization and analyzes of transmission and interference processes are demonstrated with the help of reduced Wigner quasi-probability distribution functions of considered light waves.

Ranjit Singh

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

Network performance measurement with periodic streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo describes a periodic sampling method and relevant metrics for assessing the performance of IP networks. First, the memo motivates periodic sampling and addresses the question of its value as an alternative to the Poisson sampling described ...

V. Raisanen; G. Grotefeld; A. Morton

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

344

Selective Excitation of Tropical Atmospheric Waves in Wave-CISK: The Effect of Vertical Wind Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of waves and the generation of potential energy in wave-CISK require unstable waves to tilt with height oppositely to their direction of propagation. This makes the structures and instability properties of these waves very sensitive to ...

Minghua Zhang; Marvin A. Geller

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed Carbon Nanotube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed Carbon Nanotube (CNT) ... Application of Carbon Nanotubes – Energy to Bioelectronic Sensor.

346

Experimental observation of a complex periodic window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of a special periodic window in the two-dimensional parameter space of an experimental Chua's circuit is reported. One of the main reasons that makes such a window special is that the observation of one implies that other similar periodic windows must exist for other parameter values. However, such a window has never been experimentally observed, since its size in parameter space decreases exponentially with the period of the periodic attractor. This property imposes clear limitations for its experimental detection.

D. M. Maranhăo; M. S. Baptista; J. C. Sartorelli; I. L. Caldas

2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

347

Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12 Relativity? · What are some of the consequences of GR? · What are Black Holes like and do they exist? · What? · What are Black Holes like and do they exist? · What can we learn from Gravity Waves? · To do all

Cook, Greg

348

Ocean Tidal and Wave Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First published in 2000, the annual Renewable Energy Technical Assessment Guide (TAG-RE) provides a consistent basis for evaluating the economic feasibility of renewable generation technologies. This excerpt from the 2005 TAG-RE addresses ocean tidal and wave energy conversion technologies, which offer promise for converting the significant energy potential available in ocean tidal currents and waves to electricity in the future.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

349

Momentum Transport by Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The momentum flux by orographic gravity waves and the turbulent heat flux in wave-breaking regions are estimated from aircraft data from ALPEX. The fluxes on 6 March 1982 are controlled by low-level directional shear of the mean flow and ...

Jinwon Kim; L. Mahrt

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Evolution of Persistent Wave Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the near-field leg of the Hawaiian Ocean-Mixing Experiment (HOME-NF), short, steep surface wave groups were observed that elicited strong group-forced responses in the wave-filtered surface current field, as reported by Smith. Some of ...

Jerome A. Smith; Coralie Brulefert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear power plants. However, an evi- dent lack of knowledge in the field had demanded for a detaileds & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number

352

Gravitational Waves II: Emitting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the basic equations that predict the emission of gravitational waves according to the Einstein gravitation theory to calculate the luminosities and the amplitudes of the waves generated by binary stars, pulsations of neutron stars, wobbling of deformed neutron stars, oscillating quadrupoles, rotating bars and collapsing and bouncing cores of supernovas. This paper was written to graduate and postgraduate students of Physics.

M. Cattani

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

Gravitational-wave astronomy: the high-frequency window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This contribution is divided in two parts. The first part provides a text-book level introduction to gravitational radiation. The key concepts required for a discussion of gravitational-wave physics are introduced. In particular, the quadrupole formula is applied to the anticipated ``bread-and-butter'' source for detectors like LIGO, GEO600, EGO and TAMA300: inspiralling compact binaries. The second part provides a brief review of high frequency gravitational waves. In the frequency range above (say) 100Hz, gravitational collapse, rotational instabilities and oscillations of the remnant compact objects are potentially important sources of gravitational waves. Significant and unique information concerning the various stages of collapse, the evolution of protoneutron stars and the details of the supranuclear equation of state of such objects can be drawn from careful study of the gravitational-wave signal. As the amount of exciting physics one may be able to study via the detections of gravitational waves from these sources is truly inspiring, there is strong motivation for the development of future generations of ground based detectors sensitive in the range from hundreds of Hz to several kHz.

Nils Andersson; Kostas D Kokkotas

2004-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

355

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

356

ENERGY CONTENT AND PROPAGATION IN TRANSVERSE SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC WAVES  

SciTech Connect

Recently, a significant amount of transverse wave energy has been estimated propagating along solar atmospheric magnetic fields. However, these estimates have been made with the classic bulk Alfven wave model which assumes a homogeneous plasma. In this paper, the kinetic, magnetic, and total energy densities and the flux of energy are computed for transverse MHD waves in one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube models with a piecewise constant or continuous radial density profile. There are fundamental deviations from the properties for classic bulk Alfven waves. (1) There is no local equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy. (2) The flux of energy and the velocity of energy transfer have, in addition to a component parallel to the magnetic field, components in the planes normal to the magnetic field. (3) The energy densities and the flux of energy vary spatially, contrary to the case of classic bulk Alfven waves. This last property has the important consequence that the energy flux computed with the well known expression for bulk Alfven waves could overestimate the real flux by a factor in the range 10-50, depending on the flux tube equilibrium properties.

Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Soler, R. [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: tom.vandoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

357

On some essential peculiarities of the traveling wave reactor operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of conditions for existence of nuclear burning wave in neutron-multiplicating media (U-Pu and Th-U cycles) we show the possibility of surmounting so-called dpa-parameter problem, or in other words, an algorithm of optimal nuclear burning wave mode is proposed yielding parameters of the wave (fluence/neutron flux, width and speed of nuclear burning wave) satisfying the dpa-condition, characterizing the tolerable level of radioactive stability of reactor materials, in particular the cladding materials. It is shown for the first time that capture and fission cross-sections of 238U and 239Pu increase with temperature within 1000-3000K range, that under certain conditions may lead to global loss of stability of nuclear burning wave. Some variants of possible stability loss due to so-called blow-up modes, or in other words, anomalous nuclear fuel temperature and neutron flow evolution are discussed and are found to possibly become a reason for trivial violation of internal safety of traveling wave reac...

Rusov, V D; Sharf, I V; Vaschenko, V M; Linnik, E P; Zelentsova, T N; Beglaryan, M E; Chernegenko, S A; Kosenko, S I; Molchinikolov, P A; Smolyar, V P; Grechan, E V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

On some essential peculiarities of the traveling wave reactor operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of conditions for existence of nuclear burning wave in neutron-multiplicating media (U-Pu and Th-U cycles) we show the possibility of surmounting so-called dpa-parameter problem, or in other words, an algorithm of optimal nuclear burning wave mode is proposed yielding parameters of the wave (fluence/neutron flux, width and speed of nuclear burning wave) satisfying the dpa-condition, characterizing the tolerable level of radioactive stability of reactor materials, in particular the cladding materials. It is shown for the first time that capture and fission cross-sections of 238U and 239Pu increase with temperature within 1000-3000K range, that under certain conditions may lead to global loss of stability of nuclear burning wave. Some variants of possible stability loss due to so-called blow-up modes, or in other words, anomalous nuclear fuel temperature and neutron flow evolution are discussed and are found to possibly become a reason for trivial violation of internal safety of traveling wave reactor.

V. D. Rusov; V. A. Tarasov; I. V. Sharf; V. M. Vaschenko; E. P. Linnik; T. N. Zelentsova; M. E. Beglaryan; S. A. Chernegenko; S. I. Kosenko; P. A. Molchinikolov; V. P. Smolyar; E. V. Grechan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

Lee Wave Vertical Structure Monitoring Using Height–Time Analysis of VHF?ST Radar Vertical Velocity Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strong lee wave event of intensive observation period 3 (14–15 October 1990) of the Pyrenean experiment was studied using a single VHF stratospheric–tropospheric radar installed 35 km downstream from the Pyrenean chain axis. This instrument ...

Jean-Luc Caccia

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

How Purely Wind-Driven Long Planetary Geostrophic Waves May Be Energized in the Western Part of Ocean Subtropical Gyres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite observations and idealized numerical studies reveal intensification of long-period (on the order of one cycle per year) waves in the western part of ocean basins. The authors explore the idea that the intensification is associated with ...

Ivana Cerove?ki; Roland de Szoeke

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Climatology of Gravity Waves and Other Coherent Disturbances at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory during March–April 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a climatological study of gravity waves and other coherent disturbances at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, during the period mid-March-mid-April 1984. The data were collected by a network of microbarographs, and by sensors on the ...

F. Einaudi; A. J. Bedard Jr.; J. J. Finnigan

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Coupling Impedance of a Periodic Array of Diaphragms (Erratum)  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented for calculating the high-frequency longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances in a periodic array of diaphragms in a circular perfectly conducting pipe. The method is based on Weinstein's theory of diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave on a stack of halfplanes. Using Weinstein's solution, it is shown that the problem of finding the beam field in the pipe reduces to an effective boundary condition at the radius of the diaphragms that couples the longitudinal electric field with the azimuthal magnetic one. Solving Maxwell's equations with this boundary condition leads to simple formulae for Z{sub long} and Z{sub tr}. A good agreement with a numerical solution of the problem found by other authors is demonstrated.

Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

363

Wavenumber–Frequency Spectra of Inertia–Gravity and Mixed Rossby–Gravity Waves in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1970s and 1980s, there was considerable interest in near-equatorial variability at periods of days to weeks associated with oceanic equatorial inertia–gravity waves and mixed Rossby–gravity waves. At that time, the measurements available ...

J. Thomas Farrar; Theodore S. Durland

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Nw_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=401461" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded

365

On the Diurnal Variation of Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal variation of mountain waves and wave drag associated with flow past mesoscale ridges has been examined using the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) and an analytical boundary layer (BL) model. The wave drag ...

Qingfang Jiang; James D. Doyle

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Effect of Nonlinearity on Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear limit of two-dimensional gravity waves in an incompressible, inviscid and stably stratified atmosphere is studied. The three-wave resonant interaction theory indicates an energy cascade from a vertically propagating wave (...

Mostafa M. Ibrahim

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Second Harmonic Resonance for Equatorial Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple, exact analytical conditions for second harmonic resonance between equatorial waves are derived. Such resonance can occur only between two Rossby waves or two westward travelling gravity waves. It is shown that regardless of whether the ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Wind Wave Growth at Short Fetch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave wire data from the large wind wave tank of the Ocean Engineering Laboratory at the University of California, Santa Barbara, are analyzed, and comparisons are made with published data collected in four other wave tanks. The behavior of wind ...

T. Lamont-Smith; T. Waseda

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nonlinear Wave Statistics in a Focal Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the combined effects of refraction and nonlinearity on the evolution of ocean surface wave statistics are considered and possible implications for the likelihood of extreme waves, also known as freak or rogue waves, are examined. A ...

T. T. Janssen; T. H. C. Herbers

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Observations of Breaking Surface Wave Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breaking surface waves were observed during the Surface Wave Process Program with a novel acoustical instrument that makes use of underwater ambient sound to track individual breaking events. The spatial and temporal statistics of braking waves ...

Li Ding; David M. Farmer

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Interpreting Stationary Wave Nonlinearity in Barotropic Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stationary wave nonlinearity describes the self-interaction of stationary waves and is important in maintaining the zonally asymmetric atmospheric general circulation. However, the dynamics of stationary wave nonlinearity, which is often ...

Lei Wang; Paul J. Kushner

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Topographic Waves Generated by a Transient Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of linear mountain waves is generally equated with steady-state stationary waves. This essentially means that the absolute horizontal phase velocity of mountain waves is zero and that their momentum flux profile is independent of ...

François Lott; Hector Teitelbaum

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

(3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

Mirko Previsic

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Reaching ~3.35 x 10^-25 at ~150 Hz, those upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliá, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Abstract--Wave energy will have a key role in meeting re-newable energy targets en route to a low carbon economy. How-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speed, a 5% change in wind speed would produce approximately a 25% change in wave power. As such). Fig. 1. Linking climate change and wave energy In a manner similar to wind turbines, wave energy in spreadsheet form. For each 0.25 m/s increment in wind speed (over the range 0 to 30 m/s), the probability

Harrison, Gareth

376

Contrails, Natural Clouds, and Diurnal Temperature Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct impact of aircraft condensation trails (contrails) on surface temperature in regions of high aircraft density has been a matter of recent debate in climate research. Based on data analysis for the 3-day aviation grounding period over ...

Simone Dietmüller; Michael Ponater; Robert Sausen; Klaus-Peter Hoinka; Susanne Pechtl

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Elements of a continuous-wave borehole radar. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The theory is developed for the antenna array for a proposed continuous-wave, ground-penetrating radar for use in a borehole, and field measurements are presented. Accomplishments include the underground measurement of the transmitting beam in the azimuth plane, active azimuth-steering of the transmitting beam, and the development of a range-to-target algorithm. The excellent performance of the antenna array supports the concept of a continuous-wave borehole radar. A field-prototype should be developed for use in both geothermal zones and for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas.

Caffey, T.W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysical Technology Dept.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ocean Wave Energy Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenoceanwa Region United States LinkedIn...

379

Wave Wind LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Wind LLC Place Sun Prairie, Wisconsin Zip 53590 Sector Services, Wind energy Product Wisconsin-based wind developer and construction services provider. References Wave Wind...

380

Capillary Wave Dynamics of Thin Polymer Films over Submerged Nanostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface dynamics of thin molten polystyrene films supported by nanoscale periodic silicon line-space gratings were investigated with x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Surface dynamics over these nanostructures exhibit high directional anisotropy above certain length scales, as compared to surface dynamics over flat substrates. A cutoff length scale in the dynamics perpendicular to the grooves is observed. This marks a transition from standard over-damped capillary wave behavior to suppressed dynamics due to substrate interactions.

Alvine, Kyle J.; Dai, Yeling; Ro, Hyun W.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec; Soles, Christopher L.; Shpyrko, Oleg G.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PowerPlex Fusion Product Size Ranges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The schematic diagram illustrates the fluorescent dye label color and relative PCR product size ranges for the various STR loci present in this ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

382

Physics Out Loud - Short-range Correlations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) Previous Video (Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (SRF Accelerator Cavities) SRF Accelerator Cavities Short-range...

383

HY RID WIDE RANGE TRANSIMPEDAN E AMPLIFIER  

TRANSIMPEDAN E AMPLIFIER TE HNOLOGY SUMMARY Many applications require wide range detection, where detector current is converted to a voltage by a

384

Equatorial Wave-Mean Flow Interaction: The Long Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of long equatorial Rossby waves with mean zonal currents in the ocean is investigated in a continuously stratified finite difference numerical model. The model allows for realistic specification of the mean state including both ...

Jeffrey A. Proehl

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nonintrusive Measurement of Ocean Waves: Lidar Wave Gauge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1999, a nonintrusive directional lidar wave gauge (LWG) was field tested at the Field Research Facility (FRF) in North Carolina. The LWG uses proven lidar technology to directly measure water surface elevation from above the water’s ...

Jennifer L. Irish; Jennifer M. Wozencraft; A. Grant Cunningham; Claudine Giroud

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Wave Attenuation and Wave Drift in the Marginal Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface gravity waves in a viscous rotating ocean are studied theoretically when they penetrate an area covered by highly concentrated brashlike ice. The motion is described by a Lagrangian formulation, and the brash is modeled by a viscous ...

Jan Erik Weber

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Reconfigurable long-range phonon dynamics in optomechanical arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate periodic optomechanical arrays as reconfigurable platforms for engineering the coupling between multiple mechanical and electromagnetic modes and for exploring many-body phonon dynamics. Exploiting structural resonances in the coupling between light fields and collective motional modes of the array, we show that tunable effective long-range interactions between mechanical modes can be achieved. This paves the way towards the implementation of controlled phononic walks and heat transfer on densely-connected graphs as well as the coherent transfer of excitations between distant elements of optomechanical arrays.

André Xuereb; Claudiu Genes; Guido Pupillo; Mauro Paternostro; Aurélien Dantan

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

388

Adaptive Range Counting and Other Frequency-Based Range Query Problems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We consider variations of range searching in which, given a query range, our goal is to compute some function based on frequencies of points that… (more)

Wilkinson, Bryan T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

SES Probationary Period | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SES Probationary Period SES Probationary Period SES Probationary Period An individual's initial appointment as an SES career appointee becomes final only after the individual has served a 1-year probationary period as a career appointee. That employee's rating official must perform an assessment of the new SES's performance during the probationary period. After the one year the selecting official must certify that the appointee performed at the level of excellence expected of a senior executive during the probationary period. When a career appointee's executive qualification have been certified by a Qualifications Review Board on the basis of special or unique qualities, as described in Sec. 317.502(c), the probationary assessment must address any executive development activities the agency identified in support of the

390

Wave Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:30pm Addthis Photo of a large wave. Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.) However, wave energy cannot be harnessed everywhere. Wave power-rich areas of the world include the western coasts of Scotland, northern Canada, southern Africa, and Australia as well as the northeastern and northwestern coasts of the United States. In the Pacific Northwest alone, it is feasible that wave energy could produce 40-70 kilowatts (kW) per 3.3 feet (1 meter) of western coastline. Wave Energy Technologies

391

ISEE-1 observations in the magnetosphere of VLF emissions triggered by nonducted coherent VLF waves during VLF wave-injection experiments  

SciTech Connect

It is noted that recent data from the ISEE-1 spacecraft indicate that VLF emissions triggered by nonducted coherent VLF waves often possess spectral characteristics markedly different from those of emissions triggered by ducted waves. Emission triggering by nonducted waves is found to involve a strong path selectiveness. It is also established that emission triggering by nonducted waves can take place over a wide L-range and may involve inner radiation belt particles of energy up to 200 keV. It is concluded that the VLF emission generation process can occur under much more general conditions than previously believed on the basis of the results of ground-to-ground wave-injection experiments.

Bell, T.F.; Inan, U.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Range search on multidimensional uncertain data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an uncertain database, every object o is associated with a probability density function, which describes the likelihood that o appears at each position in a multidimensional workspace. This article studies two types of range retrieval ... Keywords: Uncertain databases, range search

Yufei Tao; Xiaokui Xiao; Reynold Cheng

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Molecular communication options for long range nanonetworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science devoted to provide new opportunities in a vast range of areas. In this paper, different techniques are proposed to enable the long range interconnection of nano-machines, deployed over distances from a few ... Keywords: Axons and action potential, Fluorescent proteins, MOLED, Molecular communication, Nanonetworks

Lluís Parcerisa Giné; Ian F. Akyildiz

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Risk-averse periodic preventive maintenance optimization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We consider a class of periodic preventive maintenance (PM) optimization problems, for a single piece of equipment that deteriorates with time or use, and can… (more)

Singh, Inderjeet,1978-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Relationship of Collectors and Periodic Table  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Chemical Element (IV)—The Relationship of Collectors and Periodic Table of ..... One Dimensional Multiferroic Nanomaterials/Nanocomposites for Solar ...

396

NONPARAMETRIC BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES  

SciTech Connect

Many astronomical phenomena exhibit patterns that have periodic behavior. An important step when analyzing data from such processes is the problem of identifying the period: estimating the period of a periodic function based on noisy observations made at irregularly spaced time points. This problem is still a difficult challenge despite extensive study in different disciplines. This paper makes several contributions toward solving this problem. First, we present a nonparametric Bayesian model for period finding, based on Gaussian Processes (GPs), that does not make assumptions on the shape of the periodic function. As our experiments demonstrate, the new model leads to significantly better results in period estimation especially when the light curve does not exhibit sinusoidal shape. Second, we develop a new algorithm for parameter optimization for GP which is useful when the likelihood function is very sensitive to the parameters with numerous local minima, as in the case of period estimation. The algorithm combines gradient optimization with grid search and incorporates several mechanisms to overcome the high computational complexity of GP. Third, we develop a novel approach for using domain knowledge, in the form of a probabilistic generative model, and incorporate it into the period estimation algorithm. Experimental results validate our approach showing significant improvement over existing methods.

Wang Yuyang; Khardon, Roni [Department of Computer Science, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States); Protopapas, Pavlos [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves  

SciTech Connect

The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Crescent Model School Shadman, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

wave energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

99 99 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281099 Varnish cache server wave energy Dataset Summary Description Source The Wave Energy Resource Assessment project is a joint venture between NREL, EPRI, and Virginia Tech. EPRI is the prime contractor, Virginia Tech is responsible for development of the models and estimating the wave resource, and NREL serves as an independent validator and also develops the final GIS-based display of the data. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released September 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated October 20th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords EPRI GIS NREL Puerto Rico shapefile United States Virginia Tech wave energy

399

Waves in the chromosphere: observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the literature on observational aspects of waves in the solar chromosphere in the first part of this contribution. High-frequency waves are invoked to build elaborate cool-star chromosphere heating theories but have not been detected decisively so far, neither as magnetic modes in network elements nor as acoustic modes in below-the-canopy internetwork regions. Three-minute upward-propagating acoustic shocks are thoroughly established through numerical simulation as the cause of intermittent bright internetwork grains, but their pistoning and their role in the low-chromosphere energy budget remain in debate. Three-minute wave interaction with magnetic canopies is a newer interest, presently progressing through numerical simulation. Three-minute umbral flashes and running penumbral waves seem a similar acoustic-shock phenomenon awaiting numerical simulation. The low-frequency network Doppler modulation remains enigmatic. In the second part, I address low-frequency ultraviolet brightness variations of t...

Rutten, R J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermal Equilibration of Planetary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibration of planetary waves toward free-mode forms, steady solutions of the unforced, undamped equations of motion, is studied in a three-level quasi-geostrophic model on the hemisphere. A thermal mechanism is invoked, parameterized as a ...

John Marshall; Damon W. K. So

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Planetary-Wave Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultralong and long planetary waves are analyzed at the 500 mb level in terms of their amplitudes, phases and stationarity characteristics, the latter described in terms of a stationarity index SIn. This index consists of the ratio between ...

Elmar R. Reiter; Daniel Westhoff

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Accelerations in Steep Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface accelerations can be measured in at least two ways: 1) by a fixed vertical wave guage, 2) by a free-floating buoy. This gives rise to two different vertical accelerations, called respectively “apparent” and “real”, or Langrangian. This ...

M. S. Longuet-Higgins

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Wave Energy Extraction from buoys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different types of Wave Energy Converters currently tested or under development are using the vertical movement of floating bodies to generate electricity. For commercial applications, arrays have to be considered in order ...

Garnaud, Xavier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Orographically Induced Rossby Wave Instabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, the effects of nonlinearity on waves forced by sinusoidal orography in severely truncated barotropic and baroclinic models have been explored. Multiple equilibria were found for fixed forcing and these have been associated with zonal ...

Michael J. Revell; Brian J. Hoskins

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Explosive Instability of Vorticity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear dynamics of “vorticity waves” (VW), specific wavelike motions occurring nearshore in the presence of an alongshore shear current is examined. By means of a standard asymptotic technique starting with the shallow-water ...

V. I. Shrira; V. V. Voronovich; N. G. Kozhelupova

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Gravitational waves with distinct wavefronts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exact solutions of Einstein's vacuum equations are considered which describe gravitational waves with distinct wavefronts. A family of such solutions presented recently in which the wavefronts have various geometries and which propagate into a number of physically significant backgrounds is here related to an integral representation which is a generalisation of the Rosen pulse solution for cylindrical waves. A nondiagonal solution is also constructed which is a generalisation of the Rosen pulse, being a cylindrical pulse wave with two states of polarization propagating into a Minkowski background. The solution is given in a complete and explicit form. A further generalisation to include electromagnetic waves with a distinct wavefront of the same type is also discussed.

G A Alekseev; J B Griffiths

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

407

Three-Dimensional Edge Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exact solutions are found to the linearized three-dimensional equations for free surface-gravity waves trapped against a straight coastline with a topography varying perpendicular to the coastline. Three families of topographies are found, one ...

Richard Paul Shaw; David Paskausky

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

On Offshore Propagating Diurnal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics and dynamics of offshore diurnal waves induced by land–sea differential heating are examined using linear theory. Two types of heating profiles are investigated, namely a shallow heating source confined within an atmospheric ...

Qingfang Jiang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spar Buoy Engine Spar Buoy Engine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Functional Design Engineering Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A long period spar buoy supports a subsurface flow augmentor The augmentor directs water from the wave s submarine flow field to a free prime mover piston The prime mover is decoupled from the machine s PTO during times in the wave s cycle when there is little power available for conversion Wave energy is stored in the device until the is enough flow magnetude that power take off can efficiently take place Power can be taken off as high pressure water crankshaft torque or directly as DC electricity

410

Definition: Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features such as hot springs, fumaroles, and snow melt. LWIR can also be used to map the distribution of certain minerals related to hydrothermal alterations.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ Katherine Young,Timothy Reber,Kermit Witherbee. 2012. Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei. In: Proceedings of the Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal

411

Bayesian detection of unmodeled bursts of gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The data analysis problem of coherently searching for unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in the data generated by a global network of gravitational-wave observatories has been at the center of research for almost two decades. As data from these detectors is starting to be analyzed, a renewed interest in this problem has been sparked. A Bayesian approach to the problem of coherently searching for gravitational wave bursts with a network of ground-based interferometers is here presented. We demonstrate how to systematically incorporate prior information on the burst signal and its source into the analysis. This information may range from the very minimal, such as best-guess durations, bandwidths, or polarization content, to complete prior knowledge of the signal waveforms and the distribution of sources through spacetime. We show that this comprehensive Bayesian formulation contains several previously proposed detection statistics as special limiting cases, and demonstrate that it outperforms them.

Antony C. Searle; Patrick J. Sutton; Massimo Tinto

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

Scattering of superpositions of localized waves from spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized wave (LW) solutions of the homogeneous wave equation can represent either focused or extended pulses

Des Power; Rod Donnelly

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy  

SciTech Connect

The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

414

Planetary waves in rotating ionosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of propagation of ultralong planetary waves in the Earth's upper atmosphere is considered. A new exact solution to the MHD equations for the ionosphere is obtained in spherical coordinates with allowance for the geomagnetic field and Earth's rotation. A general dispersion relation is derived for planetary waves in the ionospheric E and F regions, and the characteristic features of their propagation in a weakly ionized ionospheric plasma are discussed.

Khantadze, A. G.; Jandieri, V. G. [Tbilisi State University (Georgia); Jandieri, G. V. [Georgian Technical University (Georgia)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Spinor wave equation of photon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we give the spinor wave equations of free and unfree photon, which are the differential equation of space-time one order. For the free photon, the spinor wave equations are covariant, and the spinors $\\psi$ are corresponding to the the reducibility representations $D^{10}+D^{01}$ and $D^{10}+D^{01}+D^{1/2 1/2}$ of the proper Lorentz group.

Xiang-Yao Wu; Bo-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Si-Qi Zhang; Jing Wang; Hong Li; Xi-Hui Fan; Jing-Wu Li

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

416

Multibaseline gravitational wave radiometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistic for the detection of stochastic gravitational wave backgrounds (SGWBs) using radiometry with a network of multiple baselines. We also quantitatively compare the sensitivities of existing baselines and their network to SGWBs. We assess how the measurement accuracy of signal parameters, e.g., the sky position of a localized source, can improve when using a network of baselines, as compared to any of the single participating baselines. The search statistic itself is derived from the likelihood ratio of the cross correlation of the data across all possible baselines in a detector network and is optimal in Gaussian noise. Specifically, it is the likelihood ratio maximized over the strength of the SGWB, and is called the maximized-likelihood ratio (MLR). One of the main advantages of using the MLR over past search strategies for inferring the presence or absence of a signal is that the former does not require the deconvolution of the cross correlation statistic. Therefore, it does not suffer from errors inherent to the deconvolution procedure and is especially useful for detecting weak sources. In the limit of a single baseline, it reduces to the detection statistic studied by Ballmer [Class. Quant. Grav. 23, S179 (2006)] and Mitra et al. [Phys. Rev. D 77, 042002 (2008)]. Unlike past studies, here the MLR statistic enables us to compare quantitatively the performances of a variety of baselines searching for a SGWB signal in (simulated) data. Although we use simulated noise and SGWB signals for making these comparisons, our method can be straightforwardly applied on real data.

Dipongkar Talukder; Sanjit Mitra; Sukanta Bose

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=40142

418

Advancing Tests of Relativistic Gravity via Laser Ranging to Phobos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phobos Laser Ranging (PLR) is a concept for a space mission designed to advance tests of relativistic gravity in the solar system. PLR's primary objective is to measure the curvature of space around the Sun, represented by the Eddington parameter $\\gamma$, with an accuracy of two parts in $10^7$, thereby improving today's best result by two orders of magnitude. Other mission goals include measurements of the time-rate-of-change of the gravitational constant, $G$ and of the gravitational inverse square law at 1.5 AU distances--with up to two orders-of-magnitude improvement for each. The science parameters will be estimated using laser ranging measurements of the distance between an Earth station and an active laser transponder on Phobos capable of reaching mm-level range resolution. A transponder on Phobos sending 0.25 mJ, 10 ps pulses at 1 kHz, and receiving asynchronous 1 kHz pulses from earth via a 12 cm aperture will permit links that even at maximum range will exceed a photon per second. A total measurement precision of 50 ps demands a few hundred photons to average to 1 mm (3.3 ps) range precision. Existing satellite laser ranging (SLR) facilities--with appropriate augmentation--may be able to participate in PLR. Since Phobos' orbital period is about 8 hours, each observatory is guaranteed visibility of the Phobos instrument every Earth day. Given the current technology readiness level, PLR could be started in 2011 for launch in 2016 for 3 years of science operations. We discuss the PLR's science objectives, instrument, and mission design. We also present the details of science simulations performed to support the mission's primary objectives.

Slava G. Turyshev; William Farr; William M. Folkner; Andre R. Girerd; Hamid Hemmati; Thomas W. Murphy, Jr.; James G. Williams; John J. Degnan

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

Dynamics of Jacobi's elliptic spatial waves in a nonlinear optical grating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of our study on the dynamics of Jacobi's elliptic spatial waves in a nonlinear optical grating based on a generalized coupled-mode model. We discuss the characteristics of their amplitudes, widths, and spatial periods as well as their bifurcation in the associated phase plane. Our study on the dynamical propagation of perturbed profiles reveal that these waves can suffer breathing and broadening due to the diffraction effect. A remarkable split-off phenomenon of a spatial wave with wide stripes into several narrow and shallow oblique stripes is observed, as well as their passing and bouncing collisions.

Alatas, Husin [Theoretical Physics Division, Department of Physics, Bogor Agricultural University, Jl. Meranti, Kampus IPB Darmaga, Bogor 16680 (Indonesia)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Shock waves in trombones A. Hirschberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock waves in trombones A. Hirschberg Eindhoven University of Technology, W&S, P.O. Box 513, 5600 of the wave propagation in the pipe. At fortissimo levels this leads to shock wave formation observed in our and the band- width necessary in order to observe shock waves. Our ex- perimental results, shown in Figs. 2

Luo, Xiaoyu

424

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION STEPHEN SCHECTER Abstract solutions that include only shock waves. Shock waves are required to satisfy the viscous profile criterion for a given viscosity (B(u)u x ) x . Undercompressive shock waves are allowed. We also show that all

425

Time damping of non-adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic waves in a partially ionized prominence plasma: Effect of helium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prominences are partially ionized, magnetized plasmas embedded in the solar corona. Damped oscillations and propagating waves are commonly observed. These oscillations have been interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Ion-neutral collisions and non-adiabatic effects (radiation losses and thermal conduction) have been proposed as damping mechanisms. We study the effect of the presence of helium on the time damping of non-adiabatic MHD waves in a plasma composed by electrons, protons, neutral hydrogen, neutral helium (He I), and singly ionized helium (He II) in the single-fluid approximation. The dispersion relation of linear non-adiabatic MHD waves in a homogeneous, unbounded, and partially ionized prominence medium is derived. The period and the damping time of Alfven, slow, fast, and thermal waves are computed. A parametric study of the ratio of the damping time to the period with respect to the helium abundance is performed. The efficiency of ion-neutral collisions as well as thermal conduc...

Soler, R; Ballester, J L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Long range interactions in nanoscale science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

Rajter, Richard F.

427

Factors affecting home range of mallard pairs  

SciTech Connect

Certain habitat and social factors were investigated for their effect on home range size of mallard (Anas platyhynchos) pairs breeding in a forested region of north-central Minnesota during the spring of 1971--72. Data from 31 radio-marked hens and drakes were used, but primary emphasis was placed on 8 pairs (5 with both members of the pair marked). Pairs were radio-tracked on river marsh areas, river channels, and large sand lakes to provide comparative data for evaluating home range size differences. Home ranges varied from an average of 53 ha for pairs using primarily river habitat to 871 ha for pairs using only large sand lakes. River and lake shorelines varied considerably in species and density of vegetation. Interaction between pairs as well as density of flocked males appeared to be influenced by these habitat differences with resultant effects on home range sizes.

Riechmann, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Range resolution of unequal strength targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the problem of resolving targets whose amplitudes may differ. A common metric used for resolution that assumes targets of equal strength is modified for the subject scenario. An expression for range ...

Carlson, Blair D.

429

Underwater vehicle localization using range measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the problem of cooperative navigation of autonomous marine vehicles using range-only acoustic measurements. We consider the use of a single maneuvering autonomous surface vehicle (ASV) to aid the ...

Papadopoulos, Ge?rgios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Smart grid e PLC: TOA ranging.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In questo lavoro vengono presentati alcuni standard PLC (PowerLine Communication) nell'ottica del loro utilizzo in applicazioni di ranging in piccole reti intelligenti (micro smart grid).… (more)

Danzi, Pietro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part IV Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy #12;#12;Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in the fundamentals of shock wave generation and delivery. That is, lithotriptors have changed in form and mode, an acoustic shock wave. This pressure pulse, or shock wave, is responsible for breaking stones. However

Cleveland, Robin

432

Wave propagation through soils in centrifuge testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave propagation phenomena in soils can be experimentally simulated using centrifuge scale models. An original excitation device (drop-ball arrangement) is proposed to generate short wave trains. Wave reflections on model boundaries are taken into account and removed by homomorphic filtering. Propagation is investigated through dispersion laws. For drop-ball experiments, spherical wave field analysis assuming linear viscoelasticity leads to a complete analytical description of wave propagation. Damping phenomena are examined and evaluated using this description.

Semblat, J F; 10.1142/S1363246998000071

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Solar Wind Oscillations With a 1.3 Year Period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The IMP-8 and Voyager 2 spacecraft have ecently detected a very strong modulation in the solar wind d w speed with an approximately 1.3 year period. Combine ith evidence from long-term auroral and magnetometer o studies, this suggests that fundamental changes in the Sun ccur on a roughly 1.3 year time scale. Introduction The Sun emits a continuous stream of ionized particles s d called the solar wind. This wind is not constant, but varie ue to changes on the Sun. Strong periodicities in the solar ) [ wind linked with the solar rotation period (roughly 25 days Neugebauer and Snyder, 1966] and the solar cycle , 1 [Neugebauer, 1975; Bridge, 1977; Lazarus and McNutt 990] have been observed. Periodicities ranging from 51 to r s 256 days have been reported both in solar wind and in othe olar observations (see Villanueva [1994] and references a therein). Solar cycle variations of sunspot numbers and uroral activity are well established [see review by Silverman, 1992]. The IMP...

John Richardson Karolen; John D. Richardson; Karolen I. Paularena; John W. Belcher; Alan J. Lazarus

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Applications of fast wave in spherical tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

In spherical tokamaks (ST), the magnetic field strength varies over a wide range across the plasma, and at high betas it deviates significantly from the 1/R dependence of conventional tokamaks. This, together with the high density expected in ST, poses challenging problems for RF heating and current drive. In this paper, the authors investigate the various possible applications of fast waves (FW) in ST. The adjoint technique of calculating current drive is implemented in the raytracing code CURRAY. The applicability of high harmonic and subharmonic FW to steady state ST is considered. They find that high harmonic FW tends to be totally absorbed before reaching the core and may be considered a candidate for off axis current drive while the subharmonic FW tends to be absorbed mainly in the core region and may be considered for central current drive. A difficult problem is the maintenance of current at the startup stage. In the bootstrap ramp-up scenario, the current ramp-up is mainly provided by the bootstrap current. Under this condition, the role of rf becomes mainly the sustainment of plasma through electron heating. Using a slab full-wave code SEMAL, the authors find that the ion-ion-hybrid mode conversion scheme is a promising candidate. The effect of possible existence of edge Alfven resonance and high harmonic cyclotron resonance is investigated and regimes of minimization of edge heating identified.

Chiu, S.C.; Chan, V.S.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.; Prater, R.; Politzer, P.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

Nonlinear forces on a vertical truncated cylinder in Stokes 5th order waves-model test and validation of prediction model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of experiments of forces on a fixed vertical truncated column due to Stokes 5th order like waves were done in a wave tank. An effort was made to generate the waves as close as possible to theoretical Stokes 5th order waves. A systematic analysis, which centers on the wave height and wave steepness, was done for the wave and wave effects on the forces. Wave elevation time series was measured in the absence of the model, at the site of the model. Horizontal and vertical forces on the model were measured using a dynamometer. Horizontal particle velocity was measured under a typical wave to find the difference between the theory and experiment. Forces on the model were calculated also using Universal Linear System Model by Kim and Wang (1999a & 199b). The measured forces (Fx, Fz) increased almost linearly with the wave steepness and with the wave period (wave height) at the given steepness. The horizontal and vertical force transfer functions Fx/(H/2) and Fz/(H/2) due to a 2.0 s period wave at H/L = 0.049 amount to 1.35 and 1.05 times the corresponding theoretical linear transfer function (LTF). The theoretical LTF was compared with the measured LTF. The theoretical LTF underestimates the measured horizontal force LTF, while it overestimates the measured vertical force LTF. The theoretical vertical linear force consistently over-predicts the nonlinear measured vertical force, whereas the theoretical linear horizontal force consistently under-predicts the nonlinear measured horizontal force. The theoretical prediction due to ULSM/L+Q (Universal Linear System Model/Linear + Quadratic) was compared with the measured horizontal and vertical forces for two typical wave forces due to low and high waves. The five harmonics of the measured and theoretical wave were the inputs. The use of the measured wave gave a more favorable comparison than the theoretical wave. However, the difference was small. Breaking of the waves at the cylinder was observed using photographs for some high waves. This trend worsened with the increasing wave height. The corresponding force time series behaves differently from the force time series due to waves that were not breaking at the cylinder.

Alex, Hitha

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Gravitational Wave Sources from New Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forthcoming advances in direct gravitational wave detection from kilohertz to nanohertz frequencies have unique capabilities to detect signatures from or set meaningful constraints on a wide range of new cosmological phenomena and new fundamental physics. A brief survey is presented of the post-inflationary gravitational radiation backgrounds predicted in cosmologies that include intense new classical sources such as first-order phase transitions, late-ending inflation, and dynamically active mesoscopic extra dimensions. LISA will provide the most sensitive direct probes of such phenomena near TeV energies or Terascale. LISA will also deeply probe the broadband background, and possibly bursts, from loops of cosmic superstrings predicted to form in current models of brane inflation.

Craig J. Hogan

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

438

First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h_{rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h_{rss} ~ 10^{-19} - 10^{-17} strain/rtHz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A N; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S V; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barker-Patton, C; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff,S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Bland-Weaver, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R G; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Brozek, S; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ebeling, C; Edlund, J; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Flanagan, E; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ingley, R; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kloevekorn, P; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H B; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K O; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNamara, P; Mendell, G; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Naundorf, H; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Papa, M A; Parameswariah, C; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Pratt, M; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schofield, R; Schrempel, M; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P S; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Skeldon, K D; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traeger, S; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Vallisneri, M; Van, M; Putten; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Ion Bernstein wave heating research  

SciTech Connect

Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW`s low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much_lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW`s that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW`s can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

Ono, Masayuki

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Ion Bernstein wave heating research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

Ono, Masayuki.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A Study of Internal Wave Propagation in the Strait of Gibraltar Using Shore-Based Marine Radar Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An X-band marine radar on Windmill Hill, Gibraltar, was used to monitor the propagation of internal waves in the Strait of Gibraltar during March, April, and June 1986. Surface roughness features of the waves were observed out to a range of 15 ...

G. Watson; I. S. Robinson

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

THE ORBITAL PERIOD OF SCORPIUS X-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The orbital period of Sco X-1 was first identified by Gottlieb et al. While this has been confirmed on multiple occasions, this work, based on nearly a century of photographic data, has remained the reference in defining the system ephemeris ever since. It was, however, called into question when Vanderlinde et al. claimed to find the one-year alias of the historical period in RXTE/All-Sky Monitor data and suggested that this was the true period rather than that of Gottlieb et al. We examine data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) spanning 2001-2009. We confirm that the period of Gottlieb et al. is in fact the correct one, at least in the optical, with the one-year alias strongly rejected by these data. We also provide a modern time of minimum light based on the ASAS data.

Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, Christopher T., E-mail: rih@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

Mars Atmosphere Pressure Periodicities from Viking Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first martian year of pressure data taken by the Viking landers on Mars is subjected to power spectrum analysis. The analysis suggests that strong periodicities are present in the martian atmosphere, especially at the high-latitude (48°N) ...

R. D. Sharman; J. A. Ryan

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) International Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) International Workshop, sponsored by NOAA Office of Global Programs and NASA Land Surface Hydrology Program, was held on 27 February 1 March 2001 at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Rick Lawford

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A Precipitation Climatology of 5-Day Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A precipitation climatology has been developed for the relative frequencies of zero, one, or two or more days with measurable precipitation within 5-day periods. In addition, the distribution of precipitation amounts is given for the one wet day ...

E. S. Epstein; A. G. Barnston

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Numerical Study of Sea-Breeze-Driven Ocean Poincare Wave Propagation and Mixing near the Critical Latitude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near the vicinity of 30° latitude, the coincidence of the period of sea breeze and the inertial period of the ocean leads to a maximum near-inertial ocean response to sea breeze. This produces a propagating inertial internal (Poincare) wave ...

Xiaoqian Zhang; David C. Smith IV; Steven F. DiMarco; Robert D. Hetland

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

MHK Technologies/Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Wave pumps and turbins Wind Wave pumps and turbins < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description 2Wave1Wind The hybrid wave power rig uses two wave converting technologies in addition to wind mills The main system is a pneumatic float in the category of overtopping as Wave Dragon In addition the pneumatic float can house point absorbers The hybrid wave power rig is based on the patented wave energy converter from 2005

448

Implicit–Explicit Multistep Methods for Fast-Wave–Slow-Wave Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implicit–explicit (IMEX) linear multistep methods are examined with respect to their suitability for the integration of fast-wave–slow-wave problems in which the fast wave has relatively low amplitude and need not be accurately simulated. The ...

Dale R. Durran; Peter N. Blossey

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Energy-momentum relation for solitary waves of relativistic wave equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solitary waves of relativistic invariant nonlinear wave equation with symmetry group U(1) are considered. We prove that the energy-momentum relation for spherically symmetric solitary waves coincides with the Einstein energy-momentum relation for point particles.

T. V. Dudnikova; A. I. Komech; H. Spohn

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

450

Internal Wave–Wave Interactions. Part II: Spectral Energy Transfer and Turbulence Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral transfer of internal wave energy toward high vertical wavenumber kz and turbulence production ? is examined by ray tracing small-scale test waves in a canonical Garrett and Munk background wave field. Unlike previous ray-tracing ...

Haili Sun; Eric Kunze

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Influence of Wave Propagation on the Doppler Spreading of Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The “Doppler spread” theory of atmospheric gravity waves has developed rapidly in recent years, from an initial theory of wave spectra into a general parameterization of gravity wave effects for use in global models of the middle atmosphere. Yet ...

Stephen D. Eckermann

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking November 6, 2007 - 5:00pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you. And let me say how much it means to have my old friend Vinodh here to introduce me. You are a true pioneer in this industry. I also want to thank Mitch for asking me to be here. It's good to see Tom Dorr from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, our partner in so much of the federal government's biomass research and development and deployment efforts. Gov. Perdue, as always, it's great to be in Georgia and to see the progress occurring here under your leadership. I want to reaffirm our support for governors and state legislators who exhibit the kind of leadership you've shown in developing America's new energy future.

453

The periodicity of the eta Carinae events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive spectral observations of eta Carinae over the last cycle, and particularly around the 2003.5 low excitation event, have been obtained. The variability of both narrow and broad lines, when combined with data taken from two earlier cycles, reveal a common and well defined period. We have combined the cycle lengths derived from the many lines in the optical spectrum with those from broad-band X-rays, optical and near-infrared observations, and obtained a period length of 2022.7+-1.3 d. Spectroscopic data collected during the last 60 years yield an average period of 2020+-4 d, consistent with the present day period. The period cannot have changed by more than $\\Delta$P/P=0.0007 since 1948. This confirms the previous claims of a true, stable periodicity, and gives strong support to the binary scenario. We have used the disappearance of the narrow component of HeI 6678 to define the epoch of the Cycle 11 minimum, T_0=JD 2,452,819.8. The next event is predicted to occur on 2009 January 11 (+-2 days). The dates for the start of the minimum in other spectral features and broad-bands is very close to this date, and have well determined time delays from the HeI epoch.

A. Damineli; M. F. Corcoran; D. J. Hillier; O. Stahl; R. S. Levenhagen; N. V. Leister; J. H. Groh; M. Teodoro; J. F. Albacete Colombo; F. Gonzalez; J. Arias; H. Levato; M. Grosso; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; G. Wallerstein; V. Niemela

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

Wave | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Wave Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 18 April, 2013 - 13:41 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing claims of LCOE, DOE has developed-for its own use-a standardized cost and performance data reporting process to facilitate uniform calculation of LCOE from MHK device developers. This standardization framework is only the first version in what is anticipated to be an iterative process that involves industry and the broader DOE stakeholder community. Multiple files are attached here for review and comment.Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon device_performance_validation_data_request.docx application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon

455

Range conditions for a spherical mean transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to the range description of the Radon type transform that averages a function over all spheres centered on a given sphere. Such transforms arise naturally in thermoacoustic tomography, a novel method of medical imaging. Range descriptions have recently been obtained for such transforms, and consisted of smoothness and support conditions, moment conditions, and some additional orthogonality conditions of spectral nature. It has been noticed that in odd dimensions, surprisingly, the moment conditions are superfluous and can be eliminated. It is shown in this text that in fact the same happens in any dimension.

Mark Agranovsky; David Finch; Peter Kuchment

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

NREL GIS Data: Wave Energy Assessment for the United States and Puerto Rico  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Energy Assessment for the United States and Puerto Rico Wave Energy Assessment for the United States and Puerto Rico Dataset Summary Description Source The Wave Energy Resource Assessment project is a joint venture between NREL, EPRI, and Virginia Tech. EPRI is the prime contractor, Virginia Tech is responsible for development of the models and estimating the wave resource, and NREL serves as an independent validator and also develops the final GIS-based display of the data. Geographic Range US coastline, including AK, HI and Puerto Rico, out to 50 nautical miles. Grid Properties Grids are derived from WaveWatch III grids. Near the coast of the lower 48 and HI, grids are squares, 4 minutes by 4 minutes (15 per degree). For the Alaska grids AK and BS, the grid is 4 minutes of latitude by 8 minutes of longitude (15 per deg by 7.5 per deg).

457

Wave Power: Destroyer of Rocks; Creator of Clean Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E E PG&E Wave Energy Wave Energy Federal Utility Partnership Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Wave Energy Wave Energy Development Development Ontario, CA Ontario, CA November 18 November 18- -19, 200 19, 2009 9 Donald G. Price Donald G. Price Senior Consulting Scientist, PG&E Senior Consulting Scientist, PG&E Wave Power Overview Wave Power Overview * * What is Wave Power? What is Wave Power? o o Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean o o Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean waves that is converted into electricity by various means. waves that is converted into electricity by various means. o o It is a clean, renewable energy resource capable of being utilized

458

Plasma beat-wave accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform an analytic study of some quantities relevant to the plasma beat-wave accelerator (PBWA) concept. We obtain analytic expressions for the plasma frequency, longitudinal electron velocity, plasma density and longitudinal plasma electric field of a nonlinear longitudinal electron plasma oscillation with amplitude less than the wave-breaking limit and phase velocity approaching the speed of light. We also estimate the luminosity of a single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear PBWA collider assuming the energy and collision beamstrahlung are fixed parameters.

Noble, R.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Partial-wave analysis for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at astrophysical energies  

SciTech Connect

A standard partial-wave analysis was performed on the basis of known measurements of differential cross sections for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at energies in the range 250-750 keV. This analysis revealed that, in the energy range being considered, it is sufficient to take into account the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave alone. A potential for the triplet {sup 3}S{sub 1}-wave state of the p{sup 13}C system in the region of the J{sup p}T = 1{sup -1} resonance at 0.55 MeV was constructed on the basis of the phase shifts obtained from the aforementioned partial-wave analysis.

Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@mail.ru [V.G. Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Prospects for Localization of Gravitational Wave Transients by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo Observatories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. For concreteness, we focus primarily on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron star (BNS) systems, as the source considered likely to be the most common for detection and also promising for multimessenger astronomy. We find that confident detections will likely require at least 2 detectors operating with BNS sensitive ranges of at least 100 Mpc, while ranges approaching 200 Mpc should give at least ~1 BNS detection per year even under pessimistic predictions of signal rates. The ability to localize the source of the detected signals...

Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brueckner, F; Buckland, K; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A D; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drasco, S; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Engel, R; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gehrels, N; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Haris, K; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kozameh, C; Kremin, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave period ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel  

SciTech Connect

Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Nonlinear dissipation of circularly polarized Alfven waves due to the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, the dissipation processes of circularly polarized Alfven waves in solar wind plasmas including beam components are numerically discussed by using a 2-D hybrid simulation code. Numerical results suggest that the parent Alfven waves are rapidly dissipated due to the presence of the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves, such as kinetic Alfven waves. The nonlinear wave-wave coupling is directly evaluated by using the induction equation for the parent wave. It is also observed both in the 1-D and 2-D simulations that the presence of large amplitude Alfven waves strongly suppresses the beam instabilities.

Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Hada, T. [Department of Earth System Science and Technology, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga City, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Tsubouchi, K. [Department of Earth and Planetary Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nuclear correlation and finite interaction-range effects in high-energy $(e,e'p)$ nuclear transparency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear transparency is calculated for high-energy, semi-inclusive $(e,e'p)$ reactions, by accounting for all orders of Glauber multiple-scattering and by using realistic finite-range $p N$ interaction and (dynamically and statistically) correlated nuclear wave functions. The nuclear correlation effect is reduced due to the $p N$ finite-range effect. The net effect is small, and depends sensitively on details of the nuclear correlations in finite nuclei, which are poorly known at present.

Ryoichi Seki; T. D. Shoppa; Akihisa Kohama; Koichi Yazaki

1995-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

Vertical Wavenumber Spectra of Gravity Waves in the Martian Atmosphere Obtained from Mars Global Surveyor Radio Occultation Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical wavenumber spectra of Martian gravity waves were obtained for the altitude range 3–32 km from temperature profiles acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation experiments. The spectra, which cover vertical wavelengths ...

Hiroki Ando; Takeshi Imamura; Toshitaka Tsuda

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Mountain Wave Signatures in MODIS 6.7-?m Imagery and Their Relation to Pilot Reports of Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for nowcasting turbulent mountain waves over the Front Range of the state of Colorado is investigated using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) water vapor (6.7 ?m) channel imagery. Pilot reports of turbulence were ...

N. L. Uhlenbrock; K. M. Bedka; W. F. Feltz; S. A. Ackerman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Stratospheric Extension of the Canadian Global Deterministic Medium-Range Weather Forecasting System and Its Impact on Tropospheric Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new system that resolves the stratosphere was implemented for operational medium-range weather forecasts at the Canadian Meteorological Centre. The model lid was raised from 10 to 0.1 hPa, parameterization schemes for nonorographic gravity wave ...

Martin Charron; Saroja Polavarapu; Mark Buehner; P. A. Vaillancourt; Cécilien Charette; Michel Roch; Josée Morneau; Louis Garand; Josep M. Aparicio; Stephen MacPherson; Simon Pellerin; Judy St-James; Sylvain Heilliette

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Gravitomagnetism and the Earth-Mercury range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically work out the impact of the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect on the Earth-Mercury range caused by the gravitomagnetic field of the rotating Sun. The peak-to peak nominal amplitude of the resulting time-varying signal amounts to 1.75 10^1 m over a temporal interval 2 yr. Future interplanetary laser ranging facilities should reach a cm-level in ranging to Mercury over comparable timescales; for example, the BepiColombo mission, to be launched in 2014, should reach a 4.5 - 10 cm level over 1 - 8 yr. We looked also at other Newtonian (solar quadrupole mass moment, ring of the minor asteroids, Ceres, Pallas, Vesta, Trans-Neptunian Objects) and post-Newtonian (gravitoelectric Schwarzschild solar field) dynamical effects on the Earth-Mercury range. They act as sources of systematic errors for the Lense-Thirring signal which, in turn, if not properly modeled, may bias the recovery of some key parameters of such other dynamical features of motion. Their nominal peak-to-peak amplitudes are as large as 4 10^5 m (Schwarzschild), 3 10^2 m (Sun's quadrupole), 8 10^1 m (Ceres, Pallas, Vesta), 4 m (ring of minor asteroids), 8 10^-1 m (Trans-Neptunian Objects). Their temporal patterns are different with respect to that of the gravitomagnetic signal.

Lorenzo Iorio

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Some Recent Long-Range Diffusion Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent atmospheric cloud-spreading (relative diffusion) data from a variety of sources are combined to show that the horizontal spreading rate is approximately linear over a time range from 1 to 10 or more hours (20?200 or more km) of downwind ...

F. A. Gifford

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Likely Ranges of Climate Change in Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bolivia is facing numerous climate-related threats, ranging from water scarcity due to rapidly retreating glaciers in the Andes to a partial loss of the Amazon forest in the lowlands. To assess what changes in climate may be expected in the future,...

Christian Seiler; Ronald W. A. Hutjes; Pavel Kabat

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Seasonal Variation in Daily Temperature Ranges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abrupt spring and autumnal changes in the daily temperature range, from low winter values to higher nonwinter values, were noted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul temperature record. Since this feature was even more evident in five rural and small town ...

David L. Ruschy; Donald G. Baker; Richard H. Skaggs

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

High-Dynamic-Range Imaging for artists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An introduction and overview of the practical applications and uses of high-dynamic-range imaging (HDRI) from a production point of view. The course begins with a brief overview of HDRI and pre-production, production, and post-production techniques. ...

Kirt Witte

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Secure multidimensional range queries in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most future large-scale sensor networks are expected to follow a two-tier architecture which consists of resource-rich master nodes at the upper tier and resource-poor sensor nodes at the lower tier. Sensor nodes submit data to nearby master nodes which ... Keywords: multidimensional range query, security, sensor networks,

Rui Zhang; Jing Shi; Yanchao Zhang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Three-terminal semiconductor laser for wave mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest and analyze the concept of a semiconductor laser device that incorporates two basic ideas: (i) dual-wavelength generation of two optical fields on the interband transitions with independent control of each field in a three-terminal "transistor" scheme, and (ii) generation of infrared radiation in the 3-300 mum range due to nonlinear wave mixing of the above optical fields in the same laser cavity. Due to inversionless nature of the difference frequency generation and inherently low threshold current, the laser can be capable of continuous room-temperature operation in the mid/far-infrared and THz range.

Belyanin, Alexey; Kocharovsky, V.; Kocharovsky, V.; Scully, Marlan O.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time. 12 figs.

Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z