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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Skew Fluxes in Polarized Wave Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scalar flux due to small amplitude waves that exhibit a preferred sense of rotation or polarization is shown to consist of a component. FS, that is skewed, being everywhere orthogonal to the mean scalar gradient, Q. The skew flux is ...

John F. Middleton; John W. Loder

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Gravity Wave 1-leat Fluxes: A Lagrangian Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of a vertically propagating, internal gravity wave on the vertical flux of potential temperature (heat) is considered by averaging the local heat flux vector over a potential temperature surface. This approach gives the wave heat flux ...

Lawrence Coy; David C. Fritts

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding internal wave generation, propagation, and dissipation. In this paper, the estimation of internal wave energy fluxes u?p? from ocean observations that may be sparse in either time or depth ...

Jonathan D. Nash; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy Flux and Wavelet Diagnostics of Secondary Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, aircraft data from mountain waves have been primarily analyzed using velocity and temperature power spectrum and momentum flux estimation. Herein it is argued that energy flux wavelets (i.e., pressure–velocity wavelet cross-...

Bryan K. Woods; Ronald B. Smith

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

HF Doppler Measurements of Mesospheric Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent theoretical studies have emphasized the probable importance of internal gravity waves in balancing the momentum budget of the mesosphere. In this paper, we propose a method by which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum can be measured ...

R. A. Vincent; I. M. Reid

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Momentum Flux and Flux Divergence of Gravity Waves in Directional Shear Flows over Three-Dimensional Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear mountain wave theory is used to derive the general formulas of the gravity wave momentum flux (WMF) and its vertical divergence that develop in directionally sheared flows with constant vertical shear. Height variations of the WMF and its ...

Xin Xu; Yuan Wang; Ming Xue

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

A Theory for the Statistical Equilibrium Energy Spectrum and Heat Flux Produced by Transient Baroclinic Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining a physically based understanding of the variations with spatial scale of the amplitude and dispersive properties of midlatitude transient baroclinic waves and the heat flux associated with these waves is a central goal of dynamic ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Direct Estimation of Near-Bottom Turbulent Fluxes in the Presence of Energetic Wave Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocities produced by energetic waves can contaminate direct covariance estimates of near-bottom turbulent shear stress and turbulent heat flux. A new adaptive filtering technique is introduced to minimize the contribution of wave-induced ...

W. J. Shaw; J. H. Trowbridge

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Energy Flux and Generation of Diurnal Shelf Waves along Vancouver Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations along the west coast of Vancouver Island reveal among diurnal-period currents due to a tidally driven continental shelf wave superimposed upon a Kelvin wave. The energy flux of this system is investigated here. It is shown ...

William R. Crawford

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A Model of the Air–Sea Momentum Flux and Breaking-Wave Distribution for Strongly Forced Wind Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under high-wind conditions, breaking surface waves likely play an important role in the air–sea momentum flux. A coupled wind–wave model is developed based on the assumption that in the equilibrium range of surface wave spectra the wind stress is ...

Tobias Kukulka; Tetsu Hara; Stephen E. Belcher

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

On Energy Flux and Group Velocity of Waves in Baroclinic Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified energy flux is defined by adding a nondivergent term that involves ? to the traditional energy flux. The resultant flux, when normalized by the total eddy energy, is exactly equal to the group velocity of Rossby waves on a ? plane with ...

Edmund K. M. Chang; Isidoro Orlanski

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

CONDITIONS FOR TRANSVERSE WAVES PROPAGATION ALONG THIN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES ON THE SUN  

SciTech Connect

The propagation of kink waves in the thin gravity stratified flux tubes with a generalized magnetic field distribution model is considered in cylindrical geometry. The new kink wave equations for both wave variables are obtained. It is shown that the inclusion of the radial component of an unperturbed tube magnetic field sufficiently transforms the conditions for the propagation of transverse waves. It is demonstrated that, for the models of isothermal and polytropic atmosphere in the tube and its environment, the propagation of kink waves along thin magnetic flux tubes is cutoff-free.

Lopin, Igor [Ussuriisk Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ussuriisk (Russian Federation); Nagorny, Ivan, E-mail: lopin78@mail.ru [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Role of Momentum Fluxes in Shaping the Life Cycle of a Baroclinic Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wide disparities in baroclinic wave development between spherical and Cartesian geometry are investigated with the purpose of assessing the role of the eddy momentum fluxes. Differences are already significant at the linear stage, as momentum ...

G. Balasubramanian; Stephen T. Garner

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Marshak waves: Constant flux vs constant T-a (slight) paradigm shift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the basic scaling laws for Marshak waves and point out the differences in results for wall loss, albedo, and Marshak depth when a constant absorbed flux is considered as opposed to a constant absorbed temperature. Comparisons with LASNEX simulations and with data are presented that imply that a constant absorbed flux is a more appropriate boundary condition.

Rosen, M.D.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Simplified Quasi-Linear Model for Wave Generation and Air–Sea Momentum Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified model is described for wave generation and air–sea momentum flux. The model is based upon the quasilinear theory employed by Fabrikant and Janssen, in which the mean flow is approximated to second order in the wave amplitude and ...

Alastair D. Jenkins

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A Comparison between Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes in Observations and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, a formal comparison is made between gravity wave momentum fluxes in models and those derived from observations. Although gravity waves occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, the focus of this paper is on scales ...

Marvin A. Geller; M. Joan Alexander; Peter T. Love; Julio Bacmeister; Manfred Ern; Albert Hertzog; Elisa Manzini; Peter Preusse; Kaoru Sato; Adam A. Scaife; Tiehan Zhou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Role of Nonlinear Momentum Fluxes on the Evolution of Directional Wind-Wave Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has long been known that nonlinear wave–wave interactions produce stationary solutions related to constant energy flux through the equilibrium range when a deep-water spectrum follows an f?4 form, as has been verified in numerical studies in ...

Donald T. Resio; Charles E. Long; William Perrie

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Enhanced flux balance analysis to model metabolic networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a widely used technique to predict rates of reactions in metabolic networks in cells under steady state using only stoichiometric information about the reactions. In this work, we introduce Enhanced Flux Balance Analysis ...

Nishanth Ulhas Nair; Navin Goyal; Nagasuma R. Chandra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Semidiurnal Baroclinic Wave Momentum Fluxes at Kaena Ridge, Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kaena Ridge, Hawaii, is a site of energetic conversion of the semidiurnal barotropic tide. Diffuse baroclinic wave beams emanate from the critical-slope regions near the ridge crest, directed upward and southward from the north flank of the ridge ...

Robert Pinkel; Luc Rainville; Jody Klymak

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Eddy Heat Fluxes and Stability of Planetary Waves. Part I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of baroclinic Rossby waves in a zonal shear flow is examined. The model used is a linear, quasi-geostrophic, two-level, adiabatic and frictionless midlatitude ?-plane model. The perturbations consist of truncated zonal Fourier ...

Charles A. Lin

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ion-acoustic cnoidal wave and associated non-linear ion flux in dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using reductive perturbation method with appropriate boundary conditions, coupled evolution equations for first and second order potentials are derived for ion-acoustic waves in a collisionless, un-magnetized plasma consisting of hot isothermal electrons, cold ions, and massive mobile charged dust grains. The boundary conditions give rise to renormalization term, which enable us to eliminate secular contribution in higher order terms. Determining the non secular solution of these coupled equations, expressions for wave phase velocity and averaged non-linear ion flux associated with ion-acoustic cnoidal wave are obtained. Variation of the wave phase velocity and averaged non-linear ion flux as a function of modulus (k{sup 2}) dependent wave amplitude are numerically examined for different values of dust concentration, charge on dust grains, and mass ratio of dust grains with plasma ions. It is found that for a given amplitude, the presence of positively (negatively) charged dust grains in plasma decreases (increases) the wave phase velocity. This behavior is more pronounced with increase in dust concentrations or increase in charge on dust grains or decrease in mass ratio of dust grains. The averaged non-linear ion flux associated with wave is positive (negative) for negatively (positively) charged dust grains in the plasma and increases (decreases) with modulus (k{sup 2}) dependent wave amplitude. For given amplitude, it increases (decreases) as dust concentration or charge of negatively (positively) charged dust grains increases in the plasma.

Jain, S. L. [Poornima Group of Institution, Sitapura, Jaipur 302022 (India); Tiwari, R. S. [Regional College for Education, Research and Technology, Jaipur 302022 (India); Mishra, M. K. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004 (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Momentum Flux Spectrum of Convectively Forced Internal Gravity Waves and Its Application to Gravity Wave Drag Parameterization. Part I: Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase-speed spectrum of momentum flux by convectively forced internal gravity waves is analytically formulated in two- and three-dimensional frameworks. For this, a three-layer atmosphere that has a constant vertical wind shear in the lowest ...

In-Sun Song; Hye-Yeong Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Air–Water Momentum Flux Observations over Shoaling waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper drab, with simultaneous momentum flux observations from four towers placed at different depths along a shore-normal line at the west end of Lake Ontario, Canada. The towers were at nominal depths of 12, 8, 4, and 2 m, in order to study ...

F. Anctil; M. A. Donelan

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Non-linear numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in small-scale flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of non-linear, 2D, numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in the photosphere and chromosphere of small-scale flux tubes with internal structure. Waves with realistic periods of three to five minutes are studied, after applying horizontal and vertical oscillatory perturbations to the equilibrium model. Spurious reflections of shock waves from the upper boundary are minimized thanks to a special boundary condition. This has allowed us to increase the duration of the simulations and to make it long enough to perform a statistical analysis of oscillations. The simulations show that deep horizontal motions of the flux tube generate a slow (magnetic) mode and a surface mode. These modes are efficiently transformed into a slow (acoustic) mode in the vA < cS atmosphere. The slow (acoustic) mode propagates vertically along the field lines, forms shocks and remains always within the flux tube. It might deposit effectively the energy of the driver into the chromosphere. When the driver oscillates with a high frequency, above the cut-off, non-linear wave propagation occurs with the same dominant driver period at all heights. At low frequencies, below the cut-off, the dominant period of oscillations changes with height from that of the driver in the photosphere to its first harmonic (half period) in the chromosphere. Depending on the period and on the type of the driver, different shock patterns are observed.

E. Khomenko; M. Collados; T. Felipe

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Spectral Estimates of Gravity Wave Energy and Momentum Fluxes. Part III: Gravity Wave-Tidal Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An application of the gravity wave parameterization scheme developed in the companion papers by Fritts and VanZandt and Fritts and Lu to the mutual interaction of gravity waves and tidal motions is presented. The results suggest that interaction ...

Wentong Lu; David C. Fritts

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The flux theory of gravitation XVIII: macro and quantum gravity, cosmo waves and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains, for the first time, recent and old astonishing phenomena based on reports from the Hubble in light of the flux theory of gravitation (FTG). Among the astonishing phenomena and their explanation are the following: (1) Accelerated ... Keywords: convertor, cosmic dust, cosmic shock waves, dark matter, energy field, fractal, gamma ray burst, macro and quantum gravity, primum, superstring

E. E. Escultura

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Mass Flux and Vertical Distribution of Currents Caused by Strong Winds in a Wave Tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity fields of wind-driven currents under strong winds were measured in a wind-wave tank with a double bottom. The tank has the characteristics to satisfy partially the continuity of the mass flux and to reduce return-flow effects on the ...

Toshinori Ogasawara; Takashi Yasuda

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Global Patterns of Low-Mode Internal-Wave Propagation. Part I: Energy and Energy Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extending an earlier attempt to understand long-range propagation of the global internal-wave field, the energy E and horizontal energy flux F are computed for the two gravest baroclinic modes at 80 historical moorings around the globe. With ...

Matthew H. Alford; Zhongxiang Zhao

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Flux: for brass quintet with analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper will examine the piece Flux: for Brass Quintet, completed in the spring of 2010 by Robert DeVet. It will first examine the system… (more)

Devet, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Millimeter-wave polarimetry instrumentation and analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) ConferenceWave Polarimetry Instrumentation and Analysis A dissertation

Bierman, Evan M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

An Analysis of Moisture Fluxes into the Gulf of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the nature of episodes of enhanced warm-season moisture flux into the Gulf of California. Both spatial structure and primary time scales of the fluxes are examined using the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis data for the period 1980–...

Man-Li C. Wu; Siegfried D. Schubert; Max J. Suarez; Norden E. Huang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Momentum Flux Spectrum of Convective Gravity Waves. Part I: An Update of a Parameterization Using Mesoscale Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convective source and momentum flux spectra of a parameterization of convective gravity wave drag (GWDC) are validated in a three-dimensional spectral space using mesoscale numerical simulations for various ideal and real convective storms. ...

Hyun-Joo Choi; Hye-Yeong Chun

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Differential evolution and its application to metabolic flux analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metabolic flux analysis with measurement data from 13C tracer experiments has been an important approach for exploring metabolic networks. Though various methods were developed for 13C positional enrichment or isotopomer modelling, ...

Jing Yang; Sarawan Wongsa; Visakan Kadirkamanathan; Stephen A. Billings; Phillip C. Wright

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

Partial Wave Analysis using Graphics Cards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partial wave analysis is a key technique in hadron spectroscopy. The use of unbinned likelihood fits on large statistics data samples and ever more complex physics models makes this analysis technique computationally very expensive. Parallel computing techniques, in particular the use of graphics processing units, are a powerful means to speed up analyses; in the contexts of the BES III, Compass and GlueX experiments, parallel analysis frameworks have been created. They provide both fits that are faster by more than two orders of magnitude than legacy code and environments to quickly program and run an analysis. This in turn allows the physicists to focus on the many difficult open problems pertaining to partial wave analysis.

Niklaus Berger

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

39

Gravitational-Wave Detection using Multivariate Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Searches for gravitational-wave bursts (transient signals, typically of unknown waveform) require identification of weak signals in background detector noise. The sensitivity of such searches is often critically limited by non-Gaussian noise fluctuations which are difficult to distinguish from real signals, posing a key problem for transient gravitational-wave astronomy. Current noise rejection tests are based on the analysis of a relatively small number of measured properties of the candidate signal, typically correlations between detectors. Multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques probe the full space of measured properties of events in an attempt to maximise the power to accurately classify events as signal or background. This is done by taking samples of known background events and (simulated) signal events to train the MVA classifier, which can then be applied to classify events of unknown type. We apply the boosted decision tree (BDT) MVA technique to the problem of detecting gravitational-wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts. We find that BDTs are able to increase the sensitive distance reach of the search by as much as 50%, corresponding to a factor of ~3 increase in sensitive volume. This improvement is robust against trigger sky position, large sky localisation error, poor data quality, and the simulated signal waveforms that are used. Critically, we find that the BDT analysis is able to detect signals that have different morphologies to those used in the classifier training and that this improvement extends to false alarm probabilities beyond the 3{\\sigma} significance level. These findings indicate that MVA techniques may be used for the robust detection of gravitational-wave bursts with a priori unknown waveform.

Thomas S. Adams; Duncan Meacher; James Clark; Patrick J. Sutton; Gareth Jones; Ariana Minot

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Spectral Estimates of Gravity Wave Energy and Momentum Fluxes. Part II: Parameterization of Wave Forcing and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to suggest a scheme for the parameterization of gravity wave propagation and effects in the lower and middle atmosphere that is tied as closely as possible to the spectral character of the observed gravity wave field. ...

David C. Fritts; Wentong Lu

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Multiscale Momentum Flux and Diffusion due to Whitecapping in Wave–Current Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whitecapping affects the Reynolds stresses near the ocean surface. A model for the conservative dynamics of waves and currents is modified to include the averaged effect of multiple, short-lived, and random wave-breaking events on large ...

Juan M. Restrepo; Jorge M. Ramírez; James C. McWilliams; Michael Banner

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Calculating Energy Flux in Internal Solitary Waves with an Application to Reflectance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energetics of internal solitary waves (ISWs) in continuous, quasi-two-layer stratifications are explored using fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic numerical simulations. The kinetic energy of an internal solitary wave is always greater than the ...

Kevin G. Lamb; Van T. Nguyen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Experimental Study on Wind-Wave Momentum Flux in Strongly Forced Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative description of wind-wave momentum transfer in high wind conditions is necessary for accurate wave models, storm and hurricane forecasting, and models that require atmosphere–ocean coupling such as circulation and mixed layer models. ...

Ivan B. Savelyev; Brian K. Haus; Mark A. Donelan

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

An Analysis of Wave-Turbulence Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of an analytical and numerical calculation of the interaction between an internal gravity wave and a wave-induced turbulence. The initial atmospheric state, assumed horizontally homogeneous, is statically and dynamically ...

D. Fua; G. Chimonas; F. Einaudi; O. Zeman

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Energy Flux from Traveling Hurricanes to the Oceanic Internal Wave Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of long interval waves by traveling hurricanes on an f plane is studied within the context of linear theory. The emphasis of the present work is on the interval wave power, that is, the fraction of the energy input from the ...

Johan Nilsson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Scattering of Sound by Internal Wave Currents: The Relation to Vertical Momentum Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal waves scatter sound by two related perturbations: 1) those associated with vertical particle displacements ?(x, y, z, t) in the presence of a vertical gradient of (potential) sound speed (?c = ??zcp); and 2) those associated with ...

W. Munk; P. Worcester; F. Zachariasen

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effect of Breaking Waves on the Transport of Heat and Vapor Fluxes from the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One method of studying the complexities of the atmospheric surface layer over the ocean during high sea states is to consider the waves as moving drag objects for the wind. The study treats transport equations for the momentum, temperature, ...

S. C. Ling

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Surface-Flux Regulation of the Coupling between Cumulus Convection and Baroclinic Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the role of convection in the dynamics of eddy life cycles through numerical experiments using initial states that are baroclinically and conditionally unstable in midlatitudes. The location of wave-induced convection and its ...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Weidong Jiang

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Spectrally Resolved Energy Dissipation Rate and Momentum Flux of Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Video observations of the ocean surface taken from aboard the Research Platform FLIP reveal the distribution of the along-crest length and propagation velocity of breaking wave crests that generate visible whitecaps. The key quantity assessed is ...

Johannes R. Gemmrich; Michael L. Banner; Chris Garrett

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

On the Intermittency of Gravity Wave Momentum Flux in the Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, long-duration balloon and spaceborne observations, and mesoscale numerical simulations are used to study the intermittency of gravity waves in the lower stratosphere above Antarctica and the Southern Ocean; namely, the ...

Albert Hertzog; M. Joan Alexander; Riwal Plougonven

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Spectral Estimates of Gravity Wave Energy and Momentum Fluxes. Part I: Energy Dissipation, Acceleration, and Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral characteristics of atmospheric gravity wave motions are remarkably uniform in frequency and wavenumber despite widely disparate sources, filtering environments, and altitudes of observation. This permits a convenient and useful means ...

David C. Fritts; Thomas E. Vanzandt

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Structural Analysis of Airborne Flux Estimates over a Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft-based observations of turbulence fields of velocity, moisture, and temperature are used to study coherent turbulent structures that dominate turbulent transfer of moisture and heat above three different eco-systems. Flux traces are ...

Paulo Caramori; Peter Schuepp; Raymond Desjardins; Ian MacPherson

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cold Plasma Wave Analysis in Magneto-Rotational Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to investigate the cold plasma wave properties. The analysis has been restricted to the neighborhood of the pair production region of the Kerr magnetosphere. The Fourier analyzed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations are dealt under special circumstances and dispersion relations are obtained. We find the $x$-component of the complex wave vector numerically. The corresponding components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. The direction and dispersion of waves are investigated.

M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Flux Parameterization Including the Effects of Capillary Waves and Sea State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air–sea interaction model that includes turbulent transport due to capillary waves (surface ripples) is developed. The model differs from others in that the physical premises are applicable to low wind speeds (10-m wind speed, U10 < 5 m s?1) ...

Mark A. Bourassa; Dayton G. Vincent; W. L. Wood

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the analysis of measured directional seas using a nonlinear model, named Directional Hybrid Wave Model (DHWM). The model has the capability of decomposing the directional wave field into its free wave components with different frequency, amplitude, direction and initial phase based on three or more time series of measured wave properties. With the information of free waves, the DHWM can predict wave properties accurately up to the second order in wave steepness. In this study, the DHWM is applied to the analyses of the data of Wave Crest Sensor Inter-comparison Study (WACSIS). The consistency between the measurements collected by different sensors in the WACSIS project was examined to ensure the data quality. The wave characteristics at the locations of selected sensors were predicted in time domain and were compared with those recorded at the same location. The degree of agreement between the predictions and the related measurements is an indicator of the consistency among different sensors. To analyze the directional seas in the presence of strong current, the original DHWM was extended to consider the Doppler effects of steady and uniform currents on the directional wave field. The advantage of extended DHWM originates from the use of the intrinsic frequency instead of the apparent frequency to determine the corresponding wavenumber and transfer functions relating wave pressure and velocities to elevation. Furthermore, a new approach is proposed to render the accurate and consistent estimates of the energy spreading parameter and mean wave direction of directional seas based on a cosine-2s model. In this approach, a Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) is employed. Because it is more tolerant of errors in the estimated cross spectrum than a Directional Fourier Transfer (DFT) used in the conventional approach, the proposed approach is able to estimate the directional spreading parameters more accurately and consistently, which is confirmed by applying the proposed and conventional approach, respectively, to the time series generated by numerical simulation and recorded during the WACSIS project.

Zhang, Shaosong

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Inverse Analysis Adjustment of the SOC Air–Sea Flux Climatology Using Ocean Heat Transport Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from a linear inverse analysis of the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) air–sea flux climatology using 10 hydrographic ocean heat transport constraints distributed throughout the Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. A ...

Jeremy P. Grist; Simon A. Josey

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavelet multiresolution analysis was used to examine the variation in dominant length scales determined from remotely sensed airborne- and satellite-derived surface energy flux data. The wavelet cospectra are computed between surface radiometric ...

Nathaniel A. Brunsell; Robert R. Gillies

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mooring Design Using Wave-State Estimate from the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean Flux Station was deployed near 47°S, 140°E. The extreme wind and wave conditions at this location require appropriate mooring design, which includes dynamic fatigue analysis and static analysis. An accurate estimate of the wave ...

E. W. Schulz; M. A. Grosenbaugh; L. Pender; D. J. M. Greenslade; T. W. Trull

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Statistics of the Air-Sea Fluxes of Momentum and Mechanical Energy in a Coupled Wave-Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) and a wind wave model are coupled through the wind stress. The wind stress which forces the wave model, depends in the coupled model on the stage of development of the wave field. As the waves depend ...

Susanne L. Weber

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Momentum Flux Spectrum of Convectively Forced Internal Gravity Waves and Its Application to Gravity Wave Drag Parameterization. Part II: Impacts in a GCM (WACCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impacts of a spectral parameterization of gravity wave drag (GWD) induced by cumulus convection (GWDC) in the NCAR Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM1b) are investigated. In the spectral GWDC parameterization, reference wave momentum ...

In-Sun Song; Hye-Yeong Chun; Rolando R. Garcia; Byron A. Boville

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nonstationary Analysis of the Directional Properties of Propagating Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is proposed that the sea surface be studied in a way that takes into account the observed groupiness of wind-generated waves. A new method of analysis to study the directional properties of the surface is developed. It is demonstrated that ...

M. A. Donelan; W. M. Drennan; A. K. Magnusson

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Effect of Wind–Wave–Current Interaction on Air–Sea Momentum Fluxes and Ocean Response in Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the wind–wave–current interaction mechanisms in tropical cyclones and their effect on the surface wave and ocean responses are investigated through a set of numerical experiments. The key element of the authors’ modeling approach ...

Yalin Fan; Isaac Ginis; Tetsu Hara

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Computation of Ground Surface Conduction Heat Flux by Fourier Analysis of Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for computing the ground surface heat flux density is tested at two places in West Africa during the rainy season and during the dry season. This method is based upon the Fourier analysis of the experimental ground surface temperature. ...

Guy Cautenet; Michel Legrand; Yaya Coulibaly; Christian Boutin

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Optimisation of a transverse flux linear PM generator using 3D Finite Element Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Several transverse flux and longitudinal flux linear generator topologies exist for freepiston Stirling engine applications. In this thesis the transverse flux permanent magnet… (more)

Schutte, Jacques

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Analysis of Abnormal Wave Records by the Hilbert–Huang Transform Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hilbert–Huang transform method is used in this work to analyze wave records from the North Sea, which include abnormal waves. The analysis of the characteristics of abnormal waves is based on the local decomposition of wave data by using the ...

Albena D. Veltcheva; C. Guedes Soares

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

68

The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Sun Zaijing [Idaho Accelerator Centre, Idaho State University, 1500 Alvin Ricken Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

New Insights into the Ocean Heat Budget Closure Problem from Analysis of the SOC Air–Sea Flux Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from an analysis of the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) global air–sea heat flux climatology, which has been calculated using in situ weather reports from voluntary observing ships covering the period 1980–93, are presented. ...

Simon A. Josey; Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines A project pursuant is to investigate the characteristics of mine blast seismic waves in southern Indiana. Coal mines are prevalent blasting) and coal mines (surface blasting) to gain new understanding of seismic wave propagation, ground

Polly, David

71

Inversion of Marine Radar Images for Surface Wave Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to estimate sea surface elevation maps from marine radar image sequences is presented. This method is the extension of an existing inverse modeling technique to derive wave spectra from marine radar images, which assumes linear wave ...

JoséC. Nieto Borge; Germán RodrÍguez RodrÍguez; Katrin Hessner; Paloma Izquierdo González

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Gravity Waves in a Forest: A Linear Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavelike oscillations are a common form of air motion in the forest canopy at night. This paper investigates the canopy wave phenomenon using a two-dimensional inviscid linear wave model taking into account the drag force exerted on the wave wind ...

Xuhui Lee

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Integrating Flux Balance Analysis into Kinetic Models to Decipher the Dynamic Metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 sequentially utilizes lactate and its waste products (pyruvate and acetate) during batch culture. To decipher MR-1 metabolism, we integrated genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA) into a multiple-substrate Monod model to perform the dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA). The dFBA employed a static optimization approach (SOA) by dividing the batch time into small intervals (i.e.,,400 mini-FBAs), then the Monod model provided time-dependent inflow/ outflow fluxes to constrain the mini-FBAs to profile the pseudo-steady-state fluxes in each time interval. The mini-FBAs used a dual-objective function (a weighted combination of ‘‘maximizing growth rate’ ’ and ‘‘minimizing overall flux’’) to capture trade-offs between optimal growth and minimal enzyme usage. By fitting the experimental data, a bi-level optimization of dFBA revealed that the optimal weight in the dual-objective function was time-dependent: the objective function was constant in the early growth stage, while the functional weight of minimal enzyme usage increased significantly when lactate became scarce. The dFBA profiled biologically meaningful dynamic MR-1 metabolisms: 1. the oxidative TCA cycle fluxes increased initially and then decreased in the late growth stage; 2. fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis were stable in the exponential growth period; and 3. the glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated when acetate became the main carbon source for MR-1 growth.

Xueyang Feng; You Xu; Yixin Chen; Yinjie J. Tang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Non-spectral methods of analysis of the internal gravity waves measurements in ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to the presentation of the non-spectral methods of analysis of the natural measurements of the internal gravity waves in the ocean with the purpose to determine characteristics of the wave-trains composing the measured field, the forms and parameters of the ocean along the pass of these wave-trains propagation. The problem of the analysis of the data of the natural measurements of the internal waves with the purpose to separate the single wave-trains from the measured field, and on this basis to determine the characteristics of these wave-trains, to receive the information on the sources of excitation of the waves, and the information on the properties of the ocean along the pass of the waves propagation, is directly connected with the problems of the wave dynamics. The basis of the offered algorithms of the analysis is the supposition, that the measured wave field represents the sum of the plane wave-trains having the certain speed and directions of propagation. Transformation of the pac...

Bulatov, Vitaly A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Time Variations of the Superkamiokande Solar Neutrino Flux Data by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis of the solar neutrino flux data from 1) 5-day-long samples from Super-Kamiokande-I detector during the period from June, 1996 to July, 2001; 2) 10 -day-long samples from the same detector during the same period and (3) 45-day long from the same detector during the same period. According to our analysis (1) gives periodicities around 0.25, 23.33, 33.75 and 42.75 months; (2) exhibits periodicities around 0.5, 1.0, 28.17, 40.67 and 52.5 months and (3) shows periodicities around 16.5 and 28.5 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data.

Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

Design of the AmeriFlux Portable Eddy Covariance System and Uncertainty Analysis of Carbon Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AmeriFlux network continues to improve the understanding of carbon, water, and energy fluxes across temporal and spatial scales. The network includes 120 research sites that contribute to the understanding of processes within and among ...

T. W. Ocheltree; H. W. Loescher

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Simulation of Significant Wave Height by Neural Networks and Its Application to Extreme Wave Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The derivation of the long-term statistical distribution of significant wave heights (Hss) is discussed in this paper. The distribution parameters are estimated using artificial neural networks (ANNs) trained with the help of a simulated ...

A. Aminzadeh-Gohari; H. Bahai; H. Bazargan

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Analysis of the Wave Scattering From Turbulent Premixed Flame .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A theoretical investigation of acoustic wave interactions with turbulent premixed flames was performed. Such interactions affect the characteristic unsteadiness of combustion processes, e.g., combustion instabilities.… (more)

Cho, Ju Hyeong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Metabolic network reconstruction and flux variability analysis of storage synthesis in developing oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) embryos  

SciTech Connect

Computational simulation of large-scale biochemical networks can be used to analyze and predict the metabolic behavior of an organism, such as a developing seed. Based on the biochemical literature, pathways databases and decision rules defining reaction directionality we reconstructed bna572, a stoichiometric metabolic network model representing Brassica napus seed storage metabolism. In the highly compartmentalized network about 25% of the 572 reactions are transport reactions interconnecting nine subcellular compartments and the environment. According to known physiological capabilities of developing B. napus embryos, four nutritional conditions were defined to simulate heterotrophy or photoheterotrophy, each in combination with the availability of inorganic nitrogen (ammonia, nitrate) or amino acids as nitrogen sources. Based on mathematical linear optimization the optimal solution space was comprehensively explored by flux variability analysis, thereby identifying for each reaction the range of flux values allowable under optimality. The range and variability of flux values was then categorized into flux variability types. Across the four nutritional conditions, approximately 13% of the reactions have variable flux values and 10-11% are substitutable (can be inactive), both indicating metabolic redundancy given, for example, by isoenzymes, subcellular compartmentalization or the presence of alternative pathways. About one-third of the reactions are never used and are associated with pathways that are suboptimal for storage synthesis. Fifty-seven reactions change flux variability type among the different nutritional conditions, indicating their function in metabolic adjustments. This predictive modeling framework allows analysis and quantitative exploration of storage metabolism of a developing B. napus oilseed.

Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Visualization and Numerical Analysis of Stress Waves in Blasting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visualization studies were performed both experimentally and theoretically to observe stress wave propagation in a material and its interaction with the free surface of the material in a blasting process. PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate) plates were used ... Keywords: Explosives, Shadowgraphy, Smoothed particle hydrodynamics, Stress waves

S. Matsumoto; Y. Nakamura; S. Itoh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Original articles: Intelligent multichannel sensors for pulse wave analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aortic pulse wave velocity is an independent predictive indicator for all cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. Unfortunately it is only invasively accessible and thus the A. carotis-A. femoralis pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is recommended as ... Keywords: Arterial stiffness, BP, Cardiovascular risk, ECG, Electrocardiography, FIR, ICA, INA, Idxao, Idxo, Idxs, LED, PTT, PW, PWV, Pulse transit time, Pulse wave velocity, SD, cfPWV, dBP, p'(Idxo), p'(Idxs), p(Idxo), p(Idxs), sBP

S. Rosenkranz; C. Mayer; J. Kropf; S. Wassertheurer

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Mesoscale Gravity Wave Event Observed during CCOPE. Part I: Multiscale Statistical Analysis of Wave Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the first in a series of three papers concerning a gravity wave event that occurred over the north-central United States on 11–12 July 1981. The event is analyzed with superb detail resulting from the availability of digitized radar,...

Steven E. Koch; Robert E. Golus

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Analysis of Convection and Its Association with African Easterly Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association between convection and African easterly wave (AEW) activity over tropical Africa and the tropical Atlantic during the boreal summer is examined using satellite brightness temperature (TB) and ECMWF reanalysis datasets. Spectral ...

Ademe Mekonnen; Chris D. Thorncroft; Anantha R. Aiyyer

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

African Easterly Waves during 2004—Analysis Using Objective Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

African easterly waves (AEWs) are identified in numerical model analyses using an objective technique based on the 700-hPa streamfunction field. This method has been developed to (i) reduce the amount of manual data interpretation, (ii) reduce ...

Gareth Berry; Chris Thorncroft; Tim Hewson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analysis of metabolic flux phenotypes for two Arabidopsis mutants with severe impairment in seed storage lipid synthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major storage reserves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds are triacylglycerols (seed oils) and proteins. Seed oil content is severely reduced for the regulatory mutant wrinkled1 (wri1-1; At3g54320) and for a double mutant in two isoforms of plastidic pyruvate kinase (pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}; At5g52920 and At3g22960). Both already biochemically well-characterized mutants were now studied by {sup 13}C metabolic flux analysis of cultured developing embryos based on comparison with their respective genetic wild-type backgrounds. For both mutations, in seeds as well as in cultured embryos, the oil fraction was strongly reduced while the fractions of proteins and free metabolites increased. Flux analysis in cultured embryos revealed changes in nutrient uptakes and fluxes into biomass as well as an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity for both mutations. While in both wild types plastidic pyruvate kinase (PK{sub p}) provides most of the pyruvate for plastidic fatty acid synthesis, the flux through PK{sub p} is reduced in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} by 43% of the wild-type value. In wri1-1, PK{sub p} flux is even more reduced (by 82%), although the genes PKp{beta}{sub 1} and PKp{alpha} are still expressed. Along a common paradigm of metabolic control theory, it is hypothesized that a large reduction in PK{sub p} enzyme activity in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} has less effect on PK{sub p} flux than multiple smaller reductions in glycolytic enzymes in wri1-1. In addition, only in the wri1-1 mutant is the large reduction in PK{sub p} flux compensated in part by an increased import of cytosolic pyruvate and by plastidic malic enzyme. No such limited compensatory bypass could be observed in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}.

Lonien, J.; Schwender, J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Modeling And Analysis of Radial Flux Toroidally Wound Twin Rotor Permanent Magnet Motor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective of current thesis is the study of Radial Flux Twin Rotor Permanent Magnet (RFTWTRPM) motor. The tasks were to review the literature… (more)

Pratapa, Ravi Kishore

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Interaction of Katabatic Flow and Mountain Waves. Part II: Case Study Analysis and Conceptual Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Via numerical analysis of detailed simulations of an early September 1993 case night, the authors develop a conceptual model of the interaction of katabatic flow in the nocturnal boundary layer with mountain waves (MKI). A companion paper (Part I)...

Gregory S. Poulos; James E. Bossert; Thomas B. McKee; Roger A. Pielke Sr.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Analysis of the Pyrenees Lee Wave Event of 23 March 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an independent analysis of mountain wave data gathered by instrumented aircraft during flights over the Pyrenees on 23 March 1982, as part of ALPEX, are presented. The prior synoptic development, cross-flow variation, vertical ...

Karl W. Cox

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

High Spatial Resolution BRDFs with Metallic powders Using Wave Optics Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This manuscript completes the analysis of our SIGGRAPH 2013 paper "Fabricating BRDFs at High Spatial Resolution Using Wave Optics" in which photolithography fabrication was used for manipulating reflectance effects. While ...

Levin, Anat

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

An Automated System for the Analysis of Gravity Waves and Other Mesoscale Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated near-real-time system for the surface analysis of gravity waves and other mesoscale phenomena is developed, tested, and applied to several cases. Five-minute observations from the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) network ...

Steven E. Koch; Stephen Saleeby

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analysis of gravitational wave signals on heterogeneous architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous architectures and programming techniques will be very important in the development of exascale HPC applications. Adapting heterogeneous programming techniques to scientific programming is not always straightforward. Here we present an in-depth ... Keywords: gravitational waves, hybrid computing, parallel computations

Maciej Cytowski

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose a simple graphic and statistical method for processing short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectivity spectra of alteration minerals, which classifies spectra according to their shape and absorption features, thus obtaining groups of spectra equivalent to mineral assemblages. It also permits selection of fewer samples for further mineralogical verification.

94

Partial-wave analysis for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at astrophysical energies  

SciTech Connect

A standard partial-wave analysis was performed on the basis of known measurements of differential cross sections for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at energies in the range 250-750 keV. This analysis revealed that, in the energy range being considered, it is sufficient to take into account the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave alone. A potential for the triplet {sup 3}S{sub 1}-wave state of the p{sup 13}C system in the region of the J{sup p}T = 1{sup -1} resonance at 0.55 MeV was constructed on the basis of the phase shifts obtained from the aforementioned partial-wave analysis.

Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@mail.ru [V.G. Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cumulative analysis of the association between the gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER and the gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE and BeppoSAX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistical association between the output of the Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS and a list of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the satellite experiments BATSE and BeppoSAX has been analyzed using cumulative algorithms. GW detector data collected between 1991 and 1999 have been correlated to the GRB flux peak times. The cumulative analysis of a large number of GRBs (387) allows to push the upper bound for the corresponding GW burst amplitude down to $h = 2.5\\cdot10^{-19}$.

P. Astone; D. Babusci; M. Bassan; P. Carelli; E. Coccia; C. Cosmelli; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; F. Frontera; G. Giordano; C. Guidorzi; A. Marini; Y. Minenkov; I. Modena; G. Modestino; A. Moleti; E. Montanari; G. V. Pallottino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; L. Sperandio; R. Terenzi; G. Torrioli; M. Visco

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Role of Low-Level Moisture Convergence and Ocean Latent Heat Fluxes in the Madden and Julian Oscillation: An Observational Analysis Using ISCCP Data and ECMWF Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines whether or not low-level moisture convergence and surface latent heat flux act as forcing mechanisms of the Madden and Julian oscillation (MJO), as it is proposed by the theories of wave-CISK (conditional instability of the ...

Charles Jones; Bryan C. Weare

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Numerical Analysis for Controlling the Eigenmode Formation of Alfven Waves in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical analysis is performed with two dimensional wave code for controlling the eigenmode formation of fast Alfven waves in the GAMMA 10 central cell. The plasma production by fast waves depends on the wave excitation in the plasma. Eigenmodes are strongly formed when the boundary conditions in the axial and radial directions are satisfied. As the optimum density for the formation of eigenmode exists discretely, the density is clamped at the value where the eigenmode is strongly formed. For the higher density plasma production, the eigenmodes must be continuously excited as the density increases. It is found that the almost continuous excitation of eigenmodes can be realized by using two waves with different frequencies at the same time.

Yamaguchi, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ichimura, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higaki, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kakimoto, S. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ide, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Inoue, D. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nagai, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakagome, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fukuyama, A. [Kyoto University (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4) Peak hydroxide-water interface temperature >140 C; and (5) Peak heat flux >565 W/cm2.

Donna P. Guillen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

100

Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

Nakos, James Thomas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Millimeter wave analysis of the dielectric properties of oil shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural sedimentation processes give rise to fine layers in shales. If these layers alternate between organic-rich and organic-poor sediments, then the contrast in dielectric properties gives rise to an effective birefringence as the presence of hydrocarbons suppresses the dielectric constant of the host rock. We have measured these effects with a quasioptical millimeter wave setup that is rapid and noncontacting. We find that the strength of this birefringence and the overall dielectric permittivity provide two useful diagnostic of the organic content of oil shales.

John A. Scales; Michael Batzle

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain  

SciTech Connect

A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Error Analysis and Sampling Strategy Design for Using Fixed or Mobile Platforms to Estimate Ocean Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For estimating lateral flux in the ocean using fixed or mobile platforms, the authors present a method of analyzing the estimation error and designing the sampling strategy. When an array of moorings is used, spatial aliasing leads to an error in ...

Yanwu Zhang; James G. Bellingham; Yi Chao

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Analysis and experiments of a whistler-wave plasma thruster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plasma thruster operating at high specific impulse ({ge} 3500 s) has been proposed to be based on electron-cyclotron resonance heating of whistler waves propagating on a plasma column on a magnetic hill. Calculations using a particle-in-cell code demonstrate that the distortion of the electron velocity distribution by the heating significantly reduces the flow of plasma up the field, greatly improving efficiency and reducing material interactions relative to a thermal plasma. These and other calculations are presented together with initial experiments on the plasma generated in the proposed device. The experiments are conducted in a magnetic field (3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} T at resonance) and a magnetic mirror ratio of 5. Microwaves (0.915 GHz, <20 kW) are coupled to the plasma with a helical antenna. Vacuum field measurements are in good agreement with prediction. The desired plasma spatial distribution has not yet been achieved.

Hooper, E.B.; Ferguson, S.W.; Makowski, M.A.; Stallard, B.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Power, J.L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Momentum Transport by Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The momentum flux by orographic gravity waves and the turbulent heat flux in wave-breaking regions are estimated from aircraft data from ALPEX. The fluxes on 6 March 1982 are controlled by low-level directional shear of the mean flow and ...

Jinwon Kim; L. Mahrt

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A Quasi-linear Eddy-Viscosity Model for the Flux of Energy and Momentum to Wind Waves Using Conservation-Law Equations in a Curvilinear Coordinate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The airflow above ocean waves is calculated using a quasi-linear model—one in which the effect of the waves on the mean flow is taken into account. The model uses curvilinear coordinates, in which one coordinate surface coincides with the ...

Alastair D. Jenkins

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Wave Dynamic Analysis of the Seismic Response of a Reinforced Concrete Building  

SciTech Connect

This paper evaluates the response of the seven-story instrumented building, Holiday Inn Hotel, during the 1994 Northridge earthquake through the wave propagation dynamic analysis. The building has been instrumented during other earthquakes, the most important of these was the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, where the building was located only 22 [km] from the epicenter and didn't showing structural damage. From the accelerograms analysis is detected the propagation of Rayleigh and soil waves in the building, where the first has a polarized particle motion on a vertical plane and the second has a coupled particle motion in the horizontal plane. Both waves impose their frequencies to the building response, whose fundamental frequency (1.4 [Hz] according to ambient vibration test) is less than the frequencies of the identified waves. Due to the impact that these observations have in the seismic design of buildings, as a first attempt, a simple method is proposed to estimate the drift produced by the propagation of a Rayleigh wave in buildings.

Astroza, Rodrigo [Faculty of Engineering, University of Los Andes, Santiago (Chile); Saragoni, G. Rodolfo [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

0.22 THz wideband sheet electron beam traveling wave tube amplifier: Cold test measurements and beam wave interaction analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe micro-fabrication, RF measurements, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation modeling analysis of the 0.22 THz double-vane half period staggered traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) circuit. The TWTA slow wave structure comprised of two sections separated by two sever ports loaded by loss material, with integrated broadband input/output couplers. The micro-metallic structures were fabricated using nano-CNC milling and diffusion bonded in a three layer process. The 3D optical microscopy and SEM analysis showed that the fabrication error was within 2-3 {mu}m and surface roughness was measured within 30-50 nm. The RF measurements were conducted with an Agilent PNA-X network analyzer employing WR5.1 T/R modules with a frequency range of 178-228 GHz. The in-band insertion loss (S{sub 21}) for both the short section and long section (separated by a sever) was measured as {approx}-5 dB while the return loss was generally around {approx}-15 dB or better. The measurements matched well with the S-matrix simulation analysis that predicted a 3 dB bandwidth of {approx}45 GHz with an operating frequency at 220 GHz. However, the measured S{sub 21} was {approx}3 dB less than the design values, and is attributed to surface roughness and alignment issues. The confirmation measurements were conducted over the full frequency band up to 270 GHz employing a backward wave oscillator (BWO) scalar network analyzer setup employing a BWO in the frequency range 190 GHz-270 GHz. PIC simulations were conducted for the realistic TWT output power performance analysis with incorporation of corner radius of 127 {mu}m, which is inevitably induced by nano-machining. Furthermore, the S{sub 21} value in both sections of the TWT structure was reduced to correspond to the measurements by using a degraded conductivity of 10% International Annealed Copper Standard. At 220 GHz, for an elliptic sheet electron beam of 20 kV and 0.25 A, the average output power of the tube was predicted to be reduced from 90 W (for ideal conductivity/design S-parameters) to 70 W (for the measured S-parameters/inferred conductivity) for an average input power of 50 mW. The gain of the tube remains reasonable: {approx}31.4 dB with an electronic efficiency of {approx}1.4%. The same analysis was also conducted for several frequencies between 190 GHz-260 GHz. This detailed realistic PIC analysis demonstrated that this nano-machined TWT circuit has slightly reduced S-parameters and output power from design, but within an acceptable range and still have promising output power, gain, and band width as required. Thus, we expect to meet the specifications of 1000 W-GHz for the darpa program goals.

Baig, Anisullah; Gamzina, Diana; Barchfeld, Robert; Domier, Calvin; Barnett, Larry R.; Luhmann, Neville C. Jr. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nettuno: Analysis of a Wind and Wave Forecast System in the Mediterranean Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nettuno is a wind and wave forecast system in the Mediterranean Sea. It has been operational since 2009 producing twice a day high resolution forecasts for the next 72 hours. We have carried out a detailed analysis of the results, both in space ...

Luciana Bertotti; Luigi Cavaleri; Layla Loffredo; Lucio Torrisi

111

A Formulation of a Phase-Independent Wave-Activity Flux for Stationary and Migratory Quasigeostrophic Eddies on a Zonally Varying Basic Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new formulation of an approximate conservation relation of wave-activity pseudomomentum is derived, which is applicable for either stationary or migratory quasigeostrophic (QG) eddies on a zonally varying basic flow. The authors utilize a ...

Koutarou Takaya; Hisashi Nakamura

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Wave–Turbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain wave are considered through an ensemble of high-resolution (essentially large-eddy simulation) wave-breaking calculations. Of particular interest are the turbulent heat and momentum fluxes ...

Craig C. Epifanio; Tingting Qian

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Efficient Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems, II: Quantum-Classical Comparison, Flux Network, and Robustness Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the calculation of optimal energy transfer in thermal environment in our first paper (Wu et al., New J. Phys., 2010, 12, 105012), full quantum dynamics and leading-order `classical' hopping kinetics are compared in the seven-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex. The difference between these two dynamic descriptions is due to higher-order quantum corrections. Two thermal bath models, classical white noise (the Haken-Strobl-Reineker model) and quantum Debye model, are considered. In the seven-site FMO model, we observe that higher-order corrections lead to negligible changes in the trapping time or in energy transfer efficiency around the optimal and physiological conditions (2% in the HSR model and 0.1% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). However, using the concept of integrated flux, we can identify significant differences in branching probabilities of the energy transfer network between hopping kinetics and quantum dynamics (26% in the HSR model and 32% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). This observation indicates that the quantum coherence can significantly change the distribution of energy transfer pathways in the flux network with the efficiency nearly the same. The quantum-classical comparison of the average trapping time with the removal of the bottleneck site, BChl 4, demonstrates the robustness of the efficient energy transfer by the mechanism of multi-site quantum coherence. To reconcile with the latest eight-site FMO model, the quantum-classical comparison with the flux network analysis is summarized in the appendix. The eight-site FMO model yields similar trapping time and network structure as the seven-site FMO model but leads to a more disperse distribution of energy transfer pathways.

Jianlan Wu; Fan Liu; Jian Ma; Robert J. Silbey; Jianshu Cao

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Topographic Waves Generated by a Transient Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of linear mountain waves is generally equated with steady-state stationary waves. This essentially means that the absolute horizontal phase velocity of mountain waves is zero and that their momentum flux profile is independent of ...

François Lott; Hector Teitelbaum

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A DATA-CENTERED COLLABORATION PORTAL TO SUPPORT GLOBAL CARBON-FLUX ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-climate, like other environmental sciences, has been changing. Large-scalesynthesis studies are becoming more common. These synthesis studies are often conducted by science teams that are geographically distributed and on datasets that are global in scale. A broad array of collaboration and data analytics tools are now available that could support these science teams. However, building tools that scientists actually use is hard. Also, moving scientists from an informal collaboration structure to one mediated by technology often exposes inconsistencies in the understanding of the rules of engagement between collaborators. We have developed a scientific collaboration portal, called fluxdata.org, which serves the community of scientists providing and analyzing the global FLUXNET carbon-flux synthesis dataset. Key things we learned or re-learned during our portal development include: minimize the barrier to entry, provide features on a just-in-time basis, development of requirements is an on-going process, provide incentives to change leaders and leverage the opportunity they represent, automate as much as possible, and you can only learn how to make it better if people depend on it enough to give you feedback. In addition, we also learned that splitting the portal roles between scientists and computer scientists improved user adoption and trust. The fluxdata.org portal has now been in operation for ~;;1.5 years and has become central to the FLUXNET synthesis efforts.

Agarwal, Deborah A.; Humphrey, Marty; Beekwilder, Norm; Jackson, Keith; Goode, Monte; van Ingen, Catharine

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Mesoscale Gravity-Wave Event Observed during CCOPE. Part IV: Stability Analysis and Doppler-derived Wave Vertical Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a detailed study from the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) of the vertical structure of mesoscale gravity waves that disturbed a sizable part of the troposphere and that played a ...

Steven E. Koch; F. Einaudi; Paul B. Dorian; Stephen Lang; Gerald M. Heymsfield

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Study of Baroclinic Wave Behavior over Bottom Topography Using Complex Principal Component Analysis of Experimental Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex principal component analysis is applied to data from three laboratory experiments of flow over two-wave sinusoidal bottom topography in a thermally driven, rotating annulus of fluid. The experiments are conducted at the same imposed ...

Richard L. Pfeffer; Jon Ahlquist; Robin Kung; Yehui Chang; Guoqing Li

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Drift-flux analysis of two-phase flow in microgravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As NASA programs such as the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, the Space Nuclear Power Initiative, and other future spacecraft become more demanding, two-phase (gas-liquid) systems for advanced life support and thermal management are highly advantageous over single-phase systems. Two-phase fluid loops provide significant thermal transport advantages over their single-phase counterparts and are able to carry more energy per unit mass than single-phase systems. They are also able to transport more energy per unit pumping power than single-phase systems. These two advantages alone offer great reductions in both mass and volume, which are two primary design parameters for space-based systems. Unfortunately, the ability to predict two-phase phenomena such as flow regime transitions and void fraction at microgravity conditions is greatly limited and its development is still in its infancy. A Texas A&M University two-phase flow loop was tested aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft to collect two-phase microgravity data for dichlorodifluoromethane (R-12). A wide variety of flow rates were tested and many different flow regimes were observed. Data produced by the two-phase microgravity experiment were analyzed in accordance with the drift-flux model to calculate the distribution parameter, C?, and the drift-velocity, V[gj], of the two-phase mixture. The C?and V[gj] found for each flow regime were compared with other microgravity and a one-g upflow data. The C? for the slug flow regime was greater than that of the transition and annular flow regimes respectively for the microgravity data and correlated well with other R-12 microgravity data for the slug flow regime. The V[gj] for slug flow was found to be negative, which was unexpected, but the drift velocities for the transition and annular flow regimes provided expected results. The V[gj] for the annular flow regime in microgravity was less than that of the one-g upflow system due to the lower superficial velocities required in microgravity. Similarly, the C? for the R-12 microgravity data was higher than for a one-g upflow system due to its lower void fraction. A common C? and V[gj] can be used to predict void fraction for the transition and annular flow regimes for R-12 for the same pipe diameter and operating conditions.

Braisted, Jonathan David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Efficient energy transfer in light-harvesting systems: Quantum-classical comparison, flux network, and robustness analysis  

SciTech Connect

Following the calculation of optimal energy transfer in thermal environment in our first paper [J. L. Wu, F. Liu, Y. Shen, J. S. Cao, and R. J. Silbey, New J. Phys. 12, 105012 (2010)], full quantum dynamics and leading-order 'classical' hopping kinetics are compared in the seven-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex. The difference between these two dynamic descriptions is due to higher-order quantum corrections. Two thermal bath models, classical white noise (the Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model) and quantum Debye model, are considered. In the seven-site FMO model, we observe that higher-order corrections lead to negligible changes in the trapping time or in energy transfer efficiency around the optimal and physiological conditions (2% in the HSR model and 0.1% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). However, using the concept of integrated flux, we can identify significant differences in branching probabilities of the energy transfer network between hopping kinetics and quantum dynamics (26% in the HSR model and 32% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). This observation indicates that the quantum coherence can significantly change the distribution of energy transfer pathways in the flux network with the efficiency nearly the same. The quantum-classical comparison of the average trapping time with the removal of the bottleneck site, BChl 4, demonstrates the robustness of the efficient energy transfer by the mechanism of multi-site quantum coherence. To reconcile with the latest eight-site FMO model which is also investigated in the third paper [J. Moix, J. L. Wu, P. F. Huo, D. F. Coker, and J. S. Cao, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 3045 (2011)], the quantum-classical comparison with the flux network analysis is summarized in Appendix C. The eight-site FMO model yields similar trapping time and network structure as the seven-site FMO model but leads to a more disperse distribution of energy transfer pathways.

Wu Jianlan [Physics Department, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Liu Fan; Silbey, Robert J.; Cao Jianshu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ma Jian [Physics Department, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Eliassen-Palm Diagnostics of Wave-Mean Flow Interaction in the GFDL "SKYHI" General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eliassen-Palm flux is important in analytical studies of small-amplitude waves where it provides a powerful and elegant tool for the description of wave propagation in mean zonal shear flows, as well as for analysis of the effective mean ...

D. G. Andrews; J. D. Mahlman; R. W. Sinclair

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Statistical and systematic errors for gravitational-wave inspiral signals: A principal component analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying the source parameters from a gravitational-wave measurement alone is limited by our ability to discriminate signals from different sources and the accuracy of the waveform family employed in the search. Here we address both issues in the framework of an adapted coordinate system that allows for linear Fisher-matrix type calculations of waveform differences that are both accurate and computationally very efficient. We investigate statistical errors by using principal component analysis of the post-Newtonian (PN) expansion coefficients, which is well conditioned despite the Fisher matrix becoming ill conditioned for larger numbers of parameters. We identify which combinations of physical parameters are most effectively measured by gravitational-wave detectors for systems of neutron stars and black holes with aligned spin. We confirm the expectation that the dominant parameter of the inspiral waveform is the chirp mass. The next dominant parameter depends on a combination of the spin and the symmetric mass ratio. In addition, we can study the systematic effect of various spin contributions to the PN phasing within the same parametrization, showing that the inclusion of spin-orbit corrections up to next-to-leading order, but not necessarily of spin-spin contributions, is crucial for an accurate inspiral waveform model. This understanding of the waveform structure throughout the parameter space is important to set up an efficient search strategy and correctly interpret future gravitational-wave observations.

Frank Ohme; Alex B. Nielsen; Drew Keppel; Andrew Lundgren

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Analysis and Design of a High Power Density Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Machine Used for Stirling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a high power density axial flux permanent magnet linear synchronous machine and the stirling system will be introduced. This machine is a tubular axial flux permanent magnet machine. It comprises two parts: stator and mover. With the 2D finite-element ... Keywords: permanent magnet, stirling engine, linear motor

Ping Zheng; Xuhui Gan; Lin Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Dynamical Energy Analysis - determining wave energy distributions in complex vibro-acoustical structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new approach towards determining the distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave energy in complex built-up structures. The technique interpolates between standard Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and full ray tracing containing both these methods as limiting case. By writing the flow of ray trajectories in terms of linear phase space operators, it is suggested here to reformulate ray-tracing algorithms in terms of boundary operators containing only short ray segments. SEA can now be identified as a low resolution ray tracing algorithm and typical SEA assumptions can be quantified in terms of the properties of the ray dynamics. The new technique presented here enhances the range of applicability of standard SEA considerably by systematically incorporating dynamical correlations wherever necessary. Some of the inefficiencies inherent in typical ray tracing methods can be avoided using only a limited amount of the geometrical ray information. The new dynamical theory - Dynamical Energy Analysis (DEA) - thus provides a universal approach towards determining wave energy distributions in complex structures.

Gregor Tanner

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

LISA Measurement of Gravitational Wave Background Anisotropy: Hexadecapole Moment via a Correlation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss spatial fluctuations in the gravitational wave background arising from unresolved Galactic binary sources, such as close white dwarf binaries, due to the fact the galactic binary source distribution is anisotropic. We introduce a correlation analysis of the two data streams of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to extract spherical harmonic coefficients, in an independent manner, of the hexadecapole moment ($l=4$) related to the projected two-dimensional density distribution of the binary source population. The proposed technique complements and improves over previous suggestions in the literature to measure the gravitational wave background anisotropy based on the time modulation of data as LISA orbits around the Sun. Such techniques, however, are restricted only to certain combinations of spherical harmonic coefficients of the galaxy with no ability to separate them individually. With LISA, $m=2,3$ and 4 coefficients of the hexadecapole ($l=4$) can be measured with signal-to-noise ratios at the level of 10 and above in a certain coordinate system. In addition to the hexadecapole coefficients, when combined with the time modulation analysis, the correlation study can also be used, in principle, to measure quadrupole coefficients of the binary distribution.

Naoki Seto; Asantha Cooray

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Multimodel Analysis of Energy and Water Fluxes: Intercomparisons between Operational Analyses, a Land Surface Model, and Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using data from seven global model operational analyses (OA), one land surface model, and various remote sensing retrievals, the energy and water fluxes over global land areas are intercompared for 2003/04. Remote sensing estimates of ...

Raghuveer K. Vinukollu; Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood; Michael G. Bosilovich; David Mocko

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Partial-wave analysis of elastic {sup 4}He{sup 4}He scattering in the energy range 40-50 MeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A partial-wave analysis of elastic {sup 4}He{sup 4}He scattering is performed in the energy range 40-50 MeV.

Dubovichenko, S. B. [Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: sergey@dubovichenko.net

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Truncated partial wave analysis of a complete experiment for photoproduction of two pseudoscalar mesons on a nucleon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A truncated partial wave analysis for the photoproduction of two pseudoscalar mesons on a nucleon is discussed with respect to the determination of a complete set of observables. For the selection of such a set we have applied a criterion previously developed for photo- and electrodisintegration of a deuteron, which allows one to find a 'minimal' set of observables for determining the partial wave amplitudes up to possible discrete ambiguities. The question of resolving the remaining ambiguities by invoking additional observables is discussed for the simplest case, when the partial wave expansion is truncated at the lowest total angular momentum of the final state $J_{max}=1/2$. The resulting 'fully' complete set, allowing an unambiguous determination of the partial wave amplitudes, is presented.

A. Fix; H. Arenhoevel

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

SAID Partial Wave Analyses from CNS DAC (Center for Nuclear Studies Data Analysis Center)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

George Washington University (GW) has one of the largest university-based nuclear-physics groups in the nation. Many of the current and future projects are geared to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) at Newport News, VA. JLab is the world's premier electron accelerator for nuclear physics, and GW is one of the charter members of the governing body of JLab, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA). The George Washington Data Analysis Center (DAC) was created in 1998 by an agreement among the Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, and the GW Center for Nuclear Studies.The activities of the DAC fall into four distinct categories: 1) Performing partial-wave analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions; 2) Maintenance of databases associated with these reactions; 3) Development of software to disseminate DAC results (as well as the results of competing model-independent analyses and potential approaches); and 4) Phenomenological and theoretical investigations which bridge the gap between theory and experiment; in particular, the extraction of N* and D * hadronic and electromagnetic couplings. Partial Wave Analyses (and the associated databases) available at GW are: Pion-Nucleon, Kaon-Nucleon, Nucleon-Nucleon, Pion Photoproduction, Pion Electroproduction, Kaon Photoproduction, Eta Photoproduction, Eta-Prime Photoproduction, Pion-Deuteron (elastic), and Pion-Deuteron to Proton+Proton. [Taken from http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm">http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm

130

Preliminaries on a Lattice Analysis of The Pion Light-cone Wave function: a Partonic Signal?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first attempt of a new method to compute the pion light-cone wave function (LCWF) on the lattice. We compute the matrix element between the pion and the vacuum of a non-local operator: the propagator of a ``scalar quark'' (named for short "squark"). A theoretical analysis shows that for some kinematical conditions (energetic pion and hard squark) this matrix element depends dominantly on the LCWF $\\Phi_\\pi(u), u\\in [0,1]$. On the lattice, the discretization of the parton momenta imposes further constraints on the pion momentum. The two-point Green functions made of squark-quark and squark-squark fields show hadron-like bound-state behaviour and verify the standard energy spectrum. We show some indications that during a short time, after being created, the system of the spectator quark and the squark behave like partons, before they form a hadron-like bound state. This short time is the place where the partonic wave function has to be looked for.

A. Abada; Ph. Boucaud; G. Herdoiza; J. P. Leroy; J. Micheli; O. Pène; J. Rodríguez-Quintero

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

131

Directional Wavelet Analysis of Inhomogeneity in the Surface Wave Field from Aerial Laser Scanning Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern measurement techniques such as aerial laser scanning allow for rapid determination of the spatial variation of sea surface elevation. Wave fields obtained from such data show spatial inhomogeneity associated with the presence of wave ...

Richard M. Gorman; D. Murray Hicks

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

FE Magnetic Field Analysis Simulation Models based Design, Development, Control and Testing of An Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Oscillating Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Development, finite element(FE) analysis of magnetic field distribution, performance, control and testing of a new axial flux permanent magnet linear oscillating motor (PMLOM) along with a suitable speed and thrust control technique is described in this paper. The PMLOM can perform precision oscillation task without exceeding the given limit on allowable average power dissipation. The use of new powerful permanent magnet materials such as Neodymium-Iron-Boron alloys can greatly improve the performance of electrical machines. Also its performance parameters, such as the force, current etc. are experimentally assessed. The objective of this paper is to determine the forces for aluminium mover embedded with rare earth permanent magnet experimentally and analytically through FEMM software and develop a microcontroller based IGBT Inverter for its control. Index Terms- Axial flux machine, finite element analysis, microcontroller based IGBT inverter, permanent magnet linear oscillating motor, rare earth permanent magnet. I.

Govindaraj T; Prof Dr; Ashoke K. Ganguli

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Flux lattices reformulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the optical flux lattices produced for ultra-cold atoms subject to laser fields where both the atom-light coupling and the effective detuning are spatially periodic. We analyze the geometric vector potential and the magnetic flux it generates, as well as the accompanying geometric scalar potential. We show how to understand the gauge-dependent Aharonov-Bohm singularities in the vector potential, and calculate the continuous magnetic flux through the elementary cell in terms of these singularities. The analysis is illustrated with a square optical flux lattice. We conclude with an explicit laser configuration yielding such a lattice using a set of five properly chosen beams with two counterpropagating pairs (one along the x axes and the other y axes), together with a single beam along the z axis. We show that this lattice is not phase-stable, and identify the one phase-difference that affects the magnetic flux. Thus armed with realistic laser setup, we directly compute the Chern number...

Juzeli?nas, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Burgulence and Alfven waves heating mechanism of solar corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating of magnetized turbulent plasma is calculated in the framework of Burgers turbulence [A.M. Polyakov, Phys. Rev. E. 52, 6183 (1995)]. Explicit formula for the energy flux of Alfven waves along the magnetic field is presented. The Alfven waves are considered as intermediary between the turbulent energy and the heat. The derived results are related to a wave channel of heating of the solar corona. If we incorporate amplification of Alfven waves by shear flow the suggested model of heating can be applied to analysis of the missing viscosity of accretion discs and to reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. We suppose that the Langevin-Burgers approach to turbulence we have applied in the current work can be also helpful for other systems where we have intensive interaction between a stochastic turbulent system and waves and can be used in many multidisciplinary researches in hydrodynamics and MHD.

T. M. Mishonov; Y. G. Maneva

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Analysis of SWADE Discus N Wind Speed and Wave Height Time Series. Part II: Quantitative Growth Rates during a Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, wind speed and wave height time series obtained from the Discus N buoy during two storm events recorded in the SWADE experiment were analyzed using discrete wavelet packet transforms. One result of the analysis is that distinct tightly ...

Jorge F. Willemsen

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Quasi-Steady Analysis of a PBL Model with an Eddy-Diffusivity Profile and Nonlocal Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytic solutions to a planetary boundary layer (PBL) model with an eddy-diffusivity profile (i.e., a K profile) and nonlocal fluxes are presented for the quasi-steady regime. The solutions demonstrate how different processes contribute to the ...

Bjorn Stevens

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Thermal-Electromagnetic Analysis of a Fault-Tolerant Dual Star Flux-Switching Permanent Magnet Motor for Critical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a fault-tolerant dual star Flux-Switching Permanent Magnet (FSPM) motor. The analytical results in terms permanent magnet motors have attracted increasing attentions in safety critical applications such as Hybrid, the phases of the motors are magnetically and physically separated. Thus, the phase failures (short

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

138

Analysis and Numerical Simulations of the Saharan Air Layer and Its Effect on Easterly Wave Disturbances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Conceptual model of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and easterly wave disturbance is presented in light of diagnostic analyses of dust outbreaks.

V. Mohan Karyampudi; Toby N. Carlson

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Analysis of Lower Hybrid Current Drive Scenario on Alcator C-Mod with a Full Wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power deposition. 2 CompX #12;LHRF waves have simple dispersion relation For LHRF Physics Regime we useX #12;For wavelength estimation, look at slab dispersion. Consider the lower hybrid dispersion relation done. Full Wave Annulus Plasma Parameters: Deuterium gas, n =1.5, f0 = 4.6 GHz, B0 = 5.3 T, Te=3.5 ke

Wright, John C.

140

Statistical Analysis of the Spatial Evolution of the Stationary Wind Wave Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed investigation of wind-generated water waves in a 5-m-long wind wave flume facility is reported. Careful measurements were carried out at a large number of locations along the test section and at numerous airflow rates. The evolution of ...

A. Zavadsky; D. Liberzon; L. Shemer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modeling and Analysis of the Wind-Waves Field Variability in the Indian Ocean During 1998-2009 Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To calculate the wind-waves in the Indian Ocean (IO), the wind field for the period from 1998 to 2009 was used, obtained from the NCEP/NOAA archive, and numerical model WAM (Cycle-4) was applied, modified by the new source function proposed in Polnikov (2005). Based on buoy data for the Indian Ocean, the fitting of the modified model WAM was done, which provides the win in accuracy of calculations on 35%, in comparison with the original model. All the further calculations of the wave fields in IO were made for these model settings. At the first stage, the analysis of the simulation results involves a) mapping the fields of the significant wave height and the wave energy , calculated with different scales of averaging in time T and space R; b) estimating the fields of seasonal, annual and long-term variability; and c) determining the 12-year trend of the annually averaged fields. The analysis was carried out taking into account the previously introduced zoning the ocean area, provided by the spatial inhomogen...

Polnikov, V G; Sannasiraj, S A; Sundar, V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evaluation of a Wind-Wave System for Ensemble Tropical Cyclone Wave Forecasting. Part II: Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wind-wave forecast system, designed with the intention of generating unbiased ensemble wave forecasts for extreme wind events, is assessed. Wave hindcasts for 12 tropical cyclones (TCs) are forced using a wind analysis produced from a ...

Steven M. Lazarus; Samuel T. Wilson; Michael E. Splitt; Gary A. Zarillo

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Analysis of an Interactive Instability Mechanism for the Antarctic Circumpolar Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An interactive atmosphere–ocean instability mechanism that reproduces some salient properties of the observed Antarctic Circumpolar Wave and also its manifestation in the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Mark 2 ...

Peter G. Baines; Wenju Cai

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Planetary Wave Analysis Using the Acoustic and Conventional Arrays in the 1981 Ocean Tomography Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the maximum likelihood estimation method, quasi-geostrophic wave solutions are fitted to the observations of the 1981 Ocean Acoustic Tomography Experiment. The experiment occupied a 300 km square area centered at 26°N, 70°W over a duration ...

Ching-Sang Chiu; Yves Desaubies

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Equatorial Long Waves in Geostationary Satellite Observations and in a Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary satellite observations of a zonally oriented sea surface temperature front in the eastern equatorial Pacific were made between 1975 and 1981. Long waves appeared along the front mainly during the summer and fall, except during 1976, ...

Richard Legeckis; William Pichel; George Nesterczuk

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An Analysis of Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves in 20 WCRP CMIP3 Global Coupled Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Output from 20 coupled global climate models is analyzed to determine whether convectively coupled Kelvin waves exist in the models, and, if so, how their horizontal and vertical structures compare to observations. Model data are obtained from ...

Katherine H. Straub; Patrick T. Haertel; George N. Kiladis

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

X-Pipeline: an analysis package for autonomous gravitational-wave burst searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous gravitational-wave searches—fully automated analyses of data that run without human intervention or assistance—are desirable for a number of reasons. They are necessary for the rapid identification of ...

Sutton, Patrick J.

148

Analysis of a Mesoscale Gravity Wave Event Using Empirical Orthogonal Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is detailed that filters mesoscale gravity wave signals from synoptic-level observation data using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Similar EOF analyses have been used to study many oceanographic and meteorological features by ...

Steven T. Fiorino; James Correia Jr

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Analysis of Gravity Waves during the POLINAT Experiment and Some Consequences for Stratosphere–Troposphere Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of horizontal wind speed and direction obtained during the Pollution from Aircraft Emissions in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor experiment are used to identify some waves propagating near the tropopause level. The variation ...

M. Moustaoui; H. Teitelbaum; P. F. J. van Velthoven; H. Kelder

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Lidar Scanning of Momentum Flux in and above the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to measure the vertical flux of horizontal momentum using both continuous wave and pulsed Doppler lidar profilers are evaluated. The lidar measurements are compared to momentum flux observations performed with sonic anemometers over flat ...

J. Mann; A. Peña; F. Bingöl; R. Wagner; M. S. Courtney

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Gravity Waves in the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present numerical simulations of penetrative convection and gravity wave excitation in the Sun. Gravity waves are self-consistently generated by a convective zone overlying a radiative interior. We produce power spectra for gravity waves in the radiative region as well as estimates for the energy flux of gravity waves below the convection zone. We calculate a peak energy flux in waves below the convection zone to be three orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates for m=1. The simulations show that the linear dispersion relation is a good approximation only deep below the convective-radiative boundary. Both low frequency propagating gravity waves as well as higher frequency standing modes are generated; although we find that convection does not continually drive the standing g-mode frequencies.

Tamara M. Rogers; Gary A. Glatzmaier

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Measuring the CO2 flux at the air/water interface in lakes using flow injection analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, close to the sampling points, in order to allow in situ analysis. O´ leo Lake, a waterflood basin

Jardim, Wilson de Figueiredo

154

Analysis of particle penetration into aluminum plate using underwater shock wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some techniques using underwater shock waves have been developed for several material processing applications: explosive welding, shock compaction, and shock synthesis. In this research, a new technique was developed for surface modification of an aluminum plate. Diamond particles were accelerated by an underwater shock wave and penetrated into an aluminum plate, creating a surface coating of diamond on the aluminum plate. In the observation of the cross-section of the recovered Al-diamond composite, a rich diamond layer was confirmed at about 200 {mu}m depth. XRD and wear measurements were conducted for the recovered Al-diamond composite. We also report on the optical observation of the underwater shock wave in this paper.

Tanaka, S. [Faculty of engineering, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hokamoto, K.; Itoh, S. [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

155

Wave Dragon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overtopping Wave Devices Wave Dragon ApSLtd HWETTEI - Workshop October 26-28, 2005, Washington, DC Hydrokinetic Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop the Wave...

156

WaveTurbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave CRAIG C. EPIFANIO AND TINGTING QIAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-breaking calculations. Of particular interest are the turbulent heat and momentum fluxes in the breaking wave fluxes on grid spacing is considered by computing a series of ensembles with grid spacings ranging from L are mostly resolved, but with increasing grid spacing, the resolved-scale fluxes decline

157

Numerical simulation and analysis to tidal currents and wave field of pearl river  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrodynamic model (MOCOE) is used in tidal current and wave calculation in Yamen river, which is one of the eight estuaries of Pearl River. The method of combining curvilinear orthogonal coordinates in the horizontal direction with Sigma mapping coordinates ... Keywords: curvilinear orthogonal, numerical simulation, tidal currents

Wu Hongxu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hurricane Gustav (2008) Waves and Storm Surge: Hindcast, Synoptic Analysis, and Validation in Southern Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Gustav (2008) made landfall in southern Louisiana on 1 September 2008 with its eye never closer than 75 km to New Orleans, but its waves and storm surge threatened to flood the city. Easterly tropical-storm-strength winds impacted the ...

J. C. Dietrich; J. J. Westerink; A. B. Kennedy; J. M. Smith; R. E. Jensen; M. Zijlema; L. H. Holthuijsen; C. Dawson; R. A. Luettich Jr.; M. D. Powell; V. J. Cardone; A. T. Cox; G. W. Stone; H. Pourtaheri; M. E. Hope; S. Tanaka; L. G. Westerink; H. J. Westerink; Z. Cobell

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Stability analysis of a two-stage tapered gyrotron traveling-wave tube amplifier with distributed losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-stage tapered gyrotron traveling-wave tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier has achieved wide bandwidth in the millimeter wave range. However, possible oscillations in each stage limit this amplifier's operating beam current and thus its output power. To further enhance the amplifier's stability, distributed losses are applied to the interaction circuit of the two-stage tapered gyro-TWT. A self-consistent particle-tracing code is used for analyzing the beam-wave interactions. The stability analysis includes the effects of the wall losses and the length of each stage on the possible oscillations. Simulation results reveal that the distributed-loss method effectively stabilizes all the oscillations in the two stages. Under stable operating conditions, the device is predicted to produce a peak power of 60 kW with an efficiency of 29% and a saturated gain of 52 dB in the Ka-band. The 3-dB bandwidth is 5.7 GHz, which is approximately 16% of the center frequency.

Hung, C. L. [Department of Communication Engineering, National Penghu University of Science and Technology, Penghu 880, Taiwan (China); Lian, Y. H.; Cheng, N. H. [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, National Penghu University of Science and Technology, Penghu 880, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Y. S. [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan 710, Taiwan (China); Chang, T. H. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Observations of Wave Breaking Kinematics in Fetch-Limited Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breaking waves play an important role in air–sea interaction, enhancing momentum flux from the atmosphere to the ocean, dissipating wave energy that is then available for turbulent mixing, injecting aerosols and sea spray into the atmosphere, and ...

Jessica M. Kleiss; W. Kendall Melville

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Apparatus for Atmospheric Surface Layer Measurements over Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an apparatus developed for simultaneously measuring water elevation and static and dynamic pressure, momentum, and heat fluxes above waves close to the interface. The apparatus was used successfully at the Lake Ontario wave ...

Mark A. Donelan; Neils Madsen; Kimmo K. Kahma; Ioannis K. Tsanis; William M. Drennan

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

HOM damping and multipacting analysis of the quarter-wave crab cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quarter-wave crab cavity design has been analyzed further to accommodate LHC requirements. The goal for the design is to provide strong deflecting voltage to the proton bunches at the IP, while keeping the effective length as short as possible. We will evaluate the higher order mode damping with two or four magnetic coupling dampers installed in different configuration. In this paper, we also show possible multipacting locations which are simulated by 2D and 3D codes.

Wu Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO, South Pole and Pyhäsalmi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyh\\"asalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present paper would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.

M. Sajjad Athar; M. Honda; T. Kajita; K. Kasahara; S. Midorikawa

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

165

Diagnostic Analysis of Tidal Winds and the Eliassen–Palm Flux Divergence in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere from TIMED/SABER Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For migrating tides or fast-moving planetary waves, polarization relations derived from the linear wave equations are required to accurately derive the wind components from the temperature field. A common problem in diagnosing winds from the ...

Xun Zhu; Jeng-Hwa Yee; E. R. Talaat; M. Mlynczak; J. M. Russell III

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

167

Arctic Ocean Radiative Fluxes and Cloud Forcing Estimated from the ISCCP C2 Cloud Dataset, 1983?1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative fluxes and cloud forcings for the ocean areas of the Arctic are computed from the monthly cloud product of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for 1983?90. Spatially averaged short-wave fluxes compare well with ...

Axel J. Schweiger; Jeffrey R. Key

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Wind Waves in the Coupled Climate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role waves play in modulating interactions between oceans and atmosphere is emphasized. All exchanges (e.g., momentum, energy, heat, mass, radiation fluxes) are influenced by the geometrical and physical characteristics of the ocean surface, which ...

L. Cavaleri; B. Fox-Kemper; M. Hemer

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geometrical vector flux sinks and ideal flux concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The description of ideal flux concentrators as shapes that do not disturb the geometrical vector flux field is extended to all the known types of ideal flux concentrators. This is accomplished, in part, by the introduction of vector flux sinks.

Greenman, P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Full-wave algorithms for model order reduction and electromagnet analysis of impedance and scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As technology advances and sophisticated electronic systems achieve ubiquity, the demand for thorough, efficient Electromagnetic (EM) analysis continues to rise. The prohibitive costs of constructing and maintaining ...

Klemas, Thomas J. (Thomas Jonas)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Combined analysis of solar neutrino and solar irradiance data: further evidence for variability of the solar neutrino flux and its implications concerning the solar core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for any particular feature in any single solar neutrino dataset is unlikely to establish variability of the solar neutrino flux since the count rates are very low. It helps to combine datasets, and in this article we examine data from both the Homestake and GALLEX experiments. These show evidence of modulation with a frequency of 11.85 yr-1, which could be indicative of rotational modulation originating in the solar core. We find that precisely the same frequency is prominent in power spectrum analyses of the ACRIM irradiance data for both the Homestake and GALLEX time intervals. These results suggest that the solar core is inhomogeneous and rotates with sidereal frequency 12.85 yr-1. We find, by Monte Carlo calculations, that the probability that the neutrino data would by chance match the irradiance data in this way is only 2 parts in 10,000. This rotation rate is significantly lower than that of the inner radiative zone (13.97 yr-1) as recently inferred from analysis of Super-Kamiokande data, suggesting that there may be a second, inner tachocline separating the core from the radiative zone. This opens up the possibility that there may be an inner dynamo that could produce a strong internal magnetic field and a second solar cycle.

P. A. Sturrock

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

Combined analysis of solar neutrino and solar irradiance data: further evidence for variability of the solar neutrino flux and its implications concerning the solar core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for any particular feature in any single solar neutrino dataset is unlikely to establish variability of the solar neutrino flux since the count rates are very low. It helps to combine datasets, and in this article we examine data from both the Homestake and GALLEX experiments. These show evidence of modulation with a frequency of 11.85 yr-1, which could be indicative of rotational modulation originating in the solar core. We find that precisely the same frequency is prominent in power spectrum analyses of the ACRIM irradiance data for both the Homestake and GALLEX time intervals. These results suggest that the solar core is inhomogeneous and rotates with sidereal frequency 12.85 yr-1. We find, by Monte Carlo calculations, that the probability that the neutrino data would by chance match the irradiance data in this way is only 2 parts in 10,000. This rotation rate is significantly lower than that of the inner radiative zone (13.97 yr-1) as recently inferred from analysis of Super-Kamiokande data, sugg...

Sturrock, P A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Partial-Wave Analysis of Centrally Produced Two-Pseudoscalar Final States in pp Reactions at COMPASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS which focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the data taking in 2008 and 2009. A world-leading data set was collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target in order to study the central production of glueball candidates. In this report, we motivate double-Pomeron exchange as a relevant production process for mesons without valence quark content. We select a centrally produced sample from the COMPASS data set recorded with a proton beam and introduce a decomposition into partial waves. Particular attention is paid to inherent mathematical ambiguities in the amplitude analysis of two-pseudoscalar final states. Furthermore, we show a simple parametrisation for the centrally produced K+K- system which can describe the mass dependence of the fit results with sensible Breit-Wigner parameters.

A. Austregesilo for the COMPASS Collaboration

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

An Efficient Hybrid Parabolic Equation --- Integral Equation Method for the Analysis of Wave Propagation in Highly Complex Indoor Communication Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient, full-wave computational technique to investigate the electromagnetic wave propagation within a complex building environment, resulting from contemporary indoor communication systems, is proposed. Unlike a standard ray-tracing technique, ... Keywords: indoor communications, integral equations, parabolic equation, ray-tracing, wave propagation

G. K. Theofilogiannakos; T. V. Yioultsis; T. D. Xenos

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Internal Wave Overturns Produced by Salt Fingers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salt finger fluxes obtained in small-domain direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are used to parameterize the fluxes in a larger domain that resolves internal gravity waves. For the case in which the molecular diffusivity ratio ? = KS/KT < 1 ...

Melvin E. Stern; Julian A. Simeonov

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Two Types of Wave Breaking in an Aquaplanet GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of two distinct types of wave breaking in an aquaplanet general circulation model (GCM) are described. A systematic analysis of wave breaking is possible because when a baroclinic wave packet is present, the wave breaking ...

Sukyoung Lee; Steven Feldstein

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electric Flux Tube in Magnetic Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study a methodical problem related to the magnetic scenario recently suggested and initiated by the authors \\cite{Liao_ES_mono} to understand the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (sQGP): the electric flux tube in monopole plasma. A macroscopic approach, interpolating between Bose condensed (dual superconductor) and classical gas medium is developed first. Then we work out a microscopic approach based on detailed quantum mechanical calculation of the monopole scattering on electric flux tube, evaluating induced currents for all partial waves. As expected, the flux tube looses its stability when particles can penetrate it: we make this condition precise by calculating the critical value for the product of the flux tube size times the particle momentum, above which the flux tube dissolves. Lattice static potentials indicate that flux tubes seem to dissolve at $T>T_{dissolution} \\approx 1.3 T_c$. Using our criterion one gets an estimate of the magnetic density $n\\approx 4.4 \\sim 6.6 fm^{-3}$ a...

Liao Jin Feng

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

An Error Analysis of the Thornthwaite-Holzman Equations for Estimating Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes over Crop and Forest Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computations of sensible and latent heat fluxes over forest and crop canopies using the Thornthwaite-Holzman equations require an a priori knowledge of roughness and data displacement heights. If the values of these parameters are not ...

O. E. Thompson; R. T. Pinker

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effects of Nonlinearity on Convectively Forced Internal Gravity Waves: Application to a Gravity Wave Drag Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the authors propose a way to include a nonlinear forcing effect on the momentum flux spectrum of convectively forced internal gravity waves using a nondimensional numerical model (NDM) in a two-dimensional framework. In NDM, ...

Hye-Yeong Chun; Hyun-Joo Choi; In-Sun Song

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

182

Time Variations of the Solar Neutrino Flux Data from Sage and Gallex-Gno Detectors Obtained by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used Rayleigh power spectrum analysis of the monthly solar neutrino flux data from (1) SAGE detector during the period from 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2000; (2) SAGE detector during the period from April 1998 to December 2001; (3) GALLEX detector during the period from May 1991 to January 1997; (4) GNO detector during the period from May 1998 to December 2001; (5) GALLEX-GNO detector (combined data) from May 1991 to December 2001 and (6) average of the data from GNO and SAGE detectors during the period from May 1998 to December 2001. (1) exhibits periodicity around 1.3, 4.3, 5.5, 6.3, 7.9, 8.7, 15.9, 18.7, 23.9, 32.9 and 48.7 months. (2) shows periodicity around 1.5, 2.9, 4.5, 10.1 months. For (3) we observe periodicity around 1.7, 18.7 and 26.9 months. For (4) periodicity is seen around 3.5, 5.5, 7.7 and 10.5 months. (5) gives periodicity around 1.7, 18.5, 28.5 and 42.1 months while (6) shows periodicity around 4.3, 6.9, 10.3 and 18.1 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data which indicates that the solar activity cycle may be due to the variable character of nuclear energy generation inside the sun.

Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

183

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Wave soldering with Pb-free solders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacturing feasibility and attachment reliability of a series of newly developed lead-free solders were investigated for wave soldering applications. Some of the key assembly aspects addressed included: wettability as a function of board surface finish, flux activation and surface tension of the molten solder, solder joint fillet quality and optimization of soldering thermal profiles. Generally, all new solder formulations exhibited adequate wave soldering performance and can be considered as possible alternatives to eutectic SnPb for wave soldering applications. Further process optimization and flux development is necessary to achieve the defect levels associated with the conventional SnPb process.

Artaki, I.; Finley, D.W.; Jackson, A.M.; Ray, U. [AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States); Vianco, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Alfven Waves in the Lower Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of oscillatory phenomena associated with a large bright-point group that is 430,000 square kilometers in area and located near the solar disk center. Wavelet analysis reveals full-width half-maximum oscillations with periodicities ranging from 126 to 700 seconds originating above the bright point and significance levels exceeding 99%. These oscillations, 2.6 kilometers per second in amplitude, are coupled with chromospheric line-of-sight Doppler velocities with an average blue shift of 23 kilometers per second. A lack of cospatial intensity oscillations and transversal displacements rules out the presence of magneto-acoustic wave modes. The oscillations are a signature of Alfven waves produced by a torsional twist of +/-22 degrees. A phase shift of 180 degrees across the diameter of the bright point suggests that these torsional Alfven oscillations are induced globally throughout the entire brightening. The energy flux associated with this wave mode is sufficient to heat the solar coro...

Jess, D B; Erdelyi, R; Crockett, P J; Keenan, F P; Christian, D J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. II. LAGRANGIAN CONSTRAINED ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speed of sound greatly exceeds typical flow velocities in many stellar and planetary interiors. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof models attempt to remove fast acoustic waves while retaining stratified convection and buoyancy dynamics. In astrophysics, anelastic models typically receive the most attention in the class of sound-filtered stratified models. Generally, anelastic models remain valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may break down in strongly sub-adiabatic, stably stratified layers common in stellar radiative zones. However, studying stellar rotation, circulation, and dynamos requires understanding the complex coupling between convection and radiative zones, and this requires robust equations valid in both regimes. Here we extend the analysis of equation sets begun in Brown et al., which studied anelastic models, to two types of pseudo-incompressible models. This class of models has received attention in atmospheric applications, and more recently in studies of white-dwarf supernova progenitors. We demonstrate that one model conserves energy but the other does not. We use Lagrangian variational methods to extend the energy conserving model to a general equation of state, and dub the resulting equation set the generalized pseudo-incompressible (GPI) model. We show that the GPI equations suitably capture low-frequency phenomena in both convection and radiative zones in stars and other stratified systems, and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number codes to this equation set.

Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Lecoanet, Daniel [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Wood, Toby S., E-mail: vasil@cita.utoronto.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Wave Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.)

190

Environmental Controls on the Surface Energy Budget over a Large Southern Inland Water in the United States: An Analysis of One-Year Eddy Covariance Flux Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyzed the surface energy fluxes that were measured by an eddy covariance system over the Ross Barnett Reservoir in Mississippi for a 1-yr period in 2008. On a monthly basis over the course of the year, positive vertical temperature ...

Heping Liu; Qianyu Zhang; Gordon Dowler

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~24°C, indicating that heat conduction was small. T h i sday, indicating large heat conduction a n d storage. Control2.1.3 showed that conduction heat flux through the roof was

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Wind-Induced Wave Growth Rate and the Spectrum of the Gravity-Capillary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A form of the spectrum of gravity-capillary waves is suggested, based on a balance of the wind input, the spectral flux divergence, the viscous dissipation, and the modulation from the wave-drift interaction. The spectrum in the alongwind ...

Yuguang Liu; Xiao-Hai Yan

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Filtering of Parameterized Nonorographic Gravity Waves in the Met Office Unified Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the vertical filtering of parameterized gravity wave pseudomomentum flux in the troposphere–stratosphere version of the Met Office Unified Model. Gravity wave forcing is parameterized using the Warner and McIntyre spectral ...

Christopher D. Warner; Adam A. Scaife; Neal Butchart

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Observed Variability of Ocean Wave Stokes Drift, and the Eulerian Response to Passing Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waves and currents interact via exchanges of mass and momentum. The mass and momentum fluxes associated with surface waves are closely linked to their Stokes drift. Both the variability of the Stokes drift and the corresponding response of the ...

Jerome A. Smith

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Experimental investigation of small-scale breaking waves : flow visualization across the air-water interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of breaking waves significantly affect air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, mass and energy across the ocean interface. Breaking waves also contribute considerable loading to offshore and coastal structures, and ...

McDonald, Angus Kai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Sensitivity of Simulated Climate to Conservation of Momentum in Gravity Wave Drag Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model is used to examine the sensitivity of simulated climate to conservation of momentum in gravity wave drag parameterization. Momentum conservation requires that the parameterized gravity wave momentum flux at ...

Tiffany A. Shaw; Michael Sigmond; Theodore G. Shepherd; John F. Scinocca

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ship Waves and Lee Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional internal trapped lee wave modes produced by an isolated obstacle in a stratified fluid are shown to have dynamics analogous to surface ship waves on water of finite depth. Two models which allow for vertical trapping of wave ...

R. D. Sharman; M. G. Wurtele

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Local full-wave energy in nonuniform plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The subject of local wave energy in plasmas is treated via quasilinear theory from the dual perspectives of the action-angle formalism and gyrokinetics analysis. This work presents an extension to all orders in the gyroradius of the self-consistent wave-propagation/quasilinear-absorption problem using gyrokinetics. Questions of when and under what conditions local energy should be of definite sign are best answered using the action-angle formalism. An important result is that the ''dielectric operators'' of the linearized wave equation and of the local energy are not the same, a fact which is obscured when the eikonal or WKB assumption is invoked. Even though the two dielectrics are very different in character (one operates linearly on electric field for the plasma current, the other operates quadratically for the energy), it is demonstrated that they are nevertheless related by a simple mathematical statement. This study was originally motivated by concern and lively discussion over the questions of local energy for rf-heating of plasmas, where in certain instances, full-wave effects such as refraction, strong absorption, and mode conversion are of primary importance. Fundamentally, the rf-absorption must equate with the energy moment of the quasilinear term to achieve a correct energy balance. This fact governs the derivation (as opposed to postulation) of the local absorption. The troublesome ''kinetic flux'' may then be chosen (it is not unique) to satisfy a wave-energy balance relation with the Poynting flux and local absorption. It is shown that at least one such choice reduces asymptotically to the Stix form away from nonuniformities, thereby demonstrating energy conservation to all orders in Larmor radius. 25 refs.

Smithe, D.N.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_(Lewicki_%26_Oldenburg)&oldid=508144" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

202

Lee Wave Vertical Structure Monitoring Using Height–Time Analysis of VHF?ST Radar Vertical Velocity Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strong lee wave event of intensive observation period 3 (14–15 October 1990) of the Pyrenean experiment was studied using a single VHF stratospheric–tropospheric radar installed 35 km downstream from the Pyrenean chain axis. This instrument ...

Jean-Luc Caccia

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Analysis of spatial mode sensitivity of gravitational wave interferometer and targeted search for gravitational radiation from the Crab pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last several years the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has been making steady progress in improving the sensitivities of its three interferometers, two in Hanford, Washington, and one ...

Betzwieser, Joseph (Joseph Charles)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Polymer floods: A case study of nonlinear wave analysis and of instability control in tertiary oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Polymer flooding in oil reservoir simulation is considered in two space dimensions. The wave structures associated with such a process give rise to interesting phenomena in the nonlinear regime which have direct bearing on the efficiency of oil recovery. These waves influence and can prevent surface instabilities of the fingering mode. In this paper we resolve these waves by a front tracking method. We consider the fingering problem and the issue of oil recovery for the polymer flood. The details of these two phenomena depend on the separation between the waves and upon the viscosity contrast between the oil, water and polymer. We identify a nonlinear transfer of instability between adjacent waves and a nonlinear enhancement of recovery due to successive waves. The conclusions produced by this work are also pertinent to tracer flooding. One interesting conclusion applies to polymer injection followed by pure water injection. In this case the instability is transferred to the polymer-water interface, and the pure water region can break through the polymer to achieve direct contact with the oil. The polymer is left in narrow ribbons parallel to the main flow field and is by-passed by pure water. The effect of narrow regions of by-passed polymer can be simulated by the front tracking method and is not equivalent to numerical or physical diffusion, which would distribute the polymer more uniformly and retard the breakthrough of water through the polymer layer. 45 refs., 15 figs.

Daripa, P.; Glimm, J.; Lindquist, B.; McBryan, O.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Polymer floods: A case study of nonlinear wave analysis and of instability control in tertiary oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymer flooding in oil reservoir simulation is considered in two space dimensions. The wave structures associated with such a process give rise to interesting phenomena in the nonlinear regime which have direct bearing on the efficiency of oil recovery. These waves influence and can prevent surface instabilities of the fingering mode. In this paper the authors resolve these waves by a front tracking method. They consider the fingering problem and the issue of oil recovery for the polymer flood. The details of these two phenomena depend on the separation between the waves and upon the viscosity contrast between the oil, water and polymer. They identify a nonlinear transfer of instability between adjacent waves and a nonlinear enhancement of recovery due to successive waves. The conclusions produced by this work are also pertinent to tracer flooding. One interesting conclusion applies to polymer injection followed by pure water injection. In this case the instability is transferred to the polymer-water interface, and the pure water region can break through the polymer to achieve direct contact with the oil. The polymer is left in narrow ribbons parallel to the main flow field and is by-passed by pure water. The effect of narrow regions of by-passed polymer can be simulated by the front tracking method and is not equivalent to numerical or physical diffusion, which would distribute the polymer more uniformly and retard the breakthrough of water through the polymer layer.

Daripa, P.; Glimm, J.; Lindquist, B.; McBryan, O.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Parameterization of Transient Eddy Heat Flux on a Beta-Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization of transient eddy heat flux is developed which incorporates baroclinic wave behavior in a continuously stratified fluid on a ?-plane. The meridional and vertical heat transports are more sensitive to forced changes in the mean ...

Lee E. Branscome

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

3D Alfven wave behaviour around proper and improper magnetic null points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context: MHD waves and magnetic null points are both prevalent in many astrophysical plasmas, including the solar atmosphere. Interaction between waves and null points has been implicated as a possible mechanism for localised heating events. Aims: Here we investigate the transient behaviour of the Alfven wave about fully 3D proper and improper 3D magnetic null points. Previously, the behaviour of fast magnetoacoustic waves at null points in 3D, cold MHD was considered by Thurgood & McLaughlin (Astronomy & Astrophysics, 2012, 545, A9). Methods: We introduce an Alfven wave into the vicinity of both proper and improper null points by numerically solving the ideal, $\\beta=0$ MHD equations using the LARE3D code. A magnetic fieldline and flux-based coordinate system permits the isolation of resulting wave-modes and the analysis of their interaction. Results: We find that the Alfven wave propagates throughout the region and accumulates near the fan-plane, causing current build up. For different values of nul...

Thurgood, J O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

ENERGY CONTENT AND PROPAGATION IN TRANSVERSE SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC WAVES  

SciTech Connect

Recently, a significant amount of transverse wave energy has been estimated propagating along solar atmospheric magnetic fields. However, these estimates have been made with the classic bulk Alfven wave model which assumes a homogeneous plasma. In this paper, the kinetic, magnetic, and total energy densities and the flux of energy are computed for transverse MHD waves in one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube models with a piecewise constant or continuous radial density profile. There are fundamental deviations from the properties for classic bulk Alfven waves. (1) There is no local equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy. (2) The flux of energy and the velocity of energy transfer have, in addition to a component parallel to the magnetic field, components in the planes normal to the magnetic field. (3) The energy densities and the flux of energy vary spatially, contrary to the case of classic bulk Alfven waves. This last property has the important consequence that the energy flux computed with the well known expression for bulk Alfven waves could overestimate the real flux by a factor in the range 10-50, depending on the flux tube equilibrium properties.

Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Soler, R. [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: tom.vandoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figs.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1989-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

210

Passive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection &...

211

Boundary element dynamical energy analysis: a versatile method for solving two or three dimensional wave problems in the high frequency limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamical energy analysis was recently introduced as a new method for determining the distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave energy in complex built up structures. The technique interpolates between standard statistical energy analysis and full ray tracing, containing both of these methods as limiting cases. As such the applicability of the method is wide ranging and additionally includes the numerical modelling of problems in optics and more generally of linear wave problems in electromagnetics. In this work we consider a new approach to the method with enhanced versatility, enabling three-dimensional problems to be handled in a straightforward manner. The main challenge is the high dimensionality of the problem: we determine the wave energy density both as a function of the spatial coordinate and momentum (or direction) space. The momentum variables are expressed in separable (polar) coordinates facilitating the use of products of univariate basis expansions. However this is not the case for the spatial argument and so we propose to make use of automated mesh generating routines to both localise the approximation, allowing quadrature costs to be kept moderate, and give versatility in the code for different geometric configurations.

David J. Chappell; Gregor Tanner; Stefano Giani

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

Wave propagation through soils in centrifuge testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave propagation phenomena in soils can be experimentally simulated using centrifuge scale models. An original excitation device (drop-ball arrangement) is proposed to generate short wave trains. Wave reflections on model boundaries are taken into account and removed by homomorphic filtering. Propagation is investigated through dispersion laws. For drop-ball experiments, spherical wave field analysis assuming linear viscoelasticity leads to a complete analytical description of wave propagation. Damping phenomena are examined and evaluated using this description.

Semblat, J F; 10.1142/S1363246998000071

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Momentum Flux Budget across the Air–Sea Interface under Uniform and Tropical Cyclone Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In coupled ocean–atmosphere models, it is usually assumed that the momentum flux into ocean currents is equal to the flux from air (wind stress). However, when the surface wave field grows (decays) in space or time, it gains (loses) momentum and ...

Yalin Fan; Isaac Ginis; Tetsu Hara

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mapping Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared camera technique designed for remote sensing of air–water heat flux has been developed. The technique uses the differential absorption of water between 3.817 and 4.514 microns. This difference causes each channel’s radiance to ...

Walt McKeown; Richard Leighton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Structure of the Circulation Induced by a Shoaling Topographic Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of the potential vorticity flux and a mean flow induced by a topographic wave incident over a bottom slope are investigated analytically and numerically, with focus on the case that bottom friction is the dominant dissipation ...

Genta Mizuta; Nelson G. Hogg

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Observations of Steep Wave Statistics in Open Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wavelet analysis methodology is proposed to estimate the statistics of steep waves. The method is applied to open ocean wave height data from the Southern Ocean Waves Experiment (1992) and from a field experiment conducted at Duck, North ...

Nicholas Scott; Tetsu Hara; Edward J. Walsh; Paul A. Hwang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Analysis of SWADE Discus N Wind Speed and Wave Height Time Series. Part I: Discrete Wavelet Packet Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discus N denotes a single buoy employed during the SWADE experiment, equipped to record wave amplitude and wind speed time series at a rate of 1 Hz. Over the course of approximately 4.5 days, two clear-cut examples of sea response to wind ...

Jorge E. Willemsen

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

On the Group-Velocity Property for Wave-Activity Conservation Laws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The density and the flux of wave-activity conservation laws are generally required to satisfy the group-velocity property: under the WKB approximation (i.e., for nearly monochromatic small-amplitude waves in a slowly varying medium), the flux ...

J. Vanneste; T. G. Shepherd

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Wave-coherent airflow and critical layers over ocean waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of coherent measurements of winds and waves from data collected during the ONR HiRes program from R/P FLIP off the coast of northern California in June 2010 is presented. A suite of wind and wave measuring systems was deployed to ...

Laurent Grare; Luc Lenain; W. Kendall Melville

220

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accurate prediction of wave runup on deepwater offshore platform columns is of great importance for design engineers. Although linear predictive models are commonly used in the design and analysis process, many of the important effects are of higher order, and thus can only be accounted for by complex nonlinear models that better reflect the physics of the problem. This study presents a two-parameter Weibull distribution function that utilizes empirical coefficients to model the surface wave runup. Laboratory measurements of irregular waves interfering with vertical platform cylinders were used to obtain the Weibull coefficients necessary for the analytical model. Six data sets with different configurations where the wave elevation was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis and spectral analysis were utilized to characterize and interpret the time series data. The analysis focused on interpreting the tails of the probability distributions by carefully fitting the analytical model to the measured model data. The main conclusion of this study is that the two-parameter Weibull model can be used to accurately model the wave runup on platform cylinders for the experimental data investigated in this study.

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

Russell, J.T.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident  

SciTech Connect

A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

MULTI-POINT SHOCK AND FLUX ROPE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AROUND 2010 AUGUST 1 IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present multi-point in situ observations of a complex sequence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which may serve as a benchmark event for numerical and empirical space weather prediction models. On 2010 August 1, instruments on various space missions, Solar Dynamics Observatory/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar-TErrestrial-RElations-Observatory (SDO/SOHO/STEREO), monitored several CMEs originating within tens of degrees from the solar disk center. We compare their imprints on four widely separated locations, spanning 120 Degree-Sign in heliospheric longitude, with radial distances from the Sun ranging from MESSENGER (0.38 AU) to Venus Express (VEX, at 0.72 AU) to Wind, ACE, and ARTEMIS near Earth and STEREO-B close to 1 AU. Calculating shock and flux rope parameters at each location points to a non-spherical shape of the shock, and shows the global configuration of the interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), which have interacted, but do not seem to have merged. VEX and STEREO-B observed similar magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), in contrast to structures at Wind. The geomagnetic storm was intense, reaching two minima in the Dst index ( Almost-Equal-To - 100 nT), and was caused by the sheath region behind the shock and one of two observed MFRs. MESSENGER received a glancing blow of the ICMEs, and the events missed STEREO-A entirely. The observations demonstrate how sympathetic solar eruptions may immerse at least 1/3 of the heliosphere in the ecliptic with their distinct plasma and magnetic field signatures. We also emphasize the difficulties in linking the local views derived from single-spacecraft observations to a consistent global picture, pointing to possible alterations from the classical picture of ICMEs.

Moestl, C.; Liu, Y.; Luhmann, J. G. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Farrugia, C. J. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Kilpua, E. K. J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, FI-00560 Helsinki (Finland); Jian, L. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Eastwood, J. P.; Forsyth, R. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. A.; Davies, J. A. [RAL Space, Harwell Oxford, Didcot (United Kingdom); Webb, D. F. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Newton, MA (United States); Temmer, M.; Rollett, T.; Veronig, A. M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Odstrcil, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Nitta, N. [Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Mulligan, T. [Space Science Applications Laboratory, The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA (United States); Jensen, E. A. [ACS Consulting, Houston, TX (United States); Lavraud, B. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Universite de Toulouse (UPS), F-31400 Toulouse (France); De Koning, C. A., E-mail: christian.moestl@uni-graz.at [NOAA/SWPC, Boulder, Colorado (United States); and others

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

AN ESTIMATE OF THE DETECTABILITY OF RISING FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

The physics of the formation of magnetic active regions (ARs) is one of the most important problems in solar physics. One main class of theories suggests that ARs are the result of magnetic flux that rises from the tachocline. Time-distance helioseismology, which is based on measurements of wave propagation, promises to allow the study of the subsurface behavior of this magnetic flux. Here, we use a model for a buoyant magnetic flux concentration together with the ray approximation to show that the dominant effect on the wave propagation is expected to be from the roughly 100 m s{sup -1} retrograde flow associated with the rising flux. Using a B-spline-based method for carrying out inversions of wave travel times for flows in spherical geometry, we show that at 3 days before emergence the detection of this retrograde flow at a depth of 30 Mm should be possible with a signal-to-noise level of about 8 with a sample of 150 emerging ARs.

Birch, A. C.; Braun, D. C. [NWRA, CoRA Division, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Fan, Y., E-mail: aaronb@cora.nwra.co [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Diagnosis of the Net Cloud Mass Flux in Gate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic analysis of the net cloud mass flux for the mean state of Phase III is presented. In the upper troposphere, the environmental mass flux is shown to be slightly larger than the adiabatic sinking motion required by radiative cooling. ...

Yi-Leng Chen

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Observations of ubiquitous compressive waves in the Sun's chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The details of the mechanism(s) responsible for the observed heating and dynamics of the solar atmosphere still remain a mystery. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are thought to play a vital role in this process. Although it has been shown that incompressible waves are ubiquitous in off-limb solar atmospheric observations their energy cannot be readily dissipated. We provide here, for the first time, on-disk observation and identification of concurrent MHD wave modes, both compressible and incompressible, in the solar chromosphere. The observed ubiquity and estimated energy flux associated with the detected MHD waves suggest the chromosphere is a vast reservoir of wave energy with the potential to meet chromospheric and coronal heating requirements. We are also able to propose an upper bound on the flux of the observed wave energy that is able to reach the corona based on observational constraints, which has important implications for the suggested mechanism(s) for quiescent coronal heating.

Morton, R J; Jess, D B; Kuridze, D; Ruderman, M S; Mathioudakis, M; Erdelyi, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Electroslag remelting with used fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

High flux reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reflection and Transmission of Equatorial Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of equatorial Rossby waves with a western boundary perforated with one or more narrow gaps is investigated using a shallow-water numerical model and supporting theory. It is found that very little of the incident energy flux is ...

Michael A. Spall; Joseph Pedlosky

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Statistics of Extreme Waves in Random Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves traveling through random media exhibit random focusing that leads to extremely high wave intensities even in the absence of nonlinearities. Although such extreme events are present in a wide variety of physical systems and the statistics of the highest waves is important for their analysis and forecast, it remains poorly understood in particular in the regime where the waves are highest. We suggest a new approach that greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis and calculate the scaling and the distribution of the highest waves valid for a wide range of parameters.

Jakob J. Metzger; Ragnar Fleischmann; Theo Geisel

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

231

Oceanic Internal Waves Are Not Weak Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the oceanic internal wave field is too energetic by roughly two orders of magnitude to be treated theoretically as an assemblage of weakly interacting waves. This may be seen both from recent weak wave theoretical calculations ...

Greg Holloway

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

ARM - Measurement - CO2 flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 flux The rate of flow for carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is...

233

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

235

Nonlinear fan instability of electromagnetic waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the linear and nonlinear stages of the fan instability, considering electromagnetic waves of the whistler frequency range interacting resonantly with energetic electron fluxes in magnetized plasmas. The main attention is paid to determine the wave-particle interaction processes that can lead to the excitation of intense electromagnetic waves by nonequilibrium particle distributions involving suprathermal tails, and to explain under what conditions and through what mechanisms they can occur, develop, and saturate. This paper presents and discusses two main processes: (i) the linear fan instability and (ii) the nonlinear process of dynamical resonance merging, which can significantly amplify the energy carried by linearly destabilized waves after they saturate due to particle trapping. This study consists of (i) determining analytically and numerically, for parameters typical of space and laboratory plasmas, the linear growth rates of whistlers excited by suprathermal particle fluxes through the fan instability, as well as the corresponding thresholds and the physical conditions at which the instability can appear, (ii) building a theoretical self-consistent 3D model and a related numerical code for describing the nonlinear evolution of the wave-particle system, and (iii) performing numerical simulations to reveal and characterize the nonlinear amplification process at work, its conditions of development, and its consequences, notably in terms of electromagnetic wave radiation. The simulations show that when the waves have reached sufficient energy levels owing to the linear fan instability, they saturate by trapping particles and due to the complex dynamics of these particles in the electromagnetic fields, the resonant velocities' domains of the waves overlap and merge, meanwhile a strong increase of the wave energy occurs.

Krafft, C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France) and University Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Volokitin, A. [Space Research Institute (IKI), 117997, 84/32 Profsoyuznaya Str., Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

237

Solar proton fluxes since 1956  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of /sup 56/Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of /sup 22/Na and /sup 55/Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity.

Reedy, R.C.

1977-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

238

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

239

The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

The boardman regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible- and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration laboratory, and several universities. The experiment was conducted in a region of severe contrasts in adjacent surface types that accentuated the response of the atmosphere to variable surface forcing. Large values of sensible-heat flux and low values of latent-heat flux characterized a sagebrush steppe area; significantly smaller sensible-heat fluxes and much larger latent-heat fluxes were associated with extensive tracts of irrigated farmland to the north, east, and west of the steppe. Data were obtained from an array of surface flux stations, remote-sensing devices, an instrumented aircraft, and soil and vegetation measurements. The data will be used to address the problem of extrapolating from a limited number of local measurements to area-averaged values of fluxes suitable for use in global climate models. 16 refs., 13 figs.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J.; Cooper, D.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L.; Cook, D.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general relativity (GR) for the first time. We present a data analysis pipeline called TIGER (Test Infrastructure for GEneral Relativity), which is designed to utilize detections of compact binary coalescences to test GR in this regime. TIGER is a model-independent test of GR itself, in that it is not necessary to compare with any specific alternative theory. It performs Bayesian inference on two hypotheses: the GR hypothesis $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm GR}$, and $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, which states that one or more of the post-Newtonian coefficients in the waveform are not as predicted by GR. By the use of multiple sub-hypotheses of $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, in each of which a different number of parameterized deformations of the GR phase are allowed, an arbitrarily large number of 'testing parameters' can be used without having to worry about a model being insufficiently parsimonious if the true number of extra parameters is in fact small. TIGER is well-suited to the regime where most sources have low signal-to-noise ratios, again through the use of these sub-hypotheses. Information from multiple sources can trivially be combined, leading to a stronger test. We focus on binary neutron star coalescences, for which sufficiently accurate waveform models are available that can be generated fast enough on a computer to be fit for use in Bayesian inference. We show that the pipeline is robust against a number of fundamental, astrophysical, and instrumental effects, such as differences between waveform approximants, a limited number of post-Newtonian phase contributions being known, the effects of neutron star spins and tidal deformability on the orbital motion, and instrumental calibration errors.

Michalis Agathos; Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Van Den Broeck; John Veitch; Salvatore Vitale

2013-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

242

Analysis of P- and S-wave VSP (vertical seismic profile) data from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To understand any geophysical data, geologic information is necessary. This thesis will begin with a summary of the geology of the Salton Trough region and the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). The information available from the SSSDP will also be summarized. After the geologic summary, the design of the VSP will be discussed, including acquisition equipment and procedures. The data processing procedures and software used will be discussed as a separate section. Processing procedures will also be described at various times in the thesis where more specialized procedures are used. Data analysis makes up the bulk of the thesis and it is divided into a number of sections detailing the basic VSP interpretation, the anisotropy analysis and the fracture detection and orientation analysis. A combined interpretation of the results, with probable geologic causes for observed events, is presented as a separate section from the data analysis. Finally, a summary of results for each of the goals stated above will be given. The reader should note that a large volume of data were collected and various display methods were used (from the standard wiggle-trace to three-component hodographs). Much of these data are left in the appendices with important or representative figures given in the body of the thesis. Also given in the appendices are listings of FORTRAN programs developed in conjunction with the thesis work. 46 refs., 63 figs., 12 tabs.

Daley, T.M.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

An exploration of CUDA and CBEA for a gravitational wave data-analysis application (Einstein@Home)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed approach for making use of two new computer hardware architectures -- CBEA and CUDA -- for accelerating a scientific data-analysis application (Einstein@Home). Our results suggest that both the architectures suit the application quite well and the achievable performance in the same software developmental time-frame, is nearly identical.

Breitbart, Jens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Definition: Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares...

245

Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower ...

L. Mahrt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The influence of waves . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing interest in offshore wind resources, it has become increasingly important to establish and refine models for the interaction between wind and waves in order to obtain accurate models for the sea surface roughness. The simple Charnock relation that has been applied for open sea conditions does not work well in the shallow water near-coastal areas that are important for offshore wind energy. A model for the surface roughness of the sea has been developed based on this concept, using an expression for the Charnock constant as a function of wave age [1], and then relating the wave `age' to the distance to the nearest upwind coastline. The data used in developing these models originated partly from analysis of data from the Vindeby site, partly from previously published results. The scatter in the data material was considerable and consequently there is a need to test these models further by analysing data from sites exhibiting varying distances to the coast. Results from such analysis of recent data are presented for sites with distances to the coast varying from 10km to several hundreds of km. The model shows a good agreement also with this data.

Bernhard Lange; Jørgen Højstrup

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

248

Estimation of Surface Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors reconsider the problem of estimating the sensible heat transfer at the earth's surface from direct measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. For simplicity, only horizontally homogeneous conditions are ...

Jielun Sun; Steven K. Esbensen; L. Mahrt

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

250

Flux Measurement with Conditional Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to measure scalar fluxes using conditional sampling. Only the mean concentrations of updraft and downdraft samples, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, and a coefficient of proportionality, b, need to be known. ...

Joost A. Businger; Steven P. Oncley

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Grid-Averaged Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the inadequacies of formulations for surface fluxes for use in numerical models of atmospheric flow. The difficulty is that numerical models imply spatial averaging over each grid area. Existing formulations am based on the ...

L. Mahrt

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Wave–Wave Interaction of Unstable Baroclinic Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two slightly unstable baroclinic waves in the two-layer Phillips model are allowed to interact with each other as well as the mean flow. A theory for small dissipation rates is developed to examine the role of wave–wave interaction in the ...

Joseph Pedlosky; Lorenzo M. Polvani

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

255

Projection of global wave climate change towards the end of the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind generated waves at the sea surface are of outstanding importance for both their practical relevance in many aspects, such as coastal erosion, protection, or safety of navigation, and for their scientific relevance in modifying fluxes at the ...

Alvaro Semedo; Ralf Weisse; Arno Behrens; Andreas Sterl; Lennart Bengtsson; Heinz Günther

256

Projection of Global Wave Climate Change toward the End of the Twenty-First Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind-generated waves at the sea surface are of outstanding importance for both their practical relevance in many aspects, such as coastal erosion, protection, or safety of navigation, and for their scientific relevance in modifying fluxes at the ...

Alvaro Semedo; Ralf Weisse; Arno Behrens; Andreas Sterl; Lennart Bengtsson; Heinz Günther

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Long-Wave Dynamics of Sea Level Variations during Indian Ocean Dipole Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-wave dynamics of the interannual variations of the equatorial Indian Ocean circulation are studied using an ocean general circulation model forced by the assimilated surface winds and heat flux of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ...

Dongliang Yuan; Hailong Liu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Influence of Vegetation on the Development and Structure of Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of vegetative cover on the development of mountain waves is analyzed using a two-dimensional meso-? model. The model includes a detailed representation of surface fluxes and friction that evolve in time as the incoming solar ...

Romualdo Romero; Sergio Alonso; Everett C. Nickerson; Clemente Ramis

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Forced Shelf Wave Dynamics for a Discontinuous Shelf Width: Application to Vancouver Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine barotropic nondivergent shelf waves generated on an exponential continental shelf that has an abrupt change in width. Three types of forcing are considered: 1) a tidal period volume flux through a gap in the coastline located ...

Andrew J. Willmott; Richard E. Thomson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Thunderstorm Bow Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thunderstorm solitary gust or bow wave, observed by Doviak and Ge, is examined from the viewpoint of boundary layer wave theory. It is concluded that all its well defined characteristics are consistently modeled as a bow wave of ducted ...

G. Chimonas; Carmen J. Nappo

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Sandia Wave Reflector  

The Sandia wave reflector is a magnetic conductor for wireless transmissions near 433 MHz. The device reflects perpendicular electromagnetic waves in-phase and suppresses surface waves resulting in improved gain performance and effective operation ...

262

Geostrophic Shock Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organized depth discontinuities involving a balance between steepening and dissipation are usually referred to as shock waves. An analytical “educed gravity” model is used to examine a special kind of shock wave. The wave under study is a depth ...

Doron Nof

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Statistics of Breaking Waves Observed as Whitecaps in the Open Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional observations of waves carried out with a buoy in open sea conditions were supplemented with simultaneous visual observations of whitecaps to identify breaking events in the buoy records. A statistical wave-by-wave analysis of these ...

L. H. Holthuijsen; T. H. C. Herbers

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Estimating the Influence of Evaporation and Moisture-Flux Convergence upon Seasonal Precipitation Rates. Part II: An Analysis for North America Based upon the NCEP–DOE Reanalysis II Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a diagnostic metric—termed the local-convergence ratio—is used to analyze the contribution of evaporation and atmospheric moisture-flux convergence to model-based estimates of climatological precipitation over the North American ...

Bruce T. Anderson; Alex C. Ruane; John O. Roads; Masao Kanamitsu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Generation of Coronal Loop Waves below the Photosphere by p-Mode Forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations of coronal-loop waves by TRACE and within the corona as a whole by CoMP clearly indicate that the dominant oscillation period is 5 minutes, thus implicating the solar p modes as a possible source. We investigate the generation of tube waves within the solar convection zone by the buffeting of p modes. The tube waves--in the form of longitudinal sausage waves and transverse kink waves--are generated on the many magnetic fibrils that lace the convection zone and pierce the solar photosphere. Once generated by p-mode forcing, the tube waves freely propagate up and down the tubes, since the tubes act like light fibers and form a waveguide for these magnetosonic waves. Those waves that propagate upward pass through the photosphere and enter the upper atmosphere where they can be measured as loop oscillations and other forms of propagating coronal waves. We treat the magnetic fibrils as vertically aligned, thin flux tubes and compute the energy flux of tube waves that can generated and driven into the upper atmosphere. We find that a flux in excess of 10^5 ergs/cm^2/s can be produced, easily supplying enough wave energy to explain the observations. Furthermore, we compute the associated damping rate of the driving p modes and find that the damping is significant compared to observed line widths only for the lowest order p modes.

Bradley W. Hindman; Rekha Jain

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

266

Measurement of Directional Wave Spectra Using Aircraft Laser Altimeters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A remote sensing method to measure directional oceanic surface waves by three laser altimeters on the NOAA LongEZ aircraft is investigated. To examine feasibility and sensitivity of the wavelet analysis method to various waves, aircraft motions, ...

J. Sun; S. P. Burns; D. Vandemark; M. A. Donelan; L. Mahrt; Timothy L. Crawford; T. H. C. Herbers; G. H. Crescenti; J. R. French

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Field Results from a Second-Generation Ocean/Lake Surface Contact Heat Flux, Solar Irradiance, and Temperature Measurement Instrument—The Multisensor Float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from two field programs that support development of a wave-following surface contact multisensor float (MSF) designed to simultaneously measure net surface heat flux, net solar irradiance, and water temperature. The ...

J. P. Boyle

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Absorption of ion Bernstein waves by impurity cyclotron harmonics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the damping of externally-launched ion Bernstein waves by absorption at the cyclotron harmonics of the impurity ions. The inclusion of the non-magnetic energy flux term reduces the damping rate by nearly two orders of magnitude from the previous calculation. Excessive impurity damping can be avoided by launching ion Bernstein waves at a frequency just below the second (or higher) cyclotron harmonic of hydrogen.

Ono, M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Mesoscale Gravity Wave Event Observed during CCOPE. Part II: Interactions between Mesoscale Convective Systems and the Antecedent Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a very detailed investigation into the effects of preexisting gravity waves upon convective systems, as well as the feedback effects of convection of varying intensity upon the waves. The analysis is based on ...

Steven E. Koch; Robert E. Golus; Paul B. Dorian

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of the frequency response of a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell exposed to radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation testing of photonic components is not new, however component level testing to date has not completely addressed quantities which are important to system behavior. One characteristic that is of particular importance for optical processing systems is the frequency response. In this report, we present the analysis of data from an experiment designed to provide a preliminary understanding of the effects of radiation on the frequency response of acousto-optic devices. The goal of the analysis is to describe possible physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation effects and to discuss the effects on signal processing functionality. The experiment discussed in this report was designed by Sandia National Laboratories and performed by Sandia and Phillips Laboratory personnel at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). In the experiment, a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell was exposed to radiation from the WSMR linear accelerator. The TeO{sub 2} cell was placed in an experimental configuration which allowed swept frequency diffracted power measurements to be taken during radiation exposure and recovery. A series of exposures was performed. Each exposure consisted of between 1 to 800, 1{mu}sec radiation pulses (yielding exposures of 2.25 kRad(Si) to 913 kRad(Si)), followed by recovery time. At low total and cumulative doses, the bandshape of the frequency response (i.e. diffracted power vs. frequency) remained almost identical during and after radiation. At the higher exposures, however, the amplitude and width of the frequency response changed as the radiation continued, but returned to the original shape slowly after the radiation stopped and recovery proceeded. It is interesting to note that the location of the Bragg degeneracy does not change significantly with radiation. In this report, we discuss these effects from the perspective of anisotropic Bragg diffraction and momentum mismatch, and we discuss the effect on the signal processing functionality.

Erteza, I.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Eulerian versus Lagrangian Approaches to the Wave-Induced Transport in the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that the Eulerian and the Lagrangian descriptions of fluid motion yield the same form for the mean wave-induced volume fluxes in the surface layer of a viscous rotating ocean. In the Eulerian case, the volume fluxes are ...

Jan Erik H. Weber; Göran Broström; Øyvind Saetra

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Trapped electron losses by interactions with coherent VLF waves  

SciTech Connect

VLF whistler waves from lightning enter the magnetosphere and cause the precipitation of energetic trapped electrons by pitch angle scattering. These events, known as Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation (LEP) have been detected by satellite and rocket instruments and by perturbations of VLF waves traveling in the earth-ionosphere waveguide. Detailed comparison of precipitating electron energy spectra and time dependence are in general agreement with calculations of trapped electron interactions with ducted whistler waves. In particular the temporal structure of the precipitation and the dynamic energy spectra of the electrons confirm this interpretation of the phenomena. There are discrepancies between observed and measured electron flux intensities and pitch angle distributions, but these quantities are sensitive to unknown wave intensities and trapped particle fluxes near the loss cone angle. The overall effect of lightning generated VLF waves on the lifetime of trapped electrons is still uncertain. The flux of electrons deflected into the bounce loss cone by a discrete whistler wave has been measured in a few cases. However, the area of the precipitation region is not known, and thus the total number of electrons lost in an LEP event can only be estimated. While the LEP events are dramatic, more important effects on trapped electrons may arise from the small but numerous deflections which increase the pitch angle diffusion rate of the electron population. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Walt, M.; Inan, U.S. [Space, Telecommunications and Radioscience Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Voss, H.D. [Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Vorticity Preserving Flux Corrected Transport Scheme for the Acoustic Equations  

SciTech Connect

Long term research goals are to develop an improved cell-centered Lagrangian Hydro algorithm with the following qualities: 1. Utilizes Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) to achieve second order accuracy with multidimensional physics; 2. Does not rely on the one-dimensional Riemann problem; and 3. Implements a form of vorticity control. Short term research goals are to devise and implement a 2D vorticity preserving FCT solver for the acoustic equations on an Eulerian mesh: 1. Develop a flux limiting mechanism for systems of governing equations with symmetric wave speeds; 2. Verify the vorticity preserving properties of the scheme; and 3. Compare the performance of the scheme to traditional MUSCL-Hancock and other algorithms.

Lung, Tyler B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roe, Phil [University of Michigan; Morgan, Nathaniel R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Air–Sea Momentum Flux in Conditions of Wind Sea and Swell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment, direct measurements of momentum, heat, and water vapor fluxes were obtained from a mast on the foredeck of a SWATH (small water-plane area, twin hull) ship in deep water off the state of Virginia. ...

Mark A. Donelan; William M. Drennan; Kristina B. Katsaros

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Mean Winds and Momentum Fluxes over Jicamarca, Peru, during June and August 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar at Jicamarca, Peru, together with other available data, are used to diagnose the mean structure of winds and gravity-wave momentum fluxes from the surface to 90 km during two ten-day ...

Matthew H. Hitchman; Kenneth W. Bywaters; David C. Fritts; Lawrence Coy; Erhan Kudeki; Fahri Surucu

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Wind Stress and Heat Flux over the Ocean in Gale Force Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An offshore stable platform has been instrumented with wind turbulence, temperature and wave height sensors. Data from this platform have been analyzed by the eddy correlation method to obtain wind stress and heat flux at wind speeds from 6 to 22 ...

Stuart D. Smith

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Application of Vertical-Mode Initialization to a Limited-Area Model in Flux Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical-mode initialization procedure of Bourke and MeGregor is applied to a limited-area weather prediction model that is formulated in flux form and is shown to be successful in reducing the undesirable gravity-wave oscillations in ...

Keith D. Sashegyi; Rangarao V. Madala

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s{sup -2} to 320 km s{sup -1}, thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 {mu}T, 6 R{sub Sun} above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} Wb (1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day{sup -1} and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Wb yr{sup -1} (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx yr{sup -1}) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to {approx} - 0.2 nT yr{sup -1} change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

280

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O' Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O' Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Radiometer and Profiler Analysis of the Effects of a Bore and a Solitary Wave on the Stability of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses data from a microwave profiling radiometer (MPR), along with 915-MHz wind profiler, Doppler radar, and surface data to quantify the kinematic and thermodynamic effects of two wave features, an undular bore and a soliton, on the ...

Timothy A. Coleman; Kevin R. Knupp

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fundamental Guided Wave Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental Guided Wave Metrology. Summary: ... The program is focused on fundamental measurement research for microwave parameters. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Modification of flux profiles using a faceted concentrator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of a faceted solar concentrator allows for some flexibility in aiming strategy and in the intensity of the resulting flux profile at the target. This can be an advantage when considering applications that do not necessarily require maximum concentration, particularly emerging, new applications in solar processed advanced materials. This paper will describe both an analysis of predicted flux profiles for several different aiming strategies using the SOLFUR computer code and experiments to characterize the actual flux profiles realized with a selected aiming strategy. The SOLFUR code models each of the furnace components explicitly. Aim points for each facet can be specified. Thus many strategies for adjusting aim points can be easily explored. One strategy calls for creating as uniform a flux over as large an area as possible. We explored this strategy analytically and experimentally. The experimental data consist of flux maps generated by a video imaging system calibrated against absolute flux measurements taken with circular foil calorimeters. Results from the analytical study and a comparison with the experimental data indicate that uniform profiles can be produced over fairly large areas.

Lewandowski, A; Scholl, K; Bingham, C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Trapped-flux superconducting memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A memory cell based on trapped flux in superconductors has been built and tested. The cell is constructed entirely by vacuum evaporation of thin films and can be selected by coincident current or by other techniques, with drive-current requirements less ...

J. W. Crowe

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Boardman Regional Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible-and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy ...

J. C. Doran; J. M. Hubbe; R. R. Kirkham; W. J. Shaw; C. D. Whiteman; F. J. Barnes; D. Cooper; W. Porch; R. L. Coutler; D. R. Cook; R. L. Hart; W. Gao; T. J. Martin; J. D. Shannon; T. L. Crawford; D. D. Baldocchi; R. J. Dobosy; T. P. Meyers; L. Balick; W. A. Dugas; R. Hicks; L. Fritschen; L. Hipps; E. Swiatek; K. E. Kunkel

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Antarctic Zone Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In winter the eastern Weddell Sea in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean hosts some of the most dynamic air-ice-sea interactions found on earth. Sea ice in the region is kept relatively thin by heat flux from below, maintained by upper-...

M. G. McPhee; S. F. Ackley; P. Guest; T. P. Stanton; B. A. Huber; D. G. Martinson; J. H. Morison; R. D. Muench; L. Padman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Effect of wave boundary layer on sea-to-air dimethylsulfide transfer velocity during typhoon passage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Dimethylsulfide; Sea-to-air gas transfer velocity; Wave boundary layer; Tropical cyclone; Drag coefficient in order to accurately calculate aerosol radiative forcing. The sea-to-air DMS flux depends on airside coefficient CD and roughness length z0 has been investigated over small areas of the sea or in wave tanks

Chu, Peter C.

291

Mountain-Wave Drag in the Stratosphere and Mesosphere Inferred from Observed Winds and a Simple Mountain-Wave Parameterization Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A daily analysis of mountain-wave propagation through observed, global wind, and temperature fields in January and August is presented. Winds and temperatures are obtained from the daily 18-level NMC Climate Analysis Center. Mountain-wave ...

Julio T. Bacmeister

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Type II superconductivity and magnetic flux transport in neutrons stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transition to a type II proton superconductor which is believed to occur in a cooling neutron star is accompanied by changes in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and by the formation of proton vortices with quantized magnetic flux. Analysis of the electron Boltzmann equation for this system and of the proton supercurrent distribution formed at the transition leads to the derivation of a simple expression for the transport velocity of magnetic flux in the liquid interior of a neutron star. This shows that flux moves easily as a consequence of the interaction between neutron and proton superfluid vortices during intervals of spin-down or spin-up in binary systems. The differences between the present analysis and those of previous workers are reviewed and an error in the paper of Jones (1991) is corrected.

P. B. Jones

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nonlinear, stationary electrostatic ion cyclotron waves: Exact solutions for solitons, periodic waves, and wedge shaped waveforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of fully nonlinear stationary electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is further developed. The existence of two fundamental constants of motion; namely, momentum flux density parallel to the background magnetic field and energy density, facilitates the reduction of the wave structure equation to a first order differential equation. For subsonic waves propagating sufficiently obliquely to the magnetic field, soliton solutions can be constructed. Importantly, analytic expressions for the amplitude of the soliton show that it increases with decreasing wave Mach number and with increasing obliquity to the magnetic field. In the subsonic, quasi-parallel case, periodic waves exist whose compressive and rarefactive amplitudes are asymmetric about the 'initial' point. A critical 'driver' field exists that gives rise to a soliton-like structure which corresponds to infinite wavelength. If the wave speed is supersonic, periodic waves may also be constructed. The aforementioned asymmetry in the waveform arises from the flow being driven towards the local sonic point in the compressive phase and away from it in the rarefactive phase. As the initial driver field approaches the critical value, the end point of the compressive phase becomes sonic and the waveform develops a wedge shape. This feature and the amplitudes of the compressive and rarefactive portions of the periodic waves are illustrated through new analytic expressions that follow from the equilibrium points of a wave structure equation which includes a driver field. These expressions are illustrated with figures that illuminate the nature of the solitons. The presently described wedge-shaped waveforms also occur in water waves, for similar 'transonic' reasons, when a Coriolis force is included.

McKenzie, J. F. [Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics, Durban University of Technology, Steve Biko Campus, Durban 4001 (South Africa); School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag: X54001, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Doyle, T. B. [Materials Research Division, iThemba LABS, P.O.Box 722, Somerset West, 7129, South Africa and School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag: X54001, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Rajah, S. S. [Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics, Durban University of Technology, Steve Biko Campus, Durban 4001 (South Africa)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Positional Analysis of Wave Power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The energy transition has started. The key is to find an alternative to uneconomical and unsustainable energy production. In this sense it is a… (more)

Garcia Teran, Jessica

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Equatorial Kelvin Waves: A UARS MLS View  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to compare two periods of Kelvin wave activity during different stages of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation. The analysis is carried out ...

Pablo O. Canziani; James R. Holton; Evan Fishbein; Lucien Froidevaux; Joe W. Waters

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

On the Measurement of Heat Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite their adverse impacts, definitions and measurements of heat waves are ambiguous and inconsistent, generally being endemic to only the group affected, or the respective study reporting the analysis. The present study addresses this issue by ...

S. E. Perkins; L. V. Alexander

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Propagation of Rossby Waves of Nonzero Frequency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The propagation of Rossby waves of positive and negative frequency, corresponding to eastward and westward phase speeds, respectively, is investigated. The techniques used are theoretical analysis, ray tracing, and initial value problems in ...

Gui-Ying Yang; Brian J. Hoskins

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Light transmission through and its complete stoppage in an ultra slow wave optical medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light Wave transmission -- its compression, amplification, and the optical energy storage -- in an Ultra Slow Wave Medium (USWM) is studied analytically. Our phenomenological treatment is based entirely on the continuity equation for the optical energy flux, and the well known distribution-product property of Dirac delta-function. The results so obtained provide a clear understanding of some recent experiments on light transmission and its complete stoppage in an USWM. Keywords : Ultra slow light, stopped light, slow wave medium, EIT.

V., Ranjith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Watching Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the vicinity of merging neutron strar binaries or supernova remnants, gravitational waves can interact with the prevailing strong magnetic fields. The resulting partial conversion of gravitational waves into electromagnetic (radio) waves might prove to be an indirect way of detecting gravitational waves from such sources. Another interesting interaction considered in this article is the excitation of magnetosonic plasma waves by a gravitational wave passing through the surrounding plasma. The transfer of gravitational wave energy into the plasma might help to fuel the `fireball' of electromagnetic radiation observed in gamma ray bursts. In the last section of the article, a dispersion relation is derived for such magnetosonic plasma waves driven by a gravitational wave.

Joachim Moortgat

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Trends of Atlantic Wave Extremes as Simulated in a 40-Yr Wave Hindcast Using Kinematically Reanalyzed Wind Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, seasonal extremes of wave height in the North Atlantic are analyzed. The analysis is based on a 40-yr (1958–97) numerical wave hindcast using an intensive kinematic reanalysis of wind fields. Changes in the ocean wave extremes are ...

Xiaolan L. Wang; Val R. Swail

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Mean and Variability of the WHOI Daily Latent and Sensible Heat Fluxes at In Situ Flux Measurement Sites in the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily latent and sensible heat fluxes for the Atlantic Ocean from 1988 to 1999 with 1° × 1° resolution have been recently developed at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) by using a variational object analysis approach. The present study ...

Lisan Yu; Robert A. Weller; Bomin Sun

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral flux and the condensation nuclei (CN) flux from an urban area are determined from in situ aircraft measurements at Denver, Colorado. The concentration differences between upwind and downwind cross ...

Paul R. Frisbie; James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

When Are Eddy Tracer Fluxes Directed Downgradient?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms controlling the direction of eddy tracer fluxes are examined using eddy-resolving isopycnic experiments for a cyclic zonal channel. Eddy fluxes are directed downgradient on average when either (i) there is a Lagrangian increase in ...

Chris Wilson; Richard G. Williams

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Transmission Line Analogy for Relativistic Poynting-Flux Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio emission, polarization, and Faraday rotation maps of the radio jet of the galaxy 3C 303 have shown that one knot of this jet carries a {\\it galactic}-scale electric current and that it is magnetically dominated. We develop the theory of magnetically dominated or Poynting-flux jets by making an analogy of a Poynting jet with a transmission line or waveguide carrying a net current and having a potential drop across it (from the jet's axis to its radius) and a definite impedance which we derive. Time-dependent but not necessarily small perturbations of a Poynting-flux jet are described by the "telegrapher's equations." These predict the propagation speed of disturbances and the effective wave impedance for forward and backward propagating wave components. A localized disturbance of a Poynting jet gives rise to localized dissipation in the jet which may explain the enhanced synchrotron radiation in the knots of the 3C 303 jet, and also in the apparently stationary knot HST-1 in the jet near the nucleus of t...

Lovelace, R V E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Program on Technology Innovation: Validation of CLASSI and SASSI Codes to Treat Seismic Wave Incoherence in Soil-Structure Interacti on (SSI) Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Plant Seismic Issues Resolution Program was initiated to address emerging seismic issues as they relate to the design of new nuclear power plants. Task S2.1 of the program is a multi-phase research project to assess the effects of seismic wave incoherence on the response of foundations and structures similar to those being considered for advanced reactor designs. The initial phases of this task focused on the objective of systematically studying seismic wave incoherence effects on structures/fo...

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

High-flux solar photon processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

CRTF Real-Time Aperture Flux system  

SciTech Connect

The Real-Time Aperture Flux system (TRAF) is a test measurement system designed to determine the input power/unit area (flux density) during solar experiments conducted at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The RTAF is capable of using both thermal sensors and photon sensors to determine the flux densities in the RTAF measuring plane. These data are manipulated in various ways to derive input power and flux density distribution to solar experiments.

Davis, D.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Valeri Korneev at Berkeley National Lab has developed a low cost method for real-time seismic monitoring of underground fluid reservoirs based on tube-wave analysis.

310

Modeling the horizon-absorbed gravitational flux for equatorial-circular orbits in Kerr spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an improved analytical model for the horizon-absorbed gravitational-wave energy flux of a small body in circular orbit in the equatorial plane of a Kerr black hole. Post-Newtonian (PN) theory provides an analytical description of the multipolar components of the absorption flux through Taylor expansions in the orbital frequency. Building on previous work, we construct a mode-by-mode factorization of the absorbed flux whose Taylor expansion agrees with current PN results. This factorized form significantly improves the agreement with numerical results obtained with a frequency-domain Teukolsky code, which evolves through a sequence of circular orbits up to the photon orbit. We perform the comparison between model and numerical data for dimensionless Kerr spins $-0.99 \\leq q \\leq 0.99$ and for frequencies up to the light ring of the Kerr black hole. Our proposed model enforces the presence of a zero in the flux at an orbital frequency equal to the frequency of the horizon, as predicted by perturbation theory. It also reproduces the expected divergence of the flux close to the light ring. Neither of these features are captured by the Taylor-expanded PN flux. Our proposed absorption flux can also help improve models for the inspiral, merger, ringdown of small mass-ratio binary systems.

Andrea Taracchini; Alessandra Buonanno; Scott A. Hughes; Gaurav Khanna

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

Maximizing Buoyancy Flux across Layered Geostrophic Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For layered analogues of the ocean stratification, the problem of maximizing buoyancy flux across a section with zero mass flux is considered. The two layer situation on an f-plane is particularly simple and it is shown that the buoyancy flux is ...

Nelson G. Hogg; Henry M. Stommel

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Atmospheric Forcing of the Winter Air–Sea Heat Fluxes over the Northern Red Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the atmospheric circulation on the winter air–sea heat fluxes over the northern Red Sea is investigated during the period 1985–2011. The analysis based on daily heat flux values reveals that most of the net surface heat exchange ...

Vassilis P. Papadopoulos; Yasser Abualnaja; Simon A. Josey; Amy Bower; Dionysios E. Raitsos; Harilaos Kontoyiannis; Ibrahim Hoteit

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Gravity Waves from Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravity waves generated by severe thunderstorms in the eastern Ohio-Pennsylvania area were recorded by an array of microbarovariographs at Palisades, New York and by standard microbarographs across northeastern United States. The waves were ...

Nambath K. Balachandran

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Interaction of a Surface Wave with Waves on a Diffuse Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resonant interaction analysis is used to study the two-dimensional interaction of a surface wave with two waves on a diffuse interface in a stratified fluid. The fluid system is modeled as a combination of two homogenous finite-depth layers ...

Mirmosadegh Jamali; Brian Seymour

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Effect of Inaccuracies in Weather-Ship Data on Bulk-Derived Estimates of Flux, Stability and Sea-Surface Roughness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical error analysis (or sensitivity study) is performed for the momentum, heat, and humidity flux estimates made from weather-ship observations by using the bulk flux method. Bulk-derived stability and roughness errors are also examined. ...

Theodore V. Blanc

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER J Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Current techniques for estimating contaminant mass inputs to impaired flux meter, MS Thesis, UF. This work was supported by the United States Department of Agriculture

Watson, Craig A.

317

NO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW BLAST WAVES ENCOUNTERING SUDDEN CIRCUMBURST DENSITY CHANGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power-law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreading, collimation, and edge effects of the blast wave as it encounters the change in circumburst medium. In all cases considered in this paper, we find that a flare will not be observed for any of the density changes studied.

Gat, Ilana; Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Effect of Wave Breaking on the Wave Energy Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of wave breaking on the wave energy spectral shape is examined. The Stokes wave-breaking criterion is first extended to random waves and a breaking wave model is established in which the elevation of breaking waves is expressed in ...

C. C. Tung; N. E. Huang

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Laboratory Simulation of Arched Magnetic Flux Rope Eruptions in the Solar Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dramatic eruption of an arched magnetic flux rope in a large ambient plasma has been studied in a laboratory experiment that simulates coronal loops. The eruption is initiated by laser generated plasma flows from the footpoints of the rope that significantly modify the magnetic-field topology and link the magnetic-field lines of the rope with the ambient plasma. Following this event, the flux rope erupts by releasing its plasma into the background. The resulting impulse excites intense magnetosonic waves that transfer energy to the ambient plasma and subsequently decay.

Tripathi, S. K. P.; Gekelman, W. [Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chromo-Electric flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profiles of the chromo-electric field generated by static quark-antiquark, $Q{\\bar Q}$ and three-quark, $QQQ$ sources are calculated in Coulomb gauge. Using a variational ansatz for the ground state, we show that a flux tube-like structure emerges and combines to the ``Y''-shape field profile for three static quarks. The properties of the chromo-electric field are, however, not expected to be the same as those of the full action density or the Wilson line and the differences are discussed.

Patrick O. Bowman; Adam P. Szczepaniak

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Resonantly enhanced four-wave mixing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving large susceptibilities and long interaction lengths in the generation of new wavelengths in the infrared spectral region. A process of resonantly enhanced four-wave mixing is employed, utilizing existing laser sources, such as the CO.sub.2 laser, to irradiate a gaseous media. The gaseous media, comprising NH.sub.3, CH.sub.3 F, D.sub.2, HCl, HF, CO, and H.sub.2 or some combination thereof, are of particular interest since they are capable of providing high repetition rate operation at high flux densities where crystal damage problems become a limitation.

Begley, Richard F. (Los Alamos, NM); Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

On the toroidal plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk-electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric field initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a finite-difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow profile and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves.

Guan Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Qin Hong [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu Jian [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

On the Toroidal Plasma Rotations Induced by Lower Hybrid Waves  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric fi eld initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a fi nite- difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow pro file and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves. __________________________________________________

Xiaoyin Guan, Hong Qin, Jian Liu and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Calculation of Extreme Wave Loads on Coastal Highway Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal bridges are exposed to severe wave, current and wind forces during a hurricane. Most coastal bridges are not designed to resist wave loads in such extreme situations, and there are no existing analytical methods to calculate wave loads on coastal highway bridges. This study focuses on developing a new scheme to estimate the extreme wave loads on bridges for designing purpose. In order to do this, a 2D wave velocity potential model (2D Model) is set up for the deterministic analysis of wave force on bridge decks. 2D Model is a linear wave model, which has the capability of calculating wave velocity potential components in time domain based on wave parameters such as wave height, wave period and water depth, and complex structural geometries. 2D Model has Laplace equation as general equation. The free surface boundary, incoming and outgoing wave boundary conditions are linearized, decomposed first, and then solved by the finite difference method. Maximum wave forces results calculated by the linear 2D Model are compared with results from CFD software Flow3D that is using Navier Stokes theory up to the 5th order; and 2D Model is validated by comparing results with experiment data. A case study is conducted for calculating extreme wave forces on I-10 Bridge across Escambia Bay, Florida during Hurricane Ivan in September 2004.SWAN model is adapted to investigate the parameters of wave heights and wave periods around bridge sites. SWAN model has the capability of predicting or hindcasting significant wave heights and wave periods as long as the domain and input parameters are given. The predicted significant wave heights are compared with measurements by Buoy Station 42039 and 42040 nearest to Escambia Bay. A new prediction equation of maximum uplift wave forces on bridge decks is developed in terms of wave height, wave period, water depth, bridge width, water clearance and over top water load. To develop the equations, the relationship is investigated between maximum uplift wave forces and wave parameters, water clearance, green water effects and bridge width. 2D Model is used for up to 1886 cases with difference parameters. Flow3D model is adopted to determine coefficients of water clearance and green water effects, which cannot be calculated by 2D Model.

Meng, Bo

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Interdecadal Variability of the Thermohaline Circulation in Box-Ocean Models Forced by Fixed Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intrinsic modes of decadal variability are analyzed using box-geometry ocean models forced by constant surface fluxes. An extensive parameter sensitivity analysis of the oscillatory behavior is carried out with respect to the spherical/Cartesian ...

Thierry Huck; Alain Colin de Verdière; Andrew J. Weaver

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Microstructure Estimates of Turbulent Salinity Flux and the Dissipation Spectrum of Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct determination of the irreversible turbulent flux of salinity in the ocean has not been possible because of the complexity of measuring salinity on the smallest scales over which it mixes. Presented is an analysis of turbulent salinity ...

Jonathan D. Nash; James N. Moum

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Interannual Variability in Rainfall, Water Vapor Flux, and Vertical Motion over West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines large-scale forcing mechanisms as they relate to initiation and maintenance of recent, long-term drought conditions in sub-Saharan Africa. The analysis uses 31-yr datasets of rainfall, moisture flux, and vertical motion. ...

Marybeth Long; Dara Entekhabi; Sharon E. Nicholson

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sensible Heat Flux in Near-Neutral Conditions over the Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variation of the sea surface sensible heat flux is investigated using data from the Gulf of Tehuantepec Experiment (GOTEX) and from eight additional aircraft datasets representing a variety of surface conditions. This analysis focuses on near-...

L. Mahrt; Dean Vickers; Edgar L Andreas; Djamal Khelif

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Comparison of Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Calculations Using the Bowen Ratio and Aerodynamic Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis technique is outlined that calculates the sensible and latent heat fluxes by the Bowen ratio and aerodynamic methods, using profile measurements at any number of heights. Field measurements at two sites near Churchill, Manitoba, ...

David H. Halliwell; Wayne R. Rouse

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

FINAL REPORT: EDDY-COVARIANCE FLUX TOWER AND TRACER TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA PROPOSAL: FROM TOWER TO PIXEL: INTEGRATION OF PATCH-SIZE NEE USING EXPERIMENTAL MODELING FOOTPRINT ANALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory has been funded since October of 2000 to provide assistance to the University of Georgia in conducting footprint analyses of individual towers based on meteorology and trace gas measurements. Brookhaven researchers conducted air flow measurements using perfluorocarbon tracers and meteorological instrumentation for three experimental campaigns at an AmeriFlux research site maintained by Dr. Monique Leclerc near Gainesville, FL. In addition, BNL provided assistance with remote data collection and distribution from remote field sites operated by Dr. John Hom of the US Forest Service in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and at FACE research sites in North Carolina and Wisconsin.

LEWIN,K.F.; NAGY, J.; WATSON, T.B.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bingham, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Signature of Collision of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Quiet Solar Photosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collision of the magnetic flux tubes in the Quiet Sun was proposed as one of the possible sources for the heating of the solar atmosphere (Furusawa and Sakai, 2000). The solar photosphere was observed using the New Solar Telescope ad Big Bear Solar Observatory. In TiO spectral line at 705.68 nm we approached resolution of 0.1". The horizontal plasma wave was observed spreading from the larger bright point. Shorty after this wave an increase in the oscillatory power appeared at the same location as the observed bright point. This behavior matches some of the results from the simulation of the collision of the two flux tubes with a weak current.

Andic, Aleksandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Downward Wave Coupling between the Stratosphere and Troposphere: The Importance of Meridional Wave Guiding and Comparison with Zonal-Mean Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of downward wave coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere in both hemispheres is analyzed using the 40-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40) dataset. Downward wave coupling occurs ...

Tiffany A. Shaw; Judith Perlwitz; Nili Harnik

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

337

The virtual observatory service TheoSSA: Establishing a database of synthetic stellar flux standards. I. NLTE spectral analysis of the DA-type white dwarf G 191-B2B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observation. We establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G 191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and ...

Rauch, T; Kruk, J W; Werner, K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Gravity waves from vortex dipoles and jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation first investigates gravity wave generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex dipoles using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model. Several initially balanced and localized jets induced by vortex dipoles are examined here. Within these dipoles, inertia-gravity waves with intrinsic frequencies 1-2 times the Coriolis parameter are simulated in the jet exit region. The ray tracing analysis reveals strong variation of wave characteristics along ray paths. The dependence of wave amplitude on the Rossby number is examined through experiments in which the two vortices are initially separated by a large distance but subsequently approach each other and form a vortex dipole with an associated amplifying localized jet. The amplitude of stationary gravity waves in the simulations with a 90-km grid spacing increases nearly linearly with the square of the Rossby number but significantly more rapidly when smaller grid spacing is used. To further address the source mechanism of the gravity waves within the vortex dipole, a linear numerical framework is developed based on the framework proposed by Plougonven and Zhang (2007). Using the nonlinearly balanced fields as the basic state and driven by three types of large scale forcing, the vorticity, divergence and thermodynamic forcing, this linear model is utilized to obtain linear wave responses. The wave packets in the linear responses compare reasonably well with the MM5 simulated gravity waves. It is suggested that the vorticity forcing is the leading contribution to both gravity waves in the jet exit region and the ascent/descent feature in the jet core. This linear model is also adopted to study inertia-gravity waves in the vicinity of a baroclinic jet during the life cycle of an idealized baroclinic wave. It is found that the thermodynamic forcing and the vorticity forcing are equally important to the gravity waves in the low stratosphere, but the divergence forcing is again playing a lesser role. Two groups of wave packets are present in the linear responses; their sources appear to locate either near the surface front or near the middle/upper tropospheric jet.

Wang, Shuguang

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Predicting Low Flux High - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High flux can access high fluence, but such TTS data is under-predicted by current ... on Defect Migration and Void Formation using the Phase Field Method.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Vector Representation of Trade Cumulus Thermodynamic Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vector representation of the BOMEX thermodynamic budget data is presented which shows graphically the relationship of the fluxes and the mean layer structure.

Alan K. Betts

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

343

WAVE REFLE TOR  

owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. SAND # 2013-8893 P WAVE REFLE TOR

344

Energy Basics: Wave Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

345

WAVE REFLE TOR  

electromagnetic wave travels through the rods along their axes it receives a 1/4 period of phase delay be- ... delay, creating positive interference that effectively

346

Trimodal steady water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

RFI Comments - Wave Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These attacks, such as those planted by rootkits ... PwC leveraged the power of TPMs to ... Wave EMBASSY® Remote Administration Server (ERAS) has ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

348

Collapse of Alfven waves  

SciTech Connect

The growth rates are calculated for the collapse of Alfven waves in a low-..beta.. plasma. The relationship to rf heating is discussed.(AIP)

Erokhin, N.S.; Moiseev, S.S.; Mukhin, V.V.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean surface latent heat flux (LHF) plays an essential role in global energy and water cycle variability. In this study, monthly LHF over global oceans during 1992–93 are compared among Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes, ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eric Nelkin; Joe Ardizzone; Robert M. Atlas

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A generalized flux function for three-dimensional magnetic reconnection  

SciTech Connect

The definition and measurement of magnetic reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic fields with multiple reconnection sites is a challenging problem, particularly in fields lacking null points. We propose a generalization of the familiar two-dimensional concept of a magnetic flux function to the case of a three-dimensional field connecting two planar boundaries. In this initial analysis, we require the normal magnetic field to have the same distribution on both boundaries. Using hyperbolic fixed points of the field line mapping, and their global stable and unstable manifolds, we define a unique flux partition of the magnetic field. This partition is more complicated than the corresponding (well-known) construction in a two-dimensional field, owing to the possibility of heteroclinic points and chaotic magnetic regions. Nevertheless, we show how the partition reconnection rate is readily measured with the generalized flux function. We relate our partition reconnection rate to the common definition of three-dimensional reconnection in terms of integrated parallel electric field. An analytical example demonstrates the theory and shows how the flux partition responds to an isolated reconnection event.

Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures Fausto Cattaneo study the topology of field lines threading buoyant magnetic flux struc- tures. The magnetic structures ­ Sun: interior ­ Sun: magnetic fields ­ Stars: spots 1 Current address: Department of Mathematics

354

Free-Wave Energy Dissipation in Experimental Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several transient wave trains containing an isolated plunging or spilling breaker at a prescribed location were generated in a two-dimensional wave flume using an energy focusing technique. Surface elevation measurements of each transient wave ...

Eustorgio Meza; Jun Zhang; Richard J. Seymour

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

METHOD AND FLUX COMPOSITION FOR TREATING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A flux composition is described fer use with molten uranium or uranium alloys. The flux consists of about 46 weight per cent calcium fiuoride, 46 weight per cent magnesium fluoride and about 8 weight per cent of uranium tetrafiuoride.

Foote, F.

1958-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

Resonantly Forced Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow, rotating layer of fluid that supports Rossby waves is subjected to turbulent friction through an Ekman layer at the bottom and is driven by a wave that exerts a shear stress on the upper boundary and for which the phase approximate ...

John Miles

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Relativistic Poynting-Flux Jets as Transmission Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent radio emission, polarization, and Faraday rotation maps of the radio jet of the galaxy 3C 303 have shown that one knot of this jet has a {\\it galactic}-scale electric current of $\\sim 3\\times 10^{18}$ Amp\\`ere flowing along the jet axis (Kronberg et al. 2011). We develop the theory of relativistic Poynting-flux jets which are modeled as a transmission line carrying a DC current $I_0$, having a potential drop $V_0$, and a definite impedance ${\\cal Z}_0 =90(u_z/c)\\Omega$, where $u_z$ is the bulk velocity of the jet plasma. The electromagnetic energy flow in the jet is ${\\cal Z}_0 I_0^2$. The observed current in 3C 303 can be used to calculate the electromagnetic energy flow in this magnetically dominated jet. Time-dependent but not necessarily small perturbations of a Poynting-flux jet - possibly triggered by a gas cloud penetrating the jet - are described by "telegrapher's equations," which predict the propagation speed of disturbances and the effective wave impedance ${\\cal Z}$. The disturbance of a Po...

Lovelace, R V E; Kronberg, P P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

359

Wave Mechanics without Probability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of monochromatic electromagnetic waves in stationary media is shown to be ruled by a frequency dependent function, which we call Wave Potential, encoded in the structure of the Helmholtz equation. Contrary to the common belief that the very concept of "ray trajectory" is reserved to the eikonal approximation, a general and exact ray-based Hamiltonian treatment, reducing to the eikonal approximation in the absence of Wave Potential, shows that its presence induces a mutual, perpendicular ray-coupling, which is the one and only cause of any typically wave-like phenomenon, such as diffraction and interference. Recalling, then, that the time-independent Schroedinger and Klein-Gordon equations (associating stationary "matter waves" to mono-energetic particles) are themselves Helmholtz-like equations, the exact, ray-based treatment developed for classical electromagnetic waves is extended - without resorting to statistical concepts - to the exact, trajectory-based Hamiltonian dynamics of mono-energetic point-like particles, both in the non-relativistic and in the relativistic case. The trajectories turn out to be perpendicularly coupled, once more, by an exact, stationary, energy-dependent Wave Potential, coinciding in the form, but not in the physical meaning, with the statistical, time-varying, energy-independent "Quantum Potential" of Bohm's theory, which views particles, just like the standard Copenhagen interpretation, as traveling wave-packets. These results, together with the connection which is shown to exist between Wave Potential and Uncertainty Principle, suggest a novel, non-probabilistic interpretation of Wave Mechanics.

Adriano Orefice; Raffaele Giovanelli; Domenico Ditto

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Quasi-stationary Structure of Radiating Shock Waves; 1, The One-temperature Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the quasi-stationary structure of a radiating shock wave propagating through a spherically symmetric shell of cold gas by solving the time-dependent equations of radiation hydrodynamics on an adaptive grid. We show that this code successfully resolves the shock wave in both the subcritical and supercritical cases and, for the first time, we have reproduced all the expected features -- including the optically thin temperature spike at a supercritical shock front -- without invoking analytic jump conditions at the discontinuity. We solve the full moment equations for the radiation flux and energy density, but the shock wave structure can also be reproduced if the radiation flux is assumed to be proportional to the gradient of the energy density (the diffusion approximation), as long as the radiation energy density is determined by the appropriate radiative transfer moment equation. We find that Zel'dovich and Raizer's analytic solution for the shock wave structure accurately describes a subcritical...

Sincell, M W; Mihalas, D L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mass transport in the Stokes edge wave for constant arbitrary bottom slope in a rotating ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lagrangian mass transport in the Stokes surface edge wave is obtained from the vertically integrated equations of momentum and mass in a viscous rotating ocean, correct to second order in wave steepness. The analysis is valid for bottom slope ...

Peygham Ghaffari; Jan Erik H. Weber

362

Directionality and Crest Length Statistics of Steep Waves in Open Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wavelet analysis methodology is applied to open ocean wave height data from the Southern Ocean Waves Experiment (1992) and from a field experiment conducted at Duck, North Carolina, in 1997 with the aim of estimating the directionality and ...

Nicholas Scott; Tetsu Hara; Paul A. Hwang; Edward J. Walsh

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Digital signal processing control of induction machine`s torque and stator flux utilizing the direct stator flux field orientation method  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of the Direct Stator Flux Field Orientation control method. This method can be used to control an induction motor`s torque and flux directly and is the application of interest for this thesis. This control method is implemented without the traditional feedback loops and associated hardware. Predictions are made, by mathematical calculations, of the stator voltage vector. The voltage vector is determined twice a switching period. The switching period is fixed throughout the analysis. The three phase inverter duty cycle necessary to control the torque and flux of the induction machine is determined by the voltage space vector Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) technique. Transient performance of either the flux or torque requires an alternate modulation scheme which is also addressed in this thesis. A block diagram of this closed loop system is provided. 22 figs., 7 tabs.

Seiz, J.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Instability of P-waves just below the transition region in a global solar wind simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how wave propagation is modified by the presence of heat sources and sinks, in the simple 1D, hydrodynamical case, including chromosphere and solar wind. We integrate the time-dependent hydrodynamic equations of the solar wind with spherical symmetry, including conduction, radiative cooling and a prescribed mechanical heat flux. Once a quasi-stationary wind is established, we study the response of the system to pressure oscillations at the photospheric boundary. We use transparent boundary conditions. We find that wavepackets with high enough amplitude propagating upward from the photosphere implode just below the transition region. This implosion is due to the radiative cooling term generating pressure holes close to the wave crests of the wave, which make the wave collapse. In the case where heat sources and sinks are not present in the equations, the wave remains stable whatever the initial wave amplitude, which is compatible with published work. Instability should be observable when and whe...

Grappin, R; Pinto, R; Wang, Y -M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi-phased and chaotic as a highly aerated region is formed in the flow in the vicinity of the structure while water runs up onto the structure. In this study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the velocity field of the water dominant region. For measurements of an aerated region that cannot be measured by PIV, a new measurement method called bubble image velocimetry (BIV) was developed. The principle and setup of the BIV method were introduced and validated. Mean and turbulence properties were obtained through ensemble averaging repeated tests measured by both methods. The dominant and maximum velocity of the breaking wave and associated green water are discussed for the three distinct phases of the impingement-runup-overtopping sequence. The distribution of the green water velocity along the top of the structure has a nonlinear profile and the maximum velocity occurs near the front of the fast moving water. Using the measured data and applying dimensional analysis, a similarity profile for the green water flow on top of the structure was obtained, and a prediction equation was formulated. The dam breaking solution used for the green water prediction was examined with determining initial water depth based on the experiment conditions. Comparison between measurements, the prediction equation, and the dam breaking flow was made. The prediction equation and the dam break flow with appropriate initial water depth may be used to predict the green water velocity caused by extreme waves in a hurricane. To demonstrate the aeration of the breaking wave and overtopping water, void fraction was also investigated. There is strong aeration in the region of overtopping water front generated by a plunging breaker. Void fraction of overtopping water was measured using a fiber optic reflectometer (FOR). The measured velocity and void fraction were also used to estimate flow rate and water volume of overtopping water.

Ryu, Yong Uk

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Wave Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

turn, rotates a turbine. Specially built seagoing vessels can also capture the energy of offshore waves. These floating platforms create electricity by funneling waves through...

367

Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Add description List of Wave Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveEnergy&oldid267203" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

368

PRELIMINARY HAZARDS SUMMARY REPORT ON THE BROOKHAVEN HIGH FLUX BEAM RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Beam Reactor, HFBR, is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water and designed to produce 40 Mw with a total epithermal flux of ~1.6 X 10/sup 15/cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ and a flector thermal maximum flux of 7 X 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/, using a core formed by ETR plate-type fuel elements in a close-packed array. The hazards summary is given in terms of site description, reactor design, building design, plant operation, disposal of radioactive wastes and effluents, and safety analysis. (B.O.G.)

Hendrie, J.M.; Kouts, H.J.C.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

ON THE ERUPTION OF CORONAL FLUX ROPES  

SciTech Connect

We present three-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of the magnetic field in the corona where the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube is driven at the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Through a sequence of simulations in which we vary the amount of twisted flux transported into the corona before the emergence is stopped, we investigate the conditions that lead to a dynamic eruption of the resulting coronal flux rope. It is found that the critical condition for the onset of eruption is for the center of the flux rope to reach a critical height at which the corresponding potential field declines with height at a sufficiently steep rate, consistent with the onset of the torus instability of the flux rope. In some cases, immediately after the emergence is stopped, the coronal flux rope first settles into a quasi-static rise with an underlying sigmoid-shaped current layer developing. Preferential heating of field lines going through this current layer may give rise to the observed quiescent X-ray sigmoid loops before eruption. Reconnections in the current layer during the initial quasi-static stage is found to add detached flux to the coronal flux rope, allowing it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height and dynamic eruption of the flux rope then ensues. By identifying field lines whose tops are in the most intense part of the current layer during the eruption, we deduce the evolution and morphology of the post-flare X-ray loops and the flare ribbons at their footpoints.

Fan, Y. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

wave | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281559 Varnish cache server wave Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. Source Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Date Released December 05th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

371

FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux influences the system's global polarity, leading in some cases to a polarity reversal while inhibiting the background dynamo from doing so in others. The emerged magnetic flux is slowly advected poleward while being diffused and assimilated by the background dynamo field.

Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S., E-mail: rui.pinto@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

Cook, DR

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Topical Issue in Solar Physics: Flux-rope Structure of Coronal Mass Ejections Preface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Topical Issue of Solar Physics, devoted to the study of flux-rope structure in coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is based on two Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAWs) held in 2010 (20 - 23 September in Dan Diego, California, USA) and 2011 (September 5-9 in Alcala, Spain). The primary purpose of the CDAWs was to address the question: Do all CMEs have flux rope structure? There are 18 papers om this topical issue, including this preface.

Gopalswamy, N; Hidalgo, M; Zhang, J; Riley, P; Gesztelyi, L van Driel-; Mandrini, C H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Quasi-biennial oscillations in the solar tachocline caused by magnetic Rossby wave instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO) are frequently observed in the solar activity indices. However, no clear physical mechanism for the observed variations has been suggested so far. Here we study the stability of magnetic Rossby waves in the solar tachocline using the shallow water magnetohydrodynamic approximation. Our analysis shows that the combination of typical differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field with a strength > 10^5 G triggers the instability of the m=1 magnetic Rossby wave harmonic with a period of 2 years. This harmonic is antisymmetric with respect to the equator and its period (and growth rate) depends on the differential rotation parameters and the magnetic field strength. The oscillations may cause a periodic magnetic flux emergence at the solar surface and consequently may lead to the observed QBO in the solar activity features. The period of QBO may change throughout the cycle, and from cycle to cycle, due to variations of the mean magnetic field and differential rotation in the...

Zaqarashvili, T V; Oliver, R; Ballester, J L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Intercomparison of Various Surface Latent Heat Flux Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Japanese Ocean Flux Data Sets with use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO) latent heat flux field is compared with the Hamburg Ocean–Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS), the Goddard Satellite-Based Surface ...

Masahisa Kubota; Atsuko Kano; Hidenori Muramatsu; Hiroyuki Tomita

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Interactions between self-assembled monolayers and an organophosphonate: A detailed study using surface acoustic wave-based mass analysis, polarization modulation-FTIR spectroscopy, and ellipsometry  

SciTech Connect

Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) having surfaces terminated in the following functional groups: -CH{sub 3}, -OH, -COOH, and (COO{sup -}){sub 2}Cu{sup 2+} (MUA-Cu{sup 2+}) have been prepared and examined as potential chemically sensitive interfaces. Mass measurements made using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices indicate that these surfaces display different degrees of selectivity and sensitivity to a range of analytes. The response of the MUA-Cu{sup 2+} SAM to the nerve-agent simulant diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) is particularly intriguing. Exposure of this surface to 50%-of-saturation DIMP yields a surface concentration equivalent to about 20 DIMP monolayers. Such a high surface concentration in equilibrium with a much lower-than-saturation vapor pressure has not previously been observed. Newly developed analytical tools have made it possible to measure the infrared spectrum of the chemically receptive surface during analyte dosing. Coupled with in-situ SAW/ellipsometry measurements, which permit simultaneous measurement of mass and thickness with nanogram and Angstrom resolution, respectively, it has been possibly to develop a model for the surface chemistry leading to the unusual behavior of this system. The results indicate that DIMP interacts strongly with surface-confined Cu{sup 2+} adduct that nucleates growth of semi-ordered crystallites having substantially lower vapor pressure than the liquid.

Crooks, R.M.; Yang, H.C.; McEllistrem, L.J. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept of Chemistry] [and others

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

Forced Trench Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general theory for forced barotropic long trench waves in the presence of linear bottom friction is presented. Two specific forcing mechanisms are considered: (i) transverse fluctuations in a western boundary current as it flows across a trench,...

Lawrence A. Mysak; Andrew J. Willmott

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Avoided-Level-Crossing Spectroscopy with Dressed Matter Waves  

SciTech Connect

We devise a method for probing resonances of macroscopic matter waves in shaken optical lattices by monitoring their response to slow parameter changes, and show that such resonances can be disabled by particular choices of the driving amplitude. The theoretical analysis of this scheme reveals far-reaching analogies between dressed atoms and time periodically forced matter waves.

Eckardt, Andre [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Holthaus, Martin [Institut fuer Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Cloud Identification for ERBE Radiative Flux Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Derivation of top of atmosphere radiative fluxes requires the use of measured satellite radiances and assumptions about the anisotropy of the Earth's radiation field. The primary modification of the Earth's anisotropy is caused by variations in ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Richard N. Green

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Computing Surface Fluxes from Mesonet Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using air–vegetation–soil layer coupled model equations as weak constraints, a variational method is developed to compute sensible and latent heat fluxes from conventional observations obtained at meteorological surface stations. This method ...

Binbin Zhou; Qin Xu

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

386

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

EVIDENCE FOR THE PHOTOSPHERIC EXCITATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC WAVES  

SciTech Connect

Observing the excitation mechanisms of incompressible transverse waves is vital for determining how energy propagates through the lower solar atmosphere. We aim to show the connection between convectively driven photospheric flows and incompressible chromospheric waves. The observations presented here show the propagation of incompressible motion through the quiet lower solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the chromosphere. We determine photospheric flow vectors to search for signatures of vortex motion and compare results to photospheric flows present in convective simulations. Further, we search for the chromospheric response to vortex motions. Evidence is presented that suggests incompressible waves can be excited by the vortex motions of a strong magnetic flux concentration in the photosphere. A chromospheric counterpart to the photospheric vortex motion is also observed, presenting itself as a quasi-periodic torsional motion. Fine-scale, fibril structures that emanate from the chromospheric counterpart support transverse waves that are driven by the observed torsional motion. A new technique for obtaining details of transverse waves from time-distance diagrams is presented and the properties of transverse waves (e.g., amplitudes and periods) excited by the chromospheric torsional motion are measured.

Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Shelyag, S., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Main Physics Building, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, County Antrim BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

On some essential peculiarities of the traveling wave reactor operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of conditions for existence of nuclear burning wave in neutron-multiplicating media (U-Pu and Th-U cycles) we show the possibility of surmounting so-called dpa-parameter problem, or in other words, an algorithm of optimal nuclear burning wave mode is proposed yielding parameters of the wave (fluence/neutron flux, width and speed of nuclear burning wave) satisfying the dpa-condition, characterizing the tolerable level of radioactive stability of reactor materials, in particular the cladding materials. It is shown for the first time that capture and fission cross-sections of 238U and 239Pu increase with temperature within 1000-3000K range, that under certain conditions may lead to global loss of stability of nuclear burning wave. Some variants of possible stability loss due to so-called blow-up modes, or in other words, anomalous nuclear fuel temperature and neutron flow evolution are discussed and are found to possibly become a reason for trivial violation of internal safety of traveling wave reac...

Rusov, V D; Sharf, I V; Vaschenko, V M; Linnik, E P; Zelentsova, T N; Beglaryan, M E; Chernegenko, S A; Kosenko, S I; Molchinikolov, P A; Smolyar, V P; Grechan, E V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

On some essential peculiarities of the traveling wave reactor operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of conditions for existence of nuclear burning wave in neutron-multiplicating media (U-Pu and Th-U cycles) we show the possibility of surmounting so-called dpa-parameter problem, or in other words, an algorithm of optimal nuclear burning wave mode is proposed yielding parameters of the wave (fluence/neutron flux, width and speed of nuclear burning wave) satisfying the dpa-condition, characterizing the tolerable level of radioactive stability of reactor materials, in particular the cladding materials. It is shown for the first time that capture and fission cross-sections of 238U and 239Pu increase with temperature within 1000-3000K range, that under certain conditions may lead to global loss of stability of nuclear burning wave. Some variants of possible stability loss due to so-called blow-up modes, or in other words, anomalous nuclear fuel temperature and neutron flow evolution are discussed and are found to possibly become a reason for trivial violation of internal safety of traveling wave reactor.

V. D. Rusov; V. A. Tarasov; I. V. Sharf; V. M. Vaschenko; E. P. Linnik; T. N. Zelentsova; M. E. Beglaryan; S. A. Chernegenko; S. I. Kosenko; P. A. Molchinikolov; V. P. Smolyar; E. V. Grechan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

390

Spectral Analysis and Diagnosis of Nonlinear Interactions of Large-Scale Moving Waves at 200 mb in the GLAS General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavenumber-frequency spectral analysis of a 90-day winter (15 January - 15 April) wind field simulated by a climate experiment of the GLAS (Goddard laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences) atmospheric circulation model is made using the space-time ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Hal G. Marshall; J. Shukla

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

RADIATION FROM COMOVING POYNTING FLUX ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with particle-in-cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison; Noguchi, Koichi [Rice University, Houston TX 77005-1892 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radiation from Comoving Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with Particle-In-Cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model. Part II: Impacts on In-Canopy Latent Heat Flux over a Winter Wheat Field Determined by Detailed Calculation of Canopy Radiation Transmission and Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the validation and sensitivity analysis of an atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and a radiation scheme for the transmission ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

395

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details...

396

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and...

397

Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport  

SciTech Connect

A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E {times} B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional ( pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

Dimits, A.M. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA). Lab. for Plasma Research); Lee, W.W. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Surface Heat Flux in the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatological monthly mean variations of the surface heat fluxes over the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea are calculated by both a data analysis and a numerical simulation. The result of the data analysis based on the empirical/bulk method ...

Naoki Hirose; Hyun-Chul Lee; Jong-Hwan Yoon

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Storm-Forced Near-Inertial Waves on a Beta Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the beta effect, that is, the variation of the Coriolis parameter with latitude on the energy flux from moving storms to the oceanic internal wave field is considered. Large-scale, fast-moving storms are emphasized, and the ...

Johan Nilsson

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Soft Capacitors for Wave Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave energy harvesting could be a substantial renewable energy source without impact on the global climate and ecology, yet practical attempts have struggle d with problems of wear and catastrophic failure. An innovative technology for ocean wave energy harvesting was recently proposed, based on the use of soft capacitors. This study presents a realistic theoretical and numerical model for the quantitative characterization of this harvesting method. Parameter regio ns with optimal behavior are found, and novel material descriptors are determined which simplify analysis dramatically. The characteristics of currently ava ilable material are evaluated, and found to merit a very conservative estimate of 10 years for raw material cost recovery.

Karsten Ahnert; Markus Abel; Matthias Kollosche; Per Jørgen Jørgensen; Guggi Kofod

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager (Flash format)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager > (Flash) Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager > (Flash) Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Remote Vital Sign Monitoring System Preventing the Worst (by CNN) Engineering Development & Applications Argonne's Nuclear Science & Technology Legacy Other Multimedia Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Detection & Diagnostic Systems - Multimedia Bookmark and Share Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager Argonne National Laboratory Read full story Argonne has developed a passive compressive sensing system that uses millimeter waves (MMWs) to rapidly image targets with high resolution and

402

Wave localization as a manifestation of ray chaos in underwater acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave chaos is demonstrated by studying a wave propagation in a periodically corrugated wave-guide. In the limit of a short wave approximation (SWA) the underlying description is related to the chaotic ray dynamics. In this case the control parameter of the problem is characterized by the corrugation amplitude and the SWA parameter. The considered model is fairly suitable and tractable for the analytical analysis of a wave localization length. The number of eigenmodes characterized the width of the localized wave packet is estimated analytically.

A. Iomin; Yu. Bliokh

2007-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause--Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 10{sup 9}m{sup 2}/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (B{sub wave}/B{sub 0} > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.

Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Transient Ocean Currents Induced by Wind and Growing Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical nonlinear model for wind- and wave-induced currents in a viscous, rotating ocean is developed. The analysis is based on a Lagrangian description of motion. The nonlinear drift problem is formulated such that the solution depends on ...

Jan Erik Weber; Arne Melsom

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Recent Increase in North Atlantic Wave Heights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature and causes of the recent increase in North Atlantic wave heights are explored by combining a numerical hindcast with a statistical analysis. The numerical hindcast incorporates a 10-yr history (1980–89) of North Atlantic, twice daily ...

Y. Kushnir; V. J. Cardone; J. G. Greenwood; M. A. Cane

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Influence of Zonal Mean Flow Change on Stationary Wave Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fluctuation of stationary waves caused by zonal mean flow changes is investigated using a barotropic model and GCM simulated upper-level data. The EOF analysis of monthly mean ? fluctuations during winter shows that a positive anomaly at the ...

In-Sik Kang

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Interactions Between orographically and Thermally Forced Planetary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive analysis has been made of the atmospheric planetary wave response to orographic and thermal forcing in midlatitudes using a simple model. Vertical heating profiles with maxima at the surface and in the mid-troposphere are ...

Kevin E. Trenberth

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Secondary Instabilities in Breaking Inertia–Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensionalization of turbulence in the breaking of nearly vertically propagating inertia–gravity waves is investigated numerically using singular vector analysis applied to the Boussinesq equations linearized about three two-dimensional ...

Mark D. Fruman; Ulrich Achatz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Global Estimates of Extreme Wind Speed and Wave Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-term dataset of satellite altimeter measurements of significant wave height and wind speed, spanning 23 years, is analyzed to determine extreme values corresponding to a 100-yr return period. The analysis considers the suitability of both ...

J. Vinoth; I. R. Young

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Wave-Turbulence Dynamics in the Stably Stratified Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New data obtained at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) has been compared with a linear stability analysis of the background atmospheric state as measured by rawinsonde ascents. Good agreement was obtained between measured wave parameters ...

F. Einaudi; J. J. Finnigan

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Numerical Model Studies of Long-Period Edge Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical modeling study of aspects of the generation and propagation of long-period edge waves along a continental shelf is described. The numerical model is based on the traditional shallow-water dynamics. A scale analysis indicates that ...

F. A. Shillington; D. Van Foreest

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

SEPARATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX  

SciTech Connect

The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon, which has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux over a narrow region {approx}20{sup 0} wide, a factor of 2-3 higher than the more globally distributed ENA flux. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the distributed flux by applying a transparency mask over the ribbon and regions of high emissions, and then solve for the distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum shows a knee between {approx}1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the distributed flux does not show a clear knee and more closely conforms to a power law over much of the sky. Consistent with previous analyses, the slope of the power law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. The knee in the energy spectrum of the ribbon suggests that its source plasma population is generated via a distinct physical process. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. The heliotail may be identified in maps of globally distributed flux as a broad region of low flux centered {approx}44{sup 0}W of the interstellar downwind direction, suggesting heliotail deflection by the interstellar magnetic field.

Schwadron, N. A.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E., E-mail: n.schwadron@unh.edu, E-mail: harald.kucharek@unh.edu, E-mail: eberhard.moebius@unh.edu [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

If sterile neutrinos exist, how can one determine the total solar neutrino fluxes?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 8B solar neutrino flux inferred from a global analysis of solar neutrino experiments is within 11% (1 sigma) of the predicted standard solar model value if only active neutrinos exist, but could be as large as 1.7 times the standard prediction if sterile neutrinos exist. We show that the total 8B neutrino flux (active plus sterile neutrinos) can be determined experimentally to about 10% (1 sigma) by combining charged current measurements made with the KamLAND reactor experiment and with the SNO CC solar neutrino experiment, provided the LMA neutrino oscillation solution is correct and the simulated performance of KamLAND is valid. Including also SNO NC data, the sterile component of the 8B neutrino flux can be measured by this method to an accuracy of about 12% (1 sigma) of the standard solar model flux. Combining Super-Kamiokande and KamLAND measurements and assuming the oscillations occur only among active neutrinos, the 8B neutrino flux can be measured to 6% (1 sigma); the total flux can be measured to an accuracy of about 9%. The total 7Be solar neutrino flux can be determined to an accuracy of about 28% (1 sigma) by combining measurements made with the KamLAND, SNO, and gallium neutrino experiments. One can determine the total 7Be neutrino flux to a one sigma accuracy of about 11% or better by comparing data from the KamLAND experiment and the BOREXINO solar neutrino experiment provided both detectors work as expected. The pp neutrino flux can be determined to about 15% using data from the gallium, KamLAND, BOREXINO, and SNO experiments.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; C. Pena-Garay

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

414

Underground particle fluxes in the Soudan mine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a summary of our knowledge of the underground particle fluxes in the vicinity of Soudan 2 and of the future MINOS detector. It includes a brief description of the measured muon fluxes and of the gamma ray spectra deduced from measurements of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations in the rock. Counting rates in gaseous and scintillation detectors are estimated. Some data on what is known about the chemical composition of the local rocks are included; these are relevant to an understanding of the underground muon rates and also to a calculation of low energy neutron fluxes. 1 Introduction As plans for the MINOS detector and for the excavation of a new detector hall progress, some people have begun asking what is known of the fluxes of various particles underground. The muon flux is relevant for possibly calibrating and certainly for monitoring the long term behavior of the detector. It will likely be the determining factor in the eventual trigger rate if the MINOS det...

Keith Ruddick; Keith Ruddick; Th

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Heating of solar chromosphere by electromagnetic wave absorption in a plasma slab model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heating of chromospheric inter-network regions by means of the absorption of electromagnetic (EM) waves that originate from the photospheric blackbody radiation is studied in the framework of a plasma slab model. The absorption is provided by the electron-neutral collisions. Given the uncertain nature of the collision cross-section due to the plasma micro-turbulence, it is shown that for plausible physical parameters, the heating flux produced by the absorption of EM waves in the chromosphere is between $20 - 45$ % of the chromospheric radiative loss flux requirement. It is also established that there is an optimal value for the collision cross-section, $5 \\times 10^{-18}$ m$^{2}$, that produces the maximal heating flux of 1990 W m$^{-2}$.

Tsiklauri, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sixteen-moment approximation for a collisionless space plasma: Waves and instabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study is carried out of waves and instabilities in an anisotropic collisionless plasma. In a strongly magnetized plasma, the velocity distributions along and across the magnetic field lines are different, which results in anisotropy of the total pressure and gives rise to an anisotropic heat flux. The fluid description of the plasma is based on the 16-moment integral transport equations, which are integral equations obtained from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation. For small incompressible perturbations in a homogeneous plasma, the general dispersion relation implies that there are not only firehose modes, but also three additional modes, and that all four wave modes interact with each other if a heat flux is present. Heat fluxes do not change the properties of conventional firehose modes. The conditions for the onset of instabilities are investigated as functions of the parameters of the problems. Qualitative estimates for conditions typical of the solar corona are presented.

Kuznetsov, V. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (Russian Federation); Dzhalilov, N. S. [Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Shemakha Astrophysical Observatory (Azerbaijan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Cloudiness and Marine Boundary Layer Dynamics in the ASTEX Lagrangian Experiments. Part II: Cloudiness, Drizzle, Surface Fluxes, and Entrainment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analysis of the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Lagrangians started in Part I is continued, presenting measurements of sea surface temperature, surface latent and sensible heat fluxes from bulk aerodynamic formulas, cloud ...

Christopher S. Bretherton; Philip Austin; Steven T. Siems

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Comparative Experiments with MAPS on Different Parameterization Schemes for Surface Moisture Flux and Boundary-Layer Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares several formulations parameterizing the surface moisture flux and boundary-layer processes using the ?-? hybrid-b model of the Mesoscale Analysis and Prediction System (MAPS) within both 1D and 3D frameworks.

Zaitao Pan; Stanley G. Benjamin; John M. Brown; Tatiana Smirnova

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Troposphere-to-Stratosphere Transition in Kinetic Energy Spectra and Nonlinear Spectral Fluxes as Seen in ECMWF Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global horizontal wavenumber kinetic energy spectra and spectral fluxes of rotational kinetic energy and enstrophy are computed for a range of vertical levels using a T799 ECMWF operational analysis. Above 250 hPa, the kinetic energy spectra ...

B. H. Burgess; Andre R. Erler; Theodore G. Shepherd

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee' s Summit, MO)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

423

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee' s Summit, MO)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

Tuck, J.L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 6 Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities. 6.0.1 Energy Current Density The energy current density is given by the Poynting vector S = E Ã? H (6.1) where all quantities are real. The Poynting vector gives the instantaneous lo- cal energy current density

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

426

Might quantum-induced deviations from the Einstein equations detectably affect gravitational wave propagation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A quantum measurement-like event can produce any of a number of macroscopically distinct results, with corresponding macroscopically distinct gravitational fields, from the same initial state. Hence the probabilistically evolving large-scale structure of space-time is not precisely or even always approximately described by the deterministic Einstein equations. Since the standard treatment of gravitational wave propagation assumes the validity of the Einstein equations, it is questionable whether we should expect all its predictions to be empirically verified. In particular, one might expect the stochasticity of amplified quantum indeterminacy to cause coherent gravitational wave signals to decay faster than standard predictions suggest. This need not imply that the radiated energy flux from gravitational wave sources differs from standard theoretical predictions. An underappreciated bonus of gravitational wave astronomy is that either detecting or failing to detect predicted gravitational wave signals would constrain the form of the semi-classical theory of gravity that we presently lack.

Adrian Kent

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE ERUPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fields of the flux rope were partly opened due to magnetic reconnection. Subject headings: Sun: flares to escape with a fairly small reconnection rate in the vertical current sheet created below. Magnetic flux an interesting flux rope eruption model for fast CMEs, in which a flux rope is in a specific sling-shot field

428

Heterotic type IIA duality with fluxes - towards the complete story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the heterotic type IIA duality when fluxes are turned on. We show that many of the known fluxes are dual to each other and claim that certain fluxes on the heterotic side require that the type IIA picture is lifted to M or even F-theory compactifications with geometric fluxes.

Andrei Micu

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Expanding impulsive gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explicitly demonstrate that the known solutions for expanding impulsive spherical gravitational waves that have been obtained by a "cut and paste" method may be considered to be impulsive limits of the Robinson-Trautman vacuum type N solutions. We extend these results to all the generically distinct subclasses of these solutions in Minkowski, de Sitter and anti-de Sitter backgrounds. For these we express the solutions in terms of a continuous metric. Finally, we also extend the class of spherical shock gravitational waves to include a non-zero cosmological constant.

J. Podolsky; J. B. Griffiths

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ultrasonic shear wave couplant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL); Lanham, Ronald N. (Lockport, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ultrasonic shear wave couplant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

432

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

433

Effects of Long Waves on Wind-Generated Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed to explain the observation made in several laboratory experiments that short wind-generated waves are suppressed by a train of long, mechanically generated waves. A sheltering mechanism is responsible for generation of the ...

Gang Chen; Stephen E. Belcher

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy flux limitation by tame turbulence  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-linear theory of energy flux limitation by ion acoustic turbulence is presented. This distribution function is modelled by a Maxwellian plus an additional piece which carries a heat flux Q. By taking the fourth moment of the Vlasov equation one finds the anomalous thermal conductivity K approximately 3 v/sub e/ delta/sub De/ (e phi/T/sub e/)$sup -2$. Other moments treated self-consistently include anomalous ion heating, electron cooling, current generation and enhanced inverse bremsstrahlung due to the nonthermal ion fluctuations. (auth)

Manheimer, W.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup 3} N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10`s of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10[sup [minus]5] to 10[sup 3] N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Evolution of a Random Directional Wave and Freak Wave Occurrence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of a random directional wave in deep water was studied in a laboratory wave tank (50 m long, 10 m wide, 5 m deep) utilizing a directional wave generator. A number of experiments were conducted, changing the various spectral ...

Takuji Waseda; Takeshi Kinoshita; Hitoshi Tamura

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Distinguishing Propagating Waves and Standing Modes: An Internal Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines high-frequency (0.1-0.5 cph) internal waves, waves previously characterized by the Garrett and Munk spectral fits (GM72, GM75, GM79) as being vertically symmetric propagating waves (or equivalently “smeared” standing modes—...

M. Benno Blumenthal; Melbourne G. Briscoe

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wave Activity Diagnostics Applied to Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave activity diagnostics are calculated for four different baroclinic wave life cycles, including the LC1 and LC2 cases studied by Thorncroft, Hoskins, and McIntyre. The wave activity is a measure of the disturbance relative to some zonally ...

Gudrun Magnusdottir; Peter H. Haynes

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Wave Breaking Dissipation in the Wave-Driven Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If wave breaking modifies the Lagrangian fluid paths by inducing an uncertainty in the orbit itself and this uncertainty on wave motion time scales is observable as additive noise, it is shown that within the context of a wave–current interaction ...

Juan M. Restrepo

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Pulsed wave interconnect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulsed wave interconnect is proposed for global interconnect applications. Signals are represented by localized wavepackets that propagate along the interconnect lines at the local speed of light to trigger the receivers. Energy consumption is reduced ... Keywords: CMOS, VLSI, high-speed interconnect, nonlinear transmission line, pulse compression, soliton, wafer-scale-integration

Pingshan Wang; Gen Pei; Edwin Chih-Chuan Kan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Deflagration Wave Profiles  

SciTech Connect

Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

445

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fields and Waves I ECSE-2100 Spring 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to draw your circuit and do the analysis. Simulations with PSpice The software we will be using for the analysis. These are loaded on the studio computers, so one looks for something called CaptureFields and Waves I ECSE-2100 Spring 2007 PSpice Analysis Since transmission lines can be modeled

Lü, James Jian-Qiang

447

Numerical Dispersion of Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When atmospheric gravity waves are simulated in numerical models, they are not only dispersive for physical but also for numerical reasons. Their wave properties (e.g., damping or propagation speed and direction) can depend on grid spacing as ...

Guido Schroeder; K. Heinke Schlünzen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Sodium Nightglow and Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oscillations in intensity of NaD nightglow attributed to mesospheric gravity waves have bean studied. Fractional atmospheric density perturbations have been obtained by means of the linear gravity waves theory of Hines. Values of other parameters ...

A. Molina

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Diffusive Transport by Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple conceptual model of the relationship between advective transport by breaking waves and diffusive transport is derived. line model postulates that the displacement of fluid parcels by a breaking wave is analogous to molecular diffusion (...

Kenneth P. Bowman

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Spectral Wave–Turbulence Decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of wave–turbulence decomposition is introduced, for which the only instrument required is one high-frequency pointwise velocity sensor. This is a spectral method that assumes equilibrium turbulence and no wave–turbulence interaction. ...

Jeremy D. Bricker; Stephen G. Monismith

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A kinematic wave theory of capacity drop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capacity drop at active bottlenecks is one of the most puzzling traffic phenomena, but a thorough understanding is practically important for designing variable speed limit and ramp metering strategies. In this study, we attempt to develop a simple model of capacity drop within the framework of kinematic wave theory based on the observation that capacity drop occurs when an upstream queue forms at an active bottleneck. In addition, we assume that the fundamental diagrams are continuous in steady states. This assumption is consistent with observations and can avoid unrealistic infinite characteristic wave speeds in discontinuous fundamental diagrams. A core component of the new model is an entropy condition defined by a discontinuous boundary flux function. For a lane-drop area, we demonstrate that the model is well-defined, and its Riemann problem can be uniquely solved. We theoretically discuss traffic stability with this model subject to perturbations in density, upstream demand, and downstream supply. We clarify that discontinuous flow-density relations, or so-called "discontinuous" fundamental diagrams, are caused by incomplete observations of traffic states. Theoretical results are consistent with observations in the literature and are verified by numerical simulations and empirical observations. We finally discuss potential applications and future studies.

Wen-Long Jin; Qi-Jian Gan; Jean-Patrick Lebacque

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

452

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Wave Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

D. Van Eester; E. Lerche

453

Gravitational waves and fundamental physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give an overview of the motivations for gravitational-wave research, concentrating on the aspects related to ``fundamental'' physics.

Michele Maggiore

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Gravitational Wave Sources: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With full?sensitivity operation of the first generation of gravitational wave detectors now just around the corner

Bernard F. Schutz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Power Incorporated Flux Power Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name Flux Power Incorporated Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product California-based FLux Ppower was created in late-2009 to provide monitoring, diagnostics and charging technology aimed at extending the life of lithium-ion batteries. The company signed a supply deal with Wheego in January 2010. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

457

Gradiometric flux qubits with tunable gap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For gradiometric three-Josephson-junction flux qubits, we perform a systematic study on the tuning of the minimal transition frequency, the so-called qubit gap. By replacing one of the qubit's Josephson junctions by a dc SQUID, the critical current of this SQUID and, in turn, the qubit gap can be tuned in situ by a control flux threading the SQUID loop. We present spectroscopic measurements demonstrating a well-defined controllability of the qubit gap between zero and more than 10 GHz. In the future, this enables one to tune the qubit into and out of resonance with other superconducting quantum circuits, while operating the qubit at its symmetry point with optimal dephasing properties. The experimental data agree very well with model calculations based on the full qubit Hamiltonian. From a numerical fit, we determine the Josephson coupling and the charging energies of the qubit junctions. The derived values agree well with those measured for other junctions fabricated on the same chip. We also demonstrate the biasing of gradiometric flux qubits near the symmetry point by trapping an odd number of flux quanta in the gradiometer loop. In this way, we study the effect of the significant kinetic inductance, thereby obtaining valuable information for the qubit design.

M. J. Schwarz; J. Goetz; Z. Jiang; T. Niemczyk; F. Deppe; A. Marx; R. Gross

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Estimation of Global Ground Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of a previously published algorithm for estimating ground heat flux (GHF) at the global scale. The method is based on an analytical solution of the diffusion equation for heat transfer in a soil layer and has been ...

William B. Bennett; Jingfeng Wang; Rafael L. Bras

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Convective Transport Theory for Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a boundary layer in free convection where turbulent thermal structures communicate information between the surface and the interior of the mixed layer, it is hypothesized that the surface momentum flux can be parameterized by u*2 = bDwBMML, ...

Roland B. Stull

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

Pinnau, Ingo (Austin, TX); Koros, William J. (Austin, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Cycles of the magnetic activity of the Sun and solar-type stars and simulation of their fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of the Wavelet analysis and Fourier analysis to the dataset of variations of radiation fluxes of solar-like stars and the Sun is examined. In case of the Sun the wavelet-analysis helped us to see a set of values of periods of cycles besides "11-year" cycle: the long-duration cycles of 22-year, 40-50 year and 100-120 year and short-duration cycles of 2-3,5 years and 1,3-year. We present a method of the chromospheric flux simulation using the 13 late-type stars, which have well-determined cyclic flux variations similar to the 11-year solar activity cycle. Our flux prediction is based on the chromospheric calcium emission time series measurements from the Mount Wilson Observatory and comparable solar dataset. We show that solar three - component modeling well explains the stellar chromospheric observations.

Bruevich, E A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA  

SciTech Connect

We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ofman, Leon, E-mail: weiliu@lmsal.com [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washingtom, DC 20064 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Energy Loss by Breaking waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the frequency of wind wave breaking in deep water are combined with laboratory estimates of the rate of energy loss a from single breaking wave to infer the net rate of energy transfer to the mixed layer from breaking waves, as a ...

S. A. Thorpe

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Thermal Delocalization of the Flux Tubes in Mesons and Baryons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gluon action density in a static mesonic system is analyzed at finite temperature using lattice QCD techniques in quenched QCD. The obtained results are compared to predictions of bosonic string models for the flux-tube profiles to understand the changes of the flux-tube profiles with temperature. The mesonic flux tube curved-width profile is found to compare well with that of the bosonic string at large distances. In the intermediate distance region, a free bosonic string behaviour is observed for analysis performed on highly UV-filtered gauge configurations. Extending the analysis to the static baryon reveals a delocalization of the baryonic node in the Y-shape gluonic configuration observed at zero temperature. At finite temperature, a filled delta-shaped configuration is observed, even at large distances. We study a baryonic string model at finite temperature.

Bakry, Ahmed S.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G. [Special Research Center for the Subatomic Structure of Matter, Departement of Physics, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

466

Long-Wave Trapping by Oceanic Ridges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long waves are affected by bottom topography and under certain conditions may be trapped along topographical contours which then act as wave guides transmitting wave energy for great distances with little loss. This study examines waves trapped ...

Richard Paul Shaw; Wayne Neu

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

CRRES observations of ion composition during EMIC mode wave events  

SciTech Connect

EMIC mode waves may play an important role in the dynamics of the growth and loss of the radiation belts. CRRES mission analysis has provided extensive information on the distributions of EMIC mode waves. Less well studied and understood is the role that ion composition plays in the formation of the EMIC mode waves. The CRESS plasma mass spectrometer LOMICS measured all ion species of interest up to 45 keV/q. This preliminary study will examine the characteristics of heavy ions during a multitude of wave events, in particular, the effect of ion composition on wave-particle interactions, amplitude, and frequency. The relevance of such data to the upcoming RBSP mission will be highlighted.

Macdonald, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Larsen, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

468

Surface Heat Flux Variations across the Kuroshio Extension as Observed by Surface Flux Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wintertime sea surface heat flux variability across the Kuroshio Extension (KE) front is analyzed using data from the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) buoy in the Kuroshio recirculation gyre south of the KE front and from the Japan Agency for ...

Masanori Konda; Hiroshi Ichikawa; Hiroyuki Tomita; Meghan F. Cronin

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part II: Latent Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the recent ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Departmental Research Initiative, an aircraft was instrumented to carry out direct turbulent flux measurements in the high wind boundary layer of a hurricane. ...

William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Jeffrey R. French; Cyril McCormick; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

Todreas, Neil E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

472

THE EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLUX FROM 0.1 nm TO 160 {mu}m: QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES FOR PLANETARY STUDIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding changes in the solar flux over geologic time is vital for understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres because it affects atmospheric escape and chemistry, as well as climate. We describe a numerical parameterization for wavelength-dependent changes to the non-attenuated solar flux appropriate for most times and places in the solar system. We combine data from the Sun and solar analogs to estimate enhanced UV and X-ray fluxes for the young Sun and use standard solar models to estimate changing visible and infrared fluxes. The parameterization, a series of multipliers relative to the modern top of the atmosphere flux at Earth, is valid from 0.1 nm through the infrared, and from 0.6 Gyr through 6.7 Gyr, and is extended from the solar zero-age main sequence to 8.0 Gyr subject to additional uncertainties. The parameterization is applied to a representative modern day flux, providing quantitative estimates of the wavelength dependence of solar flux for paleodates relevant to the evolution of atmospheres in the solar system (or around other G-type stars). We validate the code by Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in stellar age and flux, and with comparisons to the solar proxies {kappa}{sup 1} Cet and EK Dra. The model is applied to the computation of photolysis rates on the Archean Earth.

Claire, Mark W. [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Sheets, John; Meadows, Victoria S. [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ribas, Ignasi [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5 parell, 2a pl, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Catling, David C., E-mail: M.Claire@uea.ac.uk [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

The Effects of Flux Spectrum Perturbation on Transmutation of Actinides: Optimizing the Production of Transcurium Isotopes  

SciTech Connect

This research presented herein involves the optimization of transcurium production in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Due to the dependence of isotope cross sections on incoming neutron energy, the efficiency with which an isotope is transmuted is highly dependent upon the flux spectrum. There are certain energy bands in which the rate of fission of transcurium production feedstock materials is minimized, relative to the rate of non-fission absorptions. It is proposed that by perturbing the flux spectrum, it is possible to increase the amount of key isotopes, such as 249Bk and 252Cf, that are produced during a transmutation cycle, relative to the consumption of feedstock material. This optimization process is carried out by developing an iterative objective framework involving problem definition, flux spectrum and cross section analysis, simulated transmutation, and analysis of final yields and transmutation parameters. It is shown that it is possible to perturb the local flux spectrum in the transcurium target by perturbing the composition of the target. It is further shown that these perturbations are able to alter the target yields in a non-negligible way. Future work is necessary to develop the optimization framework, and identify the necessary algorithms to update the problem definition based upon progress towards the optimization goals.

Hogle, Susan L [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Alexander, Charles W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

DNA waves and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

475

HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of possible types of research reactors for the production of transplutonium elements and other isotopes indicates that a flux-trap reactor consisting of a beryllium-reflecteds light-water-cooled annular fuel region surrounding a light-water island provides the required thermal neutron fluxes at minimum cost. The preliminary desigu of such a reactor was carried out on the basis of a parametric study of the effect of dimensions of the island and fuel regions heat removal rates, and fuel loading on the achievable thermal neutmn fluxes in the island and reflector. The results indicate that a 12- to 14-cm- diam. island provides the maximum flux for a given power density. This is in good agreement with the US8R critical experiments. Heat removal calculations indicate that average power densities up to 3.9 Mw/liter are achievable with H/ sub 2/O-cooled, platetype fuel elements if the system is pressurized to 650 psi to prevent surface boiling. On this basis, 100 Mw of heat can be removed from a 14-cm-ID x 36-cm-OD x 30.5-cm-long fuel regions resulting in a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10/sup 15/ in the island after insertion of 100 g of Cm/sup 244/ or equivalent. The resulting production of Cf/sup 252/ amounts to 65 mg for a 1 1/2- year irradiation. Operation of the reactor at the more conservative level of 67 Mw, providing an irradiation flux of 2 x 10/sup 15/ in the islands will result in the production of 35 mg of Cf/sup 252/ per 18 months from 100 g of Cm/sup 244/. A development program is proposed to answer the question of the feasibility of the higher power operation. In addition to the central irradiation facility for heavyelement productions the HFIR contains ten hydraulic rabbit tubes passing through the beryllium reflector for isotope production and four beam holes for basic research, Preliminary estimates indicate that the cost of the facility, designed for an operating power level of 100 Mw, will be approximately 2 million. (auth)

Lane, J.A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Claiborne, G.C.; Cole, T.E.; Gambill, W.R.; Gill, J.P.; Hilvety, N.; McWherther, J.R.; Vroom, D.W.

1959-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

476

Would be the photon a composed particle? quantization of field fluxes in electromagnetic radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[En] Here it is made a comparative analysis between the classical and the quantum expressions for the energy of electromagnetic radiation (ER). The comparison points to the possibility of the quantization of the magnetic and the electric field fluxes in the ER.

Celso de Araujo Duarte

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Torques and the Related Meridional and Vertical Fluxes of Axial Angular Momentum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The budget equation of the zonally averaged angular momentum is analyzed by introducing belts of 1000-km width to cover the meridional plane from pole to pole up to an altitude of 28 km. Using ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA) data the fluxes of angular ...

Joseph Egger; Klaus-Peter Hoinka

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A High-Resolution Coupled Riverine Flow, Tide, Wind, Wind Wave, and Storm Surge Model for Southern Louisiana and Mississippi. Part II: Synoptic Description and Analysis of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricanes Katrina and Rita were powerful storms that impacted southern Louisiana and Mississippi during the 2005 hurricane season. In Part I, the authors describe and validate a high-resolution coupled riverine flow, tide, wind, wave, and storm ...

J. C. Dietrich; S. Bunya; J. J. Westerink; B. A. Ebersole; J. M. Smith; J. H. Atkinson; R. Jensen; D. T. Resio; R. A. Luettich; C. Dawson; V. J. Cardone; A. T. Cox; M. D. Powell; H. J. Westerink; H. J. Roberts

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Remote Vital Sign Monitoring System Preventing the Worst (by CNN) Engineering Development & Applications Argonne's Nuclear Science & Technology Legacy Other Multimedia Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Detection & Diagnostic Systems Multimedia Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager Video | Other sizes/formats available Other available versions of this video: Problems viewing the video in this page? Choose another format/size from the menu below; this video is available in Flash Video Flash, Quicktime video Quicktime or Windows Media video Windows Media format

480

Local Dynamics of Synoptic Waves in the Martian Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sources and sinks of energy for transient waves in the Martian atmosphere are investigated, applying diagnostic techniques developed for the analysis of terrestrial baroclinic waves to output from a Mars General Circulation Model. These diagnostic techniques include the vertically averaged eddy kinetic energy and regression analysis. The results suggest that the primary source of the kinetic energy of the waves is baroclinic energy conversion in localized regions. It is also shown that there exist preferred regions of baroclinic energy conversion. In addition, it is shown that downstream baroclinic development plays an important role in the evolution of the waves and in the baroclinic energy conversion process. This is the first time that evidence for downstream baroclinic development has been found for an atmosphere other than the terrestrial one.

Kavulich, Michael J., Jr.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

MODEL FOR ALFVEN WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR CORONAL LOOPS: HEATING RATE PROFILES AND TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been suggested that the solar corona may be heated by dissipation of Alfven waves that propagate up from the solar photosphere. According to this theory, counterpropagating Alfven waves are subject to nonlinear interactions that lead to turbulent decay of the waves and heating of the chromospheric and coronal plasma. To test this theory, better models for the dynamics of Alfven waves in coronal loops are required. In this paper, we consider wave heating in an active region observed with the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 2010 May. First a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic model of the region is constructed, and ten magnetic field lines that match observed coronal loops are selected. For each loop we construct a 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the Alfven waves near the selected field line. The waves are assumed to be generated by footpoint motions inside the kilogauss magnetic flux elements at the two ends of the loop. Based on such models, we predict the spatial and temporal profiles of the heating along the selected loops. We also estimate the temperature fluctuations resulting from such heating. We find that the Alfven wave turbulence model can reproduce the observed characteristics of the hotter loops in the active region core, but the loops at the periphery of the region have large expansion factors and are predicted to be thermally unstable.

Asgari-Targhi, M.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kunkel, K.E. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Kunkel, K.E. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH  

SciTech Connect

Voyager 1(V1) and Voyager 2(V2) have observed heliosheath plasma since 2005 December and 2007 August, respectively. The observed speed profiles are very different at the two spacecrafts. Speeds at V1 decreased to zero in 2010 while the average speed at V2 is a constant 150 km s{sup -1} with the direction rotating tailward. The magnetic flux is expected to be constant in these heliosheath flows. We show that the flux is constant at V2 but decreases by an order of magnitude at V1, even after accounting for divergence of the flows and changes in the solar field. If reconnection were responsible for this decrease, the magnetic field would lose 70% of its free energy to reconnection and the energy density released would be 0.6 eV cm{sup -3}.

Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Decker, R. B. [Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Drake, J. F. [Department of Physics and Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ness, N. F. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Opher, M., E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: robert.decker@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: drake@umd.edu, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com, E-mail: mopher@bu.edu [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

486

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to ?vert = (3.10 +0.05 ?0.07) 10?7 s ?1 cm ?2 sr ?1.

E. -i. Esch A; T. J. Bowles A; A. Hime A; A. Pichlmaier A; R. Reifarth A; H. Wollnik B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487