Sample records for wave flux analysis

  1. ARM: Short Wave Flux Analysis: 15-min resolution on SIRS data, Long algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, Tom; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Anderberg, Mary; Kutchenreiter, Mark

    Short Wave Flux Analysis: 15-min resolution on SIRS data, Long algorithm. Measurements began in January, 1994, and have continued to the present time. Data collected are from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) location.

  2. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  3. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  4. Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

  5. ON THE GENERATION OF FLUX-TUBE WAVES IN STELLAR CONVECTION ZONES. IV. LONGITUDINAL WAVE ENERGY SPECTRA AND FLUXES FOR STARS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulmschneider, Peter

    ON THE GENERATION OF FLUX-TUBE WAVES IN STELLAR CONVECTION ZONES. IV. LONGITUDINAL WAVE ENERGY- tudinal tube waves in stellar convection zones and used it to compute the wave energy spectra and fluxes are important only for cool stars with Teff wave energy decreases

  6. An Analysis of Fluxes by Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Aspinwall

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    M-theory on K3xK3 with non-supersymmetry-breaking G-flux is dual to M-theory on a Calabi-Yau threefold times a 2-torus without flux. This allows for a thorough analysis of the effects of flux without relying on supergravity approximations. We discuss several dual pairs showing that the usual rules of G-flux compactifications work well in detail. We discuss how a transition can convert M2-branes into G-flux. We see how new effects can arise at short distances allowing fluxes to obstruct more moduli than one expects from the supergravity analysis.

  7. Acoustic waves in random ensembles of magnetic fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutova, M.P.

    1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To analyze the observational data and provide the appropriate diagnostic procedure for photospheric manifestation of solar oscillations it is necessary to take into account strong inhomogeneity of solar atmosphere with respect to distribution of magnetic fields. We study the collective phenomena in the propagation of acoustic waves and unsteady wave-packets through quite regions, sunspots and plages, including time-dependent response of these regions to solar oscillations, the energy transfer mechanisms, frequency shift effects and reradiation of the acoustic waves in higher layers of atmosphere. We show that the dynamics of differently magnetized regions, their dispersion properties, and their response to the propagation of acoustic waves are completely different. We describe the effects caused by the specific distribution and randomness of magnetic flux tubes, which can be observed and which can provide the tools for diagnostic goals.

  8. Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

  9. Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH College of Oceanic of boundary energy in local budgets. Until recently, internal wave energy fluxes in ocean observations were 2004, in final form 3 February 2005) ABSTRACT Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding

  10. Energy flux of Alfven waves in weakly ionized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Vranjes; S. Poedts; B. P. Pandey; B. De Pontieu

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overshooting convective motions in the solar photosphere are frequently proposed as the source for the excitation of Alfv\\'en waves. However, the photosphere is a) very weakly ionized, and, b) the dynamics of the plasma particles in this region is heavily influenced by the plasma-neutral collisions. The purpose of this work is to check the consequences of these two facts on the above scenario and their effects on the electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the ions and electrons in the photosphere are both un-magnetized; their collision frequency with neutrals is much larger than the gyro-frequency. This implies that eventual Alfv\\'en-type electromagnetic perturbations must involve the neutrals as well. This has the following serious consequences: i) in the presence of perturbations, the whole fluid (plasma + neutrals) moves; ii) the Alfv\\'en velocity includes the total (plasma + neutrals) density and is thus considerably smaller compared to the collision-less case; iii) the perturbed velocity of a unit volume, which now includes both plasma and neutrals, becomes much smaller compared to the ideal (collision-less) case; and iv) the corresponding wave energy flux for the given parameters becomes much smaller compared to the ideal case.

  11. ARM - PI Product - Radiative Flux Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheatProductsISDACProductsRadiative Flux Analysis ARM

  12. Cutoff-Free Propagation of Torsional Alfvén Waves Along Thin Magnetic Flux Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. E. Musielak; S. Routh; R. Hammer

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of torsional Alfv\\'en waves along magnetic flux tubes has been extensively studied for many years but no conclusive results regarding the existence of a cutoff frequency for these waves have been obtained. The main purpose of this paper is to derive new wave equations that describe the propagation of linear torsional Alfv\\'en waves along thin and isothermal magnetic flux tubes, and use these wave equations to demonstrate that the torsional wave propagation is not affected by any cutoff frequency. It is also shown that this cutoff-free propagation is independent of different choices of the coordinate systems and wave variables adopted in the previous studies. A brief discussion of implications of this cutoff-free propagation of torsional tube waves on theories of wave heating of the solar and stellar atmospheres is also given.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in nonuniform solar flux tubes: phase mixing and energy cascade to small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soler, Roberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. The propagation and damping of these waves may play relevant roles for the transport and dissipation of energy in the solar atmospheric medium. However, in the atmospheric plasma dissipation of transverse MHD wave energy by viscosity or resistivity needs very small spatial scales to be efficient. Here, we theoretically investigate the generation of small scales in nonuniform solar magnetic flux tubes due to phase mixing of MHD kink waves. We go beyond the usual approach based on the existence of a global quasi-mode that is damped in time due to resonant absorption. Instead, we use a modal expansion to express the MHD kink wave as a superposition of Alfv\\'en continuum modes that are phase mixed as time evolves. The comparison of the two techniques evidences that the modal analysis is more physically transparent and describes both the damping of global kink motions and the building up of small scales due to phase mixing. In ...

  14. Riemann Solver for a Kinematic Wave Traffic Model with Discontinuous Flux$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    Riemann Solver for a Kinematic Wave Traffic Model with Discontinuous Flux$ Jeffrey K. Wiensa class of kinematic wave15 traffic models that couple the conservation law Eq. (1) with a variety as 0. For certain initial data, the Riemann problem can give rise to zero waves that propagate

  15. Non-linear numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in small-scale flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; M. Collados; T. Felipe

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of non-linear, 2D, numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in the photosphere and chromosphere of small-scale flux tubes with internal structure. Waves with realistic periods of three to five minutes are studied, after applying horizontal and vertical oscillatory perturbations to the equilibrium model. Spurious reflections of shock waves from the upper boundary are minimized thanks to a special boundary condition. This has allowed us to increase the duration of the simulations and to make it long enough to perform a statistical analysis of oscillations. The simulations show that deep horizontal motions of the flux tube generate a slow (magnetic) mode and a surface mode. These modes are efficiently transformed into a slow (acoustic) mode in the vA propagates vertically along the field lines, forms shocks and remains always within the flux tube. It might deposit effectively the energy of the driver into the chromosphere. When the driver oscillates with a high frequency, above the cut-off, non-linear wave propagation occurs with the same dominant driver period at all heights. At low frequencies, below the cut-off, the dominant period of oscillations changes with height from that of the driver in the photosphere to its first harmonic (half period) in the chromosphere. Depending on the period and on the type of the driver, different shock patterns are observed.

  16. Torsional Alfven Waves in Solar Magnetic Flux Tubes of Axial Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, K; Musielak, Z E; Srivastava, A K; Kraskiewicz, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: Propagation and energy transfer of torsional Alfv\\'en waves in solar magnetic flux tubes of axial symmetry is studied. Methods: An analytical model of a solar magnetic flux tube of axial symmetry is developed by specifying a magnetic flux and deriving general analytical formulae for the equilibrium mass density and a gas pressure. The main advantage of this model is that it can be easily adopted to any axisymmetric magnetic structure. The model is used to simulate numerically the propagation of nonlinear Alfv\\'en waves in such 2D flux tubes of axial symmetry embedded in the solar atmosphere. The waves are excited by a localized pulse in the azimuthal component of velocity and launched at the top of the solar photosphere, and they propagate through the solar chromosphere, transition region, and into the solar corona. Results: The results of our numerical simulations reveal a complex scenario of twisted magnetic field lines and flows associated with torsional Alfv\\'en waves as well as energy transfer to t...

  17. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); IAS and RIAM, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of) [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CASS and CMTFO, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)] [CEA, IRFM, Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gürcan, Ö. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing of the phase space density. The inclusion of the finite response time changes the model equation for avalanche dynamics from Burgers equation to a nonlinear telegraph equation. Based on the telegraph equation, the formation of heat flux jams is predicted. The growth rate and typical interval of jams are calculated. The connection of the jam interval to the typical step size of the E×B staircase is discussed.

  18. GLOBAL AND LOCAL CUTOFF FREQUENCIES FOR TRANSVERSE WAVES PROPAGATING ALONG SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Routh, S. [Department of Physics, R. V. College of Engineering, Bangalore (India)] [Department of Physics, R. V. College of Engineering, Bangalore (India); Musielak, Z. E. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Hammer, R., E-mail: routhswati@rvce.edu.in, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu, E-mail: hammer@kis.uni-freiburg.de [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, Freiburg, D-79104 Germany (Germany)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a well-established result that the propagation of linear transverse waves along a thin but isothermal magnetic flux tube is affected by the existence of the global cutoff frequency, which separates the propagating and non-propagating waves. In this paper, the wave propagation along a thin and non-isothermal flux tube is considered and a local cutoff frequency is derived. The effects of different temperature profiles on this local cutoff frequency are studied by considering different power-law temperature distributions, as well as the semi-empirical VAL C model of the solar atmosphere. The obtained results show that the conditions for wave propagation strongly depend on the temperature gradients. Moreover, the local cutoff frequency calculated for the VAL C model gives constraints on the range of wave frequencies that are propagating in different parts of the solar atmosphere. These theoretically predicted constraints are compared to observational data and are used to discuss the role played by transverse tube waves in the atmospheric heating and dynamics, and in the excitation of solar atmospheric oscillations.

  19. Metabolic Flux Analysis for Succinic Acid Production by Recombinant Escherichia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    some pyruvate and succinic acid were accumulated intracellularly. Therefore, a new flux analysis method was proposed by introducing intra- cellular pyruvate and succinic acid pools. By this new method dehydrogenase (Mdh). Malic acid can also be synthesized from pyruvate by the action of malic enzyme (coded

  20. Multiple Scattering of Seismic Waves from Ensembles of Upwardly Lossy Thin Flux Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Chris S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our previous semi-analytic treatment of f- and p-mode multiple scattering from ensembles of thin flux tubes (Hanson and Cally, Astrophys. J. 781, 125; 791, 129, 2014) is extended by allowing both sausage and kink waves to freely escape at the top of the model using a radiative boundary condition there. As expected, this additional avenue of escape, supplementing downward loss into the deep solar interior, results in substantially greater absorption of incident f- and p-modes. However, less intuitively, it also yields mildly to substantially smaller phase shifts in waves emerging from the ensemble. This may have implications for the interpretation of seismic data for solar plage regions, and in particular their small measured phase shifts.

  1. Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

  2. Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis characteristics. These insights are due to the nature of the wavelet transform that would not be immediately or decay, is Wavelets in Geophysics 151 Efi Foufoula-Georgiou and Praveen Kumar (eds.), pp. 151-166. ISBN 0

  3. Partial Wave Analysis using Graphics Cards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niklaus Berger

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial wave analysis is a key technique in hadron spectroscopy. The use of unbinned likelihood fits on large statistics data samples and ever more complex physics models makes this analysis technique computationally very expensive. Parallel computing techniques, in particular the use of graphics processing units, are a powerful means to speed up analyses; in the contexts of the BES III, Compass and GlueX experiments, parallel analysis frameworks have been created. They provide both fits that are faster by more than two orders of magnitude than legacy code and environments to quickly program and run an analysis. This in turn allows the physicists to focus on the many difficult open problems pertaining to partial wave analysis.

  4. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, D.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

  5. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: Cluster observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacombe, Catherine; Matteini, Lorenzo; Santolik, Ondrej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole; Mangeney, Andre; de Conchy, Yvonne; Maksimovic, Milan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies $f\\in[1,400]$ Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In $\\sim 10\\%$ of the selected data, we observe narrow-band, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The life time of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e. lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of the background turbulence, a slow wind, a relative...

  6. Singular value decomposition methods for wave propagation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    Singular value decomposition methods for wave propagation analysis O. Santoli´k,1 M. Parrot, and F planarity. Simulations of Z-mode waves, which simultaneously propagate with different wave vectors, indicate the waves simultaneously propagate with wave vectors in two opposite hemispheres. Finally, we show

  7. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

  8. Cubic order spin effects in the dynamics and gravitational wave energy flux of compact object binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsat, Sylvain

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate cubic-in-spin effects for inspiralling compact objects binaries, both in the dynamics and the energy flux emitted in gravitational waves, at the leading post-Newtonian order. We use a Lagrangian formalism to implement finite-size effects, and extend it at cubic order in the spins, which corresponds to the octupolar order in a multipolar decomposition. This formalism allows us to derive the equation of motion, equations of precession for the spin, and stress-energy tensor of each body in covariant form, and admits a formal generalization to any multipolar order. For spin-induced multipoles, i.e. in the case where the rotation of the compact object is sole responsible for the additional multipole moments, we find a unique structure for the octupolar moment representing cubic-in-spin effects. We apply these results to compute the associated effects in the dynamics of compact binary systems, and deduce the corresponding terms in the energy loss rate due to gravitational waves. These effects enter a...

  9. Cubic order spin effects in the dynamics and gravitational wave energy flux of compact object binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylvain Marsat

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate cubic-in-spin effects for inspiralling compact objects binaries, both in the dynamics and the energy flux emitted in gravitational waves, at the leading post-Newtonian order. We use a Lagrangian formalism to implement finite-size effects, and extend it at cubic order in the spins, which corresponds to the octupolar order in a multipolar decomposition. This formalism allows us to derive the equation of motion, equations of precession for the spin, and stress-energy tensor of each body in covariant form, and admits a formal generalization to any multipolar order. For spin-induced multipoles, i.e. in the case where the rotation of the compact object is sole responsible for the additional multipole moments, we find a unique structure for the octupolar moment representing cubic-in-spin effects. We apply these results to compute the associated effects in the dynamics of compact binary systems, and deduce the corresponding terms in the energy loss rate due to gravitational waves. These effects enter at the third-and-a-half post-Newtonian order, and can be important for binaries involving rapidly spinning black holes. We provide simplified results for spin-aligned, circular orbits, and discuss the quantitative importance of the new contributions.

  10. A DISCRETE WAVELET ANALYSIS OF FREAK WAVES IN THE OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DISCRETE WAVELET ANALYSIS OF FREAK WAVES IN THE OCEAN EN-BING LIN AND PAUL C. LIU Received 25 wavelet analysis on a freak wave. We demonstrate several applications of wavelets and discrete and continuous wavelet transforms on the study of a freak wave. A modeling setting for freak waves will also

  11. A Wave Analysis of the Subset Sum Problem Mark Jelasity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelasity, Márk

    A Wave Analysis of the Subset Sum Problem M´ark Jelasity Research Group of Artificial Intelligence the wave model, a novel approach on analyzing the behavior of GAs. Our aim is to give techniques that have and effective heuristics on certain problem classes. The wave analysis is the process of building wave models

  12. Propagation Analysis of Electromagnetic Waves: Application to Auroral Kilometric Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    12 Propagation Analysis of Electromagnetic Waves: Application to Auroral Kilometric Radiation, containing waves which simultaneously propagate in different directions and/or wave modes the concept emission is found to propagate predominantly in the R-X mode with wave energy distributed in relatively

  13. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHALLOW WATER WAVES: LINEAR ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin [Institute for Advanced Study, School of Natural Sciences, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Spitkovsky, Anatoly, E-mail: heng@ias.ed, E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.ed [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a linear analysis of inviscid, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shallow water systems. In spherical geometry, a generic property of such systems is the existence of five wave modes. Three of them (two magneto-Poincare modes and one magneto-Rossby mode) are previously known. The other two wave modes are strongly influenced by the magnetic field and rotation, and have substantially lower angular frequencies; as such, we term them 'magnetostrophic modes'. We obtain analytical functions for the velocity, height, and magnetic field perturbations in the limit that the magnitude of the MHD analogue of Lamb's parameter is large. On a sphere, the magnetostrophic modes reside near the poles, while the other modes are equatorially confined. Magnetostrophic modes may be an ingredient in explaining the frequency drifts observed in Type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars.

  14. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the naturally available and technically recoverable resource in a given location. The methodology was developed by the EPRI and uses a modified Gamma spectrum that interoperates hindcast sea state parameter data produced by NOAA's Wave watch III. This Gamma...

  15. Partial wave analysis of J/?\\to ???

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BES Collaboration

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using $5.8 \\times 10^7 J/\\psi$ events collected in the BESII detector, the radiative decay $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma \\phi \\phi \\to \\gamma K^+ K^- K^0_S K^0_L$ is studied. The $\\phi\\phi$ invariant mass distribution exhibits a near-threshold enhancement that peaks around 2.24 GeV/$c^{2}$. A partial wave analysis shows that the structure is dominated by a $0^{-+}$ state ($\\eta(2225)$) with a mass of $2.24^{+0.03}_{-0.02}{}^{+0.03}_{-0.02}$ GeV/$c^{2}$ and a width of $0.19 \\pm 0.03^{+0.06}_{-0.04}$ GeV/$c^{2}$. The product branching fraction is: $Br(J/\\psi \\to \\gamma \\eta(2225))\\cdot Br(\\eta(2225)\\to \\phi\\phi) = (4.4 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-4}$.

  16. Blade dynamics and flux measurements for model seagrass blades in waves and currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Erin Grace

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex interactions between flow conditions, blade posture, and mass transport processes, represent a challenge to fully understanding the influence of hydrodynamic conditions on the flux of nutrients to the blade surface ...

  17. IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ao, Tommy

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

  18. Analysis of optimum Lamb wave tuning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yijun, 1970-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guided waves are of enormous interest in the nondestructive evaluation of thin-walled structures and layered media. Due to their dispersive and multi-modal nature, it is desirable to tune the waves by discriminating one ...

  19. Use of a moments method for the analysis of flux distributions in subcritical assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Hsiang-Shou

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A moments method has been developed for the analysis of flux distributions in subcritical neutron-multiplying assemblies. The method determines values of the asymptotic axial and radial buckling, and of the extrapolated ...

  20. Possible Zero-Flux Transport induced by Density Waves in a Tube filled with Solid Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwang-Hua W. Chu

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Macroscopic derivation of the entrainment in a supersolid cylinder induced by a surface elastic wave (of small amplitude) propagating along the flexible interface is conducted by considering the nonlinear coupling between the interface and the rarefaction effect. We obtain the critical bounds for zero-volume-flow-rate states corresponding to specific rarefaction measure and wave number which is relevant to the rather small critical velocity or disappearance of supersolid flows reported by Rittner and Reppy.

  1. Tail effects in the third post-Newtonian gravitational wave energy flux of compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K G Arun; Luc Blanchet; Bala R Iyer; Moh'd S S Qusailah

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The far-zone flux of energy contains hereditary (tail) contributions that depend on the entire past history of the source. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism, we propose and implement a semi-analytical method in the frequency domain to compute these contributions from the inspiral phase of a binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits up to 3PN order. The method explicitly uses the quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits at 1PN order and exploits the doubly periodic nature of the motion to average the 3PN fluxes over the binary's orbit. Together with the instantaneous (non-tail) contributions evaluated in a companion paper, it provides crucial inputs for the construction of ready-to-use templates for compact binaries moving on quasi-elliptic orbits, an interesting class of sources for the ground based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and Virgo as well as space based detectors like LISA.

  2. Cold Plasma Wave Analysis in Magneto-Rotational Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to investigate the cold plasma wave properties. The analysis has been restricted to the neighborhood of the pair production region of the Kerr magnetosphere. The Fourier analyzed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations are dealt under special circumstances and dispersion relations are obtained. We find the $x$-component of the complex wave vector numerically. The corresponding components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. The direction and dispersion of waves are investigated.

  3. The Allegro gravitational wave detector Data acquisition and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauceli, E; Hamilton, W O; Johnson, W W; Merkowitz, S; Morse, A; Price, B T; Solomonson, N

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the data acquisition and analysis procedures used on the Allegro gravity wave detector, including a full description of the filtering used for bursts of gravity waves. The uncertainties introduced into timing and signal strength estimates due to stationary noise are measured, giving the windows for both quantities in coincidence searches.

  4. The Allegro gravitational wave detector: Data acquisition and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Mauceli; Z. K. Geng; W. O. Hamilton; W. W. Johnson; S. Merkowitz; A. Morse; B. Price; N. Solomonson

    1996-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the data acquisition and analysis procedures used on the Allegro gravity wave detector, including a full description of the filtering used for bursts of gravity waves. The uncertainties introduced into timing and signal strength estimates due to stationary noise are measured, giving the windows for both quantities in coincidence searches.

  5. Helicity and partial wave amplitude analysis of D -> K^* ?decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El hassan El aaoud; A. N. Kamal

    1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out an analysis of helicity and partial-wave amplitudes for the process D -> K^* \\rho in the factorization approximation using several models for the form factors. All the models, with the exception of one, generate partial-wave amplitudes with the hierarchy $\\mid S\\mid >\\mid P\\mid >\\mid D\\mid$. The one exception gives $\\mid S \\mid >\\mid D \\mid >\\mid P \\mid$. Even though in most models the D-wave amplitude is an order of magnitude smaller than the S-wave amplitude, its effect on the longitudinal polarization could be as large as 30%. Due to a misidentification of the partial-wave amplitudes in terms of the Lorentz structures in the relevant literature, we cast doubt on the veracity of the listed data, particularly the partial-wave branching ratios. (PACS numbers: 13.25.-k, 13.25.Ft)

  6. A wave refraction analysis for an axially symmetrical island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forst, Ronald John

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A WAVE REFRACTION ANALYSIS FOR AN AXIALLY SYMMETRICAL ISLAND A Thesis By LIEUTENANT RONALD J FORST UNITED STATES NAVY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE l966 Major Subject Oceanography A WAVE REFRACTION ANALYSIS FOR AN AXIALLY SYMMETRICAL ISLAND A Thesis By LIEUTENANT RONALD J FORST UNITED STATES NAVY Approved as to style and content by; ( airma Committee) Head of Dep rtme t...

  7. A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical of Mechanical Engineering) ABSTRACT Within a wave energy converter's operational bandwidth, device operation

  8. A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3 4 Forest Service, 271 Mast Road, Durham, NH 03824 USA.25 #12;RANDOM ERRORS IN ENERGY AND CO2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS Richardson et al. 1 January 13, 2006 Abstract1 Measured surface-atmosphere fluxes of energy

  9. AN ANALYSIS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INVARIANTS OF MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS WITHIN INTERPLANETARY FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telloni, D. [National Institute for Astrophysics, Astrophysical Observatory of Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Perri, S.; Carbone, V. [Department of Physics, University of Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Bruno, R.; D Amicis, R. [National Institute for Astrophysics, Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical analysis of magnetic flux ropes, identified by large-amplitude, smooth rotations of the magnetic field vector and a low level of both proton density and temperature, has been performed by computing the invariants of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, namely the magnetic helicity, the cross-helicity, and the total energy, via magnetic field and plasma fluctuations in the interplanetary medium. A technique based on the wavelet spectrograms of the MHD invariants allows the localization and characterization of those structures in both scales and time: it has been observed that flux ropes show, as expected, high magnetic helicity states (|?{sub m}| in [0.6: 1]), but extremely variable cross-helicity states (|?{sub c}| in [0: 0.8]), which, however, are not independent of the magnetic helicity content of the flux rope itself. The two normalized MHD invariants observed within the flux ropes tend indeed to distribute, neither trivially nor automatically, along the ?(?{sub m}{sup 2}+?{sub c}{sup 2})=1 curve, thus suggesting that some constraint should exist between the magnetic and cross-helicity content of the structures. The analysis carried out has further showed that the flux rope properties are totally independent of their time duration and that they are detected either as a sort of interface between different portions of solar wind or as isolated structures embedded in the same stream.

  10. Tropospheric ozone reduces carbon assimilation in trees: estimates from analysis of continuous flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Tropospheric ozone reduces carbon assimilation in trees: estimates from analysis of continuous flux Abstract High ground-level ozone concentrations are typical of Mediterranean climates. Plant exposure to this oxidant is known to reduce carbon assimilation. Ozone damage has been traditionally measured through

  11. MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    i MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: CASE of Nonthaburi, Statistical office of Nonthaburi and Agricultural extension office of Pak Kret for their kind nutrient management, organic waste, wastewater and septage that contained high concentration of nutrients

  12. Fourier analysis of the flux-tube distribution in SU(3) lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arata Yamamoto

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter presents a novel analysis of the action/energy density distribution around a static quark-antiquark pair in SU(3) lattice quantum chromodynamics. Using the Fourier transformation of the link variable, we remove the high-momentum gluon and extract the flux-tube component from the action/energy density. When the high-momentum gluon is removed, the statistical fluctuation is drastically suppressed, and the singularities from the quark self-energy disappear. The obtained flux-tube component is broadly distributed around the line connecting the quark and the antiquark.

  13. Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain Paper number: 197

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    . Madrid, Spain Paper number: 197 #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis

  14. High-accuracy numerical simulation of black-hole binaries: Computation of the gravitational-wave energy flux and comparisons with post-Newtonian approximants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Boyle; Alessandra Buonanno; Lawrence E. Kidder; Abdul H. Mroué; Yi Pan; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Mark A. Scheel

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Expressions for the gravitational wave (GW) energy flux and center-of-mass energy of a compact binary are integral building blocks of post-Newtonian (PN) waveforms. In this paper, we compute the GW energy flux and GW frequency derivative from a highly accurate numerical simulation of an equal-mass, non-spinning black hole binary. We also estimate the (derivative of the) center-of-mass energy from the simulation by assuming energy balance. We compare these quantities with the predictions of various PN approximants (adiabatic Taylor and Pade models; non-adiabatic effective-one-body (EOB) models). We find that Pade summation of the energy flux does not accelerate the convergence of the flux series; nevertheless, the Pade flux is markedly closer to the numerical result for the whole range of the simulation (about 30 GW cycles). Taylor and Pade models overestimate the increase in flux and frequency derivative close to merger, whereas EOB models reproduce more faithfully the shape of and are closer to the numerical flux, frequency derivative and derivative of energy. We also compare the GW phase of the numerical simulation with Pade and EOB models. Matching numerical and untuned 3.5 PN order waveforms, we find that the phase difference accumulated until $M \\omega = 0.1$ is -0.12 radians for Pade approximants, and 0.50 (0.45) radians for an EOB approximant with Keplerian (non-Keplerian) flux. We fit free parameters within the EOB models to minimize the phase difference, and confirm degeneracies among these parameters. By tuning pseudo 4PN order coefficients in the radial potential or in the flux, or, if present, the location of the pole in the flux, we find that the accumulated phase difference can be reduced - if desired - to much less than the estimated numerical phase error (0.02 radians).

  15. An analysis of pavement heat flux to optimize the1 water efficiency of a pavement-watering method2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An analysis of pavement heat flux to optimize the1 water efficiency of a pavement-watering method2.hendel@paris.fr)8 9 Preprint version. Uploaded on May 12th , 2014.10 Abstract: Pavement-watering as a technique rarely been conducted. We propose an15 analysis of pavement heat flux at a depth of 5 cm and solar

  16. HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) Eddy Current Analysis for Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    1 NSTX HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) Eddy Current Analysis for Antenna NSTX-CALC-24-03-01 June 1 performed.) The model was first built for NSTX to verify the eddy current effect on antenna during plasma force of the induced eddy current in the components. The force data was transferred to the structural

  17. Wave equation analysis of pile driving in gravel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, William Dieterich

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and gravel. The fundamental analysis procedure involves varying the soil damping parameter J to match measured static soil resistance and blowcount records. The analysis uses quake values determined by drawing a secant through a point corresponding to 25X... of the ultimate load on the load-deflection curves. For each selected pile, the J value that best correlates ultimate static resistance of the time of driving (calculated by the wave equation) and the measured ultimate static resistance from the load tests...

  18. Statistical Analysis of Microgravity Two-Phase Slug Flow via the Drift Flux Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Benjamin A

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF MICROGRAVITY TWO-PHASE SLUG FLOW VIA THE DRIFT FLUX MODEL A Thesis by BENJAMIN ANDREW LARSEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... made their data available to me and willingly took the time to converse about their work. Finally I would like to thank my parents Donald and Christine Larsen for their love and support in completing my graduate work. v NOMENCLATURE Symbol...

  19. Dynamics of excitation pulses with attractive interaction: Kinematic analysis and chemical wave experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Dynamics of excitation pulses with attractive interaction: Kinematic analysis and chemical wave present a theoretical analysis of stacking and destacking wave trains in excitable reaction-diffusion systems with anomalous velocity-wavelength dependence. For linearized dispersion relations, kinematic

  20. A multi-site analysis of random error in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A multi-site analysis of random error in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes 2006 Abstract Measured surface-atmosphere fluxes of energy (sensible heat, H, and latent heat, LE of which include ``tall tower'' instrumentation), one grassland site, and one agricultural site, to conduct

  1. Fourier analysis of wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Mordant

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of the deformation of a vibrated plate is measured by a high speed Fourier transform profilometry technique. The space-time Fourier spectrum is analyzed. It displays a behavior consistent with the premises of the Weak Turbulence theory. A isotropic continuous spectrum of waves is excited with a non linear dispersion relation slightly shifted from the linear dispersion relation. The spectral width of the dispersion relation is also measured. The non linearity of this system is weak as expected from the theory. Finite size effects are discussed. Despite a qualitative agreement with the theory, a quantitative mismatch is observed which origin may be due to the dissipation that ultimately absorbs the energy flux of the Kolmogorov-Zakharov casade.

  2. Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

  3. The dynamics of a seismic wave field: Animation and analysis of kinematic GPS data recorded during the 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    The dynamics of a seismic wave field: Animation and analysis of kinematic GPS data recorded during. Freymueller (2011), The dynamics of a seismic wave field: Animation and analysis of kinematic GPS data identify dynamic ground motion due to Swaves (body waves), Love waves and Rayleigh waves (surface waves

  4. Flux and energy analysis of species in hollow cathode magnetron ionized physical vapor deposition of copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, L.; Ko, E.; Dulkin, A.; Park, K. J.; Fields, S.; Leeser, K. [Novellus Systems, Inc., 4000 North 1st St., San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Meng, L.; Ruzic, D. N. [Center for Plasma-Material Interactions, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 201 South Goodwin, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the stringent requirements of interconnect metallization for sub-32 nm technologies, an unprecedented level of flux and energy control of film forming species has become necessary to further advance ionized physical vapor deposition technology. Such technology development mandates improvements in methods to quantify the metal ion fraction, the gas/metal ion ratio, and the associated ion energies in the total ion flux to the substrate. In this work, a novel method combining planar Langmuir probes, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and gridded energy analyzer (GEA) custom instrumentation is developed to estimate the plasma density and temperature as well as to measure the metal ion fraction and ion energy. The measurements were conducted in a Novellus Systems, Inc. Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCM{sup TM}) physical vapor deposition source used for deposition of Cu seed layer for 65-130 nm technology nodes. The gridded energy analyzer was employed to measure ion flux and ion energy, which was compared to the collocated planar Langmuir probe data. The total ion-to-metal neutral ratio was determined by the QCM combined with GEA. The data collection technique and the corresponding analysis are discussed. The effect of concurrent resputtering during the deposition process on film thickness profile is also discussed.

  5. Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Gillies, Robert R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the variability across different spatial res- olutions in input data translates into variation across scales in modeled output. This issue is of prime im- portance to the remote sensing community involved in the modeling of land–atmosphere interactions...1212 VOLUME 4J O U R N A L O F H Y D R O M E T E O R O L O G Y q 2003 American Meteorological Society Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing NATHANIEL A. BRUNSELL* Department of Plants, Soils, and Biometeorology...

  6. Fresnel analysis of the wave propagation in nonlinear electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri N. Obukhov; Guillermo F. Rubilar

    2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the wave propagation in nonlinear electrodynamical models. Particular attention is paid to the derivation and the analysis of the Fresnel equation for the wave covectors. For the class of general nonlinear Lagrangian models, we demonstrate how the originally quartic Fresnel equation factorizes, yielding the generic birefringence effect. We show that the closure of the effective constitutive (or jump) tensor is necessary and sufficient for the absence of birefringence, i.e., for the existence of a unique light cone structure. As another application of the Fresnel approach, we analyze the light propagation in a moving isotropic nonlinear medium. The corresponding effective constitutive tensor contains non-trivial skewon and axion pieces. For nonmagnetic matter, we find that birefringence is induced by the nonlinearity, and derive the corresponding optical metrics.

  7. Time Variations of the Superkamiokande Solar Neutrino Flux Data by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis of the solar neutrino flux data from 1) 5-day-long samples from Super-Kamiokande-I detector during the period from June, 1996 to July, 2001; 2) 10 -day-long samples from the same detector during the same period and (3) 45-day long from the same detector during the same period. According to our analysis (1) gives periodicities around 0.25, 23.33, 33.75 and 42.75 months; (2) exhibits periodicities around 0.5, 1.0, 28.17, 40.67 and 52.5 months and (3) shows periodicities around 16.5 and 28.5 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data.

  8. Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Ralf Starzmann Fluid of harnessing the energy from ocean waves is the oscillating water column (OWC) device. The OWC converts

  9. Introduction Nonlinear Fourier Analysis Ocean Internal Waves KdV Hidden Solitons Closure Two case studies in nonlinear Fourier analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christov, Ivan C.

    Introduction Nonlinear Fourier Analysis Ocean Internal Waves KdV Hidden Solitons Closure Two case studies in nonlinear Fourier analysis: Ocean internal solitary waves and the Zabusky­Kruskal solitons Ivan Engineering, The University of Sheffield September 10, 2010 Ivan C. Christov (NU) Nonlinear Fourier Analysis

  10. Introduction Nonlinear Fourier Analysis Ocean Internal Waves KdV Hidden Solitons Closure Two case studies in nonlinear Fourier analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christov, Ivan C.

    Introduction Nonlinear Fourier Analysis Ocean Internal Waves KdV Hidden Solitons Closure Two case studies in nonlinear Fourier analysis: Ocean internal solitary waves and the Zabusky­Kruskal solitons Ivan Ivan C. Christov (PU) Nonlinear Fourier Analysis INRNE Seminar 1 / 26 #12;Introduction Nonlinear

  11. Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines A project pursuant is to investigate the characteristics of mine blast seismic waves in southern Indiana. Coal mines are prevalent blasting) and coal mines (surface blasting) to gain new understanding of seismic wave propagation, ground

  12. Analysis and Development of a Three Body Heaving Wave Energy Scott J. Beatty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Analysis and Development of a Three Body Heaving Wave Energy Converter by Scott J. Beatty BASc Body Heaving Wave Energy Converter by Scott J. Beatty BASc, University of British Columbia, 2003 A relative motion based heaving point absorber wave energy converter is being co- developed by researchers

  13. IMPLODING IGNITION WAVES. I. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Livne, Eli [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that converging spherical and cylindrical shock waves may ignite a detonation wave in a combustible medium, provided the radius at which the shocks become strong exceeds a critical radius, R{sub crit}. An approximate analytic expression for R{sub crit} is derived for an ideal gas equation of state and a simple (power-law-Arrhenius) reaction law, and shown to reproduce the results of numerical solutions. For typical acetylene-air experiments we find R{sub crit} {approx} 100 {mu}m (spherical) and R{sub crit} {approx} 1 mm (cylindrical). We suggest that the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) observed in these systems may be due to converging shocks produced by the turbulent deflagration flow, which reaches sub- (but near) sonic velocities on scales >>R{sub crit}. Our suggested mechanism differs from that proposed by Zel'dovich et al., in which a fine-tuned spatial gradient in the chemical induction time is required to be maintained within the turbulent deflagration flow. Our analysis may be readily extended to more complicated equations of state and reaction laws. An order of magnitude estimate of R{sub crit} within a white dwarf at the pre-detonation conditions believed to lead to Type Ia supernova explosions is 0.1 km, suggesting that our proposed mechanism may be relevant for DDT initiation in these systems. The relevance of our proposed ignition mechanism to DDT initiation may be tested by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  14. Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

  15. Simulation and Analysis of Superconducting Traveling-Wave Parametric Amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saptarshi Chaudhuri; Jiansong Gao; Kent Irwin

    2015-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting parametric amplifiers have great promise for quantum-limited readout of superconducting qubits and detectors. Until recently, most superconducting parametric amplifiers had been based on resonant structures, limiting their bandwidth and dynamic range. Broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifiers based both on the nonlinear kinetic inductance of superconducting thin films and on Josephson junctions are in development. By modifying the dispersion property of the amplifier circuit, referred to as dispersion engineering, the gain can be greatly enhanced and the size can be reduced. We present two theoretical frameworks for analyzing and understanding such parametric amplifiers: (1) generalized coupled-mode equations and (2) a finite difference time domain (FDTD) model combined with a small signal analysis. We show how these analytical and numerical tools may be used to understand device performance.

  16. Generation and analysis of multi-directional waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liagre, Pierre-Yves Francois Bernard

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real sea states cannot be represented adequately by a single sine wave. Indeed, wind-generated waves in the ocean have obviously different amplitudes and frequencies, but also come from different directions. Consequently, the distribution of energy...

  17. Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCure, Mari Mae

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

  18. Spin induced multipole moments for the gravitational wave flux from binary inspirals to third Post-Newtonian order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael A. Porto; Andreas Ross; Ira Z. Rothstein

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using effective field theory techniques we calculate the source multipole moments needed to obtain the spin contributions to the power radiated in gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries to third Post-Newtonian order (3PN). The multipoles depend linearly and quadratically on the spins and include both spin(1)spin(2) and spin(1)spin(1) components. The results in this paper provide the last missing ingredient required to determine the phase evolution to 3PN including all spin effects which we will report in a separate paper.

  19. Quadratic-in-spin effects in the orbital dynamics and gravitational-wave energy flux of compact binaries at the 3PN order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Bohé; Guillaume Faye; Sylvain Marsat; Edward K Porter

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of spinning binaries of compact objects at the next-to-leading order in the quadratic-in-spin effects, which corresponds to the third post-Newtonian order (3PN). Using a Dixon-type multipolar formalism for spinning point particles endowed with spin-induced quadrupoles and computing iteratively in harmonic coordinates the relevant pieces of the PN metric within the near zone, we derive the post-Newtonian equations of motion as well as the equations of spin precession. We find full equivalence with available results. We then focus on the far-zone field produced by those systems and obtain the previously unknown 3PN spin contributions to the gravitational-wave energy flux by means of the multipolar post-Minkowskian (MPM) wave generation formalism. Our results are presented in the center-of-mass frame for generic orbits, before being further specialized to the case of spin-aligned, circular orbits. We derive the orbital phase of the binary based on the energy balance equation and briefly discuss the relevance of the new terms.

  20. Combining a New 3-D Seismic S-Wave Propagation Analysis for Remote Fracture Detection with a Robust Subsurface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Combining a New 3-D Seismic S-Wave Propagation Analysis for Remote Fracture Detection with a Robust. This report culminates Phase 2 of the study, Combining a New 3-D Seismic S-Wave Propagation Analysis

  1. Connecting Numerical Relativity and Data Analysis of Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Deirdre; London, Lionel; Pekowsky, Larne

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves deliver information in exquisite detail about astrophysical phenomena, among them the collision of two black holes, a system completely invisible to the eyes of electromagnetic telescopes. Models that predict gravitational wave signals from likely sources are crucial for the success of this endeavor. Modeling binary black hole sources of gravitational radiation requires solving the Eintein equations of General Relativity using powerful computer hardware and sophisticated numerical algorithms. This proceeding presents where we are in understanding ground-based gravitational waves resulting from the merger of black holes and the implications of these sources for the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  2. Preliminary Investigations on Uncertainty Analysis of Wind-Wave Predictions in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekouee, Navid

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With all the improvement in wave and hydrodynamics numerical models, the question rises in our mind that how the accuracy of the forcing functions and their input can affect the results. In this paper, a commonly used numerical third generation wave model, SWAN is applied to predict waves in Lake Michigan. Wind data were analyzed to determine wind variation frequency over Lake Michigan. Wave predictions uncertainty due to wind local effects were compared during a period where wind had a fairly constant speed and direction over the northern and southern basins. The study shows that despite model calibration in Lake Michigan area, the model deficiency arises from ignoring wind effects in small scales. Wave prediction also emphasizes that small scale turbulence in meteorological forces can increase error in predictions up to 35%. Wave frequency and coherence analysis showed that both models are able to reveal the time scale of the wave variation with same accuracy. Insufficient number of meteorological stations ...

  3. Root cause analysis of solder flux residue incidence in the manufacture of electronic power modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Pranav

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates the root causes of the incidence of solder flux residue underneath electronic components in the manufacture of power modules. The existing deionized water-based centrifugal cleaning process was ...

  4. Partial Wave Analysis of $?_{c0}\\to?^+?^-K^+K^-$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ablikim; BES Collaboration

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial wave analysis of $\\chi_{c0}\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-K^+K^-$ in $\\psi(2S)\\to\\gamma\\chi_{c0}$ decay is presented using a sample of 14 million $\\psi(2S)$ events accumulated by the BES II detector. The data are fitted to the sum of relativistic covariant tensor amplitudes for intermediate resonant decay modes. From the fit, significant contributions to $\\chi_{c0}$ decays from the channels $f_0(980)f_0(980)$, $f_0(980)f_0(2200)$, $f_0(1370)f_0(1710)$, $K^*(892)^0\\bar K^*(892)^0$, $K^*_0(1430)\\bar K^*_0(1430)$, $K^*_0(1430)\\bar K^*_2(1430) + c.c.$, and $K_1(1270)K$ are found. Flavor-SU(3)-violating $K_1(1270)-K_1(1400)$ asymmetry is observed. Values obtained for the masses and widths of the resonances $f_0(1710)$, $f_0(2200)$, $f_0(1370)$, and $K^*_0(1430)$ are presented.

  5. Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis for Wave Rotor Combustor Based Combined Cycle Jessica Collins1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis for Wave Rotor Combustor Based Combined Cycle Jessica Collins1 , Brian of Engineering and Technology The conventional combustor that exists in today's market is a constant pressure device; whereas, the wave rotor combustor investigated in the present research is a constant volume

  6. Characterizing a tropical deforestation wave: a dynamic spatial analysis of a deforestation hotspot in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    Characterizing a tropical deforestation wave: a dynamic spatial analysis of a deforestation hotspot deforestation is the major contemporary threat to global biodiversity, because a diminishing extent of tropical of deforestation. How- ever, it is not a random process, but often moves in waves originating from settled areas

  7. As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna P. Guillen

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4) Peak hydroxide-water interface temperature >140 C; and (5) Peak heat flux >565 W/cm2.

  8. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  9. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  10. Acoustic wave propagation through a supercooled liquid: A normal mode analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Matsuoka; Hideyuki Mizuno; Ryoichi Yamamoto

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of acoustic wave propagation in supercooled liquids is not yet fully understood since the vibrational dynamics of supercooled liquids are strongly affected by their amorphous inherent structures. In this paper, the acoustic wave propagation in a supercooled model liquid is studied by using normal mode analysis. Due to the highly disordered inherent structure, a single acoustic wave is decomposed into many normal modes in broad frequency range. This causes the rapid decay of the acoustic wave and results in anomalous wavenumber dependency of the dispersion relation and the rate of attenuation.

  11. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER ARNAUD ROUGIREL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for buoy-type ocean wave energy converter. The simplest model for this scheme is a non autonomous piecewise): see [OOS10]. Basically, a WEC is a floating body with a power takeoff system. It uses the vertical

  12. MEAN-FLUX-REGULATED PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS CONTINUUM FITTING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY Ly{alpha} FOREST SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Spergel, David N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Suzuki, Nao, E-mail: lee@astro.princeton.edu [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuum fitting is an important aspect of Ly{alpha} forest science, since errors in the derived optical depths scale with the fractional continuum error. However, traditional methods of estimating continua in noisy and moderate-resolution spectra (e.g., Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS; S/N {approx}< 10 pixel{sup -1} and R {approx} 2000), such as power-law extrapolation or dividing by the mean spectrum, achieve no better than {approx}15% rms accuracy. To improve on this, we introduce mean-flux-regulated principal component analysis (MF-PCA) continuum fitting. In this technique, PCA fitting is carried out redward of the quasar Ly{alpha} line in order to provide a prediction for the shape of the Ly{alpha} forest continuum. The slope and amplitude of this continuum prediction is then corrected using external constraints for the Ly{alpha} forest mean flux. This requires prior knowledge of the mean flux, (F), but significantly improves the accuracy of the flux transmission, F {identical_to} exp (- {tau}), estimated from each pixel. From tests on mock spectra, we find that MF-PCA reduces the errors to 8% rms in S/N {approx} 2 spectra, and <5% rms in spectra with S/N {approx}> 5. The residual Fourier power in the continuum is decreased by a factor of a few in comparison with dividing by the mean continuum, enabling Ly{alpha} flux power spectrum measurements to be extended to {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign larger scales. Using this new technique, we make available continuum fits for 12,069 z > 2.3 Ly{alpha} forest spectra from SDSS Data Release 7 for use by the community. This technique is also applicable to future releases of the ongoing Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey, which obtains spectra for {approx}150, 000 Ly{alpha} forest spectra at low signal-to-noise (S/N {approx} 2).

  13. Cumulative analysis of the association between the gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER and the gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE and BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Astone; D. Babusci; M. Bassan; P. Carelli; E. Coccia; C. Cosmelli; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; F. Frontera; G. Giordano; C. Guidorzi; A. Marini; Y. Minenkov; I. Modena; G. Modestino; A. Moleti; E. Montanari; G. V. Pallottino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; L. Sperandio; R. Terenzi; G. Torrioli; M. Visco

    2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistical association between the output of the Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS and a list of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the satellite experiments BATSE and BeppoSAX has been analyzed using cumulative algorithms. GW detector data collected between 1991 and 1999 have been correlated to the GRB flux peak times. The cumulative analysis of a large number of GRBs (387) allows to push the upper bound for the corresponding GW burst amplitude down to $h = 2.5\\cdot10^{-19}$.

  14. Partial-wave analysis for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@mail.ru [V.G. Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard partial-wave analysis was performed on the basis of known measurements of differential cross sections for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at energies in the range 250-750 keV. This analysis revealed that, in the energy range being considered, it is sufficient to take into account the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave alone. A potential for the triplet {sup 3}S{sub 1}-wave state of the p{sup 13}C system in the region of the J{sup p}T = 1{sup -1} resonance at 0.55 MeV was constructed on the basis of the phase shifts obtained from the aforementioned partial-wave analysis.

  15. Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

  16. Generation and analysis of multi-directional waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liagre, Pierre-Yves Francois Bernard

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution technique through computer simulated wave data and found it to be accurate. Later, Hasle and Stansberg 5 (1984) applied this method for the determination of the directional spectrum in a laboratory basin by means of 12 gauges. 1.1.2 Parametric...

  17. Numerical Analysis for Controlling the Eigenmode Formation of Alfven Waves in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ichimura, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higaki, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kakimoto, S. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ide, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Inoue, D. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nagai, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakagome, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fukuyama, A. [Kyoto University (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerical analysis is performed with two dimensional wave code for controlling the eigenmode formation of fast Alfven waves in the GAMMA 10 central cell. The plasma production by fast waves depends on the wave excitation in the plasma. Eigenmodes are strongly formed when the boundary conditions in the axial and radial directions are satisfied. As the optimum density for the formation of eigenmode exists discretely, the density is clamped at the value where the eigenmode is strongly formed. For the higher density plasma production, the eigenmodes must be continuously excited as the density increases. It is found that the almost continuous excitation of eigenmodes can be realized by using two waves with different frequencies at the same time.

  18. Taming the post-Newtonian expansion: Simplifying the modes of the gravitational wave energy flux at infinity for a point particle in a circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) High-order terms in the post-Newtonian (PN) expansions of various quantities for compact binaries exhibit a combinatorial increase in complexity, including ever-increasing numbers of transcendentals. Here we consider the gravitational wave energy flux at infinity from a point particle in a circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole, which is known to 22PN beyond the lowest-order Newtonian prediction, at which point each order has over 1000 terms. We introduce a factorization that considerably simplifies the spherical harmonic modes of the energy flux (and thus also the amplitudes of the spherical harmonic modes of the gravitational waves); it is likely that much of the complexity this factorization removes is due to curved-space wave propagation (e.g., tail effects). For the modes with azimuthal number l of 7 or greater, this factorization reduces the expressions for the modes that enter the 22PN total energy flux to pure integer PN series with rational coefficients, which amounts to a reduct...

  19. Analysis of Piston Heat Flux for Highly Complex Piston Shapes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NMPerformanceof Energy Piston Heat Flux for Highly

  20. Analysis and results of a hydrogen moderated isotope production assembly in the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootan, D.W.; Rawlins, J.A.; Carter, L.L.; Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cobalt test assembly containing yttrium hydride pins for neutron moderation was irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility during Cycle 9A for 137.7 equivalent full-power days at a power level of 291 MW. The 36 test pins consisted of a batch of 32 pins containing cobalt metal used to produce /sup 60/Co and a set of four pins with europium oxide to produce /sup 153/Gd, a radioisotope used in detection of the bone disease osteoporosis. Postirradiation examination of the cobalt pins determined the /sup 60/Co was produced with an accuracy of about 5%. The measured /sup 60/Co spatially distributed concentrations were within 20% of the calculated concentrations. The assembly average /sup 60/Co measured activity was 4% less than the calculated value. The europium oxide pins were gamma scanned for the europium isotopes /sup 152/Eu and /sup 154/Eu to an absolute accuracy of about 10%. The measured europium radioisotope and /sup 153/Gd concentrations were within 20% of calculated values. The hydride assembly performed well and is an excellent vehicle for many Fast Flux Test Facility isotope production applications. The results also demonstrate the accuracy of the calculational methods developed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for predicting isotope production rates in this type of assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Taming the post-Newtonian expansion: Simplifying the modes of the gravitational wave energy flux at infinity for a point particle in a circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan K. Johnson-McDaniel

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) High-order terms in the post-Newtonian (PN) expansions of various quantities for compact binaries exhibit a combinatorial increase in complexity, including ever-increasing numbers of transcendentals. Here we consider the gravitational wave energy flux at infinity from a point particle in a circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole, which is known to 22PN beyond the lowest-order Newtonian prediction, at which point each order has over 1000 terms. We introduce a factorization that considerably simplifies the spherical harmonic modes of the energy flux (and thus also the amplitudes of the spherical harmonic modes of the gravitational waves); it is likely that much of the complexity this factorization removes is due to curved-space wave propagation (e.g., tail effects). For the modes with azimuthal number l of 7 or greater, this factorization reduces the expressions for the modes that enter the 22PN total energy flux to pure integer PN series with rational coefficients, which amounts to a reduction of up to a factor of ~150 in the total number of terms in a given mode. The reduction in complexity becomes less dramatic for smaller l, due to the structure of the expansion, though the factorization is still able to remove all the half-integer PN terms. For the 22PN l = 2 modes, this factorization still reduces the total number of terms (and size) by a factor of ~10 and gives purely rational coefficients through 8PN. This factorization also improves the convergence of the series, though we find the exponential resummation introduced for the full energy flux by Isoyama et al. to be even more effective at improving the convergence of the individual modes, producing improvements of over four orders of magnitude over the original series for some modes. However, the exponential resummation is not as effective at simplifying the series, particularly for the higher-order modes.

  2. Searching for A Generic Gravitational Wave Background via Bayesian Nonparametric Analysis with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xihao Deng

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational wave background results from the superposition of gravitational waves generated from all sources across the Universe. Previous efforts on detecting such a background with pulsar timing arrays assume it is an isotropic Gaussian background with a power law spectrum. However, when the number of sources is limited, the background might be non-Gaussian or the spectrum might not be a power law. Correspondingly previous analysis may not work effectively. Here we use a method --- Bayesian Nonparametric Analysis --- to try to detect a generic gravitational wave background, which directly sets constraints on the feasible shapes of the pulsar timing signals induced by a gravitational wave background and allows more flexible forms of the background. Our Bayesian nonparametric analysis will infer if a gravitational wave background is present in the data, and also estimate the parameters that characterize the background. This method will be much more effective than the conventional one assuming the background spectrum follows a power law in general cases. While the context of our discussion focuses on pulsar timing arrays, the analysis itself is directly applicable to detect and characterize any signals that arise from the superposition of a large number of astrophysical events.

  3. Millimeter wave analysis of the dielectric properties of oil shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John A. Scales; Michael Batzle

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural sedimentation processes give rise to fine layers in shales. If these layers alternate between organic-rich and organic-poor sediments, then the contrast in dielectric properties gives rise to an effective birefringence as the presence of hydrocarbons suppresses the dielectric constant of the host rock. We have measured these effects with a quasioptical millimeter wave setup that is rapid and noncontacting. We find that the strength of this birefringence and the overall dielectric permittivity provide two useful diagnostic of the organic content of oil shales.

  4. Efficient Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems, II: Quantum-Classical Comparison, Flux Network, and Robustness Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianlan Wu; Fan Liu; Jian Ma; Robert J. Silbey; Jianshu Cao

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the calculation of optimal energy transfer in thermal environment in our first paper (Wu et al., New J. Phys., 2010, 12, 105012), full quantum dynamics and leading-order `classical' hopping kinetics are compared in the seven-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex. The difference between these two dynamic descriptions is due to higher-order quantum corrections. Two thermal bath models, classical white noise (the Haken-Strobl-Reineker model) and quantum Debye model, are considered. In the seven-site FMO model, we observe that higher-order corrections lead to negligible changes in the trapping time or in energy transfer efficiency around the optimal and physiological conditions (2% in the HSR model and 0.1% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). However, using the concept of integrated flux, we can identify significant differences in branching probabilities of the energy transfer network between hopping kinetics and quantum dynamics (26% in the HSR model and 32% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). This observation indicates that the quantum coherence can significantly change the distribution of energy transfer pathways in the flux network with the efficiency nearly the same. The quantum-classical comparison of the average trapping time with the removal of the bottleneck site, BChl 4, demonstrates the robustness of the efficient energy transfer by the mechanism of multi-site quantum coherence. To reconcile with the latest eight-site FMO model, the quantum-classical comparison with the flux network analysis is summarized in the appendix. The eight-site FMO model yields similar trapping time and network structure as the seven-site FMO model but leads to a more disperse distribution of energy transfer pathways.

  5. Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, S.; Svarc, A. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Doering, M. [HISKP (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Meissner, U.-G. [HISKP (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

  6. A DATA-CENTERED COLLABORATION PORTAL TO SUPPORT GLOBAL CARBON-FLUX ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Deborah A.; Humphrey, Marty; Beekwilder, Norm; Jackson, Keith; Goode, Monte; van Ingen, Catharine

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon-climate, like other environmental sciences, has been changing. Large-scalesynthesis studies are becoming more common. These synthesis studies are often conducted by science teams that are geographically distributed and on datasets that are global in scale. A broad array of collaboration and data analytics tools are now available that could support these science teams. However, building tools that scientists actually use is hard. Also, moving scientists from an informal collaboration structure to one mediated by technology often exposes inconsistencies in the understanding of the rules of engagement between collaborators. We have developed a scientific collaboration portal, called fluxdata.org, which serves the community of scientists providing and analyzing the global FLUXNET carbon-flux synthesis dataset. Key things we learned or re-learned during our portal development include: minimize the barrier to entry, provide features on a just-in-time basis, development of requirements is an on-going process, provide incentives to change leaders and leverage the opportunity they represent, automate as much as possible, and you can only learn how to make it better if people depend on it enough to give you feedback. In addition, we also learned that splitting the portal roles between scientists and computer scientists improved user adoption and trust. The fluxdata.org portal has now been in operation for ~;;1.5 years and has become central to the FLUXNET synthesis efforts.

  7. International Lige Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics, GAS TRANSFER AT WATER SURFACES, May 2 -6 2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and surface wave measurements and much higher heat fluxes. In addition, the infrared imagery analysis reveals potentially significant the infrared images. It is also shown that the difference in the surface boundary conditions for heat and gas

  8. Analysis of plasma waves observed within local plasma injections seen in Saturn's magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Analysis of plasma waves observed within local plasma injections seen in Saturn's magnetosphere J; published 17 May 2008. [1] Plasma injections or density depletion regions have been reported plasma in a cooler, locally produced plasma background. The injected plasma undergoes dispersion

  9. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Wave An Application to Diagnose Dam Bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Wave ­ An Application to Diagnose Dam Bodies Noppadol Poomvises it use as a part of geological program to explore an appropriated rock foundation at a proposed dam location, but also use to investigate the condition of dam after water being storage as well

  10. Development and analysis of non-linearity in the pressure waves resulting from thermoacoustic heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Development and analysis of non-linearity in the pressure waves resulting from thermoacoustic heat@aucegypt.edu Proceedings of the Acoustics 2012 Nantes Conference 23-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 1123 #12;Thermoacoustic. In this work, a thermoacoustic prototype was designed, built and operated and its performance indices

  11. MICROFLUIDIC DETECTION AND ANALYSIS BY INTEGRATION OF EVANESCENT WAVE SENSING WITH THERMOCAPILLARY ACTUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troian, Sandra M.

    MICROFLUIDIC DETECTION AND ANALYSIS BY INTEGRATION OF EVANESCENT WAVE SENSING WITH THERMOCAPILLARY, Princeton, NJ, USA ABSTRACT An integrated system capable of microfluidic actuation, detection and sensing surface tension-driven microfluidic devices [1-5] requires new and innovative methods for in-situ droplet

  12. Laser Measurement of SAM Bulk and Surface Wave Amplitudes for Material Microstructure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken L. Telschow; Chiaki Miyasaka; David L. Cottle

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) at ultra high frequencies has proven to be a useful tool for investigating materials on the scale of individual grains. This technique is normally performed in a reflection mode from one side of a sample surface. Information about the generation and transmission of bulk acoustic waves into the material is inferred from the reflection signal amplitude. We present an adaptation to the SAM method whereby the acoustic bulk waves are directly visualized through laser acoustic detection. Ultrasonic waves were emitted from a nominal 200 MHz point focus acoustic lens into a thin silicon plate (thickness 75ìm) coupled with distilled water. A scanned laser beam detected the bulk and surface acoustic waves at the opposite surface of the thin silicon plate. Distinct amplitude patterns exhibiting the expected symmetry for Silicon were observed that alter in predictable ways as the acoustic focal point was moved throughout the plate. Predictions of the acoustic wave fields generated by the acoustic lens within and at the surface of the Silicon are being investigated through the angular spectrum of plane waves approach. Results shall be presented for plates with (100) and (111) orientations followed by discussion of applications of the technique for material microstructure analysis.

  13. Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of Three-dimensional Breaking Waves on B. Biausser, S.T. Grilli, P. Frauni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of Three-dimensional Breaking Waves/Navier-Stokes solver. Analysis of wave profiles and kinematics (velocity, vorticity, pressure) are carried out. Keyword the breaking and post-breaking in a three- dimensional numerical wave tank of a solitary wave over a sloping

  14. Wind/Wave Misalignment in the Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barj, L.; Stewart, S.; Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind resources far from the shore and in deeper seas have encouraged the offshore wind industry to look into floating platforms. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is developing a new technical specification for the design of floating offshore wind turbines that extends existing design standards for land-based and fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. The work summarized in this paper supports the development of best practices and simulation requirements in the loads analysis of floating offshore wind turbines by examining the impact of wind/wave misalignment on the system loads under normal operation. Simulations of the OC3-Hywind floating offshore wind turbine system under a wide range of wind speeds, significant wave heights, peak-spectral periods and wind/wave misalignments have been carried out with the aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool FAST [4]. The extreme and fatigue loads have been calculated for all the simulations. The extreme and fatigue loading as a function of wind/wave misalignment have been represented as load roses and a directional binning sensitivity study has been carried out. This study focused on identifying the number and type of wind/wave misalignment simulations needed to accurately capture the extreme and fatigue loads of the system in all possible metocean conditions considered, and for a down-selected set identified as the generic US East Coast site. For this axisymmetric platform, perpendicular wind and waves play an important role in the support structure and including these cases in the design loads analysis can improve the estimation of extreme and fatigue loads. However, most structural locations see their highest extreme and fatigue loads with aligned wind and waves. These results are specific to the spar type platform, but it is expected that the results presented here will be similar to other floating platforms.

  15. Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shaosong

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 WACSIS Data Analysis ...................................................................102 6.5.1 Data Sets Recorded By the Directional Waverider Buoy .......105 6.5.2 Estimation Based On the PUV................................................108 6... (before shifted)..................................................31 4.2 Time series of pressure and Vx (after shifted).....................................................32 4.3 Power spectrum of pressure...

  16. Physics of String Flux Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

    2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

  17. Design and Analysis for a Floating Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Li, Y.; Hallett, K.; Hotimsky, C.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a recent study on the design and analysis of an oscillating surge wave energy converter. A successful wave energy conversion design requires the balance between the design performance and cost. The cost of energy is often used as the metric to judge the design of the wave energy conversion system. It is often determined based on the device power performance, the cost for manufacturing, deployment, operation and maintenance, as well as the effort to ensure the environmental compliance. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the importance of a cost driven design strategy and how it can affect a WEC design. Three oscillating surge wave energy converter (OSWEC) designs were used as the example. The power generation performance of the design was modeled using a time-domain numerical simulation tool, and the mass properties of the design were determined based on a simple structure analysis. The results of those power performance simulations, the structure analysis and a simple economic assessment were then used to determine the cost-efficiency of selected OSWEC designs. Finally, a discussion on the environmental barrier, integrated design strategy and the key areas that need further investigation is also presented.

  18. NONLINEAR WAVE EVOLUTION IN VLASOV PLASMA: A LIE-TRANSFORM ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, J.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Packets: The Meaning of Wave Energy and Momentum and theAnalyzing Wave Packets Wave Energy and Momentum Derivationf i r s t consider wave energy and wave momentum. We prove

  19. Efficient energy transfer in light-harvesting systems: Quantum-classical comparison, flux network, and robustness analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Jianlan [Physics Department, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Liu Fan; Silbey, Robert J.; Cao Jianshu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ma Jian [Physics Department, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the calculation of optimal energy transfer in thermal environment in our first paper [J. L. Wu, F. Liu, Y. Shen, J. S. Cao, and R. J. Silbey, New J. Phys. 12, 105012 (2010)], full quantum dynamics and leading-order 'classical' hopping kinetics are compared in the seven-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex. The difference between these two dynamic descriptions is due to higher-order quantum corrections. Two thermal bath models, classical white noise (the Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model) and quantum Debye model, are considered. In the seven-site FMO model, we observe that higher-order corrections lead to negligible changes in the trapping time or in energy transfer efficiency around the optimal and physiological conditions (2% in the HSR model and 0.1% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). However, using the concept of integrated flux, we can identify significant differences in branching probabilities of the energy transfer network between hopping kinetics and quantum dynamics (26% in the HSR model and 32% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). This observation indicates that the quantum coherence can significantly change the distribution of energy transfer pathways in the flux network with the efficiency nearly the same. The quantum-classical comparison of the average trapping time with the removal of the bottleneck site, BChl 4, demonstrates the robustness of the efficient energy transfer by the mechanism of multi-site quantum coherence. To reconcile with the latest eight-site FMO model which is also investigated in the third paper [J. Moix, J. L. Wu, P. F. Huo, D. F. Coker, and J. S. Cao, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 3045 (2011)], the quantum-classical comparison with the flux network analysis is summarized in Appendix C. The eight-site FMO model yields similar trapping time and network structure as the seven-site FMO model but leads to a more disperse distribution of energy transfer pathways.

  20. Single-wavenumber Representation of Nonlinear Energy Spectrum in Elastic-Wave Turbulence of {F}öppl-von {K}ármán Equation: Energy Decomposition Analysis and Energy Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama; Masanori Takaoka

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-wavenumber representation of nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., stretching energy spectrum is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wavenumber space, and analytical expressions of detailed energy budget in the nonlinear interactions are obtained for the first time in wave turbulence systems. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic and bending energies are comparable with each other at large wavenumbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, the stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wavenumbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode $a_{\\bm{k}}$ and its companion mode $a_{-\\bm{k}}$ is observed at the small wavenumbers. Energy transfer shows that the energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wavenumbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wavenumbers. A total-energy flux consistent with the energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

  1. The measurement of pile driving forces and its application to wave equation analysis of piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Francis Xavier

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPECIFICATIONS FOR DELMAG -- DIESEL PILE HAMMER, MODEL D-12 PROPERTIES USED IN COMPUTATIONS OF CALIBRATION SIGNAL EQUIVALENT VALUES FINAL DETERMINATION OF WEIGHTED AVERAGE PERCENT DIFFERENCE OF DYROD GALVO FROM STDSYS FINAL DETERMINATION OF WEIGHTED AVERAGE... OF A PILE. 67 19 BEARING GRAPH FOR PILE 8-17 INTRODUCTION Present Status of the uestion. The wave equation method of analysis has become a rather well- known technique over the last decade for the simulation of piles during driving. It is a...

  2. Slow Feature Analysis on Retinal Waves Leads to V1 Complex Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiskott, Laurenz

    Slow Feature Analysis on Retinal Waves Leads to V1 Complex Cells Sven Da¨hne1,2,3 *, Niko Wilbert2 such that it is best prepared for coding input from the natural world. Citation: Da¨hne S, Wilbert N, Wiskott L (2014 Received June 25, 2013; Accepted December 20, 2013; Published May 8, 2014 Copyright: ß 2014 Da¨hne et al

  3. Constrained Parameterization of the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves Approach with Application at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwenk, Jacob Tyler

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    used to study Vs. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) is used for Rayleigh-wave Vs estimations (Miller et al., 1999a). MASW employs a linear line of low frequency (e.g., Tyler Schwenk B.S., University of Kansas, 2009 Submitted to the graduate degree program...

  4. Earthquake Damage Detection in the Imperial County Services Building III: Analysis of Wave Travel Times via Impulse Response Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    1 Earthquake Damage Detection in the Imperial County Services Building III: Analysis of Wave Travel characteristics of the structure, and are not sensitive to local damage. Wave travel times between selected changes in such characteristics of response are potentially more sensitive to local damage. In this paper

  5. Black-hole quasinormal resonances: Wave analysis versus a geometric-optics approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahar Hod

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been known that null unstable geodesics are related to the characteristic modes of black holes-- the so called quasinormal resonances. The basic idea is to interpret the free oscillations of a black hole in the eikonal limit in terms of null particles trapped at the unstable circular orbit and slowly leaking out. The real part of the complex quasinormal resonances is related to the angular velocity at the unstable null geodesic. The imaginary part of the resonances is related to the instability timescale (or the inverse Lyapunov exponent) of the orbit. While this geometric-optics description of the black-hole quasinormal resonances in terms of perturbed null {\\it rays} is very appealing and intuitive, it is still highly important to verify the validity of this approach by directly analyzing the Teukolsky wave equation which governs the dynamics of perturbation {\\it waves} in the black-hole spacetime. This is the main goal of the present paper. We first use the geometric-optics technique of perturbing a bundle of unstable null rays to calculate the resonances of near-extremal Kerr black holes in the eikonal approximation. We then directly solve the Teukolsky wave equation (supplemented by the appropriate physical boundary conditions) and show that the resultant quasinormal spectrum obtained directly from the wave analysis is in accord with the spectrum obtained from the geometric-optics approximation of perturbed null rays.

  6. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  7. Black-hole quasinormal resonances: Wave analysis versus a geometric-optics approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hod, Shahar [Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel) and Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem 91010 (Israel)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been known that null unstable geodesics are related to the characteristic modes of black holes--the so-called quasinormal resonances. The basic idea is to interpret the free oscillations of a black hole in the eikonal limit in terms of null particles trapped at the unstable circular orbit and slowly leaking out. The real part of the complex quasinormal resonances is related to the angular velocity at the unstable null geodesic. The imaginary part of the resonances is related to the instability time scale (or the inverse Lyapunov exponent) of the orbit. While this geometric-optics description of the black-hole quasinormal resonances in terms of perturbed null rays is very appealing and intuitive, it is still highly important to verify the validity of this approach by directly analyzing the Teukolsky wave equation which governs the dynamics of perturbation waves in the black-hole spacetime. This is the main goal of the present paper. We first use the geometric-optics technique of perturbing a bundle of unstable null rays to calculate the resonances of near-extremal Kerr black holes in the eikonal approximation. We then directly solve the Teukolsky wave equation (supplemented by the appropriate physical boundary conditions) and show that the resultant quasinormal spectrum obtained directly from the wave analysis is in accord with the spectrum obtained from the geometric-optics approximation of perturbed null rays.

  8. Flux and flexibility : a comparative institutional analysis of evolving university-industry relationships in MIT, Cambridge and Tokyo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatakenaka, Sachi, 1961-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University-industry relationships are in a state of flux. They represent important strategic issues for universities, for industry, and for governments alike. This confluence of interests has led to experimentation in which ...

  9. Introduction to the Analysis of Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. F. Schutz

    1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-based gravitational wave detector LISA will observe in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band (0.1 mHz up to 1 Hz). LISA will search for a variety of expected signals, and when it detects a signal it will have to determine a number of parameters, such as the location of the source on the sky and the signal's polarisation. This requires pattern-matching, called matched filtering, which uses the best available theoretical predictions about the characteristics of waveforms. All the estimates of the sensitivity of LISA to various sources assume that the data analysis is done in the optimum way. Because these techniques are unfamiliar to many young physicists, I use the first part of this lecture to give a very basic introduction to time-series data analysis, including matched filtering. The second part of the lecture applies these techniques to LISA, showing how estimates of LISA's sensitivity can be made, and briefly commenting on aspects of the signal-analysis problem that are special to LISA.

  10. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lei

    annulus arises due to a wave energy flux differential acrossprincipal collisionless wave energy dissipation channel inOn the other hand, wave energy can be dissipated by ion

  11. Wave breaking along the stratospheric polar vortex as seen in ERA-40 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abatzoglou, John T; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1983), Breaking planetary waves in the stratosphere, Nature,structure of breaking Rossby waves in the polar wintertimecontrol of upward wave flux near the tropopause, Geophys.

  12. Comparative Analysis of GALLEX-GNO Solar Neutrino Data and SOHO/MDI Helioseismology Data; Further Evidence for Rotational Modulation of the Solar Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Sturrock; Mark A. Weber

    2001-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We carry out a comparative analysis of the GALLEX-GNO solar neutrino data and estimates of the solar internal rotation rate derived from the MDI helioseismology experiment on the SOHO spacecraft. We introduce a statistic, which we evaluate as a function of radius and latitude, that is a measure of the degree of "resonance" of oscillations in the neutrino flux and the synodic solar rotation rate at that radius and latitude. A map of this statistic indicates that the probable location is deep in the convection zone near the equator. We also examine the integral of this statistic over the equatorial section of the convection zone. This provides a measure of the likelihood that the variability of the solar neutrino flux, as measured by the GALLEX-GNO data, has its origin in the equatorial section of the convection zone. We apply the shuffle test, randomly reassigning measurements among runs, to estimate the significance of the value of the statistic computed from the actual data. This test implies that the result is significant at the 0.2% level. When, for comparison, we repeat this analysis for the radiative zone, we find that the integral resonance statistic is not significant. These results support earlier evidence for rotational modulation of the solar neutrino flux.

  13. Dynamical Energy Analysis - determining wave energy distributions in complex vibro-acoustical structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor Tanner

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach towards determining the distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave energy in complex built-up structures. The technique interpolates between standard Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and full ray tracing containing both these methods as limiting case. By writing the flow of ray trajectories in terms of linear phase space operators, it is suggested here to reformulate ray-tracing algorithms in terms of boundary operators containing only short ray segments. SEA can now be identified as a low resolution ray tracing algorithm and typical SEA assumptions can be quantified in terms of the properties of the ray dynamics. The new technique presented here enhances the range of applicability of standard SEA considerably by systematically incorporating dynamical correlations wherever necessary. Some of the inefficiencies inherent in typical ray tracing methods can be avoided using only a limited amount of the geometrical ray information. The new dynamical theory - Dynamical Energy Analysis (DEA) - thus provides a universal approach towards determining wave energy distributions in complex structures.

  14. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by ?-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nault, Rance, E-mail: naultran@msu.edu [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Abdul-Fattah, Hiba [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Moon, Thomas W. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist ?-naphthoflavone (?NF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 ?M ?NF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by ?NF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to ?NF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  15. Wave-Turbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave Craig Epifanio and Tingting Qian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Dissipation of Mean Wave Energy · Mean wave energy E is just the total energy (kinetic + available · The dissipation of mean wave energy is caused by the turbulent momentum fluxes--specifically, by their tendency

  16. Partial-wave analysis of elastic {sup 4}He{sup 4}He scattering in the energy range 40-50 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B. [Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: sergey@dubovichenko.net

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial-wave analysis of elastic {sup 4}He{sup 4}He scattering is performed in the energy range 40-50 MeV.

  17. Paper No. 2003-JSC-340 Biausser 1 Numerical analysis of the internal kinematics and dynamics of three-dimensional breaking waves on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Paper No. 2003-JSC-340 Biausser 1 Numerical analysis of the internal kinematics and dynamics of three-dimensional breaking waves on slopes B. Biausser(1),(3) , S.T. Grilli (2) , R. Marcer (3) , P- dimensional numerical wave tank of a solitary wave over a sloping ridge. The numerical model is based

  18. Turbulence and internal waves in numerical models of the equatorial undercurrents system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Hieu T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    w ? field at t = 80; (b) Wave energy flux p ? w ? across thethe shear layer is wave energy and not turbulence. ) Thestress u ? w ? and (f) wave energy flux p ? w ? . The

  19. Exact Near-Onset Analysis of the Spin-Density-Wave Instability in Ferromagnetic Superconductors - the Linearly Polarized State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Chia-Ren.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW 8 VOLUME 30, NUMBER 5 1 SEPTEMBER 1984 Exact near-onset analysis of the spin-density-wave instability in ferromagnetic superconductors: The linearly polarized state Chia-Ren Hu Department ofPhysics, Texas Ad'cM Uniuersity..., College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 29 August 1983) Using an approach similar to Abvikosov's theory of the vortex state near H, 2, we have performed an exact, near-onset analysis of a spin-density-wave instability leading to the "linearly polarized...

  20. SAID Partial Wave Analyses from CNS DAC (Center for Nuclear Studies Data Analysis Center)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    George Washington University (GW) has one of the largest university-based nuclear-physics groups in the nation. Many of the current and future projects are geared to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) at Newport News, VA. JLab is the world's premier electron accelerator for nuclear physics, and GW is one of the charter members of the governing body of JLab, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA). The George Washington Data Analysis Center (DAC) was created in 1998 by an agreement among the Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, and the GW Center for Nuclear Studies.The activities of the DAC fall into four distinct categories: 1) Performing partial-wave analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions; 2) Maintenance of databases associated with these reactions; 3) Development of software to disseminate DAC results (as well as the results of competing model-independent analyses and potential approaches); and 4) Phenomenological and theoretical investigations which bridge the gap between theory and experiment; in particular, the extraction of N* and D * hadronic and electromagnetic couplings. Partial Wave Analyses (and the associated databases) available at GW are: Pion-Nucleon, Kaon-Nucleon, Nucleon-Nucleon, Pion Photoproduction, Pion Electroproduction, Kaon Photoproduction, Eta Photoproduction, Eta-Prime Photoproduction, Pion-Deuteron (elastic), and Pion-Deuteron to Proton+Proton. [Taken from http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm">http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm

  1. A Truncated partial wave analysis of a complete experiment for photoproduction of two pseudoscalar mesons on a nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fix; H. Arenhoevel

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A truncated partial wave analysis for the photoproduction of two pseudoscalar mesons on a nucleon is discussed with respect to the determination of a complete set of observables. For the selection of such a set we have applied a criterion previously developed for photo- and electrodisintegration of a deuteron, which allows one to find a 'minimal' set of observables for determining the partial wave amplitudes up to possible discrete ambiguities. The question of resolving the remaining ambiguities by invoking additional observables is discussed for the simplest case, when the partial wave expansion is truncated at the lowest total angular momentum of the final state $J_{max}=1/2$. The resulting 'fully' complete set, allowing an unambiguous determination of the partial wave amplitudes, is presented.

  2. Partial-Wave Analysis of the Centrally Produced ?+?- System in pp Reactions at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Austregesilo; T. Schlueter; for the COMPASS collaboration

    2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS which investigates the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. During nine weeks in 2008 and 2009, a 190 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target was used in order to study the production of exotic mesons and glueball candidates at central rapidities. As no bias on the production mechanism was introduced by the trigger system, the contribution from diffractive dissociation of the beam proton poses a challenge. We select a centrally produced sample by kinematic cuts and introduce a model to describe the data in terms of partial waves. Preliminary fits are presented, which are consistent with results from previous experiments. Particular attention is paid to the ambiguities in the amplitude analysis of the two-pseudoscalar final state.

  3. Partial wave analysis of J/{psi}{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bai, Y.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a sample of 58 million J/{psi} events collected with the BESII detector at the BEPC, more than 100 000 J/{psi}{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0} events are selected, and a detailed partial wave analysis is performed. The branching fraction is determined to be Br(J/{psi}{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0})=(1.33{+-}0.02{+-}0.11)x10{sup -3}. A long-sought missing N*, first observed in J/{psi}{yields}pn{pi}{sup -}, is observed in this decay too, with mass and width of 2040{sub -4}{sup +3}{+-}25 MeV/c{sup 2} and 230{sub -8}{sup +8}{+-}52 MeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. Its spin-parity favors (3/2){sup +}. The masses, widths, and spin parities of other N* states are obtained as well.

  4. Bayesian semiparametric power spectral density estimation in gravitational wave data analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Matthew C; Christensen, Nelson

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard noise model in gravitational wave (GW) data analysis assumes detector noise is stationary and Gaussian distributed, with a known power spectral density (PSD) that is usually estimated using clean off-source data. Real GW data often depart from these assumptions, and misspecified parametric models of the PSD could result in misleading inferences. We propose a Bayesian semiparametric approach to improve this. We use a nonparametric Bernstein polynomial prior on the PSD, with weights attained via a Dirichlet process distribution, and update this using the Whittle likelihood. Posterior samples are obtained using a Metropolis-within-Gibbs sampler. We simultaneously estimate the reconstruction parameters of a rotating core collapse supernova GW burst that has been embedded in simulated Advanced LIGO noise. We also discuss an approach to deal with non-stationary data by breaking longer data streams into smaller and locally stationary components.

  5. Analysis of the spectroscopy of a hybrid system composed of a superconducting flux qubit and diamond NV centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Cai; Y. Matsuzaki; K. Kakuyanagi; H. Toida; X. Zhu; N. Mizuochi; K. Nemoto; K. Semba; W. J. Munro; S. Saito; H. Yamaguchi

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid system that combines the advantages of a superconducting flux qubit and an electron spin ensemble in diamond is one of the promising devices to realize quantum information processing. Exploring the properties of the superconductor diamond system is essential for the efficient use of this device. When we perform spectroscopy of this system, significant power broadening is observed. However, previous models to describe this system are known to be applicable only when the power broadening is negligible. Here, we construct a new approach to analyze this system with strong driving, and succeed to reproduce the spectrum with the power broadening. Our results provide an efficient way to analyze this hybrid system.

  6. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  7. Testing gravitational-wave searches with numerical relativity waveforms: Results from the first Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Aylott; John G. Baker; William D. Boggs; Michael Boyle; Patrick R. Brady; Duncan A. Brown; Bernd Brügmann; Luisa T. Buchman; Alessandra Buonanno; Laura Cadonati; Jordan Camp; Manuela Campanelli; Joan Centrella; Shourov Chatterji; Nelson Christensen; Tony Chu; Peter Diener; Nils Dorband; Zachariah B. Etienne; Joshua Faber; Stephen Fairhurst; Benjamin Farr; Sebastian Fischetti; Gianluca Guidi; Lisa M. Goggin; Mark Hannam; Frank Herrmann; Ian Hinder; Sascha Husa; Vicky Kalogera; Drew Keppel; Lawrence E. Kidder; Bernard J. Kelly; Badri Krishnan; Pablo Laguna; Carlos O. Lousto; Ilya Mandel; Pedro Marronetti; Richard Matzner; Sean T. McWilliams; Keith D. Matthews; R. Adam Mercer; Satyanarayan R. P. Mohapatra; Abdul H. Mroué; Hiroyuki Nakano; Evan Ochsner; Yi Pan; Larne Pekowsky; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Denis Pollney; Frans Pretorius; Vivien Raymond; Christian Reisswig; Luciano Rezzolla; Oliver Rinne; Craig Robinson; Christian Röver; Lucía Santamaría; Bangalore Sathyaprakash; Mark A. Scheel; Erik Schnetter; Jennifer Seiler; Stuart L. Shapiro; Deirdre Shoemaker; Ulrich Sperhake; Alexander Stroeer; Riccardo Sturani; Wolfgang Tichy; Yuk Tung Liu; Marc van der Sluys; James R. van Meter; Ruslan Vaulin; Alberto Vecchio; John Veitch; Andrea Viceré; John T. Whelan; Yosef Zlochower

    2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project is a collaborative effort between members of the numerical relativity and gravitational-wave data analysis communities. The purpose of NINJA is to study the sensitivity of existing gravitational-wave search algorithms using numerically generated waveforms and to foster closer collaboration between the numerical relativity and data analysis communities. We describe the results of the first NINJA analysis which focused on gravitational waveforms from binary black hole coalescence. Ten numerical relativity groups contributed numerical data which were used to generate a set of gravitational-wave signals. These signals were injected into a simulated data set, designed to mimic the response of the Initial LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. Nine groups analysed this data using search and parameter-estimation pipelines. Matched filter algorithms, un-modelled-burst searches and Bayesian parameter-estimation and model-selection algorithms were applied to the data. We report the efficiency of these search methods in detecting the numerical waveforms and measuring their parameters. We describe preliminary comparisons between the different search methods and suggest improvements for future NINJA analyses.

  8. A partial wave analysis of the centrally produced pi+pi- system in pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis et al

    1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial wave analysis of the centrally produced pi+pi- channel has been performed in pp collisions using an incident beam momentum of 450 GeV/c. An unambiguous physical solution has been found. Evidence is found for the f0(980), f0(1300), f0(1500) and fJ(1710) with J = 0 in the the S-wave. The rho(770) is observed dominantly in the P0-wave and the f2(1270) is observed dominantly in the D0-wave. In addition, there is evidence for a broad enhancement in the D-wave below 1 GeV.

  9. Harmonic Analysis of Time Variations Observed in the Solar Radio Flux Measured at 810 MHz from 1957 to 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zieba; J. Maslowski; A. Michalec; G. Michalek; A. Kulak

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-running measurements of the solar radio flux density at 810 MHz were processed. Based on the least-squares method and using modified periodograms and an iterative technique of fitting and subtracting sinusoids in the time domain, frequency, amplitude, and phase characteristics of any analyzed time series were obtained. Solar cycles 20, 21, and 22 and shorter segments around solar minima and maxima were examined separately. Also, dynamic studies with 405, 810, and 1620 day windows were undertaken. The harmonic representations obtained for all these time series indicate large differences among solar cycles and their segments. We show that the solar radio flux at 810 MHz violates the Gnevyshev-Ohl rule for the pair of cycles 22-23. Analyzing the period 1957-2004, the following spectral periods longer than 1350 days were detected: 10.6, 8.0, 28.0, 5.3, 55.0, 3.9, 6.0, 4.4, and 14.6 yr. For spectral periods between 270 and 1350 days the 11 yr cycle is not recognized. We think that these harmonics form ``impulses of activity'' or a quasi-biennial cycle defined in the Benevolenskaya model of the ``double magnetic cycle.'' The value of about 0.09 is proposed for the interaction parameter (between the low- and high-frequency components) of this model. We confirm the intermittent behavior of the periodicity near 155 days. Correlation coefficients between the radio emission at 810 MHz and sunspot numbers, as well as the radio emission at 2800 MHz calculated for 540 day intervals, depend on the solar cycle phase.

  10. 8 Damping, dissipation and the loss factor concept In the previous analysis essentially undamped wave propagation has been treated. By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    wave propagation has been treated. By observing nature, however, an undamped wave propagation is rather

  11. Propagation of seismic waves through liquefied soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Jeremic, Boris; Dafalias, Yannis; Kaynia, Amir; Cheng, Zhao

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the mechanisms of wave propagation and ARTICLE IN PRESS M.Numerical analysis Wave propagation Earthquake Liquefactionenergy during any wave propagation. This paper summarizes

  12. Elementary analysis of interferometers for wave-particle duality test and the perspective of going beyond the complementarity principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Yuan Li

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave-particle duality and complementarity principle stand at the conceptual core of quantum theory in its orthodox Copenhagen interpretation. They imply that the wave behavior and particle behavior of quantum objects are mutually exclusive to each other in experimental observation. Here we make a systematic analysis using the elementary methodology of quantum mechanics upon Young`s two-slit interferometer and Mach-Zehnder two-arm interferometer with the focus placed on how to measure the interference pattern (wave nature) and which-way information (particle nature) of quantum objects. We design several schemes to simultaneously acquire the which-way information for an individual quantum object and the high-contrast interference pattern for an ensemble of these quantum objects by placing two sets of measurement instrument that are well separated in space and whose perturbation on each other is negligibly small within the interferometer at the same time. Yet, improper arrangement and cooperation of these two sets of measurement instrument in the interferometer would lead to failure of simultaneous observation of wave and particle behavior. The internal freedoms of quantum object could be harnessed to probe both the which-way information and interference pattern for the center-of-mass motion. That quantum objects can behave beyond the wave-particle duality and complementarity principle would stimulate new conceptual examination and exploration of quantum theory at a deeper level.

  13. Analysis and results of a hydrogen-moderated isotope production assembly in the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootan, D.W.; Rawlins, J.A.; Carter, L.L.; Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a cobalt test assembly containing yttrium hydride pins for neutron moderation irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during cycle 9A for 137.7 equivalent full-power days at a power level of 291 MW. The 36 test pins consisted of a batch of 32 pins containing cobalt metal used to produce {sup 60}Co and a set of four pins with europium oxide to produce {sup 153}Gd, a radioisotope used in detection of the bone disease osteoporosis. Postirradiation examination of the cobalt pins determined the {sup 60}Co production to be predictable to an accuracy of {approximately} 5%. The measured {sup 60}Co spatially distributed concentrations were within 20% of the calculated concentrations. The assembly average {sup 60}Co measured activity was 4% less than the calculated value. The europium oxide pins were gamma scanned for the europium isotopes {sup 152}Eu and {sup 154}Eu to an absolute accuracy of {approx equal} 10%. The measured europium radioisotope and {sup 153}Gd concentrations were within 20% of calculated values. The hydride assembly performed well and is an excellent vehicle for many FFTF isotope production applications. The results also demonstrate the accuracy of the calculational methods developed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for predicting isotope production rates in this type of assembly.

  14. Fast flux locked loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  15. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchava, E. S. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Nodia Institute of Geophysics, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Shergelashvili, B. M. [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); CODeS, KU Leuven Campus Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, 8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Tevzadze, A. G. [Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Center (LMCC), KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  16. WAVE PROPAGATION AND JET FORMATION IN THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heggland, L.; Hansteen, V. H.; Carlsson, M. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); De Pontieu, B., E-mail: lars.heggland@astro.uio.no [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Organization ADBS, Building 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of numerical simulations of wave propagation and jet formation in solar atmosphere models with different magnetic field configurations. The presence in the chromosphere of waves with periods longer than the acoustic cutoff period has been ascribed to either strong inclined magnetic fields, or changes in the radiative relaxation time. Our simulations include a sophisticated treatment of radiative losses, as well as fields with different strengths and inclinations. Using Fourier and wavelet analysis techniques, we investigate the periodicity of the waves that travel through the chromosphere. We find that the velocity signal is dominated by waves with periods around 5 minutes in regions of strong, inclined field, including at the edges of strong flux tubes where the field expands, whereas 3 minute waves dominate in regions of weak or vertically oriented fields. Our results show that the field inclination is very important for long-period wave propagation, whereas variations in the radiative relaxation time have little effect. Furthermore, we find that atmospheric conditions can vary significantly on timescales of a few minutes, meaning that a Fourier analysis of wave propagation can be misleading. Wavelet techniques take variations with time into account and are more suitable analysis tools. Finally, we investigate the properties of jets formed by the propagating waves once they reach the transition region, and find systematic differences between the jets in inclined-field regions and those in vertical field regions, in agreement with observations of dynamic fibrils.

  17. Use of Exact Solutions of Wave Propagation Problems to Guide Implementation of Nonlinear Seismic Ground Response Analysis Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zhou, G. S. ?1980?. “Wave propagation method of site seismicUse of Exact Solutions of Wave Propagation Problems to Guidesolutions for body wave propagation through an elastic

  18. A partial wave analysis of the centrally produced pi0pi0 system in pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis et al

    1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial wave analysis of the centrally produced pi0pi0 channel has been performed in pp collisions using an incident beam momentum of 450 GeV/c. An unambiguous physical solution has been found. Evidence is found for the f0(980), f0(1300) and f0(1500) in the the S-wave. and the f2(1270) is observed dominantly in the D0-wave. In addition, there is evidence for a broad enhancement in the D-wave below 1 GeV.

  19. Analysis of P-wave seismic response for fracture detection: modelling and case studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yungui

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses a few specific issues in the use of wide azimuth P-wave seismic data for fracture detection based on numerical modelling and real data. These issues include the seismic response of discrete fractures, ...

  20. X-Pipeline: an analysis package for autonomous gravitational-wave burst searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Patrick J.

    Autonomous gravitational-wave searches—fully automated analyses of data that run without human intervention or assistance—are desirable for a number of reasons. They are necessary for the rapid identification of ...

  1. Analysis of PS-converted wave seismic data in the presence of azimuthal anisotropy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weining

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear-wave splitting and azimuthal variations of seismic attributes are two major anisotropic effects induced by vertically-aligned fractures. They both have influences on seismic data processing and interpretation, and ...

  2. A finite element method and the method of finite spheres enriched for analysis of wave propagations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ham, Seounghyun, 1982-

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to present a finite element method and the method of finite spheres enriched for the solution of various wave propagation problems. The first part of this thesis is to present an enriched ...

  3. SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF AN EIT WAVE/DIMMING OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, F.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F., E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.c [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves are a wavelike phenomenon propagating outward from the coronal mass ejection source region, with expanding dimmings following behind. We present a spectroscopic study of an EIT wave/dimming event observed by the Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer. Although the identification of the wave front is somewhat affected by the pre-existing loop structures, the expanding dimming is well defined. We investigate the line intensity, width, and Doppler velocity for four EUV lines. In addition to the significant blueshift implying plasma outflows in the dimming region as revealed in previous studies, we find that the widths of all four spectral lines increase at the outer edge of the dimmings. We illustrate that this feature can be well explained by the field line stretching model, which claims that EIT waves are apparently moving brightenings that are generated by the successive stretching of the closed field lines.

  4. Refraction index analysis of light propagation in a colliding gravitational wave spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Andrea Geralico; Maria Haney

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical medium analogy of a given spacetime was developed decades ago and has since then been widely applied to different gravitational contexts. Here we consider the case of a colliding gravitational wave spacetime, generalizing previous results concerning single gravitational pulses. Given the complexity of the nonlinear interaction of two gravitational waves in the framework of general relativity, typically leading to the formation of either horizons or singularities, the optical medium analogy proves helpful to simply capture some interesting effects of photon propagation.

  5. Time domain analysis of a gyrotron traveling wave amplifier with misaligned electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiushi, E-mail: qiushiwork@gmail.com; Peng, Shuyuan [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2652, Beijing 100080 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Luo, Jirun [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2652, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article develops a time-domain theory to study the beam-wave interaction in gyrotron traveling wave amplifier (gyro-TWA) with a misaligned electron beam. The effects of beam misalignment on the TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWA operating at the fundamental are discussed. Numerical results show that the effect of misalignment is less obvious when the input power is larger, and the influences of misalignment on the stable gain and the stable time are basically opposite.

  6. Wave Packet for Massless Fermions and its Implication to the Superluminal Velocity Statistics of Neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelin Wang; Zexian Cao

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-dispersive wave packet for massless fermions is formulated on the basis of squeezed coherent states that are put in a form of common eigenfunction for the Hamiltonian and the helicity operator, starting from the Dirac equation. The wave packet thus constructed is demonstrated to propagate at a constant velocity as that of light. This explicit expression of wave packet for the massless fermions can facilitate theoretical analysis of problems where a wave packet is of formal significance. Furthermore, extensive wave packet may result in a superluminal velocity statistics if determined from the time-of-flight measurement, as recently done on muon neutrinos, when a threshold particle flux or energy transfer, which is eventually referred to the propagation of wave packet, to invoke a detection event is assumed.

  7. Stability analysis for two-dimensional ion-acoustic waves in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seadawy, A. R., E-mail: Aly742001@yahoo.com [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, Al-Ula (Saudi Arabia); Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University (Egypt)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum hydrodynamic model is applied to two-dimensional ion-acoustic waves in quantum plasmas. The two-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model is used to obtain a deformed Kortewegde Vries (dKdV) equation by reductive perturbation method. By using the solution of auxiliary ordinary equations, a extended direct algebraic method is described to construct the exact solutions for nonlinear quantum dKdV equation. The present results are describing the generation and evolution of such waves, their interactions, and their stability.

  8. Three Dimensional MHD Wave Propagation and Conversion to Alfven Waves near the Solar Surface. I. Direct Numerical Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Cally; M. Goossens

    2007-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficacy of fast/slow MHD mode conversion in the surface layers of sunspots has been demonstrated over recent years using a number of modelling techniques, including ray theory, perturbation theory, differential eigensystem analysis, and direct numerical simulation. These show that significant energy may be transferred between the fast and slow modes in the neighbourhood of the equipartition layer where the Alfven and sound speeds coincide. However, most of the models so far have been two dimensional. In three dimensions the Alfven wave may couple to the magneto-acoustic waves with important implications for energy loss from helioseismic modes and for oscillations in the atmosphere above the spot. In this paper, we carry out a numerical ``scattering experiment'', placing an acoustic driver 4 Mm below the solar surface and monitoring the acoustic and Alfvenic wave energy flux high in an isothermal atmosphere placed above it. These calculations indeed show that energy conversion to upward travelling Alfven waves can be substantial, in many cases exceeding loss to slow (acoustic) waves. Typically, at penumbral magnetic field strengths, the strongest Alfven fluxes are produced when the field is inclined 30-40 degrees from the vertical, with the vertical plane of wave propagation offset from the vertical plane containing field lines by some 60-80 degrees.

  9. On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

    2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

  10. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

  11. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgado, Carlos W. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weygand, Dennis P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  12. Anisotropy and mantle flow in the Chile-Argentina subduction zone from shear wave splitting analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouch, Matthew J.

    Anisotropy and mantle flow in the Chile-Argentina subduction zone from shear wave splitting subduction zone. Data is from the CHARGE network, which traversed Chile and western Argentina across two, M. L., G. Zandt, E. Triep, M. Fouch, and S. Beck (2004), Anisotropy and mantle flow in the Chile-Argentina

  13. Aperture synthesis of time-limited X waves and analysis of their propagation characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jian-yu

    of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering Cairo University, Giza, Egypt Ioannis M. Besieris. Also, the possibility of using a finite-time excitation of a dynamic aperture to generate a finite-energy-time aperture. This confirms the fact that time windowing the infinite energy X-wave excitation is a viable

  14. Two-Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator,"of a standing-wave free-electron laser," Lawrence Berkeleyof a standing-wave free-electron laser," Lawrence Berkeley

  15. Long-range propagation of ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    hours. Friday, February 22, 2013 #12;OceanPowerTechnologies A 103 foot long, 260ton buoy being tested #12;Wave Power? PelamisWavePower With T=10sec and a = 1 meter, the energy flux is 40kW/meter. An average 40kW/meter of wave power is typical of good sites. Energy Flux = cg × Energy Density = g2 Ta2 8

  16. Nonlinear Response and Stability Analysis of Vessel Rolling Motion in Random Waves Using Stochastic Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Zhiyong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................83 viii LIST OF FIGURES Fig. 1. Body fixed coordinate system x-y and principal system xN - yN ......................... 6  Fig. 2. Illustration of the SCK equation (2.8) (Moe, 1997.... 5. Rolling moment amplitude per unit wave height ............................................... 41  Fig. 6. GZ curve of T-AGOS (C1=3.618m,C3=-2.513m) ............................................ 42  Fig. 7. Comparison of original force...

  17. Nonlinear Response and Stability Analysis of Vessel Rolling Motion in Random Waves Using Stochastic Dynamical Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Zhiyong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................83 viii LIST OF FIGURES Fig. 1. Body fixed coordinate system x-y and principal system xN - yN ......................... 6 Fig. 2. Illustration of the SCK equation (2.8) (Moe, 1997.... 5. Rolling moment amplitude per unit wave height ............................................... 41 Fig. 6. GZ curve of T-AGOS (C1=3.618m,C3=-2.513m) ............................................ 42 Fig. 7. Comparison of original force...

  18. Impedance-based analysis and study of phase sensitivity in slow-wave two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurtele, J.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Whittum, D.H. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sessler, A.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ``coupling impedance`` for both the RK and SWFEWL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. Expressions are derived for the phase and amplitude sensitivities of the TBA schemes to errors (shot-to-shot jitter) in current and energy. The analysis allows, for the first time, relative comparisons of the RK and the SWFEL TBAs.

  19. Relativistic distorted-wave analysis of quasielastic proton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titus, N. P.; Ventel, B. I. S. van der; Niekerk, D. D. van; Hillhouse, G. C. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); University for Information Science and Technology, Partizanska Street, Ohrid 6000 (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic distorted-wave impulse approximation formalism is presented for the calculation of quasielastic proton-nucleus scattering. It is shown that the double differential cross section may be written as a contraction between the hadronic tensor (describing the projectile and ejectile) and the polarization tensor (describing the nuclear target) and that this mathematical structure also holds for the case where distortions are included. The eikonal approximation is used to introduce distortions in the wave functions, and the nuclear response is described using a Fermi gas model. The highly oscillatory nine-dimensional integrand contained in the expression for the double differential cross section is computed using a novel technique based on combining traditional Gaussian integration methods with the powerful fitting functions in the matlab programming language. This work has successfully calculated the distorted-wave quasielastic differential cross section for proton-nucleus scattering within a fully relativistic framework. It is found that the distortions lead to a reduction in the double differential cross section and have a negligible effect on the computed spin observables.

  20. Gravity Waves Gravity Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    ;14/03/2014 6 H L H L L Phase & Group Velocity #12;14/03/2014 7 Doppler Effect #12;14/03/2014 8 Shock Waves #12;14/03/2014 14 Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Supernova blast waves #12;14/03/2014 15 Tycho's Remnant (SN 1572AD A SNR flythrough Theory of Supernova Blast Waves Supernovae: Type Ia Subsonic deflagration wave turning

  1. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spinneken, Johannes, E-mail: j.spinneken@imperial.ac.uk; Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  2. Time Variations of the Solar Neutrino Flux Data from Sage and Gallex-Gno Detectors Obtained by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used Rayleigh power spectrum analysis of the monthly solar neutrino flux data from (1) SAGE detector during the period from 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2000; (2) SAGE detector during the period from April 1998 to December 2001; (3) GALLEX detector during the period from May 1991 to January 1997; (4) GNO detector during the period from May 1998 to December 2001; (5) GALLEX-GNO detector (combined data) from May 1991 to December 2001 and (6) average of the data from GNO and SAGE detectors during the period from May 1998 to December 2001. (1) exhibits periodicity around 1.3, 4.3, 5.5, 6.3, 7.9, 8.7, 15.9, 18.7, 23.9, 32.9 and 48.7 months. (2) shows periodicity around 1.5, 2.9, 4.5, 10.1 months. For (3) we observe periodicity around 1.7, 18.7 and 26.9 months. For (4) periodicity is seen around 3.5, 5.5, 7.7 and 10.5 months. (5) gives periodicity around 1.7, 18.5, 28.5 and 42.1 months while (6) shows periodicity around 4.3, 6.9, 10.3 and 18.1 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data which indicates that the solar activity cycle may be due to the variable character of nuclear energy generation inside the sun.

  3. The Analysis of Large Order Bessel Functions in Gravitational Wave Signals from Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Chishtie; S. R. Valluri; K. M. Rao; D. Sikorski; T. Williams

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present the analytic treatment of the large order Bessel functions that arise in the Fourier Transform (FT) of the Gravitational Wave (GW) signal from a pulsar. We outline several strategies which employ asymptotic expansions in evaluation of such Bessel functions which also happen to have large argument. Large order Bessel functions also arise in the Peters-Mathews model of binary inspiralling stars emitting GW and several problems in potential scattering theory. Other applications also arise in a variety of problems in Applied Mathematics as well as in the Natural Sciences and present a challenge for High Performance Computing(HPC).

  4. Comparative analysis of continuous-wave surface-plasma negative ion sources with various discharge geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belchenko, Yu, E-mail: belchenko@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Negative ion extraction from continuous-wave (CW) magnetron and semiplanotron discharges was studied and it was compared with that for the source with Penning electrode geometry. The CW negative ion beam up current to 13 mA was extracted from the magnetron source with emission aperture of 3.5 mm in diameter, while the beam with current up to 8 mA was obtained from the semiplanotron source modification. Characteristics of CW magnetron and semiplanotron sources are presented and analyzed.

  5. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  6. Full-wave algorithms for model order reduction and electromagnet analysis of impedance and scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemas, Thomas J. (Thomas Jonas)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As technology advances and sophisticated electronic systems achieve ubiquity, the demand for thorough, efficient Electromagnetic (EM) analysis continues to rise. The prohibitive costs of constructing and maintaining ...

  7. axial flux permanent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 13 Design and analysis aspects of radial flux air-cored permanent magnet wind generator system for direct battery charging applications. Open Access Theses and...

  8. Alternative method for wave propagation analysis within bounded linear media: conceptual and practical implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Lencina; Beatriz Ruiz; Pablo Vaveliuk

    2006-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses an alternative approach to study the monochromatic plane wave propagation within dielectric and conductor linear media of plane-parallel-faces. This approach introduces the time-averaged Poynting vector modulus as field variable. The conceptual implications of this formalism are that the nonequivalence between the time-averaged Poynting vector and the squared-field amplitude modulus is naturally manifested as a consequence of interface effects. Also, two practical implications are considered: first, the exact transmittance is compared with that given by the Beer's Law, employed commonly in experiments. The departure among them can be significative for certain material parameter values. Second, when the exact reflectance is studied for negative permittivity slabs, it is show that the high reflectance can be diminished if a small amount of absorption is present.

  9. Poincare analysis of wave motion in ultrarelativistic electron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a relativistic Maxwell-fluid description, the existence of ultrarelativistic laser-induced periodic waves in an electron-ion plasma is investigated. Within a one-dimensional propagation geometry nonlinear coupling of the electromagnetic and electrostatic components occurs that makes the fourth-order problem nonintegrable. A Hamiltonian description is derived, and the manifolds of periodic solutions are studied by Poincare section plots. The influence of ion motion is investigated in different intensity regimes. For ultrarelativistic laser intensities the phase-space structures change significantly compared to the weakly relativistic case. Ion motion becomes very important such that finally electron-ion plasmas in the far-ultrarelativistic regime behave similarly to electron-positron plasmas. The characteristic new types of periodic solutions of the system are identified and discussed.

  10. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 1, PAGES 4l-44, JANUARY 1,200O Atmospheric gravity wave signatures in the infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    extended to calculations of the vertical flux of wave en- ergy and the horizontal momentumcarried. A disadvantage of imagers operating in the l-2 pm region is the necessity of cooling the detector in order variations in OH airglow im- ages in the 1.4-1.5 pm infrared region. 2. Instrumentation and data analysis

  11. Method and apparatus for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux for analysis of same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Denton, M. Bonner (Tucson, AZ); Sperline, Roger (Tucson, AZ), Koppenaal, David W. (Richland, WA), Barinaga, Charles J. (Richland, WA), Hieftje, Gary (Bloomington, IN), Barnes, IV, James H. (Santa Fe, NM); Atlas, Eugene (Irvine, CA)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle detector and method are disclosed providing for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux in a measurement cycle. The detector provides multiple and independently selectable levels of integration and/or gain in a fully addressable readout manner.

  12. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  13. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 95, No. 3, pp. 11501169, June 2005, doi: 10.1785/0120040028 On the Spectral Analysis of Love Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzina, Bojan

    to the pore fluid. Introduction During the past two decades, the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW design of structures (Gazetas, 1991), evaluation of the soil lique- faction potential (Robertson et al., 1992; Andrus and Stokoe, 2000), and assessment of the effectiveness of ground- improvement techniques

  14. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e l Atmosphere ceiling, back panel roof, exposed roof insideSAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A Thesis submitted i no n Convection Exposed Roof Temperature Seasonal Temperature

  15. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  16. Time series analysis of ionization waves in dc neon glow discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassouba, M. A.; Al-Naggar, H. I.; Al-Naggar, N. M.; Wilke, C. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Benha University (Egypt); Institute of Physics, E. M. A. University, Domstrasse 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of dc neon glow discharge is examined by calculating a Lyapunov exponent spectrum (LES) and correlation dimension (D{sub corr}) from experimental time series. The embedding theory is used to reconstruct an attractor with the delay coordinate method. The analysis refers to periodic, chaotic, and quasi-periodic attractors. The results obtained are confirmed by a comparison with other methods of time series analysis such as the Fourier power spectrum and autocorrelation function. The main object of the present work is the positive column of a dc neon glow discharge. The positive column is an excellent model for the study of a non-linearity plasma system because it is nonisothermal plasma far from equilibrium.

  17. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  18. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  19. ITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    , Acknowledgment Surface waves are phenomena that are characterised by the dynamic interplay between linear.3 Linear Dispersive wave model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Wave groupsITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves Brenny van Groesen, Applied Analysis & Mathematical

  20. Gravitational wave recoils in non-axisymmetric Robinson-Trautman spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Aranha; I. Damião Soares; E. V. Tonini

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the gravitational wave recoil waves and the associated net kick velocities in non-axisymmetric Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. We use characteristic initial data for the dynamics corresponding to non-head-on collisions of black holes. We make a parameter study of the kick distributions, corresponding to an extended range of the incidence angle $\\rho_0$ in the initial data. For the range of $\\rho_0$ examined ($3^{\\circ} \\leq \\rho_0 \\leq 110^{\\circ}$) the kick distributions as a function of the symmetric mass parameter $\\eta$ satisfy a law obtained from an empirical modification of the Fitchett law, with a parameter $C$ that accounts for the non-zero net gravitational momentum wave fluxes for the equal mass case. The law fits accurately the kick distributions for the range of $\\rho_0$ examined, with a rms normalized error of the order of $5 \\%$. For the equal mass case the nonzero net gravitational wave momentum flux increases as $\\rho_0$ increases, up to $\\rho_0 \\simeq 55^{\\circ}$ beyond which it decreases. The maximum net kick velocity is about $190 {\\rm km/s}$ for for the boost parameter considered. For $\\rho_0 \\geq 50^{\\circ}$ the distribution is a monotonous function of $\\eta$. The angular patterns of the gravitational waves emitted are examined. Our analysis includes the two polarization modes present in wave zone curvature.

  1. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. II. LAGRANGIAN CONSTRAINED ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Lecoanet, Daniel [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Wood, Toby S., E-mail: vasil@cita.utoronto.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The speed of sound greatly exceeds typical flow velocities in many stellar and planetary interiors. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof models attempt to remove fast acoustic waves while retaining stratified convection and buoyancy dynamics. In astrophysics, anelastic models typically receive the most attention in the class of sound-filtered stratified models. Generally, anelastic models remain valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may break down in strongly sub-adiabatic, stably stratified layers common in stellar radiative zones. However, studying stellar rotation, circulation, and dynamos requires understanding the complex coupling between convection and radiative zones, and this requires robust equations valid in both regimes. Here we extend the analysis of equation sets begun in Brown et al., which studied anelastic models, to two types of pseudo-incompressible models. This class of models has received attention in atmospheric applications, and more recently in studies of white-dwarf supernova progenitors. We demonstrate that one model conserves energy but the other does not. We use Lagrangian variational methods to extend the energy conserving model to a general equation of state, and dub the resulting equation set the generalized pseudo-incompressible (GPI) model. We show that the GPI equations suitably capture low-frequency phenomena in both convection and radiative zones in stars and other stratified systems, and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number codes to this equation set.

  2. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C., E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory for Acoustics and Thermal Physics, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Center for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 23, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vanstreels, K. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (?) of a 500?nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E?=?25?±?1?GPa and ?=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  3. Progress In Electromagnetics Research C, Vol. 49, 6777, 2014 Analysis and Design of Millimeter-Wave Circularly Polarized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Communications Commission (FCC) for wireless communications and automotive radar [1­4]. The 77-GHz band has been transceivers for communication and radar systems at millimeter-wave frequencies. 1. INTRODUCTION Using on their applications. There are several frequency bands in the mm-wave range which have been approved by the Federal

  4. RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

  6. Wave soldering with Pb-free solders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artaki, I.; Finley, D.W.; Jackson, A.M.; Ray, U. [AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States); Vianco, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacturing feasibility and attachment reliability of a series of newly developed lead-free solders were investigated for wave soldering applications. Some of the key assembly aspects addressed included: wettability as a function of board surface finish, flux activation and surface tension of the molten solder, solder joint fillet quality and optimization of soldering thermal profiles. Generally, all new solder formulations exhibited adequate wave soldering performance and can be considered as possible alternatives to eutectic SnPb for wave soldering applications. Further process optimization and flux development is necessary to achieve the defect levels associated with the conventional SnPb process.

  7. Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux Roel Sniedera) Center for Wave, Cambridge CB3 0EL, United Kingdom ivasconc@gmail.com Abstract: Existing methods for Green's function extraction give the Green's function from the correlation of field fluctuations recorded at those points

  8. Resonant absorption in dissipative flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safari, H; Karami, K; Sobouti, Y

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillations of coronal loops are believed to be the primary cause of the solar corona heating. We study the resonant absorbtion of MHD waves in magnetized flux tubes with graded densities across the cross section of the tube. Within the approximation that resistive and viscous processes are operative in thin layers surrounding the singularities of the MHD equations, we give the full spectrum of the eigenfrequencies, damping rates, as well as, the eigenfields of the normal MHD modes of the tube. Both surface and body modes are analyzed and the contribution of each class to heating of the corona is commented on.

  9. Common Analysis of the Relativistic Klystron and the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the standing-wave free-electron laser on the same footingSessler, A.M. , "The Free Electron Laser as a Power SourceNew Version of a Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",

  10. Analysis of spatial mode sensitivity of gravitational wave interferometer and targeted search for gravitational radiation from the Crab pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betzwieser, Joseph (Joseph Charles)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last several years the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has been making steady progress in improving the sensitivities of its three interferometers, two in Hanford, Washington, and one ...

  11. A comparative analysis of the environmental impacts of a Pelamis Wave Energy device with existing off shore developments and installations. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Eoghan

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Scotland is currently at the forefront of development and expansion of wave energy, especially with recent renewable energy targets. Research and development has increased greatly off the Scottish coastline. Various adjectives can be used...

  12. Wave Energy Resources Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flux p14 Appendix A ­ SWAN Numerical Model Calibration with NOAA/NDBO Buoys p21 #12;Wave Power. Vega Ph.D October 11, 2010 #12;Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands October 11, 2010 1 of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges

  13. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  14. Experimental investigation of small-scale breaking waves : flow visualization across the air-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Angus Kai

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of breaking waves significantly affect air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, mass and energy across the ocean interface. Breaking waves also contribute considerable loading to offshore and coastal structures, and ...

  15. Stabilization of moduli by fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrndt, Klaus [Albert-Einstein-Institute, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to fix the moduli, non-trivial fluxes might the essential input. We summarize different aspects of compactifications in the presence of fluxes, as there is the relation to generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions and gauged supergravity but also the description of flux-deformed geometries in terms of G-structures and intrinsic torsion.

  16. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of...

  17. Short communication On the use of the Radon Transform in studying nearshore wave dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shallow water domain, the celerity of short waves is a key kinematic variable to describe energy fluxesShort communication On the use of the Radon Transform in studying nearshore wave dynamics Rafael 23 June 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords: Surf zone Wave transformation Wave propagation

  18. Development of a Computer Program for Three Dimensional Frequency Domain Analysis of Zero Speed First Order Wave Body Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guha, Amitava 1984-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................. 32 2.12 Added Mass and Damping Coefficients ............................................. 34 2.13 Exciting Forces ................................................................................... 34 2.14 Body Motion in Waves.... Irregular frequency of the truncated floating cylinder of radius R ....................... 43 Fig. 6. Irregular frequency at non dimensional frequency 1.96 shown in numerically calculated surge added mass (A11...

  19. ENERGY CONTENT AND PROPAGATION IN TRANSVERSE SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Soler, R. [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: tom.vandoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a significant amount of transverse wave energy has been estimated propagating along solar atmospheric magnetic fields. However, these estimates have been made with the classic bulk Alfven wave model which assumes a homogeneous plasma. In this paper, the kinetic, magnetic, and total energy densities and the flux of energy are computed for transverse MHD waves in one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube models with a piecewise constant or continuous radial density profile. There are fundamental deviations from the properties for classic bulk Alfven waves. (1) There is no local equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy. (2) The flux of energy and the velocity of energy transfer have, in addition to a component parallel to the magnetic field, components in the planes normal to the magnetic field. (3) The energy densities and the flux of energy vary spatially, contrary to the case of classic bulk Alfven waves. This last property has the important consequence that the energy flux computed with the well known expression for bulk Alfven waves could overestimate the real flux by a factor in the range 10-50, depending on the flux tube equilibrium properties.

  20. ACSD/CRB/CCRM Hindcasting Winds and Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ACSD/CRB/CCRM Hindcasting Winds and Waves Using Kinematic Analysis V.R. SwailV.R. SwailWorkstationWindWorkstation®® #12;7 ACSD/CRB/CCRM Wave AnalysisWave Analysis · Import final kinematic surface (10m) winds/CRB/CCRM OUTLINEOUTLINE · Introduction · Data Sources · Wind Analysis · Generation of wave hindcasts · Wind and wave

  1. Two Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the First Sections of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator,"of a standing-wave free electron laser," Nucl. Instr. anda standing-wave free-electron laser," Proc. SPIE Conference

  2. Semiclassical Distorted Wave Model Analysis of Backward Proton Emission from $(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. K. Gaidarov; Y. Watanabe; K. Ogata; M. Kohno; M. Kawai; A. N. Antonov

    2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiclassical distorted wave (SCDW) model with Wigner transform of one-body density matrix is presented for multistep direct $(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ reactions to the continuum. The model uses Wigner distribution functions obtained in methods which include nucleon-nucleon correlations to a different extent, as well as Woods-Saxon (WS) single-particle wave function. The higher momentum components of target nucleons that play a crucial role in reproducing the high-energy part of the backward proton spectra are properly taken into account. This SCDW model is applied to analyses of multistep direct processes in $^{12}$C$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$, $^{40}$Ca$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ and $^{90}$Zr$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ in the incident energy range of 150--392 MeV. The double differential cross sections are calculated up to three-step processes. The calculated angular distributions are in good agreement with the experimental data, in particular at backward angles where the previous SCDW calculations with the WS single-particle wave function showed large underestimation. It is found that the result with the Wigner distribution function based on the coherent density fluctuation model provides overall better agreement with the experimental data over the whole emission energies.

  3. WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research a preliminary examination and analysis of a small suite of 4-D wave data to explore what new insight century. We feel it is timely to encourage further 4-D ocean wave measurement and thereby facilitate fresh

  4. Fluxes, Gaugings and Gaugino Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Derendinger; C. Kounnas; P. M. Petropoulos

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the correspondence between the N = 1 superstring compactifications with fluxes and the N = 4 gauged supergravities, we study effective N = 1 four-dimensional supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates in the framework of orbifold limits of (generalized) Calabi-Yau compactifications. We give examples in heterotic and type II orientifolds in which combined fluxes and condensates lead to vacua with small supersymmetry breaking scale. We clarify the respective roles of fluxes and condensates in supersymmetry breaking, and analyze the scaling properties of the gravitino mass.

  5. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and fourier transform-ion cyclotronresonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  6. Waving in the rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavaleri, Luigi; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of rain on wind wave generation and dissipation. Rain falling on a wavy surface may have a marked tendency to dampen the shorter waves in the tail of the spectrum, the related range increasing with the rain rate. Following the coupling between meteorological and wave models, we derive that on the whole this should imply stronger wind and higher waves in the most energetic part of the spectrum. This is supported by numerical experiments. However, a verification based on the comparison between operational model results and measured data suggests that the opposite is true. This leads to a keen analysis of the overall process, in particular on the role of the tail of the spectrum in modulating the wind input and the white-capping. We suggest that the relationship between white-capping and generation by wind is deeper and more implicative than presently generally assumed.

  7. The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

  8. Vacuum Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  9. High precision photon flux determination for photon tagging experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teymurazyan, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Asratyan, A.; Baker, K.; Benton, L.; Burkert, V.; Clinton, E.; Cole, P.; Collins, P.; Dale, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, R.; Deur, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Ent, R.; Evdokimov, A.; Feng, J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Goryachev, V.; Hardy, K.; He, J.; Ito, M.; Jiang, L.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kolarkar, A.; Konchatnyi, M.; Korchin, A.; Korsch, W.; Kosinov, O.; Kowalski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Larin, I.; Lawrence, D.; Li, X.; Martel, P.; Matveev, V.; McNulty, D.; Mecking, B.; Milbrath, B.; Minehart, R.; Miskimen, R.; Mochalov, V.; Nakagawa, I.; Overby, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.; Prok, Y.; Ritchie, B.; Salgado, C.; Shahinyan, A.; Sitnikov, A.; Sober, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stevens, W.; Underwood, J.; Vasiliev, A.; Vishnyakov, V.; Wood, M.; Zhou, S.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Laboratory PrimEx Collaboration has developed and implemented a method to control the tagged photon flux in photoproduction experiments at the 1% level over the photon energy range from 4.9 to 5.5 GeV. This method has been successfully implemented in a high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Here, we outline the experimental equipment and the analysis techniques used to accomplish this. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and a new method for post-bremsstrahlung electron counting.

  10. Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indrebo, Ann Kristin

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate prediction of wave runup on deepwater offshore platform columns is of great importance for design engineers. Although linear predictive models are commonly used in the design and analysis process, many of the important effects...

  11. A partial wave analysis of the centrally produced K+K- and K0K0 systems in pp interactions at 450 GeV/c and new information on the spin of the fJ(1710)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis et al

    1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial wave analysis of the centrally produced K+K- and K0K0 channels has been performed in pp collisions using an incident beam momentum of 450 GeV/c. An unambiguous physical solution has been found in each channel. The striking feature is the observation of peaks in the S-wave corresponding to the f0(1500) and fJ(1710) with J = 0. The D-wave shows evidence for the f2(1270)/a2(1320), the f2(1525) and the f2(2150) but there is no evidence for a statistically significant contribution in the D-wave in the 1.7 GeV mass region.

  12. High Heat Flux Components Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, J.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

  13. Elastic Wave Behavior Across Linear Slip Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, M.

    plane waves incident at arbitrary angles upon a plane linear slip interface are computed ... Also included in these sections is an analysis ... ish, Ut is of the form.

  14. The Solar Wind Energy Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

  15. Fractal Fluctuations and Quantum-Like Chaos in the Brain by Analysis of Variability of Brain Waves: A New Method Based on a Fractal Variance Function and Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Conte; A. Khrennikov; A. Federici; J. P. Zbilut

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a new method for analysis of fundamental brain waves as recorded by EEG. To this purpose we introduce a Fractal Variance Function that is based on the calculation of the variogram. The method is completed by using Random Matrix Theory. Some examples are given.

  16. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

  17. Wave propagation and shock formation in different magnetic structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebecca Centeno; Manuel Collados; Javier Trujillo Bueno

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Velocity oscillations "measured" simultaneously at the photosphere and the chromosphere -from time series of spectropolarimetric data in the 10830 A region- of different solar magnetic features allow us to study the properties of wave propagation as a function of the magnetic flux of the structure (i.e. two different-sized sunspots, a tiny pore and a facular region). While photospheric oscillations have similar characteristics everywhere, oscillations measured at chromospheric heights show different amplitudes, frequencies and stages of shock development depending on the observed magnetic feature. The analysis of the power and the phase spectra, together with simple theoretical modeling, lead to a series of results concerning wave propagation within the range of heights of this study. We find that, while the atmospheric cut-off frequency and the propagation properties of the different oscillating modes depend on the magnetic feature, in all the cases the power that reaches the high chromosphere above the atmospheric cut-off comes directly from the photosphere by means of linear vertical wave propagation rather than from non-linear interaction of modes.

  18. Integrated Study of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Collisional Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George R. Tynan

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An existing linear magnetized plasma device, the Controlled Shear Decorrelation experiment (CSDX) was used to study the transition from a state of coherent wave like activity to a state of turbulent activity using the magnetic field and thus magnetization of the plasma as the control parameter. The results show the onset of coherent drift waves consistent with linear stability analysis. As the magnetization is raised, at first multiple harmonics appear, consistent with wave steepening. This period is then followed by the beginning of nonlinear interactions between different wave modes, which then results in the formation of narrow frequency but distributed azimuthal wave number fluctuations that are consistent with the formation of long-lived coherent nonlinear structures within the plasmas. These structures, termed quasicoherent modes, persist as the magnetic field is raised. Measurements of turbulent momentum flux indicate that the plasma is also forming an azimuthally symmetric radially sheared fluid flow that is nonlinearly driven by smaller scaled turbulent fluctuations. Further increases in the magnetic field result in the breakup of the quasicoherent mode, and the clear formation of the sheared flow. Numerical simulations of the experiment reproduce the formation of the sheared flow via a vortex merging process, and confirm that the experiment is providing the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of sheared zonal flows from drift turbulent fluctuations in a magnetized plasma.

  19. Multi-Dimensional Error Analysis of Nearshore Wave Modeling Tools, with Application Toward Data-Driven Boundary Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Boyang

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiment ........................................................... 6 1.3.2 Nearshore Canyon Experiment (NCEX) ..................................... 8 2. COMPARISON OF FIELD OBSERVATIONS AND MODEL EXPERIMENTS... ................................................................................................ 10 2.1 Model Parameters and Setup ................................................................ 10 2.2 Comparisons of Delft3D Output to Data .............................................. 11 3. ERROR ANALYSIS...

  20. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

  1. Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

  2. TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalis Agathos; Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Van Den Broeck; John Veitch; Salvatore Vitale

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general relativity (GR) for the first time. We present a data analysis pipeline called TIGER (Test Infrastructure for GEneral Relativity), which is designed to utilize detections of compact binary coalescences to test GR in this regime. TIGER is a model-independent test of GR itself, in that it is not necessary to compare with any specific alternative theory. It performs Bayesian inference on two hypotheses: the GR hypothesis $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm GR}$, and $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, which states that one or more of the post-Newtonian coefficients in the waveform are not as predicted by GR. By the use of multiple sub-hypotheses of $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, in each of which a different number of parameterized deformations of the GR phase are allowed, an arbitrarily large number of 'testing parameters' can be used without having to worry about a model being insufficiently parsimonious if the true number of extra parameters is in fact small. TIGER is well-suited to the regime where most sources have low signal-to-noise ratios, again through the use of these sub-hypotheses. Information from multiple sources can trivially be combined, leading to a stronger test. We focus on binary neutron star coalescences, for which sufficiently accurate waveform models are available that can be generated fast enough on a computer to be fit for use in Bayesian inference. We show that the pipeline is robust against a number of fundamental, astrophysical, and instrumental effects, such as differences between waveform approximants, a limited number of post-Newtonian phase contributions being known, the effects of neutron star spins and tidal deformability on the orbital motion, and instrumental calibration errors.

  3. Thermality of the Hawking flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Is the Hawking flux "thermal"? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word "thermal". The original 1850's notions of thermality --- based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized "black bodies" or "lamp black surfaces" --- when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900's, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but "without" any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, and quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only "approximately" Planck-shaped over a bounded frequency range. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is "approximately" Planck-shaped from both above and below --- the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

  4. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  5. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  6. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  7. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  8. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  9. Type II superconductivity and magnetic flux transport in neutrons stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Jones

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition to a type II proton superconductor which is believed to occur in a cooling neutron star is accompanied by changes in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and by the formation of proton vortices with quantized magnetic flux. Analysis of the electron Boltzmann equation for this system and of the proton supercurrent distribution formed at the transition leads to the derivation of a simple expression for the transport velocity of magnetic flux in the liquid interior of a neutron star. This shows that flux moves easily as a consequence of the interaction between neutron and proton superfluid vortices during intervals of spin-down or spin-up in binary systems. The differences between the present analysis and those of previous workers are reviewed and an error in the paper of Jones (1991) is corrected.

  10. Modification of flux profiles using a faceted concentrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewandowski, A; Scholl, K; Bingham, C

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a faceted solar concentrator allows for some flexibility in aiming strategy and in the intensity of the resulting flux profile at the target. This can be an advantage when considering applications that do not necessarily require maximum concentration, particularly emerging, new applications in solar processed advanced materials. This paper will describe both an analysis of predicted flux profiles for several different aiming strategies using the SOLFUR computer code and experiments to characterize the actual flux profiles realized with a selected aiming strategy. The SOLFUR code models each of the furnace components explicitly. Aim points for each facet can be specified. Thus many strategies for adjusting aim points can be easily explored. One strategy calls for creating as uniform a flux over as large an area as possible. We explored this strategy analytically and experimentally. The experimental data consist of flux maps generated by a video imaging system calibrated against absolute flux measurements taken with circular foil calorimeters. Results from the analytical study and a comparison with the experimental data indicate that uniform profiles can be produced over fairly large areas.

  11. Existence of traveling wave solutions of a high-order nonlinear ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Chen; Monica Torres; Timothy Walsh

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 27, 2009 ... Traveling wave solutions in the form of solitons have been studied in ... applied similar analysis techniques to the problem of traveling wave.

  12. Vorticity Preserving Flux Corrected Transport Scheme for the Acoustic Equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lung, Tyler B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roe, Phil [University of Michigan; Morgan, Nathaniel R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Long term research goals are to develop an improved cell-centered Lagrangian Hydro algorithm with the following qualities: 1. Utilizes Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) to achieve second order accuracy with multidimensional physics; 2. Does not rely on the one-dimensional Riemann problem; and 3. Implements a form of vorticity control. Short term research goals are to devise and implement a 2D vorticity preserving FCT solver for the acoustic equations on an Eulerian mesh: 1. Develop a flux limiting mechanism for systems of governing equations with symmetric wave speeds; 2. Verify the vorticity preserving properties of the scheme; and 3. Compare the performance of the scheme to traditional MUSCL-Hancock and other algorithms.

  13. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  14. Interaction of Kelvin waves and non-locality of the energy transfer in superfluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurie, Jason; Nazarenko, Sergey; Rudenko, Oleksii

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that the physics of interacting Kelvin Waves (KWs) is highly non-trivial and cannot be understood on the basis of pure dimensional reasoning only. A consistent theory of KWs turbulence in superfluids should be based on explicit knowledge of the details of their interactions. To achieve this, we present a detailed calculation and comprehensive analysis of the interaction coefficients for KWs, thereby fixing previous mistakes stemming from unaccounted contributions. As a first application of this analysis, we show that the previously suggested Kozik-Svistunov energy spectrum of KWs, which has been often used for analysis of experimental and numerical data in superfluid turbulence, is irrelevant, because it is based on an erroneous assumption of the locality of the energy transfer through scales. We also demonstrate weak non-locality of the inverse cascade spectrum with a constant particle-number flux and find resulting logarithmic corrections to this spectrum.

  15. Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

  16. THE EMERGENCE OF A TWISTED FLUX TUBE INTO THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE: SUNSPOT ROTATIONS AND THE FORMATION OF A CORONAL FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Y. [HAO, ESSL, National Center for Atmospheric Research , P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a three-dimensional simulation of the dynamic emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube from the top layer of the solar convection zone into the solar atmosphere and corona. It is found that after a brief initial stage of flux emergence during which the two polarities of the bipolar region become separated and the tubes intersecting the photosphere become vertical, significant rotational motion sets in within each polarity. The rotational motions of the two polarities are found to twist up the inner field lines of the emerged fields such that they change their orientation into an inverse configuration (i.e., pointing from the negative polarity to the positive polarity over the neutral line). As a result, a flux rope with sigmoid-shaped, dipped core fields forms in the corona, and the center of the flux rope rises in the corona with increasing velocity as the twisting of the flux rope footpoints continues. The rotational motion in the two polarities is a result of propagation of nonlinear torsional Alfven waves along the flux tube, which transports significant twist from the tube's interior portion toward its expanded coronal portion. This is a basic process whereby twisted flux ropes are developed in the corona with increasing twist and magnetic energy, leading up to solar eruptions.

  17. Characterizing Vertical Mass Flux Profiles in Aeolian Saltation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Eugene

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to November, 2008. These data were supplemented with 621 profiles gathered from an extensive review of the aeolian literature. From the field experiment, the analysis of the grain-size statistics for the flux caught in each trap shows that a reverse in grain...

  18. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Shearing Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Johnson

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    I consider the nonaxisymmetric linear theory of a rotating, isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear flow. The analysis is performed in the shearing box, a local model of a thin disk, using a decomposition in terms of shearing waves, i.e., plane waves in a frame comoving with the shear. These waves do not have a definite frequency as in a normal mode decomposition, and numerical integration of a coupled set of amplitude equations is required to characterize their time dependence. Their generic time dependence, however, is oscillatory with slowly-varying frequency and amplitude, and one can construct accurate analytical solutions by applying the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method to the full set of amplitude equations. The solutions have the following properties: 1) Their accuracy increases with wavenumber, so that most perturbations that fit within the disk are well-approximated as modes with time-dependent frequencies and amplitudes. 2) They can be broadly classed as incompressive and compressive perturbations, the former including the nonaxisymmetric extension of magnetorotationally unstable modes, and the latter being the extension of fast and slow modes to a differentially-rotating medium. 3) Wave action is conserved, implying that their energy varies with frequency. 4) Their shear stress is proportional to the slope of their frequency, so that they transport angular momentum outward (inward) when their frequency increases (decreases). The complete set of solutions constitutes a comprehensive linear test suite for numerical MHD algorithms that incorporate a background shear flow. I conclude with a brief discussion of possible astrophysical applications.

  20. Flux cancellation and coronal mass ejectionsa... Jon A. Linker,b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and coronal mass ejections CMEs . This paper shows that flux cancellation in an energized two into the solar wind and forms an interplanetary shock wave. A similar eruption occurs for a three, ener- getic events in the solar corona that expel plasma and mag- netic fields into the solar wind

  1. Numerical calculation of wave refraction by digital computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orr, Terry Edwin

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF REFRACTION COEFFICIENTS Geometric Aspect of Wave Refraction. Energy Aspect of Wave Refraction I1I. ADAPTATION TO COMPUTER METHCDS IV, PROGRAM INPUT AND OUTPUT V. ANALYSIS AND RESULTS VI. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS. 6 8 19 30 33 44 BIBLIOGRAPHY... that the wave does not advance at a uniform rate. With more nearabout e structures being built in coastal regions, ''t is imperati ve that the design engineer be able to estimate wave characteristics in shallow water. Wave height is a prime criterion...

  2. Heisenberg groups and noncommutative fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freed, Daniel S. [Department of Mathematics, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: dafr@math.utexas.edu; Moore, Gregory W. [Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Segal, Graeme [All Souls College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a group-theoretical approach to the formulation of generalized abelian gauge theories, such as those appearing in string theory and M-theory. We explore several applications of this approach. First, we show that there is an uncertainty relation which obstructs simultaneous measurement of electric and magnetic flux when torsion fluxes are included. Next, we show how to define the Hilbert space of a self-dual field. The Hilbert space is Z{sub 2}-graded and we show that, in general, self-dual theories (including the RR fields of string theory) have fermionic sectors. We indicate how rational conformal field theories associated to the two-dimensional Gaussian model generalize to (4k+2)-dimensional conformal field theories. When our ideas are applied to the RR fields of string theory we learn that it is impossible to measure the K-theory class of a RR field. Only the reduction modulo torsion can be measured.

  3. Local Dynamics of Synoptic Waves in the Martian Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavulich, Michael J., Jr.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The sources and sinks of energy for transient waves in the Martian atmosphere are investigated, applying diagnostic techniques developed for the analysis of terrestrial baroclinic waves to output from a Mars General Circulation Model...

  4. Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

  5. ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data

  6. Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deldar, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles obtained from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for $SU(3)$ gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

  7. The Nature of Running Penumbral Waves Revealed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Shaun Bloomfield; Andreas Lagg; Sami K. Solanki

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We seek to clarify the nature of running penumbral (RP) waves: are they chromospheric trans-sunspot waves or a visual pattern of upward-propagating waves? Full Stokes spectropolarimetric time series of the photospheric Si I 10827 \\AA line and the chromospheric He I 10830 \\AA multiplet were inverted using a Milne-Eddington atmosphere. Spatial pixels were paired between the outer umbral/inner penumbral photosphere and the penumbral chromosphere using inclinations retrieved by the inversion and the dual-height pairings of line-of-sight velocity time series were studied for signatures of wave propagation using a Fourier phase difference analysis. The dispersion relation for radiatively cooling acoustic waves, modified to incorporate an inclined propagation direction, fits well the observed phase differences between the pairs of photospheric and chromospheric pixels. We have thus demonstrated that RP waves are in effect low-beta slow-mode waves propagating along the magnetic field.

  8. Turbulent Fluxes in Stably Stratified Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'vov, Victor S; Rudenko, Oleksii; 10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T132/014010

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extended version of an invited talk given on the International Conference "Turbulent Mixing and Beyond". The dynamical and statistical description of stably stratified turbulent boundary layers with the important example of the stable atmospheric boundary layer in mind is addressed. Traditional approaches to this problem, based on the profiles of mean quantities, velocity second-order correlations, and dimensional estimates of the turbulent thermal flux run into a well known difficulty, predicting the suppression of turbulence at a small critical value of the Richardson number, in contradiction with observations. Phenomenological attempts to overcome this problem suffer from various theoretical inconsistencies. Here we present an approach taking into full account all the second-order statistics, which allows us to respect the conservation of total mechanical energy. The analysis culminates in an analytic solution of the profiles of all mean quantities and all second-order correlations removing t...

  9. Irregular wave induced velocities in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultan, Nels John

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    probabil- ity density function. This thesis applies this expanded distribution to fluid particle velocities instead of wave elevations. Ochi (1982) presents a review of recent ad- vances in the stochastic analysis of random seas. He notes that the first..., (Longuet-Higgins 1963), that purely linear waves will have a Gaussian distribu- tion. Therefore, any deviation from a Gaussian distribution must be attributed to wave nonlinearities. Ochi (1982) discusses a series of experiments by Honda and Mitsuyasu...

  10. Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

  11. The Statistics of the Prompt-to-Afterglow GRB Flux Ratios and the Supercritical Pile GRB Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazanas, D; Sultana, J; Mastichiadis, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the statistics of the ratio, ${\\mathrm R}$, between the prompt and afterglow "plateau" fluxes of GRB. This we define as the ratio between the mean prompt energy flux in the {\\em Swift} BAT and the {\\em Swift} XRT, immediately following the steep transition between these two states and the beginning of the afterglow stage referred to as the "plateau". Like the distribution of other GRB observables, the histogram of ${\\mathrm R}$ is close to log-normal, with maximum at ${\\mathrm R = R}_{\\rm m} \\simeq 2,000$, FWHM of about 2 decades and with the entire distribution spanning about 6 decades in the value of ${\\mathrm R}$. We note that the peak of the distribution is close to the proton-to-electron mass ratio $({\\mathrm R}_{\\rm m} \\simeq m_p/m_e = 1836)$, as proposed by us earlier, on the basis of a specific model for the conversion of the GRB blast wave kinetic energy into radiation, before any similar analysis were made. It therefore appears that, in addition to the values of the energy of peak luminos...

  12. High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

  13. Estimation of advective fluxes from CO2 flux profile observations at the Cabauw Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Estimation of advective fluxes from CO2 flux profile observations at the Cabauw Tower Kasper O profile observations at the Cabauw Tower Version 1.0 Date April 2012 Status Final #12;#12;Estimation of Advective Fluxes from CO2 Flux Profile Observations at the Cabauw Tower Master of Science Thesis Kasper O

  14. ELECTRON HALO AND STRAHL FORMATION IN THE SOLAR WIND BY RESONANT INTERACTION WITH WHISTLER WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . A thermal core and a suprathermal halo and antisunward, magnetic field­aligned beam, or ``strahl,'' can- trons in the solar corona and wind, including resonant interaction between electrons and whistler waves, can repro- duce an enhancement of suprathermal electron fluxes compared to the core flux. The whistler

  15. An experimental investigation of critical heat flux in subcooled internal flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatto, Donald Patrick

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diameters, tube lengths, and mass flow rates. Methods of developing predictive correlations for subcooled critical heat flux based on dimensional analysis, and the sublayer dryout model, are described and applied to the data from these experiments. When...

  16. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Rudolph; Waldemar Herr; Christoph Grzeschik; Tammo Sternke; Alexander Grote; Manuel Popp; Dennis Becker; Hauke Müntinga; Holger Ahlers; Achim Peters; Claus Lämmerzahl; Klaus Sengstock; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

    2015-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a challenging endeavor. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6$\\,$s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1$\\,$Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based BEC experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. Additionally, the flux is approaching those of current interferometers employing Raman-type velocity selection of laser-cooled atoms. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for transportable high-precision quantum sensors.

  17. ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We

  18. Gradual eddy-wave crossover in superfluid turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'vov, Victor S; Rudenko, Oleksii

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revise the theory of superfluid turbulence near the absolute zero of temperature and suggest a model with differential approximation for the energy fluxes in the k-space carried by the collective hydrodynamic motions of quantized vortex lines and by their individual uncorrelated motions known as Kelvin waves. The model predicts energy spectra of the hydrodynamic and the Kelvin waves components of the system, which experience a smooth crossover between different regimes of motion over a finite range of scales.

  19. Gradual eddy-wave crossover in superfluid turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor S. L'vov; Sergey V. Nazarenko; Oleksii Rudenko

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We revise the theory of superfluid turbulence near the absolute zero of temperature and suggest a model with differential approximation for the energy fluxes in the k-space carried by the collective hydrodynamic motions of quantized vortex lines and by their individual uncorrelated motions known as Kelvin waves. The model predicts energy spectra of the hydrodynamic and the Kelvin waves components of the system, which experience a smooth crossover between different regimes of motion over a finite range of scales.

  20. On the wave energy potential of Western Black Sea shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galabov, Vasko

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study we evaluate the approaches to estimate the wave energy potential of the western Black Sea shelf with numerical models. For the purpose of our evaluation and due to the lack of long time series of measurements in the selected area of the Black Sea, we compare the modeled mean wave power flux output from the SWAN wave model with the only available long term measurements from the buoy of Gelendzhik for the period 1997-2003 (with gaps). The forcing meteorological data for the numerical wave models for the selected years is extracted from the ERA Interim reanalysis of ECMWF (European Centre for Medium range Forecasts). For the year 2003 we also compare the estimated wave power with the modeled by SWAN, using ALADIN regional atmospheric model winds. We try to identify the shortcomings and limitations of the numerical modeling approach to the evaluation of the wave energy potential in Black Sea.

  1. Wave functions of linear systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Sowinski

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete analysis of quantum wave functions of linear systems in an arbitrary number of dimensions is given. It is shown how one can construct a complete set of stationary quantum states of an arbitrary linear system from purely classical arguments. This construction is possible because for linear systems classical dynamics carries the whole information about quantum dynamics.

  2. Validation/Uncertainty Quantification for Large Eddy Simulations of the heat flux in the Tangentially Fired Oxy-Coal Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.J.; Eddings, E.G.; Ring, T.; Thornock, J.; Draper, T.; Isaac, B.; Rezeai, D.; Toth, P.; Wu, Y.; Kelly, K.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task is to produce predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for the heat flux in commercial-scale, tangentially fired, oxy-coal boilers. Validation data came from the Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF) for tangentially fired, oxy-coal operation. This task brings together experimental data collected under Alstom’s DOE project for measuring oxy-firing performance parameters in the BSF with this University of Utah project for large eddy simulation (LES) and validation/uncertainty quantification (V/UQ). The Utah work includes V/UQ with measurements in the single-burner facility where advanced strategies for O2 injection can be more easily controlled and data more easily obtained. Highlights of the work include: • Simulations of Alstom’s 15 megawatt (MW) BSF, exploring the uncertainty in thermal boundary conditions. A V/UQ analysis showed consistency between experimental results and simulation results, identifying uncertainty bounds on the quantities of interest for this system (Subtask 9.1) • A simulation study of the University of Utah’s oxy-fuel combustor (OFC) focused on heat flux (Subtask 9.2). A V/UQ analysis was used to show consistency between experimental and simulation results. • Measurement of heat flux and temperature with new optical diagnostic techniques and comparison with conventional measurements (Subtask 9.3). Various optical diagnostics systems were created to provide experimental data to the simulation team. The final configuration utilized a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) camera to measure heat flux and temperature, which was synchronized with a high-speed, visible camera to utilize two-color pyrometry to measure temperature and soot concentration. • Collection of heat flux and temperature measurements in the University of Utah’s OFC for use is subtasks 9.2 and 9.3 (Subtask 9.4). Several replicates were carried to better assess the experimental error. Experiments were specifically designed for the generation of high-fidelity data from a turbulent oxy-coal flame for the validation of oxy-coal simulation models. Experiments were also conducted on the OFC to determine heat flux profiles using advanced strategies for O2 injection. This is important when considering retrofit of advanced O2 injection in retrofit configurations.

  3. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

  4. Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.E.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  6. Experiments on wind-perturbed rogue wave hydrodynamics using the Peregrine breather model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom 2 Dynamics Group, Hamburg University on the surface that results in a flux of energy from the wind to the waves and (ii) it generates a rotationalExperiments on wind-perturbed rogue wave hydrodynamics using the Peregrine breather model A

  7. ac rectangular wave: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vibration analysis. I. Mansour Nikkhah-bahrami; Masih Loghmani; Mostafa Pooyanfar 6 Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves on a Rectangular Lattice of Polarizable Points...

  8. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America...

  9. Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

  10. Analysis of collective spin-wave modes at different points within the hysteresis loop of a one-dimensional magnonic crystal comprising alternative-width nanostripes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adekunle

    , Singapore 117685, Singapore 6 School of Physics M013, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, 6009 Western Australia, Australia Received 17 June 2010; revised manuscript received 7 October 2010; published and forbidden magnonic energy bands. The measured frequencies as a function of the exchanged wave vector have

  11. Energy Contents of Gravitational Waves in Teleparallel Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Sumaira Taj

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The conserved quantities, that are, gravitational energy-momentum and its relevant quantities are investigated for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity using the Hamiltonian approach. For both cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves, we obtain definite energy and constant momentum. The constant momentum shows consistency with the results available in General Relativity and teleparallel gravity. The angular momentum for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves also turn out to be constant. Further, we evaluate their gravitational energy-momentum fluxes and gravitational pressure.

  12. Surface Wave Enhanced Turbulence as an important source energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Pulling by wind stress & surface waves 9/15/2006 4 Heating Cooling Heating Cooling CoolingHeating . . Wind) Surface heating/cooling cannot maintain THC observed in the oceans. Sandstrom Theorem and the new debate 3 balance in the oceans Geostrophic Currents Ekman Drift Freshwater Flux 0.05 KE GPE Mean State Geothermal

  13. ABSTRACT : Wave propagation phenomena in soils can be experimentally simulated using centrifuge scale models. An original excitation device (drop-ball arrangement) is proposed to generate short wave trains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ABSTRACT : Wave propagation phenomena in soils can be experimentally simulated using centrifuge. Propagation is investigated through dispersion laws. For drop-ball experiments, spherical wave field analysis assuming linear viscoelasticity leads to a complete analytical description of wave propagation. Damping

  14. Fluxing agent for metal cast joining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gunkel, Ronald W. (Lower Burrell, PA); Podey, Larry L. (Greensburg, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  15. Confinement and the Short Type I' Flux Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the recent world-sheet analysis of the quantum fluctuations of a short flux tube in type II string theory leads to a simple and precise description of a pair of stuck D0branes in an orientifold compactification of the type I' string theory. The existence of a stable type I' flux tube of sub-string-scale length is a consequence of the confinement of quantized flux associated with the scalar dualized ten-form background field strength *F_{10}, evidence for a -2brane in the BPS spectrum of M theory. Using heterotic-type I duality, we infer the existence of an M2brane of finite width O(\\sqrt{\\alpha'}) in M-theory, the strong coupling resolution of a spacetime singularity in the D=9 twisted and toroidally compactified E_8 x E_8 heterotic string. This phenomenon has a bosonic string analog in the existence of a stable short electric flux tube arising from the confinement of photons due to tachyon field dynamics. The appendix clarifies the appearance of nonperturbative states and enhanced gauge symmetry in toroidal compactifications of the type I' string. We account for all of the known disconnected components of the moduli space of theories with sixteen supercharges, in striking confirmation of heterotic-type I duality.

  16. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

  17. Nonlinear, stationary electrostatic ion cyclotron waves: Exact solutions for solitons, periodic waves, and wedge shaped waveforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, J. F. [Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics, Durban University of Technology, Steve Biko Campus, Durban 4001 (South Africa); School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag: X54001, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Doyle, T. B. [Materials Research Division, iThemba LABS, P.O.Box 722, Somerset West, 7129, South Africa and School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag: X54001, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Rajah, S. S. [Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics, Durban University of Technology, Steve Biko Campus, Durban 4001 (South Africa)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of fully nonlinear stationary electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is further developed. The existence of two fundamental constants of motion; namely, momentum flux density parallel to the background magnetic field and energy density, facilitates the reduction of the wave structure equation to a first order differential equation. For subsonic waves propagating sufficiently obliquely to the magnetic field, soliton solutions can be constructed. Importantly, analytic expressions for the amplitude of the soliton show that it increases with decreasing wave Mach number and with increasing obliquity to the magnetic field. In the subsonic, quasi-parallel case, periodic waves exist whose compressive and rarefactive amplitudes are asymmetric about the 'initial' point. A critical 'driver' field exists that gives rise to a soliton-like structure which corresponds to infinite wavelength. If the wave speed is supersonic, periodic waves may also be constructed. The aforementioned asymmetry in the waveform arises from the flow being driven towards the local sonic point in the compressive phase and away from it in the rarefactive phase. As the initial driver field approaches the critical value, the end point of the compressive phase becomes sonic and the waveform develops a wedge shape. This feature and the amplitudes of the compressive and rarefactive portions of the periodic waves are illustrated through new analytic expressions that follow from the equilibrium points of a wave structure equation which includes a driver field. These expressions are illustrated with figures that illuminate the nature of the solitons. The presently described wedge-shaped waveforms also occur in water waves, for similar 'transonic' reasons, when a Coriolis force is included.

  18. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  19. NO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW BLAST WAVES ENCOUNTERING SUDDEN CIRCUMBURST DENSITY CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gat, Ilana; Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power-law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreading, collimation, and edge effects of the blast wave as it encounters the change in circumburst medium. In all cases considered in this paper, we find that a flare will not be observed for any of the density changes studied.

  20. Distribution of electric field and energy flux around the cracks on the surfaces of Nd-doped phosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lei; Huang Li; Fan Sijun; Bai Gongxun; Li Kefeng; Chen Wei; Hu Lili

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate and calculate numerically the electromagnetic field and energy flux around a surface crack of an Nd-doped phosphate laser glass by using the finite-difference time-domain method. Because of a strong interference between the incident wave and the total internal reflections from the crack and the glass surface, the electric field is redistributed and enhanced. The results show that the electric-field distribution and corresponding energy flux component depend sensitively on the light polarization and crack geometry, such as orientation and depth. The polarization of the incident laser beam relative to the crack surfaces will determine the profile of the electric field around the crack. Under TE wave incidence, the energy flux peak is always inside the glass. But under TM wave incidence, the energy flux peak will be located inside the glass or inside the air gap. For both incident modes, the light intensification factor increases with the crack depth, especially for energy flux along the surface. Because cracks on the polished surfaces are the same as the roots extending down, the probability for much larger intensification occurring is high. The results suggest that the surface laser-damage threshold of Nd-doped phosphate may decrease dramatically with subsurface damage.

  1. Data system for automatic flux mapping applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couch, R.D.; Kasinoff, A.M.; Neuner, J.A.; Oates, R.M.

    1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In an automatic flux mapping system utilizing a microprocessor for control and data information processing, signals from the incore detectors providing the flux mapping operation are converted to a frequency link and are made available to the microprocessor via a programmable timer thus minimizing the participation of the microprocessor so that the microprocessor can be made more available to satisfy other tasks.

  2. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

  3. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  4. PHELIX for flux compression studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

  5. AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

  6. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Rudolph; Waldemar Herr; Christoph Grzeschik; Tammo Sternke; Alexander Grote; Manuel Popp; Dennis Becker; Hauke Müntinga; Holger Ahlers; Achim Peters; Claus Lämmerzahl; Klaus Sengstock; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for portable high-precision quantum sensors.

  7. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph, Jan; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of...

  8. Barotropic Impacts of Surface Friction on Eddy Kinetic Energy and Momentum Fluxes: An Alternative to the Barotropic Governor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.

    Barotropic Impacts of Surface Friction on Eddy Kinetic Energy and Momentum Fluxes: An Alternative energy decreases, a response that is inconsistent with the conventional barotropic governor mechanism on eddy momentum fluxes and eddy kinetic energy. Analysis of the pseudomomentum budget shows

  9. Flux penetration into superconducting Nb3Sn in oblique magnetic fields Diana G. Gheorghe, Mariela Menghini, and Rinke J. Wijngaarden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Flux penetration into superconducting Nb3Sn in oblique magnetic fields Diana G. Gheorghe, Mariela; published 14 June 2006 Penetration of magnetic flux into a rectangular platelet of superconducting Nb3Sn-II superconductors. For such an analysis, often the simplest solutions of the critical state problem are used, which

  10. Photon wave function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, the photon wave function exists as long as it can be precisely defined and made useful.

  11. http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Influence of Temperature on Guided Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Influence of Temperature on Guided Wave Propagation Manton J. Guers Ph-established technique for studying ultrasonic wave propagation in both conventional and guided wave applications in the mechanical properties influences the guided wave propagation. In order to analysis the transient results

  12. Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 45, No. 5, 2009 MODELING THE ELASTIC WAVE PROPAGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrov, Victor

    427 Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 45, No. 5, 2009 MODELING THE ELASTIC WAVE PROPAGATION UDC 622.7 + 622 The wave propagation analysis revealed that the low-frequency pendulum wave propagating in a 2D block medium with periodic structure due to the action of local impulse has a two-wave

  13. LABORATORY OBSERVATIONS AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE EFFECTS OF AN ARRAY OF WAVE ENERGY CONVERTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    1 LABORATORY OBSERVATIONS AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE EFFECTS OF AN ARRAY OF WAVE ENERGY of wave energy converters (WECs) on water waves through the analysis of extensive laboratory experiments absorption is a reasonable predictor of the effect of WECs on the far field. Keywords: wave- energy; spectral

  14. Computations of Three-Dimensional Overturning Waves in Shallow Water: Dynamics and Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Computations of Three-Dimensional Overturning Waves in Shallow Water: Dynamics and Kinematics P. A detailed analysis of wave profiles and wave kinematics (both on the free surface and within the flow waves over constant depth, greatly contributed to our understandingof breakingwave kinemat- ics

  15. Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arana, J I; Grahn, H T

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains.

  16. Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Arana; L. L. Bonilla; H. T. Grahn

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains.

  17. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  18. High-Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a high-flux, microchannel solar receiver project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by Oregon State University, is working to demonstrate a microchannel-based solar receiver capable of absorbing high solar flux, while using a variety of liquid and gaseous working fluids. High-flux microchannel receivers have the potential to dramatically reduce the size and cost of a solar receiver by minimizing re-radiation and convective losses.

  19. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  20. Internal Wave Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Manikandan S.

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous and significant means of momentum and energy transport in the oceans, atmosphere, and astrophysical bodies. Here, we show that internal wave propagation in nonuniform density stratifications, ...

  1. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

  2. A Wave-function for Stringy Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costas Kounnas; Nicolaos Toumbas; Jan Troost

    2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a wave-function for string theory cosmological backgrounds. We give a prescription for computing its norm following an earlier analysis within general relativity. Under Euclidean continuation, the cosmologies we discuss in this paper are described in terms of compact parafermionic worldsheet systems. To define the wave-function we provide a T-fold description of the parafermionic conformal field theory, and of the corresponding string cosmology. In specific examples, we compute the norm of the wave-function and comment on its behavior as a function of moduli.

  3. Peculiarities of wave fields in nonlocal media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Danylenko; S. I. Skurativskyi

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The article summarizes the studies of wave fields in structured non-equilibrium media describing by means of nonlocal hydrodynamic models. Due to the symmetry properties of models, we derived the invariant wave solutions satisfying autonomous dynamical systems. Using the methods of numerical and qualitative analysis, we have shown that these systems possess periodic, multiperiodic, quasiperiodic, chaotic, and soliton-like solutions. Bifurcation phenomena caused by the varying of nonlinearity and nonlocality degree are investigated as well.

  4. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  5. A low cost high flux solar simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codd, Daniel S.

    A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

  6. Bragg grating rogue wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degasperis, Antonio; Aceves, Alejandro B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the rogue wave solution of the classical massive Thirring model, that describes nonlinear optical pulse propagation in Bragg gratings. Combining electromagnetically induced transparency with Bragg scattering four-wave mixing, may lead to extreme waves at extremely low powers.

  7. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    , known as parametric sub- harmonic instability, results generally when a disturbance of one frequency imparts energy to disturbances of half that frequency.13,14 Generally, a plane periodic internal wave, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  8. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

  9. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  10. Nonlinear acoustic wave generation in a three-phase seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kukarkin, A B; Zhileikin, Ya M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of an acoustic wave by two pump sound waves is studied in a three-phase marine sediment that consists of a solid frame and the pore water with air bubbles in it. To avoid shock-wave formation the interaction is considered in the frequency range where there is a significant amount of sound velocity dispersion. Nonlinear equations are obtained to describe the interaction of acoustic waves in the presence of air bubbles. An expression for the amplitude of the generated wave is obtained and numerical analysis of its dependence on distance and on the resonance frequency of bubbles is performed.

  11. Nonlinear acoustic wave generation in a three-phase seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Kukarkin; N. I. Pushkina; Ya. M. Zhileikin

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of an acoustic wave by two pump sound waves is studied in a three-phase marine sediment that consists of a solid frame and the pore water with air bubbles in it. To avoid shock-wave formation the interaction is considered in the frequency range where there is a significant amount of sound velocity dispersion. Nonlinear equations are obtained to describe the interaction of acoustic waves in the presence of air bubbles. An expression for the amplitude of the generated wave is obtained and numerical analysis of its dependence on distance and on the resonance frequency of bubbles is performed.

  12. Constraints on the ionizing flux emitted by T Tauri stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Alexander; C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

    2005-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an analysis of ultraviolet observations of T Tauri Stars (TTS). By analysing emission measures taken from the literature we derive rates of ionizing photons from the chromospheres of 5 classical TTS in the range ~10^41-10^44 photons/s, although these values are subject to large uncertainties. We propose that the HeII/CIV line ratio can be used as a reddening-independent indicator of the hardness of the ultraviolet spectrum emitted by TTS. By studying this line ratio in a much larger sample of objects we find evidence for an ionizing flux which does not decrease, and may even increase, as TTS evolve. This implies that a significant fraction of the ionizing flux from TTS is not powered by the accretion of disc material onto the central object, and we discuss the significance of this result and its implications for models of disc evolution. The presence of a significant ionizing flux in the later stages of circumstellar disc evolution provides an important new constraint on disc photoevaporation models.

  13. Emission Origin for the Wave of Quanta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjay M Wagh

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that certain assumptions about the process of the emission of the quanta by their (oscillating) emitter provide for their changing (oscillatory) flux at any location. This mechanism underlying (such) wave phenomena is not based, both, on the newtonian notion of force and the field concept (of Faraday, Maxwell, Lorentz and Einstein). When applied to the case of thermal radiation, this emission origin for the wave of quanta is shown here to be consistent with the laws of the black body radiation. We conclude therefore also that a conceptual framework, which is not rooted in the notion of force and in the field concept, may provide a deterministic basis underlying the probabilistic methods of the quantum theory.

  14. au flux diffus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contribution of the GRB prompt and scattered emissions to the measured extragalactic gamma-ray flux. To estimate this contribution we optimistically require that the energy flux...

  15. Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape034hsu2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Novel Flux Coupling...

  16. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

  17. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

  18. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  19. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  20. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  1. Modeling of the recycling particle flux and electron particle transport in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.R.; Jackson, G.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States); Owen, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Porter, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most difficult aspects of performing an equilibrium particle transport analysis in a diverted tokamak is the determination of the particle flux which enters the plasma after recycling from the divertor plasma, the divertor target plates or the vessel wall. An approach which has been utilized in the past is to model the edge, scrape-off layer (SOL), and divertor plasma to match measured plasma parameters and then use a neutral transport code to obtain an edge recycling flux while trying to match the measured divertor D(x emissivity. Previous simulations were constrained by electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) data at the outer midplane, divertor heat flux from infrared television cameras, and n{sub e}, T{sub e} and particle flux at the target from fixed Langmuir probes, along with the divertor D{sub {alpha}} emissivity. In this paper, we present results of core fueling calculations from the 2-D modeling for ELM-free discharges, constrained by data from the new divertor diagnostics. In addition, we present a simple technique for estimating the recycling flux just after the L-H transition and demonstrate how this technique is supported by the detailed modeling. We will show the effect which inaccuracies in the recycling flux have on the calculated particle flux in the plasma core. For some specific density profiles, it is possible to separate the convective flux from the conductive flux. The diffusion coefficients obtained show a sharp decrease near a normalized radius of 0.9 indicating the presence of a transport barrier.

  2. A comparison between matter wave and light wave interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacôme Delva; Marie-Christine Angonin; Philippe Tourrenc

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate and compare the response of light wave interferometers and matter wave interferometers to gravitational waves. We find that metric matter wave interferometers will not challenge kilometric light wave interferometers such as Virgo or LIGO, but could be a good candidate for the detection of very low frequency gravitational waves.

  3. Moreton Waves and EIT Waves Related to the Flare Events of June 3, 2012 and July 6, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Admiranto, A G; Yus'an, U; Puspitaningrum, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present geometrical and kinematical analysis of Moreton waves and EIT waves observed on June 3, 2012 and Moreton waves observed on July 6, 2012. The Moreton waves were recorded in H$\\alpha$ images of Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) archive and EIT waves obtained from SDO/AIA observations, especially in 193 nm channel. The observed wave of June 3 has angular span of about $70^{\\circ}$ with a broad wave front associated to NOAA active region 11496. It was found that the speed of the wave that started propagating at 17.53 UT is between 950 to 1500 km/s. Related to this wave occurrence, there was solar type II and III radio bursts. The speed of the EIT in this respect about 247 km/sec. On the other hand, the wave of July 6 may be associated to X1.1 class flare that occurred at 23.01 UT around the 11514 active region. From the kinematical analysis, the wave propagated with the initial velocity of about 1180 km/s which is in agreement with coronal shock velocity derived from type II radio burst observati...

  4. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  5. IJOPE Paper No JC-343AB-final 9/26/04 Biausser Page number 1 Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of 3D Breaking Waves on Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Kinematics and Dynamics of 3D Breaking Waves on Slopes Benjamin Biausser1 , Stéphan T. Grilli2 , Philippe and internal kinematics (velocity, vorticity, pressure) are presented. KEY WORDS: breaking ocean waves years, our understanding of wave breaking dynamics and kinematics is still quite incomplete. Due

  6. Bifurcations of traveling wave solutions for an integrable equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jibin [Department of Mathematics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China) and Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan 650093 (China); Qiao Zhijun [Department of Mathematics, University of Texas Pan-American, 1201 West University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78541 (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the following equation m{sub t}=(1/2)(1/m{sup k}){sub xxx}-(1/2)(1/m{sup k}){sub x}, which is proposed by Z. J. Qiao [J. Math. Phys. 48, 082701 (2007)] and Qiao and Liu [Chaos, Solitons Fractals 41, 587 (2009)]. By adopting the phase analysis method of planar dynamical systems and the theory of the singular traveling wave systems to the traveling wave solutions of the equation, it is shown that for different k, the equation may have infinitely many solitary wave solutions, periodic wave solutions, kink/antikink wave solutions, cusped solitary wave solutions, and breaking loop solutions. We discuss in a detail the cases of k=-2,-(1/2),(1/2),2, and parametric representations of all possible bounded traveling wave solutions are given in the different (c,g)-parameter regions.

  7. Kinetic Alfvén wave turbulence and formation of localized structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Modi, K. V. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India) [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents non-linear interaction of magnetosonic wave with kinetic Alfvén wave for intermediate ?-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i}???1). A set of dimensionless equations have been developed for analysis by considering ponderomotive force due to pump kinetic Alfvén wave in the dynamics of magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis has been done to study modulational instability or linear growth rate. Further, numerical simulation has been carried out to study the nonlinear stage of instability and resulting power spectrum applicable to solar wind around 1 AU. Due to the nonlinearity, background density of magnetosonic wave gets modified which results in localization of kinetic Alfvén wave. From the obtained results, we observed that spectral index follows k{sup ?3.0}, consistent with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU. The result shows the steepening of power spectrum which may be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind.

  8. Coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux buildup in the heliosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    electron heat flux. The first panel shows the preeruption heliospheric flux, which consists of the an open the observed doubling in the magnetic field intensity at 1 AU over the solar cycle. Such timescales signatures; no flux buildup results. The dynamic simulation yields a solar cycle flux variation with high

  9. Connection between inner jet kinematics and broadband flux variability in the BL Lac object S5 0716+714

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, B; Marscher, A P; Hodgson, J A; Fuhrmann, L; Angelakis, E; Britzen, S; Zensus, J A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a high-frequency very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) kinematical study of the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 over the time period of September 2008 to October 2010. The aim of the study is to investigate the relation of the jet kinematics to the observed broadband flux variability. We find significant non-radial motions in the jet outflow of the source. In the radial direction, the highest measured apparent speed is \\sim37 c, which is exceptionally high, especially for a BL Lac object. Patterns in the jet flow reveal a roughly stationary feature \\sim0.15 mas downstream of the core. The long-term fits to the component trajectories reveal acceleration in the sub-mas region of the jet. The measured brightness temperature, T_{B}, follows a continuous trend of decline with distance, T_B \\propto r_{jet}^{-(2.36\\pm0.41)}, which suggests a gradient in Doppler factor along the jet axis. Our analysis suggest that a moving disturbance (or a shock wave) from the base of the jet produces the high-energy (optica...

  10. Can High Frequency Acoustic Waves Heat the Quiet Sun Chromosphere?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Carlsson; Viggo H. Hansteen; Bart De Pontieu; Scott McIntosh; Theodore D. Tarbell; Dick Shine; Saku Tsuneta; Yukio Katsukawa; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Yoshinori Suematsu; Toshifumi Shimizu; Shin'ichi Nagata

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Hinode/SOT Ca II H-line and blue continuum broadband observations to study the presence and power of high frequency acoustic waves at high spatial resolution. We find that there is no dominant power at small spatial scales; the integrated power using the full resolution of Hinode (0.05'' pixels, 0.16'' resolution) is larger than the power in the data degraded to 0.5'' pixels (TRACE pixel size) by only a factor of 1.2. At 20 mHz the ratio is 1.6. Combining this result with the estimates of the acoustic flux based on TRACE data of Fossum & Carlsson (2006), we conclude that the total energy flux in acoustic waves of frequency 5-40 mHz entering the internetwork chromosphere of the quiet Sun is less than 800 W m$^{-2}$, inadequate to balance the radiative losses in a static chromosphere by a factor of five.

  11. Nonlinear spherical Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf Torkelsson; G. Christopher Boynton

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an one-dimensional numerical study of Alfven waves propagating along a radial magnetic field. Neglecting losses, any spherical Alfven wave, no matter how small its initial amplitude is, becomes nonlinear at sufficiently large radii. From previous simulations of Alfven waves in plane parallel atmospheres we did expect the waves to steepen and produce current sheets in the nonlinear regime, which was confirmed by our new calculations. On the other hand we did find that even the least nonlinear waves were damped out almost completely before 10 solar radii. A damping of that kind is required by models of Alfven wave-driven winds from old low-mass stars as these winds are mainly accelerated within a few stellar radii.

  12. Microlocal Analysis of Thermoacoustic (or ... - Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen Stefanov

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Microlocal Analysis of Thermoacoustic (or Multiwave). Tomography, III. Plamen Stefanov. Purdue University. TAT of brain imaging (discontinuous wave speed).

  13. High-Frequency Gravitational Waves from Hairy Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinoud J. Slagter

    1999-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the stability of the spherically symmetric non-abelian (Bartnik-McKinnon) black hole solution of the SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills system using the multiple-scale analysis. It is found, in contrast with the vacuum situation, that a spherically symmetric oscillatory perturbation to second order cannot be constructed. The singular behavior of gravitational waves is induced by the coupling of the gravitational waves to the Yang-Mills waves.

  14. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  15. Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived #12;66 2. Wave Propagation Theory quantities of the quiescent (time independent) medium are identified perturbations is much smaller than the speed of sound. 2.1.1 The Nonlinear Wave Equation Retaining higher

  16. Uniform flux dish concentrators for photovoltaic application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G; Wendelin, T

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have designed a unique and innovative molded dish concentrator capable of producing a uniform flux profile on a flat target plane. Concentration levels of 100--200 suns, which are uniform over an area of several square inches, can be directly achieved for collection apertures of a reasonable size ({approximately}1.5-m diameter). Such performance would be immediately applicable to photovoltaic (PV) use. Economic concerns have shown that the proposed approach would be less expensive thatn Fresnel lens concepts or other dish concentrator designs that require complicated and costly receivers to mix the flux to obtain a uniform distribution. 12 refs.

  17. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  18. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

  19. The oscillations of a magnetic flux tube and its application to sunspots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, D.J.; Roberts, B. (Saint Andrews Univ. (Scotland))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modes of oscillation of an isolated magnetic flux tube in the absence of gravity is examined, with parameters chosen to mimic a sunspot. Gravitational stratification of the umbral atmosphere leads to consider two cases, distinguished primarily by the ordering of the Alfven speed and the external sound speed. The transition between these two regimes occurs at about the level where the optical depth, tau(c), is equal to 1 in the umbra. The modes given by the model, taken together with the observations, suggest that 3 minute oscillations are slow-body modes (driven by overstable convection) and that a sunspot consists of a bundle of pore-sized flux tubes rather than a single monolithic one. Fast-body modes are identified in the tube with the observed 5 minute oscillations of the umbral photosphere and below. The excitation of these modes propagating up or down the tube may explain the recent observation that sunspots act as sinks for p-modes propagating in their environment. Running penumbral waves are associated with fast- and slow-surface modes. The fast-surface wave could arise from fast-body modes driven below the level where tau(c) = 1; the slow-surface waves may arise from granular buffeting or overstable convection. 55 refs.

  20. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, J. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  1. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J; Mathur, Manikandan; Gostiaux, Louis; Peacock, Thomas; Dauxois, Thierry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (2007). This mechanism, which involves a tunable source comprised of oscillating plates, has so far been used for a few fundamental studies of internal waves, but its full potential has yet to be realized. Our studies reveal that this approach is capable of producing a wide variety of two-dimensional wave fields, including plane waves, wave beams and discrete vertical modes in finite-depth stratifications. The effects of discretization by a finite number of plates, forcing amplitude and angle of propagation are investigated, and it is found that the method is remarkably efficient at generating a complete wave field despite forcing only one velocity component in a controllable manner. We furthermore find that the nature of the radiated wave field is well predicted using Fourier transforms of the spatial structure of the wave generator.

  2. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  3. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) reactor shutdown system reliability reevaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, B.F.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliability analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor shutdown system was reevaluated. Failure information based on five years of plant operating experience was used to verify original reliability numbers or to establish new ones. Also, system modifications made subsequent to performance of the original analysis were incorporated into the reevaluation. Reliability calculations and sensitivity analyses were performed using a commercially available spreadsheet on a personal computer. The spreadsheet was configured so that future failures could be tracked and compared with expected failures. A number of recommendations resulted from the reevaluation including both increased and decreased surveillance intervals. All recommendations were based on meeting or exceeding existing reliability goals. Considerable cost savings will be incurred upon implementation of the recommendations.

  4. Investigation of ionized metal flux in enhanced high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stranak, Vitezslav, E-mail: stranak@prf.jcu.cz [Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 31, 37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Hubicka, Zdenek; Cada, Martin [Institute of Physics v. v. i., Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Drache, Steffen; Hippler, Rainer [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Tichy, Milan [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The metal ionized flux fraction and production of double charged metal ions Me{sup 2+} of different materials (Al, Cu, Fe, Ti) by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) operated with and without a pre-ionization assistance is compared in the paper. The Electron Cyclotron Wave Resonance (ECWR) discharge was employed as the pre-ionization agent providing a seed of charge in the idle time of HiPIMS pulses. A modified grid-free biased quartz crystal microbalance was used to estimate the metal ionized flux fraction ?. The energy-resolved mass spectrometry served as a complementary method to distinguish particular ion contributions to the total ionized flux onto the substrate. The ratio between densities of doubly Me{sup 2+} and singly Me{sup +} charged metal ions was determined. It is shown that ECWR assistance enhances Me{sup 2+} production with respect of absorbed rf-power. The ECWR discharge also increases the metal ionized flux fraction of about 30% especially in the region of lower pressures. Further, the suppression of the gas rarefaction effect due to enhanced secondary electron emission of Me{sup 2+} was observed.

  5. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Wave Energy ­ challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Risø-R-1608(EN) 161 #12;© Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  6. Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayrapetyan, A.G., E-mail: armen@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G. [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Fritzsche, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany) [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period ? is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods ? between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

  7. Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

  8. Love wave propagation in piezoelectric layered structure with dissipation Jianke Du a,b,*, Kai Xian a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ji

    Love wave propagation in piezoelectric layered structure with dissipation Jianke Du a,b,*, Kai Xian characteristics of Love wave propagation in a layered structure, which involves a thin pie- zoelectric layer of wave propagation [2]. Numerous investigations have been undertaken for the analysis of Love waves

  9. SYNOPTIC MAPPING OF CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FLUX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, C. L. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Harvey, J. W.; Pietarila, A., E-mail: cljin@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: jharvey@nso.edu, E-mail: apietarila@nso.edu [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We used daily full-disk Ca II 854.2 nm magnetograms from the Synoptic Optical Long Term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility to study the chromospheric magnetic field from 2006 April through 2009 November. We determined and corrected previously unidentified zero offsets in the SOLIS magnetograms. By tracking the disk passages of stable unipolar regions, the measured net flux densities were found to systematically decrease from the disk center to the limb by a factor of about two. This decrease was modeled using a thin flux tube model with a difference in signal formation height between the center and limb sides. Comparison of photospheric and chromospheric observations shows that their differences are largely due to horizontal spreading of magnetic flux with increasing height. The north polar magnetic field decreased nearly linearly with time during our study period while the south polar field was nearly constant. We used the annual change in the viewing angle of the polar regions to estimate the radial and meridional components of the polar fields and found that the south polar fields were tilted away from the pole. Synoptic maps of the chromospheric radial flux density distribution were used as boundary conditions for extrapolation of the field from the chromosphere into the corona. A comparison of modeled and observed coronal hole boundaries and coronal streamer positions showed better agreement when using the chromospheric rather than the photospheric synoptic maps.

  10. EUV mirror based absolute incident flux detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for the in-situ monitoring of EUV radiation flux includes an integrated reflective multilayer stack. This device operates on the principle that a finite amount of in-band EUV radiation is transmitted through the entire multilayer stack. This device offers improvements over existing vacuum photo-detector devices since its calibration does not change with surface contamination.

  11. Energies of Quantum QED Flux Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H Weigel

    2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I present recent studies on vacuum polarization energies and energy densities induced by QED flux tubes. I focus on comparing three and four dimensional scenarios and the discussion of various approximation schemes in view of the exact treatment.

  12. Flux tubes in the SU(3) vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario S. Cardaci; Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai; Rossella Falcone; Alessandro Papa

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the distribution of the chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair in the SU(3) vacuum. We find that the transverse profile of the flux tube resembles the dual version of the Abrikosov vortex field distribution and give an estimate of the London penetration length in the confined vacuum.

  13. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR Compiled by S. M. Shapiro I. PICTORIAL with fiberglass insulation and a protective aluminum skin. The reactor vessel is shaped somewhat like a very large at the spherical end. It is located at the center of the reactor building and is surrounded by a lead and steel

  14. Flux Exclusion Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial: Towards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Flux Exclusion Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial: Towards Quantum-level Switching V. Savinov1, they require extremely high levels of nanofabrication. Here we introduce a new quantum superconducting properties of the mac- roscopic quantum state of superconducting carriers1 , and essentially plasmonic nature

  15. Gravitational wave radiometry: Mapping a stochastic gravitational wave background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitra, Sanjit [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Souradeep, Tarun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Lazzarini, Albert; Mandic, Vuk; Ballmer, Stefan [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 18-34, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bose, Sukanta [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of the detection and mapping of a stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB), either cosmological or astrophysical, bears a strong semblance to the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and polarization, which too is a stochastic field, statistically described in terms of its correlation properties. An astrophysical gravitational wave background (AGWB) will likely arise from an incoherent superposition of unmodelled and/or unresolved sources and cosmological gravitational wave backgrounds (CGWB) are also predicted in certain scenarios. The basic statistic we use is the cross correlation between the data from a pair of detectors. In order to ''point'' the pair of detectors at different locations one must suitably delay the signal by the amount it takes for the gravitational waves (GW) to travel to both detectors corresponding to a source direction. Then the raw (observed) sky map of the SGWB is the signal convolved with a beam response function that varies with location in the sky. We first present a thorough analytic understanding of the structure of the beam response function using an analytic approach employing the stationary phase approximation. The true sky map is obtained by numerically deconvolving the beam function in the integral (convolution) equation. We adopt the maximum likelihood framework to estimate the true sky map using the conjugate gradient method that has been successfully used in the broadly similar, well-studied CMB map-making problem. We numerically implement and demonstrate the method on signal generated by simulated (unpolarized) SGWB for the GW radiometer consisting of the LIGO pair of detectors at Hanford and Livingston. We include 'realistic' additive Gaussian noise in each data stream based on the LIGO-I noise power spectral density. The extension of the method to multiple baselines and polarized GWB is outlined. In the near future the network of GW detectors, including the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors that will be sensitive to sources within a thousand times larger spatial volume, could provide promising data sets for GW radiometry.

  16. MHD wave modes resolved in fine-scale chromospheric magnetic structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verth, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the last decade, due to significant improvements in the spatial and temporal resolution of chromospheric data, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave studies in this fascinating region of the Sun's atmosphere have risen to the forefront of solar physics research. In this review we begin by reviewing the challenges and debates that have manifested in relation to MHD wave mode identification in fine-scale chromospheric magnetic structures, including spicules, fibrils and mottles. Next we go on to discuss how the process of accurately identifying MHD wave modes also has a crucial role to play in estimating their wave energy flux. This is of cardinal importance for estimating what the possible contribution of MHD waves is to solar atmospheric heating. Finally, we detail how such advances in chromospheric MHD wave studies have also allowed us, for the first time, to implement cutting-edge magnetoseismological techniques that provide new insight into the sub-resolution plasma structuring of the lower solar atmospher...

  17. Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad to study the sensitivity of dam-breach flood waves to breach-outflow hydrograph volume, peak discharge the channel. A dam-breach Froude number is defined to enable analysis through a wide range of site and flow

  18. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  19. Refraction of dispersive shock waves , V.V. Khodorovskii 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a dispersive counterpart of the classical gas dynamics problem of the interaction of a shock wave investigations, most notably in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) (see, e.g., [8, 32, 6]), where these waves problem involves complicated analysis of nonlinear multiphase wavetrains (see e.g. [22] for the Kd

  20. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  1. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  2. Higher order treatment on temporal derivative of angular flux for time-dependent MOC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujita, K.; Endo, T.; Yamamoto, A. [Nagoya University, Department of Material, Physics and Energy Engineering, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Kamiyama, Y.; Kirimura, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Wadasakicho1-1-1, Hyogo-ku, Kobe, 652-8585 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kinetic analysis method, whose angular dependence of temporal derivative for angular flux is accurately treated within practical memory requirement, is proposed. The method of characteristics (MOC) is being widely used for reactor analysis thanks to the advances of numerical algorithms and computer hardware. However, the computational resources, i.e., the memory capacity, can be still a crucial problem for rigorous kinetic calculations using MOC. In the straightforward approach for kinetic calculation using MOC, the segment-averaged angular fluxes should be stored on the memory in order to explicitly calculate the temporal derivative of the angular flux, which would require huge memory. Thus, in the conventional kinetic calculation code using MOC, the temporal derivative of the angular flux has been approximated as angularly isotropic in order to reduce the memory requirement (isotropic assumption). However, the approximation error caused by the conventional isotropic assumption has not been thoroughly and quantitatively investigated so far and an accurate kinetic calculation method, which can quantitatively estimate the above approximation error within practical memory storage, has not been developed. The present study tries to address this issue with a newly developed approach. Effect of the approximate treatment for the temporal derivative of angular flux is evaluated through benchmark calculations. (authors)

  3. Effects of soil rewetting and thawing on soil gas fluxes: a review of current literature and suggestions for future research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Gill; Vargas, Rodrigo; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Turetsky, Merritt

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Rewetting of dry soils and thawing of frozen soils are short-term, transitional phenomena in terms of hydrology and thermodynamics in soil systems. The impact of these short-term phenomena on larger-scale ecosystem fluxes has only recently been fully appreciated, and a growing number of studies show that these events affect various biogeochemical processes including fluxes of biogenic gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and nitric oxide (NO). Global climate models predict that future climatic change is likely to alter the frequency and intensity of drying-rewetting events and thawing of frozen soils, highlighting the importance of understanding how rewetting and thawing will influence biogenic gas fluxes. Here we summarize findings in an acquired database from 338 studies conducted from 1956-2010, and propose future research questions. Studies have reported conflicting results, ranging from large increases in gas fluxes to non-significant changes following rewetting and thawing in various terrestrial ecosystems. An analysis of published data revealed that CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, NO and NH{sub 3} fluxes increase 7.6 (standard error 1.1) times following rewetting and thawing with no significant difference between these events. We explore possible mechanisms and controls that regulate flux responses, and note that there is a lack of studies on variation of CH{sub 4}, NO and NH{sub 3} fluxes following rewetting and thawing events. High temporal resolution of flux measurements is critical to capture rapid changes in the gas fluxes after these soil perturbations. Finally, we propose that future studies should investigate the interactions between biological (i.e., microbial community) and physical (i.e., gas production, flux, and dissolution) changes in biogenic gas fluxes, and explore synergistic experimental and modelling approaches.

  4. Iso-Flux Tension Propagation Theory of Driven Polymer Translocation: The Role of Initial Configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalal Sarabadani; Timo Ikonen; Tapio Ala-Nissila

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of pore-driven polymer translocation by theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the tension propagation theory within the constant flux approximation we derive an explicit equation of motion for the tension front. From this we derive a scaling relation for the average translocation time $\\tau$, which captures the asymptotic result $\\tau \\propto N_0^{1+\

  5. Secondary dust density waves excited by nonlinear dust acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary dust density waves were observed in conjunction with high amplitude (n{sub d}/n{sub d0}>2) dust acoustic waves (DAW) that were spontaneously excited in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma in the moderately coupled, {Gamma}{approx}1, state. The high amplitude dust acoustic waves produced large dust particle oscillations, displacements, and trapping. Secondary dust density waves were excited in the wave troughs of the high amplitude DAWs. The waveforms, amplitudes, wavelengths, and wave speeds of the primary DAWs and the secondary waves were measured. A dust-dust streaming instability is discussed as a possible mechanism for the production of the secondary waves.

  6. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizard, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model lies with the simple wave energy conservation law itthe recirculation of wave energy introduces interference e?particles, the tertiary-wave energy may be negative and thus

  7. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  8. Wave equations with energy dependent potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Formanek; R. J. Lombard; J. Mares

    2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study wave equations with energy dependent potentials. Simple analytical models are found useful to illustrate difficulties encountered with the calculation and interpretation of observables. A formal analysis shows under which conditions such equations can be handled as evolution equation of quantum theory with an energy dependent potential. Once these conditions are met, such theory can be transformed into ordinary quantum theory.

  9. Accelerometer using atomic waves for space applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of a dilute gas of trapped atoms in a single quantum state [18, 19, 20 of such devices in the field of navigation, surveying and analysis of earth structures. Matter-wave interferometry that the use of Bose-Einstein condensed atoms will bring the science of atom optics, and in particular atom

  10. THE EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLUX FROM 0.1 nm TO 160 {mu}m: QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES FOR PLANETARY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire, Mark W. [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Sheets, John; Meadows, Victoria S. [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ribas, Ignasi [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5 parell, 2a pl, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Catling, David C., E-mail: M.Claire@uea.ac.uk [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding changes in the solar flux over geologic time is vital for understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres because it affects atmospheric escape and chemistry, as well as climate. We describe a numerical parameterization for wavelength-dependent changes to the non-attenuated solar flux appropriate for most times and places in the solar system. We combine data from the Sun and solar analogs to estimate enhanced UV and X-ray fluxes for the young Sun and use standard solar models to estimate changing visible and infrared fluxes. The parameterization, a series of multipliers relative to the modern top of the atmosphere flux at Earth, is valid from 0.1 nm through the infrared, and from 0.6 Gyr through 6.7 Gyr, and is extended from the solar zero-age main sequence to 8.0 Gyr subject to additional uncertainties. The parameterization is applied to a representative modern day flux, providing quantitative estimates of the wavelength dependence of solar flux for paleodates relevant to the evolution of atmospheres in the solar system (or around other G-type stars). We validate the code by Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in stellar age and flux, and with comparisons to the solar proxies {kappa}{sup 1} Cet and EK Dra. The model is applied to the computation of photolysis rates on the Archean Earth.

  11. Mapping the nano-Hertz gravitational wave sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil J. Cornish; Rutger van Haasteren

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method for extracting gravitational wave signals from pulsar timing data. We show that any gravitational wave signal can be decomposed into an orthogonal set of sky maps, with the number of maps equal to the number of pulsars in the timing array. These maps may be used as a basis to construct gravitational wave templates for any type of source, including collections of point sources. A variant of the standard Hellings-Downs correlation analysis is recovered for statistically isotropic signals. The template based approach allows us to probe potential anisotropies in the signal and produce maps of the gravitational wave sky.

  12. The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todreas, Neil E.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

  13. Grading of lumber using stress waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bethi, Rajeshwar

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 2, 500 psi/min was used for all the tension tests, resulting in an average ume to failure of approximately 2 minutes. The section to follow presents an analysis of these experimental results. 40 CHAPTER IV ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION MISCELLANEOUS... gravity and MOEs grouped by grade. Grade Sample Size Specifice Gravity Averageee Static Bending MOE (10' psi) Conjugate++e MOE (10 psi) Transverse Long Span Vibration MOE Bending MOE (10' psi) (10' psi) fmpact Stress Wave MOE (10 psi) 302...

  14. Continuous kinematic wave models of merging traffic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Long Jin

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Merging junctions are important network bottlenecks, and a better understanding of merging traffic dynamics has both theoretical and practical implications. In this paper, we present continuous kinematic wave models of merging traffic flow which are consistent with discrete Cell Transmission Models with various distribution schemes. In particular, we develop a systematic approach to constructing kinematic wave solutions to the Riemann problem of merging traffic flow in supply-demand space. In the new framework, Riemann solutions on a link consist of an interior state and a stationary state, subject to admissible conditions such that there are no positive and negative kinematic waves on the upstream and downstream links respectively. In addition, various distribution schemes in Cell Transmission Models are considered entropy conditions. In the proposed analytical framework, we prove that the stationary states and boundary fluxes exist and are unique for the Riemann problem for both fair and constant distribution schemes. We also discuss two types of invariant merge models, in which local and discrete boundary fluxes are the same as global and continuous ones. With numerical examples, we demonstrate the validity of the analytical solutions of interior states, stationary states, and corresponding kinematic waves. Discussions and future studies are presented in the conclusion section.

  15. Diagonalization of pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

  16. acoustic wave array: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scene analysis is done in terms of circular harmonics 9. A desired Zotkin, Dmitry N. 4 Propagation of acoustic waves in a one-dimensional array of noncohesive cylinders...

  17. DECAY OF SOLUTIONS TO A WATER WAVE MODEL WITH A ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    present article, we restrict the analysis of (1.1) to one-way waves. With the usual ..... In order to derive the integral form of the solution to (2.2), we apply the ...

  18. Time-domain analysis of a dynamically tuned signal recycled interferometer for the detection of chirp gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Simakov

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we study a particular method of detection of chirp signals from coalescing compact binary stars -- the so-called dynamical tuning, i.e. amplification of the signal via tracking of its instantaneous frequency by the tuning of the signal-recycled detector. A time-domain consideration developed for signal-recycled interferometers, in particular GEO 600, describes the signal and noise evolution in the non-stationary detector. Its non-stationarity is caused by motion of the signal recycling mirror, whose position defines the tuning of the detector. We prove that the shot noise from the dark port and optical losses remains white. The analysis of the transient effects shows that during the perfect tracking of the chirp frequency only transients from amplitude changes arise. The signal-to-noise-ratio gain, calculated in this paper, is ~ 16 for a shot-noise limited detector and ~ 4 for a detector with thermal noise.

  19. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Deike; Benjamin Miquel; Pablo Gutiérrez-Matus; Timothée Jamin; Benoit Semin; Sébastien Aumaitre; Michael Berhanu; Eric Falcon; Félicien BONNEFOY

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation that highlights the important role of a large scale Fourier mode. By estimation of the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is evaluated and found to be compatible with a recent theoretical value.

  20. An Index for the Dirac Operator on D3 Brane withBackground Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; /Groningen U.; Kallosh, Renata; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto; Kashani-Poor, Amir-Kian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Sorokin, Dmitri; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of instanton generated superpotentials in Calabi-Yau orientifold compactifications directly in type IIB string theory. To this end, we derive the Dirac equation on a Euclidean D3 brane in the presence of background fluxes. We propose an index which governs whether the generation of a superpotential in the effective 4d theory by D3 brane instantons is possible. Applying the formalism to various classes of examples, including the K3 x T{sup 2}/Z{sub 2} orientifold, in the absence and presence of fluxes, we show that our results are consistent with conclusions attainable via duality from an M-theory analysis.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR THE PHOTOSPHERIC EXCITATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Shelyag, S., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Main Physics Building, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, County Antrim BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing the excitation mechanisms of incompressible transverse waves is vital for determining how energy propagates through the lower solar atmosphere. We aim to show the connection between convectively driven photospheric flows and incompressible chromospheric waves. The observations presented here show the propagation of incompressible motion through the quiet lower solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the chromosphere. We determine photospheric flow vectors to search for signatures of vortex motion and compare results to photospheric flows present in convective simulations. Further, we search for the chromospheric response to vortex motions. Evidence is presented that suggests incompressible waves can be excited by the vortex motions of a strong magnetic flux concentration in the photosphere. A chromospheric counterpart to the photospheric vortex motion is also observed, presenting itself as a quasi-periodic torsional motion. Fine-scale, fibril structures that emanate from the chromospheric counterpart support transverse waves that are driven by the observed torsional motion. A new technique for obtaining details of transverse waves from time-distance diagrams is presented and the properties of transverse waves (e.g., amplitudes and periods) excited by the chromospheric torsional motion are measured.

  2. Water-waves as a spatial reversible dynamical system, influence of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical study of travelling waves, in the context of two di- mensional ... A normal form analysis shows that in most cases, the dynamics on the center ...

  3. A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershberger, Darla Anne

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the wind waves and ship induced water motions. The wind wave analysis is examined in this thesis with a brief summary of the ship induced water motions. The wind wave characteristics were measured at the refuge and are compared to the characteristics...

  4. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  5. Surface Magnetic Flux Maintenance In Quiet Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Iida

    2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate surface processes of magnetic patches, namely merging, splitting, emergence, and cancellation, by using an auto-detection technique. We find that merging and splitting are locally predominant in the surface level, while the frequencies of the other two are less by one or two orders of magnitude. The frequency dependences on flux con- tent of surface processes are further investigated. Based on these observations, we discuss a possible whole picture of the maintenance. Our conclusion is that the photospheric magnetic field structure, especially its power-law nature, is maintained by the processes locally in the surface not by the interactions between different altitudes. We suggest a scenario of the flux maintenance as follows: The splitting and merging play a crucial role for the generation of the power-law distribution, not the emergence nor cancellation do. This power-law distribution results in another power-law one of the cancellation with an idea of the random convective transport. The cancellation and emergence have a common value for the power-law indices in their frequency distributions, which may suggest a "recycle of fluxes by submergence and re-emergence".

  6. Coupling spin ensembles via superconducting flux qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yueyin Qiu; Wei Xiong; Lin Tian; J. Q. You

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a hybrid quantum system consisting of spin ensembles and superconducting flux qubits, where each spin ensemble is realized using the nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond crystal and the nearest-neighbor spin ensembles are effectively coupled via a flux qubit.We show that the coupling strengths between flux qubits and spin ensembles can reach the strong and even ultrastrong coupling regimes by either engineering the hybrid structure in advance or tuning the excitation frequencies of spin ensembles via external magnetic fields. When extending the hybrid structure to an array with equal coupling strengths, we find that in the strong-coupling regime, the hybrid array is reduced to a tight-binding model of a one-dimensional bosonic lattice. In the ultrastrong-coupling regime, it exhibits quasiparticle excitations separated from the ground state by an energy gap. Moreover, these quasiparticle excitations and the ground state are stable under a certain condition that is tunable via the external magnetic field. This may provide an experimentally accessible method to probe the instability of the system.

  7. Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John C.

    Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks J. C. Wright , P. T. Bonoli , C hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron

  8. Wave localization as a manifestation of ray chaos in underwater acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iomin; Yu. Bliokh

    2007-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave chaos is demonstrated by studying a wave propagation in a periodically corrugated wave-guide. In the limit of a short wave approximation (SWA) the underlying description is related to the chaotic ray dynamics. In this case the control parameter of the problem is characterized by the corrugation amplitude and the SWA parameter. The considered model is fairly suitable and tractable for the analytical analysis of a wave localization length. The number of eigenmodes characterized the width of the localized wave packet is estimated analytically.

  9. Soft Capacitors for Wave Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsten Ahnert; Markus Abel; Matthias Kollosche; Per Jørgen Jørgensen; Guggi Kofod

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave energy harvesting could be a substantial renewable energy source without impact on the global climate and ecology, yet practical attempts have struggle d with problems of wear and catastrophic failure. An innovative technology for ocean wave energy harvesting was recently proposed, based on the use of soft capacitors. This study presents a realistic theoretical and numerical model for the quantitative characterization of this harvesting method. Parameter regio ns with optimal behavior are found, and novel material descriptors are determined which simplify analysis dramatically. The characteristics of currently ava ilable material are evaluated, and found to merit a very conservative estimate of 10 years for raw material cost recovery.

  10. Deflection microwave and millimeter-wave amplifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang., C.M. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Lau, Y.Y. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Swyden, T.A. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of microwave and millimeter-wave amplifiers, called deflectron amplifiers, which are based on the deflection of low voltage electron beams in a microstructure were analyzed. This concept may be applied in two ways: as microelectronic amplifiers or as bunched beam cathodes to power conventional amplifier configurations such as klystrodes and traveling wave tubes. Estimates for gain and efficiency are obtained from a circuit analysis. Particle codes are used to test the viability of the concept. Frequencies of operation are projected up to a few tens of GHz for microelectronic amplifiers and up to {approx}80 GHz for power amplifiers 29 refs., 5 figs.

  11. High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark The High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory resides in a pool of water illuminated by the blue...

  12. Comparison of neutron diffusion and Monte Carlo simulations of a fission wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deinert, Mark

    common con- figuration a fertile material, such as depleted uranium, is subjected to a fast neutron flux). The fresh fuel zone consisted of depleted uranium groups have shown that fission waves could form in uranium and potentially be used as the basis

  13. Wind Wave Float

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Peer Review WindWaveFloat Alla Weinstein Principle Power, Inc. aweinstein@principlepowerinc.com November 1, 2011 2 | Wind and Water Power Program eere.energy.gov...

  14. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  15. Surface wave interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  16. Millimeter-wave sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seoktae

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    New millimeter wave interferometric, multifunctional sensors have been studied for industrial sensing applications: displacement measurement, liquid-level gauging and velocimetry. Two types of configuration were investigated to implement the sensor...

  17. Pilot-wave hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    Yves Couder, Emmanuel Fort, and coworkers recently discovered that a millimetric droplet sustained on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath may self-propel through a resonant interaction with its own wave field. This article ...

  18. First measurements of the flux integral with the NIST-4 watt balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, D; Chao, L S; Cao, A; Sineriz, G; Pratt, J R; Newell, D B; Schlamminger, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 2014, construction of a new watt balance, named NIST-4, has started at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In a watt balance, the gravitational force of an unknown mass is compensated by an electromagnetic force produced by a coil in a magnet system. The electromagnetic force depends on the current in the coil and the magnetic flux integral. Most watt balances feature an additional calibration mode, referred to as velocity mode, which allows one to measure the magnetic flux integral to high precision. In this article we describe first measurements of the flux integral in the new watt balance. We introduce measurement and data analysis techniques to assess the quality of the measurements and the adverse effects of vibrations on the instrument.

  19. Controlling the level of the ideal invariant fluxes for MHD turbulence using TURBO spectral solver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teaca, B; Knaepen, B; Carati, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ideal invariants present in the formalism of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), i.e. global quantities that are conserved in the absence of sources and dissipative effects, play an important role in various theoretical and numerical studies of MHD turbulence. The fluxes of these ideal invariants represent separate channels that transfer the information across different scales in a turbulent system. Once a statistically stationary state of turbulence is reached, the amount of any ideal invariant quantity introduced in the system by a forcing mechanism equals the amount of the same quantity removed by the dissipative effects from the system. For highly developed turbulence, these two mechanisms act predominantly at different scales that are largely separated. Since the ideal invariant quantities cascade between scales, a constant flux is generated with great implication on the state of the system. Numerically, controlling the ideal invariant fluxes levels for a turbulent MHD system is important for the analysis of...

  20. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  1. Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

  2. Autoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    of the wave, the pump and the wave will phase lock at very low wave amplitude. When the pump reachesAutoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves J. Fajans E. Gilson U.C. Berkeley L. Friedland Hebrew of phase with the oscillator, and the os- cillator's amplitude will decrease, eventually reaching zero

  3. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ting; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a comparative analysis for two filaments that showed quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) are carried out to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17-20 and September 29. The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4*10^21 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed within 3 days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2*10^20 Mx, about one ...

  4. The transverse and rotational motions of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, bus 2400, B-3001 Herverlee (Belgium); Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves have now been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. With modern instruments, they have now been detected in the chromosphere, interface region, and corona. The key purpose of this paper is to show that kink waves do not only involve purely transverse motions of solar magnetic flux tubes, but the velocity field is a spatially and temporally varying sum of both transverse and rotational motion. Taking this fact into account is particularly important for the accurate interpretation of varying Doppler velocity profiles across oscillating structures such as spicules. It has now been shown that, as well as bulk transverse motions, spicules have omnipresent rotational motions. Here we emphasize that caution should be used before interpreting the particular MHD wave mode/s responsible for these rotational motions. The rotational motions are not necessarily signatures of the classic axisymmetric torsional Alfvén wave alone, because kink motion itself can also contribute substantially to varying Doppler velocity profiles observed across these structures. In this paper, the displacement field of the kink wave is demonstrated to be a sum of its transverse and rotational components, both for a flux tube with a discontinuous density profile at its boundary, and one with a more realistic density continuum between the internal and external plasma. Furthermore, the Doppler velocity profile of the kink wave is forward modeled to demonstrate that, depending on the line of sight, it can either be quite distinct or very similar to that expected from a torsional Alfvén wave.

  5. Geometrical investigation of the kinetic evolution of the magnetic field in a periodic flux rope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restante, A. L.; Lapenta, G. [Afdeling Plasma-astrofysica, Departement Wiskunde, KULeuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Afdeling Plasma-astrofysica, Departement Wiskunde, KULeuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Intrator, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M.S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M.S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux ropes are bundles of magnetic field wrapped around an axis. Many laboratory, space, and astrophysics processes can be represented using this idealized concept. Here, a massively parallel 3D kinetic simulation of a periodic flux rope undergoing the kink instability is studied. The focus is on the topology of the magnetic field and its geometric structures. The analysis considers various techniques such as Poincaré maps and the quasi-separatrix layer (QSL). These are used to highlight regions with expansion or compression and changes in the connectivity of magnetic field lines and consequently to outline regions where heating and current may be generated due to magnetic reconnection. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first QSL analysis of a fully kinetic 3D particle in cell simulation and focuses the existing QSL method of analysis to periodic systems.

  6. Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause--Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 10{sup 9}m{sup 2}/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (B{sub wave}/B{sub 0} > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.

  7. Detecting Sound-Wave-Like Surface Brightness Ripples in Cluster Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Graham; A. C. Fabian; J. S. Sanders

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the observational requirements for the detection of sound-wave-like features in galaxy cluster cores. We calculate the effect of projection on the observed wave amplitude, and find that the projection factor depends only weakly on the underlying cluster properties but strongly on the wavelength of the sound waves, with the observed amplitude being reduced by a factor ~5 for 5 kpc waves but only by a factor ~ 2 for 25 kpc waves. We go on to estimate the time needed to detect ripples similar to those previously detected in the Perseus cluster in other clusters. We find that the detection time scales most strongly with the flux of the cluster and the amplitude of the ripples. By connecting the ripple amplitude to the heating power in the system, we estimate detection times for a selection of local clusters and find that several may have ripples detected with ~1Ms Chandra time.

  8. A new gravitational wave generation algorithm for particle perturbations of the Kerr spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enno Harms; Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Alessandro Nagar; Anil Zenginoglu

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new approach to solve the 2+1 Teukolsky equation for gravitational perturbations of a Kerr black hole. Our approach relies on a new horizon penetrating, hyperboloidal foliation of Kerr spacetime and spatial compactification. In particular, we present a framework for waveform generation from point-particle perturbations. Extensive tests of a time domain implementation in the code {\\it Teukode} are presented. The code can efficiently deliver waveforms at future null infinity. As a first application of the method, we compute the gravitational waveforms from inspiraling and coalescing black-hole binaries in the large-mass-ratio limit. The smaller mass black hole is modeled as a point particle whose dynamics is driven by an effective-one-body-resummed analytical radiation reaction force. We compare the analytical angular momentum loss to the gravitational wave angular momentum flux. We find that higher-order post-Newtonian corrections are needed to improve the consistency for rapidly spinning binaries. Close to merger, the subdominant multipolar amplitudes (notably the $m=0$ ones) are enhanced for retrograde orbits with respect to prograde ones. We argue that this effect mirrors nonnegligible deviations from circularity of the dynamics during the late-plunge and merger phase. We compute the gravitational wave energy flux flowing into the black hole during the inspiral using a time-domain formalism proposed by Poisson. Finally, a self-consistent, iterative method to compute the gravitational wave fluxes at leading-order in the mass of the particle is presented. For a specific case study with $\\hat{a}$=0.9, a simulation that uses the consistent flux differs from one that uses the analytical flux by $\\sim35$ gravitational wave cycles over a total of about $250$ cycles. In this case the horizon absorption accounts for about $+5$ gravitational wave cycles.

  9. AmeriFlux Network Data from the ORNL AmeriFlux Website

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The AmeriFlux network was established in 1996 to provide continuous observations of ecosystem level exchanges of CO2, water, energy and momentum spanning diurnal, synoptic, seasonal, and interannual time scales. It is fed by sites from North America, Central America, and South America. DOE's CDIAC stores and maintains AmeriFlux data, and this web site explains the different levels of data available there, with links to the CDIAC ftp site. A separate web-based data interface is also provided; it allows users to graph, query, and download Level 2 data for up to four sites at a time. Data may be queried by site, measurement period, or parameter. More than 550 site-years of level 2 data are available from AmeriFlux sites through the interface.

  10. The energy of high frequency waves in the low solar Chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandra Andic

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High frequency acoustic waves have been suggested as a source of mechanical heating in the chromosphere. In this work the radial component of waves in the frequency interval 22mHz to 1mHz are investigated. Observations were performed using 2D spectroscopy in the spectral lines of Fe I 543.45nm and Fe I 543.29nm at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife, Spain. Speckle reconstruction has been applied to the observations. We have used Fourier and wavelet techniques to identify oscillatory power. The energy flux is estimated assuming that all observed oscillations are acoustics running waves. We find that the estimated energy flux is not sufficient to cover the chromospheric radiative losses.

  11. Local Runup Amplification By Resonant Wave Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanakis, Themistoklis; Dutykh, Denys

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until now the analysis of long wave runup on a plane beach has been focused on finding its maximum value, failing to capture the existence of resonant regimes. One-dimensional numerical simulations in the framework of the Nonlinear Shallow Water Equations (NSWE) are used to investigate the Boundary Value Problem (BVP) for plane and non-trivial beaches. Monochromatic waves, as well as virtual wave-gage recordings from real tsunami simulations, are used as forcing conditions to the BVP. Resonant phenomena between the incident wavelength and the beach slope are found to occur, which result in enhanced runup of non-leading waves. The evolution of energy reveals the existence of a quasi-periodic state for the case of sinusoidal waves, the energy level of which, as well as the time required to reach that state, depend on the incident wavelength for a given beach slope. Dispersion is found to slightly reduce the value of maximum runup, but not to change the overall picture. Runup amplification occurs for both leadin...

  12. The neutrino signal at HALO: learning about the primary supernova neutrino fluxes and neutrino properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Väänänen, Daavid; Volpe, Cristina, E-mail: vaananen@ipno.in2p3.fr, E-mail: volpe@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, F-91406 Orsay cedex, CNRS/IN2P3 and University of Paris-XI (France)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-collapse supernova neutrinos undergo a variety of phenomena when they travel from the high neutrino density region and large matter densities to the Earth. We perform analytical calculations of the supernova neutrino fluxes including collective effects due to the neutrino-neutrino interactions, the Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect due to the neutrino interactions with the background matter and decoherence of the wave packets as they propagate in space. We predict the numbers of one- and two-neutron charged and neutral-current electron-neutrino scattering on lead events. We show that, due to the energy thresholds, the ratios of one- to two-neutron events are sensitive to the pinching parameters of neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere, almost independently of the presently unknown neutrino properties. Besides, such events have an interesting sensitivity to the spectral split features that depend upon the presence/absence of energy equipartition among neutrino flavors. Our calculations show that a lead-based observatory like the Helium And Lead Observatory (HALO) has the potential to pin down important characteristics of the neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere, and provide us with information on the neutrino transport in the supernova core.

  13. THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2 FLARE, RIBBONS, CORONAL FRONT, AND MASS EJECTION: INTERPRETING THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL VIEWS FROM THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY AND STEREO GUIDED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC FLUX-ROPE MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Aulanier, Guillaume; Pariat, Etienne; Delannee, Cecile, E-mail: schrijver@lmsal.com, E-mail: title@lmsal.com, E-mail: guillaume.aulanier@obspm.fr, E-mail: etienne.pariat@obspm.fr, E-mail: ceaulanier@voila.fr [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France)

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 February 15 X2.2 flare and associated Earth-directed halo coronal mass ejection were observed in unprecedented detail with high resolution in spatial, temporal, and thermal dimensions by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, as well as by instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft, then at near-quadrature relative to the Sun-Earth line. These observations enable us to see expanding loops from a flux-rope-like structure over the shearing polarity-inversion line between the central {delta}-spot groups of AR 11158, developing a propagating coronal front ('EIT wave'), and eventually forming the coronal mass ejection moving into the inner heliosphere. The observations support the interpretation that all of these features, including the 'EIT wave', are signatures of an expanding volume traced by loops (much larger than the flux rope only), surrounded by a moving front rather than predominantly wave-like perturbations; this interpretation is supported by previously published MHD models for active-region and global scales. The lateral expansion of the eruption is limited to the local helmet-streamer structure and halts at the edges of a large-scale domain of connectivity (in the process exciting loop oscillations at the edge of the southern polar coronal hole). The AIA observations reveal that plasma warming occurs within the expansion front as it propagates over quiet Sun areas. This warming causes dimming in the 171 A (Fe IX and Fe X) channel and brightening in the 193 and 211 A (Fe XII-XIV) channels along the entire front, while there is weak 131 A (Fe VIII and Fe XXI) emission in some directions. An analysis of the AIA response functions shows that sections of the front running over the quiet Sun are consistent with adiabatic warming; other sections may require additional heating which MHD modeling suggests could be caused by Joule dissipation. Although for the events studied here the effects of volumetric expansion are much more obvious than true wave phenomena, we discuss how different magnetic environments within and around the erupting region can lead to the signatures of either or both of these aspects.

  14. SU(2) Flux Distributions on Finite Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Y; Peng, Yingcai; Haymaker, Richard W.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied SU(2) flux distributions on four dimensional euclidean lattices with one dimension very large. By choosing the time direction appropriately we can study physics in two cases: one is finite volume in the zero temperature limit, another is finite temperature in the the intermediate to large volume limit. We found that for cases of beta > beta crit there is no intrinsic string formation. Our lattices with beta > beta crit belong to intermediate volume region, and the string tension in this region is due to finite volume effects. In large volumes we found evidence for intrinsic string formation.

  15. Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Poon, Siu-Joe (Palo Alto, CA); Duwez, Pol E. (Pasadena, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

  16. Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Jokovic, D.; Udovicic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Puzovic, J.; Anicin, I. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two identical plastic scintillator detectors, of prismatic shape (50x23x5)cm similar to NE102, were used for continuous monitoring of cosmic-ray intensity. Muon {delta}E spectra have been taken at five minute intervals, simultaneously from the detector situated on the ground level and from the second one at the depth of 25 m.w.e in the low-level underground laboratory. Sum of all the spectra for the years 2002-2004 has been used to determine the cosmic-ray muon flux at the ground level and in the underground laboratory.

  17. Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

  18. Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergyInformationOpenOpenFlux Power

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - ISDAC - Hemispheric Flux Spectroradiometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall- Hemispheric Flux

  20. Influence of the outer-magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide on the reflection of hydromagnetic waves from a shear flow at the magnetopause

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazur, V. A., E-mail: ninesmartcats@yahoo.com; Chuiko, D. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The coefficient of reflection of a fast magnetosonic wave incident on the magnetosphere from the solar wind is studied analytically in the framework of a plane-stratified model of the medium with allowance for the transverse inhomogeneity of the magnetosphere and a jump of the plasma parameters at the magnetopause. Three factors decisively affecting the properties of reflection are taken into account: the shear flow of the solar wind plasma relative to the magnetosphere; the presence of a magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide caused by the transverse plasma inhomogeneity; and the presence of an Alfvén resonance deep in the magnetosphere, where the oscillation energy dissipates. If the solar wind velocity exceeds the wave phase velocity along the magnetopause, then the wave energy in the solar wind is negative and such a wave experiences overreflection. In the opposite case, the wave energy is positive and the wave is reflected only partially. The wave reflection has a pronounced resonant character: the reflection coefficient has deep narrow minima or high narrow maxima at the eigenfrequencies of the magnetospheric waveguide. For other frequencies, the reflection coefficient only slightly differs from unity. The wave energy influx into the magnetosphere is positive for waves with both positive and negative energies. For waves with a negative energy, this is a consequence of their overreflection, because the flux of negative energy carried away by the reflected wave exceeds the incident flux of negative energy.

  1. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  2. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Third post-Newtonian angular momentum flux and the secular evolution of orbital elements for inspiralling compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Arun; Luc Blanchet; Bala R. Iyer; Siddhartha Sinha

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The angular momentum flux from an inspiralling binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits is computed at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) order using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism. The 3PN angular momentum flux involves the instantaneous, tail, and tail-of-tails contributions as for the 3PN energy flux, and in addition a contribution due to non-linear memory. We average the angular momentum flux over the binary's orbit using the 3PN quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits. The averaged angular momentum flux provides the final input needed for gravitational wave phasing of binaries moving in quasi-elliptical orbits. We obtain the evolution of orbital elements under 3PN gravitational radiation reaction in the quasi-elliptic case. For small eccentricities, we give simpler limiting expressions relevant for phasing up to order $e^2$. This work is important for the construction of templates for quasi-eccentric binaries, and for the comparison of post-Newtonian results with the numerical relativity simulations of the plunge and merger of eccentric binaries.

  4. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  5. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  6. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  7. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  8. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  9. PROPERTIES OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE OBTAINED WITH HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimura, D. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyoku, 113-0033 Tokyo (Japan); Tsuneta, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, 181-8588 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: daisuke.fujimura@nao.ac.jp

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observations of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating along magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere. We identified 20 isolated strong peaks (8 peaks for pores and 12 peaks for intergranular magnetic structure) in the power spectra of the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetic flux, the LOS velocity, and the intensity for 14 different magnetic concentrations. The observation is performed with the spectro-polarimeter of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite. The oscillation periods are located in 3-6 minutes for the pores and in 4-9 minutes for the intergranular magnetic elements. These peaks correspond to the magnetic, the velocity, and the intensity fluctuation in time domain with root-mean-square amplitudes of 4-17 G (0.3%-1.2%), 0.03-0.12 km s{sup -1}, and 0.1%-1%, respectively. Phase differences between the LOS magnetic flux ({phi}{sub B}), the LOS velocity ({phi} {sub v}), the intensities of the line core ({phi}{sub I,core}), and the continuum intensity ({phi}{sub I,}c{sub ont}) have striking concentrations at around -90 deg. for {phi}{sub B} - {phi} {sub v} and {phi}{sub v} - {phi}{sub I,core}, around 180 deg. for {phi}{sub I,core} - {phi}{sub B}, and around 10 deg. for {phi} {sub I,core} - {phi}{sub I,cont}. Here, for example, {phi}{sub B} - {phi}{sub v} {approx} -90 deg. means that the velocity leads the magnetic field by a quarter of cycle. The observed phase relation between the magnetic and the photometric intensity fluctuations would not be consistent with that caused by the opacity effect, if the magnetic field strength decreases with height along the oblique LOS. We suggest that the observed fluctuations are due to longitudinal (sausage-mode) and/or transverse (kink-mode) MHD waves. The observed phase relation between the fluctuations in the magnetic flux and the velocity is consistent with the superposition of the ascending wave and the descending wave reflected at chromosphere/corona boundary (standing wave). Even with such reflected waves, the residual upward Poynting flux is estimated to be 2.7 x 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for a case of the kink wave. Seismology of the magnetic flux tubes is possible to obtain various physical parameters from the observed period and amplitude of the oscillations.

  10. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandra Andi?

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20mHz) have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences are taken using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis is performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observe the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10mHz to 13mHz. We also observe propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in regions where magnetic structures are present.

  11. FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

    2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

  12. Small Scale Magnetic Flux Emergence Observed with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenichi Otsuji; Kazunari Shibata; Reizaburo Kitai; Satoru Ueno; Shin'ichi Nagata; Takuma Matsumoto; Tahei Nakamura; Hiroko Watanabe; Saku Tsuneta; Yoshinori Suematsu; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Toshifumi Shimizu; Yukio Katsukawa; Theodore D. Tarbell; Bruce W. Lites; Richard A. Shine; Alan M. Title

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed small scale magnetic flux emergence in a sunspot moat region by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite. We analyzed filtergram images observed in the wavelengths of Fe 6302 angstrom, G-band and Ca II H. In Stokes I images of Fe 6302 angstrom, emerging magnetic flux were recognized as dark lanes. In G-band, they showed their shapes almost the same as in Stokes I images. These magnetic flux appeared as dark filaments in Ca II H images. Stokes V images of Fe 6302 angstrom showed pairs of opposite polarities at footpoints of each filament. These magnetic concentrations are identified to correspond to bright points in G-band/Ca II H images. From the analysis of time-sliced diagrams, we derived following properties of emerging flux, which are consistent with the previous works. (1) Two footpoints separate each other at a speed of 4.2 km/s during the initial phase of evolution and decreases to about 1 km/s in 10 minutes later. (2) Ca II H filaments appear almost simultaneously with the formation of dark lanes in Stokes I in the observational cadence of 2 minutes. (3) The lifetime of the dark lanes in Stokes I and G-band is 8 minutes, while that of Ca filament is 12 minutes. An interesting phenomena was observed that an emerging flux tube expands laterally in the photosphere with a speed of 3.8 km/s. Discussion on the horizontal expansion of flux tube will be given with refernce to previous simulation studies.

  13. ORIGIN OF MACROSPICULE AND JET IN POLAR CORONA BY A SMALL-SCALE KINKED FLUX TUBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, Abhishek K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263129 (India); Murawski, K. [Group of Astrophysics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Tripathi, Durgesh, E-mail: pradeep.kashyap@aries.res.in, E-mail: aks@aries.res.in, E-mail: kmur@kft.umcs.lublin.pl, E-mail: durgesh@iucaa.ernet.in [Inter-University Centre for Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an observation of a small-scale flux tube that undergoes kinking and triggers the macrospicule and a jet on 2010 November 11 in the north polar corona. The small-scale flux tube emerged well before the triggering of the macrospicule and as time progresses the two opposite halves of this omega-shaped flux tube bent transversely and approach each other. After {approx}2 minutes, the two approaching halves of the kinked flux tube touch each other and an internal reconnection as well as an energy release takes place at the adjoining location and a macrospicule was launched which goes up to a height of 12 Mm. Plasma begins to move horizontally as well as vertically upward along with the onset of the macrospicule and thereafter converts into a large-scale jet in which the core denser plasma reaches up to {approx}40 Mm in the solar atmosphere with a projected speed of {approx}95 km s{sup -1}. The fainter and decelerating plasma chunks of this jet were also seen up to {approx}60 Mm. We perform a two-dimensional numerical simulation by considering the VAL-C initial atmospheric conditions to understand the physical scenario of the observed macrospicule and associated jet. The simulation results show that reconnection-generated velocity pulse in the lower solar atmosphere steepens into slow shock and the cool plasma is driven behind it in the form of macrospicule. The horizontal surface waves also appeared with shock fronts at different heights, which most likely drove and spread the large-scale jet associated with the macrospicule.

  14. Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuksel, Cem

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

  15. A kinematic wave theory of capacity drop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Long Jin; Qi-Jian Gan; Jean-Patrick Lebacque

    2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacity drop at active bottlenecks is one of the most puzzling traffic phenomena, but a thorough understanding is practically important for designing variable speed limit and ramp metering strategies. In this study, we attempt to develop a simple model of capacity drop within the framework of kinematic wave theory based on the observation that capacity drop occurs when an upstream queue forms at an active bottleneck. In addition, we assume that the fundamental diagrams are continuous in steady states. This assumption is consistent with observations and can avoid unrealistic infinite characteristic wave speeds in discontinuous fundamental diagrams. A core component of the new model is an entropy condition defined by a discontinuous boundary flux function. For a lane-drop area, we demonstrate that the model is well-defined, and its Riemann problem can be uniquely solved. We theoretically discuss traffic stability with this model subject to perturbations in density, upstream demand, and downstream supply. We clarify that discontinuous flow-density relations, or so-called "discontinuous" fundamental diagrams, are caused by incomplete observations of traffic states. Theoretical results are consistent with observations in the literature and are verified by numerical simulations and empirical observations. We finally discuss potential applications and future studies.

  16. Parameterization and Statistical Analysis of Hurricane Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mclaughlin, Patrick William

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    .3 WRF Station location and map of surrounding area for Gulfport, MS. 70 O.C. stations shown in red and 95 Bay stations shown in green. Note: Bay of St. Louis located on Western side of map, while Biloxi Bay is to the East... event (vertical red line) occurs 1 hour after maximum surge event (vertical blue line). ............................................................................... 37 Figure 4.2 Time series for: Top- Bay station #25 (Bay of St. Louis...

  17. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  18. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

  19. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  20. Research on ponderomotive driven Vlasov–Poisson system in electron acoustic wave parametric region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, C. Z.; Huang, T. W. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; He, X. T. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Qiao, B. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical analysis and corresponding 1D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of ponderomotive driven Vlasov–Poisson system in electron acoustic wave (EAW) parametric region are demonstrated. Theoretical analysis identifies that under the resonant condition, a monochromatic EAW can be excited when the wave number of the drive ponderomotive force satisfies 0.26?k{sub d}?{sub D}?0.53. If k{sub d}?{sub D}?0.26, nonlinear superposition of harmonic waves can be resonantly excited, called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear waves. Numerical simulations have demonstrated these wave excitation and evolution dynamics, in consistence with the theoretical predictions. The physical nature of these two waves is supposed to be interaction of harmonic waves, and their similar phase space properties are also discussed.

  1. Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Donald Eugene

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

  2. QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ofman, Leon, E-mail: weiliu@lmsal.com [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washingtom, DC 20064 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  3. Solving three-body-breakup problems with outgoing-flux asymptotic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randazzo, J. M.; Frapiccini, A. L.; Colavecchia, F. D. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and CONICET, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Buezas, F.; Gasaneo, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur and CONICET, 8000 Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytically solvable three-body collision system (s wave) model is used to test two different theoretical methods. The first one is a configuration interaction expansion of the scattering wave function using a basis set of Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF) with purely outgoing flux (CISF), introduced recently in A. L. Frapicinni, J. M. Randazzo, G. Gasaneo, and F. D. Colavecchia [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43, 101001 (2010)]. The second one is a finite element method (FEM) calculation performed with a commercial code. Both methods are employed to analyze different ways of modeling the asymptotic behavior of the wave function in finite computational domains. The asymptotes can be simulated very accurately by choosing hyperspherical or rectangular contours with the FEM software. In contrast, the CISF method can be defined both in an infinite domain or within a confined region in space. We found that the hyperspherical (rectangular) FEM calculation and the infinite domain (confined) CISF evaluation are equivalent. Finally, we apply these models to the Temkin-Poet approach of hydrogen ionization.

  4. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  5. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  6. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  7. Permanent-magnet switched-flux machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trzynadlowski, Andrzej M.; Qin, Ling

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent-magnet switched-flux (PMSF) device has a ferromagnetic outer stator mounted to a shaft about a central axis extending axially through the PMSF device. Pluralities of top and bottom stator poles are respectively mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly in first and second transverse planes extending from first and second sections of the central axis adjacent to an inner surface of the ferromagnetic outer stator. A ferromagnetic inner rotor is coupled to the shaft and has i) a rotor core having a core axis co-axial with the central axis; and ii) first and second discs having respective outer edges with first and second pluralities of permanent magnets (PMs) mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly from the rotor core axis in the first and second transverse planes. The first and second pluralities of PMs each include PMs of alternating polarity.

  8. Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

  9. CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms at station 139. Keywords: wave energy, survivability, breaking waves, joint distribution, OWEC INTRODUCTION

  10. Flux avalanches in superconducting films with periodic arrays of holes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V.; Welp, U.; Metlushko, V.; Crabtree, G. W.; Materials Science Division; Inst. of Solid State Physics RAS

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic flux dynamics in Nb films with periodic hole arrays is studied magneto-optically. Flux motion in the shape of microavalanches along {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} directions of the hole lattice is observed. At lower temperatures anisotropic large scale thermo-magnetic avalanches dominate flux entry and exit. At T-T{sub c} critical-state-like field patterns periodically appear at fractions of the matching field.

  11. Two-dimensional elastic wave propagation in a duraluminum sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cefola, David Paul

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MENTAL PROCEDURE Experimental Design Data Acquisition Data Correction III. DATA PROCESSING 12 12 12 15 16 Wiener Filter Theory Construction of Desired. Wavelet 23 25 Wiener Filter Results 27 Bandpass Filter IV. TRAVELTIME ANALYSIS Wave... perpendicular to strike 2, Duraluminum model used in experiments 1 and 2 Relations between the Rayleigh-, P-, and S-wave velocities in an infinite medium for Poisson's ratio, o-, ranging from 0. 0 to 0. 5 Square root of energy ratios for reflected P- and S-waves...

  12. Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number characteristics 14 3.5. Characteristics of the primary pressure wave 21 3.6. Pressure propagation over a hard

  13. 2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NHESSD 2, 7017­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  14. EVOLUTION OF L HYBRID WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    is an envelope solitary wave. These solitary waves are not solitons. The occurrence of the constant phase pulses-state propagation of one of the two lower hybrid rays in a homogeneous considering the balance between thermal break up into two types of solitary waves, constant phase pulses or envelope pulses. e examine

  15. Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current Source Inverters for HEVs and FCVs Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Wireless Charging Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

  16. antineutrino flux measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Terrestrial Antineutrino Flux Measurements CERN Preprints Summary: Uranium and thorium are the main heat producing elements in the earth. Their quantities and...

  17. Examining How Radiative Fluxes Are Affected by Cloud and Particle...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    How Radiative Fluxes Are Affected by Cloud and Particle Characteristics Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights...

  18. analyze magnetic flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the cracks are the objective of the inversion process. The proposed procedure Reilly, James P. 47 Quantitative observation of magnetic flux distribution in new magnetic...

  19. achieve high flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of mass immunization William M. Weiss; Gilbert Burnham; Peter J. Winch 2 Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Fluxes and Their Constraints HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: Applying...

  20. ambipolar particle flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a cascade Wehrli, Bernhard 32 Earth Planets Space, 62, 333345, 2010 Cosmic ray and solar energetic particle flux in paleomagnetospheres Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  1. annual particle flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a cascade Wehrli, Bernhard 20 Earth Planets Space, 62, 333345, 2010 Cosmic ray and solar energetic particle flux in paleomagnetospheres Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  2. as4 flux morfologiya: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guido D'Amico; Roberto Gobbetti; Matthew Kleban; Marjorie Schillo 2012-11-14 11 Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes CERN Preprints Summary: The most probable initial magnetic...

  3. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki, Et Al.,...

  4. Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- relations between surface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  5. airborne flux measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmospheresurface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to...

  6. Ising interaction between capacitively-coupled superconducting flux qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiko Satoh; Yuichiro Matsuzaki; Kosuke Kakuyanagi; Koichi Semba; Hiroshi Yamaguchi; Shiro Saito

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we propose a scheme to generate a controllable Ising interaction between superconducting flux qubits. Existing schemes rely on inducting couplings to realize Ising interactions between flux qubits, and the interaction strength is controlled by an applied magnetic field On the other hand, we have found a way to generate an interaction between the flux qubits via capacitive couplings. This has an advantage in individual addressability, because we can control the interaction strength by changing an applied voltage that can be easily localized. This is a crucial step toward the realizing superconducting flux qubit quantum computation.

  7. Gaugino Condensates and Fluxes in N = 1 Effective Superpotentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Pierre Derendinger; Costas Kounnas; P. Marios Petropoulos

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of orbifold compactifications of heterotic and type II orientifolds, we study effective N = 1 supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates. These string solutions display a broad phenomenology which we analyze using the method of N = 4 supergravity gaugings. We give examples in type II and heterotic compactifications of combined fluxes and condensates leading to vacua with naturally small supersymmetry breaking scale controlled by the condensate, cases where the supersymmetry breaking scale is specified by the fluxes even in the presence of a condensate and also examples where fluxes and condensates conspire to preserve supersymmetry.

  8. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialNasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughconstitute pressure wave energy and/or shear wave energy.

  9. Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains NearMaster University Tsunamis and ocean waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent

  10. The Influence of Filaments in the Private Flux Region on Divertor Particle and Power Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, J R; Thornton, A J; Walkden, N R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of particles via intermittent filamentary structures in the private flux region of plasmas in the MAST tokamak has been investigated using a fast framing camera recording visible light emission from the volume of the lower divertor, as well as Langmuir probes and IR thermography monitoring particle and power fluxes to plasma-facing surfaces in the divertor. The visible camera data suggests that, in the divertor volume, fluctuations in light emission above the X-point are strongest in the scrape-off layer (SOL). Conversely, in the region below the X-point, it is found that these fluctuations are strongest in the private flux region (PFR) of the inner divertor leg. Detailed analysis of the appearance of these filaments in the camera data suggests that they are approximately circular, around 1-2cm in diameter. The most probable toroidal mode number is between 2 and 3. These filaments eject plasma deeper into the private flux region, sometimes by the production of secondary filaments, moving at a sp...

  11. Suggestions for the measurement and derivation of fluxes and flux divergences from a satellite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Man-Li C. Wu (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1990-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical studies shown here indicate that the best bands to measure and derive the total outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), surface downward flux (SDF), and cooling rates (CRs) using linear regression are (1) the band between 800 and 1,200 cm{sup {minus}1} for OLR, (2) the band between 500 and 660 cm{sup {minus}1} or 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for SDF, and (3) the band between 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for CRs. These results are obtained from scatter plots of total fluxes and cooling rates associated with the various bands. The advanced very high resolution radiometer OLR is damped compared with the Nimbus 7 Earth radiation budget (ERB) OLR, which is derived from the broadband, narrow field of view ERB instrument, owing to its use of only one narrow band (centered around the 11-{mu}m window region) measurement.

  12. Fast Traveling-Wave Reactor of the Channel Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaliy D. Rusov; Victor A. Tarasov; Volodymyr N. Vashchenko; Sergei A. Chernezhenko; Andrei A. Kakaev; Oksana I. Pantak

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of this paper is to solve the technological problems of the TWR based on the technical concept described in our priority of invention reference, which makes it impossible, in particular, for the fuel claddings damaging doses of fast neutrons to excess the ~200 dpa limit. Thus the essence of the technical concept is to provide a given neutron flux at the fuel claddings by setting the appropriate speed of the fuel motion relative to the nuclear burning wave. The basic design of the fast uranium-plutonium nuclear traveling-wave reactor with a softened neutron spectrum is developed, which solves the problem of the radiation resistance of the fuel claddings material.

  13. Fast Traveling-Wave Reactor of the Channel Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusov, Vitaliy D; Vashchenko, Volodymyr N; Chernezhenko, Sergei A; Kakaev, Andrei A; Pantak, Oksana I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of this paper is to solve the technological problems of the TWR based on the technical concept described in our priority of invention reference, which makes it impossible, in particular, for the fuel claddings damaging doses of fast neutrons to excess the ~200 dpa limit. Thus the essence of the technical concept is to provide a given neutron flux at the fuel claddings by setting the appropriate speed of the fuel motion relative to the nuclear burning wave. The basic design of the fast uranium-plutonium nuclear traveling-wave reactor with a softened neutron spectrum is developed, which solves the problem of the radiation resistance of the fuel claddings material.

  14. analysis reveals permanent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 21 Design and analysis aspects of radial flux air-cored permanent magnet wind generator system for direct battery charging applications. Open Access Theses and...

  15. The generation and damping of propagating MHD kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Hillier, A., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, 17 Ohmine-cho Kita Kazan, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto City, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  16. MODEL FOR ALFVEN WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR CORONAL LOOPS: HEATING RATE PROFILES AND TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgari-Targhi, M.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that the solar corona may be heated by dissipation of Alfven waves that propagate up from the solar photosphere. According to this theory, counterpropagating Alfven waves are subject to nonlinear interactions that lead to turbulent decay of the waves and heating of the chromospheric and coronal plasma. To test this theory, better models for the dynamics of Alfven waves in coronal loops are required. In this paper, we consider wave heating in an active region observed with the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 2010 May. First a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic model of the region is constructed, and ten magnetic field lines that match observed coronal loops are selected. For each loop we construct a 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the Alfven waves near the selected field line. The waves are assumed to be generated by footpoint motions inside the kilogauss magnetic flux elements at the two ends of the loop. Based on such models, we predict the spatial and temporal profiles of the heating along the selected loops. We also estimate the temperature fluctuations resulting from such heating. We find that the Alfven wave turbulence model can reproduce the observed characteristics of the hotter loops in the active region core, but the loops at the periphery of the region have large expansion factors and are predicted to be thermally unstable.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of coherent optical photon emission from shock waves in Evan J. Reed,1,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soljaèiæ, Marin

    Molecular dynamics simulations of coherent optical photon emission from shock waves in crystals, 013904 2006 . In this work, we present analysis and molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves subject to a shock wave or solitonlike propagating excitation E. J. Reed et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96

  18. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cabaret; P. Béquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  19. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabaret, J; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control de...

  20. DNA waves and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.