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1

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

US Army Corps of Engineers

2

Energy and Energy Flux in Planetary Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Energy and Energy Flux in Planetary Waves V. T. Buchwald The propagation...a thorough study of the energy of these waves in the plane approximation...case of divergent planetary waves, the total energy density being E = T + U...

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding internal wave generation, propagation, and dissipation. In this paper, the estimation of internal wave energy fluxes ?u?p?? from ocean observations that may be sparse in either time or depth ...

Jonathan D. Nash; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy Flux and Wavelet Diagnostics of Secondary Mountain Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, aircraft data from mountain waves have been primarily analyzed using velocity and temperature power spectrum and momentum flux estimation. Herein it is argued that energy flux wavelets (i.e., pressure–velocity wavelet cross-...

Bryan K. Woods; Ronald B. Smith

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Energy flux of timeharmonic waves in anisotropic dissipative media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy flux of time­harmonic waves in anisotropic dissipative media Vlastislav Ÿ Cerven 2, Czech Republic. E­mail vcerveny@seis.karlov.m#.cuni.cz Summary The energy flux of time to consider the average energy flux, which is real­valued and time­independent. An extension

Cerveny, Vlastislav

6

Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence Eric Falcon,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence ´Eric Falcon,1 S´ebastien Auma^itre,2 Claudio Falc gravity and capillary wave turbulence in a statistically stationary regime displays fluctuations much interactions transfer kinetic energy toward small scales where viscous dissipation takes place

Falcon, Eric

9

Introduction Idealized Moist Jet/Front Waves Ray Tracing Momentum Flux/Forcing Conclusion Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Idealized Moist Jet/Front Waves Ray Tracing Momentum Flux/Forcing Conclusion Gravity Waves in Moist Baroclinic Jet-Front Systems Junhong Wei, Fuqing Zhang Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University Tuesday 19th August, 2014 #12;Introduction Idealized Moist Jet/Front Waves Ray

Thompson, Anne

10

Nonhydrostatic and nonlinear contributions to the energy flux budget in nonlinear internal waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonhydrostatic and nonlinear contributions to the energy flux budget in nonlinear internal waves S waves. Our results show that the contributions to the total energy flux from these additional terms as well as non- linearity. The partitioning of the incident internal wave energy over the course

Fringer, Oliver B.

11

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH College of Oceanic FE u p cgE is a fundamental quan- tity in internal wave energetics to identify energy sources, wave propagation, and energy sinks. Internal wave radiation transports energy from the boundaries

Kurapov, Alexander

12

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 023003 (2014) Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory. The Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant waves interact with each other, they can develop a regime of wave turbulence where the wave energyPHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 023003 (2014) Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary

Falcon, Eric

13

Saturation levels of heat-flux- and fast-electron-driven ion-acoustic-wave turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Saturation levels of ion-acoustic-wave turbulence driven by a heat-flux and a suprathermal electron current have been calculated on the basis of perturbed-orbit theory. The levels are found to be lower than those commonly estimated from simple trapping arguments and too low to explain the thermal-flux inhibition observed in many laser-plasma experiments.

H. C. Barr and T. J. M. Boyd

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

15

Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence Luc Deike, Michael Berhanu, and Eric Falcon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence Luc Deike, Michael the dissipation is increased. The energy dissipated by capillary waves is also measured and found to increase with the frequency and the newly defined mean energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

Air–Water Momentum Flux Observations over Shoaling waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper drab, with simultaneous momentum flux observations from four towers placed at different depths along a shore-normal line at the west end of Lake Ontario, Canada. The towers were at nominal depths of 12, 8, 4, and 2 m, in order to study ...

F. Anctil; M. A. Donelan

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17
18

HOMOLOGOUS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVES IN THE EMERGING FLUX REGION OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations, we present four homologous extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves within 3 hr on 2010 November 11. All EUV waves emanated from the same emerging flux region (EFR), propagated in the same direction, and were accompanied by surges, weak flares, and faint coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The waves had the basically same appearance in all EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO. The waves propagated at constant velocities in the range of 280-500 km s{sup -1}, with little angular dependence, which indicated that the homologous waves could be likely interpreted as fast-mode waves. The waves are supposed to likely involve more than one driving mechanism, and it was most probable that the waves were driven by the surges, due to their close timing and location relations. We also propose that the homologous waves were intimately associated with the continuous emergence and cancellation of magnetic flux in the EFR, which could supply sufficient energy and trigger the onsets of the waves.

Zheng Ruisheng; Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Hong Junchao; Yang, B.; Yang Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Airbreathing Rotating Detonation Wave Engine Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airbreathing Rotating Detonation Wave Engine Cycle Analysis Eric M. Braun, Frank K. Lu, Donald R analysis of an airbreathing, rotating detonation wave engine (RDWE) is developed. The engine consists of a steady inlet system with an isolator which delivers air into the detonation annulus. A single wave

Texas at Arlington, University of

20

How upgoing and downgoing energy fluxes contribute to the establishment of lamb waves in an immersed elastic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How upgoing and downgoing energy fluxes contribute to the establishment of lamb waves inhomogeneous waves does not transfer energy through the plate. Thus, nonstandard upgoing and downgoing waves pair "angle of incidence/frequency": the quasi-energy brought by the incident harmonic plane wave

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Numerical Modeling of Footpoint-driven Magneto-acoustic Wave Propagation in a Localized Solar Flux Tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present and discuss results of two-dimensional simulations of linear and nonlinear magneto-acoustic wave propagation through an open magnetic flux tube embedded in the solar atmosphere expanding from the photosphere through to the transition region and into the low corona. Our aim is to model and analyze the response of such a magnetic structure to vertical and horizontal periodic motions originating in the photosphere. To carry out the simulations, we employed our MHD code SAC (Sheffield Advanced Code). A combination of the VALIIIC and McWhirter solar atmospheres and coronal density profiles were used as the background equilibrium model in the simulations. Vertical and horizontal harmonic sources, located at the footpoint region of the open magnetic flux tube, are incorporated in the calculations, to excite oscillations in the domain of interest. To perform the analysis we have constructed a series of time-distance diagrams of the vertical and perpendicular components of the velocity with respect to the magnetic field lines at each height of the computational domain. These time-distance diagrams are subject to spatio-temporal Fourier transforms allowing us to build ?-k dispersion diagrams for all of the simulated regions in the solar atmosphere. This approach makes it possible to compute the phase speeds of waves propagating throughout the various regions of the solar atmosphere model. We demonstrate the transformation of linear slow and fast magneto-acoustic wave modes into nonlinear ones, i.e., shock waves, and also show that magneto-acoustic waves with a range of frequencies efficiently leak through the transition region into the solar corona. It is found that the waves interact with the transition region and excite horizontally propagating surface waves along the transition region for both types of drivers. Finally, we estimate the phase speed of the oscillations in the solar corona and compare it with the phase speed derived from observations.

V. Fedun; S. Shelyag; R. Erdélyi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Torsional Alfven Waves in Solar Magnetic Flux Tubes of Axial Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: Propagation and energy transfer of torsional Alfv\\'en waves in solar magnetic flux tubes of axial symmetry is studied. Methods: An analytical model of a solar magnetic flux tube of axial symmetry is developed by specifying a magnetic flux and deriving general analytical formulae for the equilibrium mass density and a gas pressure. The main advantage of this model is that it can be easily adopted to any axisymmetric magnetic structure. The model is used to simulate numerically the propagation of nonlinear Alfv\\'en waves in such 2D flux tubes of axial symmetry embedded in the solar atmosphere. The waves are excited by a localized pulse in the azimuthal component of velocity and launched at the top of the solar photosphere, and they propagate through the solar chromosphere, transition region, and into the solar corona. Results: The results of our numerical simulations reveal a complex scenario of twisted magnetic field lines and flows associated with torsional Alfv\\'en waves as well as energy transfer to t...

Murawski, K; Musielak, Z E; Srivastava, A K; Kraskiewicz, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Non-convex flux functions and compound shock waves in sediment beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-convex flux functions and compound shock waves in sediment beds Gert Bartholomeeusen1 , Hans De of Engineering Science, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ, UK gilliane.sills@eng.ox.ac.uk Summary. Sediment layers in sediment beds and the numerical modelling of the sedimentation process using an experimentally obtained

De Sterck, Hans

24

Global Patterns of Low-Mode Internal-Wave Propagation. Part I: Energy and Energy Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extending an earlier attempt to understand long-range propagation of the global internal-wave field, the energy E and horizontal energy flux F are computed for the two gravest baroclinic modes at 80 historical moorings around the globe. With ...

Matthew H. Alford; Zhongxiang Zhao

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study experimentally the influence of dissipation on stationary capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid by changing its viscosity. We observe that the frequency power law scaling of the capillary spectrum departs significantly from its theoretical value when the dissipation is increased. The energy dissipated by capillary waves is also measured and found to increase nonlinearly with the mean power injected within the fluid. Here, we propose an experimental estimation of the energy flux at every scale of the capillary cascade. The latter is found to be non constant through the scales. For fluids of low enough viscosity, we found that both capillary spectrum scalings with the frequency and the newly defined mean energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory. The Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is then experimentally estimated and compared to its theoretical value.

Luc Deike; Michaël Berhanu; Eric Falcon

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

GLOBAL AND LOCAL CUTOFF FREQUENCIES FOR TRANSVERSE WAVES PROPAGATING ALONG SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

It is a well-established result that the propagation of linear transverse waves along a thin but isothermal magnetic flux tube is affected by the existence of the global cutoff frequency, which separates the propagating and non-propagating waves. In this paper, the wave propagation along a thin and non-isothermal flux tube is considered and a local cutoff frequency is derived. The effects of different temperature profiles on this local cutoff frequency are studied by considering different power-law temperature distributions, as well as the semi-empirical VAL C model of the solar atmosphere. The obtained results show that the conditions for wave propagation strongly depend on the temperature gradients. Moreover, the local cutoff frequency calculated for the VAL C model gives constraints on the range of wave frequencies that are propagating in different parts of the solar atmosphere. These theoretically predicted constraints are compared to observational data and are used to discuss the role played by transverse tube waves in the atmospheric heating and dynamics, and in the excitation of solar atmospheric oscillations.

Routh, S. [Department of Physics, R. V. College of Engineering, Bangalore (India)] [Department of Physics, R. V. College of Engineering, Bangalore (India); Musielak, Z. E. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Hammer, R., E-mail: routhswati@rvce.edu.in, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu, E-mail: hammer@kis.uni-freiburg.de [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, Freiburg, D-79104 Germany (Germany)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Swift detection of all previously undetected blazars in a micro-wave flux-limited sample of WMAP foreground sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies a...

Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Colafrancesco, S; Cucchiara, A; Falcone, A; Kennea, J; Nesci, R; Perri, M; Tagliaferri, G; Tramacere, A; Tosti, G; Blustin, A J; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G; Dean, A J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Marshall, F; Parsons, A M; Zhang, B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Energy flux into internal lee waves: sensitivity to future climate changes using linear theory and a climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Internal lee waves generated by geostrophic flows over rough topography are thought to be a significant energy sink for eddies and energy source for deep ocean mixing. The sensitivity of the energy flux into lee waves from pre-industrial, present ...

Angelique Melet; Robert Hallberg; Alistair Adcroft; Maxim Nikurashin; Sonya Legg

29

Swift detection of all previously undetected blazars in a micro-wave flux-limited sample of WMAP foreground sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies above the sensitivity limit of the WMAP and of the Planck CMB missions are X-ray sources detectable by the present generation of X-ray satellites. An hypothetical all-sky soft X-ray survey with sensitivity of approximately $10^{-15}$ erg/s would be crucial to locate and remove over 100,000 blazars from CMB temperature and polarization maps and therefore accurately clean the primordial CMB signal from the largest population of extragalactic foreground contaminants.

P. Giommi; M. Capalbi; E. Cavazzuti; S. Colafrancesco; A. Cucchiara; A. Falcone; J. Kennea; R. Nesci; M. Perri; G. Tagliaferri; A. Tramacere; G. Tosti; A. J. Blustin; G. Branduardi-Raymont; D. N. Burrows; G. Chincarini; A. J. Dean; N. Gehrels; H. Krimm; F. Marshall; A. M. Parsons; B. Zhang

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Electromagnetic waves, gravitational coupling and duality analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we introduce a particular solution for parallel electric and magnetic fields, in a gravitational background, which satisfy free-wave equations and the phenomenology suggested by astrophysical plasma physics. These free-wave equations are computed such that the electric field does not induce the magnetic field and vice-versa. In a gravitational field, we analyze the Maxwell equations and the corresponding electromagnetic waves. A continuity equation is presented. A commutative and noncommutative analysis of the electromagnetic duality is described.

E. M. C. Abreu; C. Pinheiro; S. A. Diniz; F. C. Khanna

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

Analysis of Gravitational-Wave Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The field of gravitational-wave data analysis has expanded greatly over the past decade and significant developments have been made in methods of analyzing the data taken by resonant bar and interferometric detectors, as well as analysis of mock LISA data. This book introduces much of the required theoretical background in gravitational physics, statistics and time series analysis before moving on to a discussion of gravitational-wave data analysis techniques themselves. The book opens with an overview of the theory of gravitational radiation, providing a comprehensive discussion of various introductory topics: linearized gravity, transverse traceless gauge, the effects of gravitational waves (via geodesic deviation), energy and momentum carried by the waves, and generation of gravitational waves. The second chapter provides an introduction to the various sources of gravitational waves, followed by more detailed expositions on some of the primary sources. For example, the description of compact binary coalescence is thorough and includes a brief exposition of the post-Newtonian formalism and the effective one body method. There also follows extended derivations of gravitational waves from distorted neutron stars, supernovae and a stochastic background. Chapter three provides an introduction to the statistical theory of signal detection, including a discussion of parameter estimation via the Fisher matrix formalism. This is presented from a very mathematical, postulate based, standpoint and I expect that even established gravitational-wave data analysts will find the derivations here more formal than they are used to. The discussion of likelihood ratio tests and the importance of prior probabilities are presented particularly clearly. The fourth chapter covers time series analysis, with power spectrum estimation, extraction of periodic signals and goodness of fit tests. Chapter five switches topics and gives the details of the response of gravitational-wave detectors. The derivation is kept general at the outset, so that a detailed discussion of the response of the LISA detector is possible, before restricting to the long wavelength approximation for discussion of ground based detectors. Chapter six provides a detailed exposition of the maximum likelihood method for searching for signals in Gaussian noise. Jaranowski and Królak developed the F-statistic search method, which has become standard in searches for continuous waves and is also used in LISA data analysis. Perhaps then, it is unsurprising that the discussion of matched filtering is couched in terms of a generalized F-statistic method. This chapter also covers parameter estimation via the Fisher matrix and applications to networks of detectors. As in other chapters, the initial formalism is rather general but, in later sections, specific examples are given, such as the application to continuous wave, compact binary coalescence and stochastic signals. The seventh, and final, chapter provides examples of concrete methods for analyzing data. The focus is on methods which the authors are most familiar with and consequently these are mostly relevant for the analysis of resonant bar data and searches for continuous wave signals. The discussion of complexities arising in creating banks of template waveforms is likely to be of more general interest. The last two chapters of the book, which contain the meat of the subject of gravitational-wave data analysis, are regrettably short. Several large research areas are not discussed at all, including: time–frequency excess power search methods; Bayesian parameter estimation techniques (e.g. Markov Chain Monte Carlo) to go past the Fisher matrix approximation; signal consistency tests and other methods of dealing with non-Gaussian data. On the back cover, it states that `this book introduces researchers entering the field ... to gravitational-wave data analysis'. While this book certainly does contain much of the necessary introductory material, the presentation will likely prove too technical to be easily accessible to beginn

Stephen Fairhurst

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

33

THE BEHAVIOR OF TRANSVERSE WAVES IN NONUNIFORM SOLAR FLUX TUBES. I. COMPARISON OF IDEAL AND RESISTIVE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. Kink waves are a type of transverse MHD waves in magnetic flux tubes that are damped due to resonant absorption. The theoretical study of kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes is usually based on the simplification that the transverse variation of density is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the tube, i.e., the so-called thin boundary approximation. Here, we develop a general analytic method to compute the dispersion relation and the eigenfunctions of ideal MHD waves in pressureless flux tubes with transversely nonuniform layers of arbitrary thickness. Results for kink waves are produced and compared with fully numerical resistive MHD eigenvalue computations in the limit of small resistivity. We find that the frequency and resonant damping rate are the same in both ideal and resistive cases. The actual results for thick nonuniform layers deviate from the behavior predicted in the thin boundary approximation and strongly depend on the shape of the nonuniform layer. The eigenfunctions in ideal MHD are very different from those in resistive MHD. The ideal eigenfunctions display a global character regardless of the thickness of the nonuniform layer, while the resistive eigenfunctions are localized around the resonance and are indistinguishable from those of ordinary resistive Alfvén modes. Consequently, the spatial distribution of wave energy in the ideal and resistive cases is dramatically different. This poses a fundamental theoretical problem with clear observational consequences.

Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Goossens, Marcel, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: Cluster observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies $f\\in[1,400]$ Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In $\\sim 10\\%$ of the selected data, we observe narrow-band, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The life time of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e. lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of the background turbulence, a slow wind, a relative...

Lacombe, Catherine; Matteini, Lorenzo; Santolik, Ondrej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole; Mangeney, Andre; de Conchy, Yvonne; Maksimovic, Milan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73  

SciTech Connect

This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

Gantt, D.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Stratospheric Wave–Mean Flow Feedbacks and Sudden Stratospheric Warmings in a Simple Model Forced by Upward Wave Activity Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A classic result of studying stratospheric wave–mean flow interactions presented by Holton and Mass is that, for constant incoming wave forcing (at a notional tropopause), a vacillating stratospheric response may ensue. Simple models, such as the ...

Jeremiah P. Sjoberg; Thomas Birner

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

February 5, 2013 10:35 9in x 6in Advances in Wave Turbulence b1517-ch02 2nd Reading Fluctuations of the Energy Flux in Wave Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of the Injected Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 2.4 Fluctuations of the Energy Flux that involve a finite mean energy flux per unit surface and density across the scales. In the case of a n Fluctuations of the Energy Flux in Wave Turbulence S. Auma^itre , E. Falcon,§ and S. Fauve SPEC, DSM, CEA

Falcon, Eric

39

Partial wave analysis of $J/?\\to ???$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a sample of $2.25\\times 10^{8}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII, a full partial wave analysis on $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta\\eta$ was performed using the relativistic covariant tensor amplitude method. The results show that the dominant $0^{++}$ and $2^{++}$ components are from the $f_0(1710)$, $f_0(2100)$, $f_0(1500)$, $f_2'(1525)$, $f_2(1810)$ and $f_2(2340)$. The resonance parameters and branching fractions are also presented.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; N. Berger; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; C. Q. Feng; P. Friedel; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; D. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. U. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. X. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; Li Li Zhang; R. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Zhenghao Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. Z. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; Z. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Calculating Energy Flux in Internal Solitary Waves with an Application to Reflectance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energetics of internal solitary waves (ISWs) in continuous, quasi-two-layer stratifications are explored using fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic numerical simulations. The kinetic energy of an internal solitary wave is always greater than the ...

Kevin G. Lamb; Van T. Nguyen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Use of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in reactor design verification Part II: Flux measurement analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As for any new reactor design, the ACR-1000® design has to go through a comprehensive design verification process. One of the activities for supporting the ACR physics design calculations using the ACR physics code toolset, namely WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP, is to compare the flux distributions resulting from the calculation using this toolset at various power calibration monitor (PCM) detector locations against the flux measurement data from the Japanese Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR) FUGEN. The discussion of this particular design verification exercise will be presented in a two-part paper. The usage of data from the FUGEN reactor qualifies this exercise as design verification by alternate analysis. In order to have meaningful results at the end of the design verification process, the similarity between the ACR-1000 and FUGEN reactors has to be demonstrated. It is accomplished through the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using the TSUNAMI (Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation) methodology. The results from the similarity comparison have been presented in Part I of the paper. In Part II, results from flux distribution comparison will be presented. Favourable results from this design verification exercise give a high level of confidence that using the same physics toolset in calculating the flux distribution for ACR-1000 reactor will produce results with acceptable fidelity. In addition, the results will also give an indication of expected margins in the design calculations, not only at the locations of the PCM detectors but also at the derived bundle and channel powers obtained through the flux mapping calculation.

Doddy Kastanya; Mohamed Dahmani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.  

SciTech Connect

IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

Ao, Tommy

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: CASE nutrient management, organic waste, wastewater and septage that contained high concentration of nutrients area. The nitrogen fluxes in relation to organic waste and wastewater were chosen as indicators

Richner, Heinz

44

Single-wave-number representation of nonlinear energy spectrum in elastic-wave turbulence of the Föppl–von Kármán equation: Energy decomposition analysis and energy budget  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A single-wave-number representation of a nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., a stretching-energy spectrum, is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the Föppl–von Kármán (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wave-number space and analytical expressions of detailed energy budgets in the nonlinear interactions. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic energy and bending energy are comparable with each other at large wave numbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wave numbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode ak and its companion mode a?k is observed at the small wave numbers. The energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wave numbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wave numbers. Total-energy flux consistent with energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

Naoto Yokoyama and Masanori Takaoka

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Use of a moments method for the analysis of flux distributions in subcritical assemblies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A moments method has been developed for the analysis of flux distributions in subcritical neutron-multiplying assemblies. The method determines values of the asymptotic axial and radial buckling, and of the extrapolated ...

Cheng, Hsiang-Shou

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wavelet multiresolution analysis was used to examine the variation in dominant length scales determined from remotely sensed airborne- and satellite-derived surface energy flux data. The wavelet cospectra are computed between ...

Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Gillies, Robert R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Spin flux and magnetic solitons in an interacting two-dimensional electron gas: Topology of two-valued wave functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is suggested that an interacting many-electron system in a two-dimensional lattice may condense into a topological magnetic state distinct from any discussed previously. This condensate exhibits local spin-1/2 magnetic moments on the lattice sites but is composed of a Slater determinant of single-electron wave functions which exist in an orthogonal sector of the electronic Hilbert space from the sector describing traditional spin-density-wave or spiral magnetic states. These one-electron spinor wave functions have the distinguishing property that they are antiperiodic along a closed path encircling any elementary plaquette of the lattice. This corresponds to a 2? rotation of the internal coordinate frame of the electron as it encircles the plaquette. The possibility of spinor wave functions with spatial antiperiodicity is a direct consequence of the two-valuedness of the internal electronic wave function defined on the space of Euler angles describing its spin. This internal space is the topologically, doubly-connected, group manifold of SO(3). Formally, these antiperiodic wave functions may be described by passing a flux which couples to spin (rather than charge) through each of the elementary plaquettes of the lattice. When applied to the two-dimensional Hubbard model with one electron per site, this new topological magnetic state exhibits a relativistic spectrum for charged, quasiparticle excitations with a suppressed one-electron density of states at the Fermi level.For a topological antiferromagnet on a square lattice, with the standard Hartree-Fock, spin-density-wave decoupling of the on-site Hubbard interaction, there is an exact mapping of the low-energy one-electron excitation spectrum to a relativistic Dirac continuum field theory. In this field theory, the Dirac mass gap is precisely the Mott-Hubbard charge gap and the continuum field variable is an eight-component Dirac spinor describing the components of physical electron-spin amplitude on each of the four sites of the elementary plaquette in the original Hubbard model. Within this continuum model we derive explicitly the existence of hedgehog Skyrmion textures as local minima of the classical magnetic energy. These magnetic solitons carry a topological winding number ? associated with the vortex rotation of the background magnetic moment field by a phase angle 2?? along a path encircling the soliton. Such solitons also carry a spin flux of ?? through the plaquette on which they are centered. The ?=1 hedgehog Skyrmion describes a local transition from the topological (antiperiodic) sector of the one-electron Hilbert space to the nontopological sector. We derive from first principles the existence of deep level localized electronic states within the Mott-Hubbard charge gap for the ?=1 and 2 solitons. The spectrum of localized states is symmetric about E=0 and each subgap electronic level can be occupied by a pair of electrons in which one electron resides primarily on one sublattice and the second electron on the other sublattice. It is suggested that flux-carrying solitons and the subgap electronic structure which they induce are important in understanding the physical behavior of doped Mott insulators.

Sajeev John and Andrey Golubentsev

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Numerical analysis of the coherent radiation emission by two stacked Josephson flux-flow oscillators  

SciTech Connect

The numerical investigation of the radiation emission by a system of two magnetically coupled, long Josephson junctions is reported. Time-dependent synchronized voltage response in the flux-flow regime is analyzed for the case of in-phase and out-of-phase oscillations in the junctions. Simulations show that Josephson junctions operating in the in-phase flux-flow mode may generate rf radiation power by a factor of more than 4 larger than that of a single Josephson junction. The radiation in the out-of-phase flux-flow mode is characterized by nearly completely suppressed amplitudes of odd harmonics and considerably damped even harmonics as compared to that of a single barrier junction. The dependence of the radiation power on the parameter spread between the junctions is investigated. The advantages of using stacked Josephson junctions as oscillators for the sub-mm wave band are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Wallraff, A.; Goldobin, E.; Ustinov, A.V. [Institute of Thin Film and Ion Technology, Research Center Juelich (KFA), D-52425 (Germany)] [Institute of Thin Film and Ion Technology, Research Center Juelich (KFA), D-52425 (Germany)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Compact binary systems in scalar-tensor gravity. III. Scalar waves and energy flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the scalar waveform generated by a binary of nonspinning compact objects (black holes or neutron stars) in a general class of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. The waveform is accurate to 1.5 post-Newtonian order [$O((v/c)^3)$] beyond the leading order tensor gravitational waves (the "Newtonian quadrupole"). To solve the scalar-tensor field equations, we adapt the direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations formalism developed by Will, Wiseman, and Pati. The internal gravity of the compact objects is treated with an approach developed by Eardley. We find that the scalar waves are described by the same small set of parameters which describe the equations of motion and tensor waves. For black hole-black hole binaries, the scalar waveform vanishes, as expected from previous results which show that these systems in scalar-tensor theory are indistinguishable from their general relativistic counterparts. For black hole-neutron star binaries, the scalar waveform simplifies considerably from the g...

Lang, Ryan N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical of Mechanical Engineering) ABSTRACT Within a wave energy converter's operational bandwidth, device operation

Victoria, University of

51

Bayesian statistics applied to neutron activation data for reactor flux spectrum analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we present a statistical method, based on Bayesian statistics, to analyze the neutron flux spectrum from the activation data of different isotopes. The experimental data were acquired during a neutron activation experiment performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of Pavia University (Italy) in four irradiation positions characterized by different neutron spectra. In order to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum, subdivided in energy groups, a system of linear equations, containing the group effective cross sections and the activation rate data, has to be solved. However, since the system’s coefficients are experimental data affected by uncertainties, a rigorous statistical approach is fundamental for an accurate evaluation of the neutron flux groups. For this purpose, we applied the Bayesian statistical analysis, that allows to include the uncertainties of the coefficients and the a priori information about the neutron flux. A program for the analysis of Bayesian hierarchical models, based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, was used to define the problem statistical model and solve it. The first analysis involved the determination of the thermal, resonance-intermediate and fast flux components and the dependence of the results on the Prior distribution choice was investigated to confirm the reliability of the Bayesian analysis. After that, the main resonances of the activation cross sections were analyzed to implement multi-group models with finer energy subdivisions that would allow to determine the neutron flux groups, their uncertainties and correlations with good accuracy. The results were then compared with the ones obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations of the reactor fluxes performed with the MCNP code, finding in general a good agreement.

Davide Chiesa; Ezio Previtali; Monica Sisti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3 4 MEASUREMENTS Richardson et al. 1 January 13, 2006 Abstract1 Measured surface-atmosphere fluxes of energy open-path, gas analyzer is22 used.23 #12;RANDOM ERRORS IN ENERGY AND CO2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS Richardson

53

Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain Paper number: 197  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain Paper number: 197 #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth

Grilli, Stéphan T.

54

Optimisation of a transverse flux linear PM generator using 3D Finite Element Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Several transverse flux and longitudinal flux linear generator topologies exist for freepiston Stirling engine applications. In this thesis the transverse flux permanent magnet… (more)

Schutte, Jacques

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

56

Analysis of a multi-machine database on divertor heat flux  

SciTech Connect

A coordinated effort to measure divertor heat flux characteristics in fully attached, similarly shaped H-mode plasmas on C-Mod, DIII-D, and NSTX was carried out in 2010 in order to construct a predictive scaling relation applicable to next step devices including ITER, FNSF, and DEMO. Few published scaling laws are available and those that have been published were obtained under widely varying conditions and divertor geometries, leading to conflicting predictions for this critically important quantity. This study was designed to overcome these deficiencies. Analysis of the combined data set reveals that the primary dependence of the parallel heat flux width is robustly inverse with I-p, which all three tokamaks independently demonstrate. An improved Thomson scattering system on DIII-D has yielded very accurate scrape off layer (SOL) profile measurements from which tests of parallel transport models have been made. It is found that a flux-limited model agrees best with the data at all collisionalities, while a Spitzer resistivity model agrees at higher collisionality where it is more valid. The SOL profile measurements and divertor heat flux scaling are consistent with a heuristic drift based model as well as a critical gradient model.

Makowski, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Elder, J. D. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Gray, Travis K [ORNL; LaBombard, Brian [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Leonard, A. W. [General Atomics; Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Osborne, T. H. [General Atomics; Stangeby, P. C. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies; Terry, J. L. [MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA; Watkins, J. G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems  

SciTech Connect

Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

58

Progress in xenon stability analysis for a flux-flattened reactor  

SciTech Connect

A power oscillation induced by a xenon transient is common to all large thermal reactors. The Hanford N Reactor, operated by UNC Nuclear Industries for the US Dept. of Energy, is a large graphite-moderated horizontal pressure tube reactor whose dimensions are approx. 10 x 10 x 12 m. To preclude xenon instability, the N Reactor was designed to have a large negative power coefficient of reactivity. Previous analyses and observations made over 23 yr of operation have confirmed that the reactor is in fact very stable. Currently an effort is under way to introduce axial flux-flattening to improve the operating and long-term safety margins. Safety evaluations associated with the flux-flattening program require a complete review of the xenon stability question. To achieve the level of accuracy necessary to make an unambiguous analysis of the xenon stability characteristics in the flux-flattened mode, it is necessary to employ sophisticated methods. To this end, it was decided to write a three-dimensional nodal code and to couple xenon and temperature feedbacks to this code. This paper summarizes the progress made in developing such a code for xenon stability analysis related to the N Reactor.

Wu, R.M.; Lan, J.S.; Albrecht, R.W.; Toffer, H.; Omberg, R.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Multiscale finite element analysis of elastic wave scattering from localized defects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the use of a multiscale finite element approach to study the interaction between elastic waves and localized defects. The analysis of wave-defect interaction is of fundamental importance for the development of ultrasonic non-destructive ... Keywords: Elastic wave scattering, Finite element method, Multiscale analysis

F. Casadei, J. J. Rimoli, M. Ruzzene

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Yield Modeling and Analysis of a Clockless Asynchronous Wave Pipeline with Pulse Faults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yield Modeling and Analysis of a Clockless Asynchronous Wave Pipeline with Pulse Faults T. Feng fault model and its modeling and analysis methods in a clockless asynchronous wave pipeline fault rate model for establishing a sound theoretical foundation for clockless wave pipeline design

Ayers, Joseph

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Limit cycle analysis of nuclear coupled density-wave oscillations  

SciTech Connect

Recent tests at commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) have demonstrated the existence of limit cycles for nuclear coupled density-wave oscillations (NCDWOs) at off-normal conditions. This paper presents the application of a simplified nonlinear BWR core model to determine the potential magnitude and limiting mechanisms of severe NCDWOs, and an approximate determination of the limit cycle using singular perturbation analysis. In this model, the point kinetics equation with infinite-delayed approximation and linear reactivity feedback to both fuel temperature and coolant density is used. This model correctly predicts the magnitude of the Vermont Yankee power oscillations.

Ward, M.E.; Lee, J.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE VISIBILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE a new method for imaging spectroscopy analysis of hard X-ray emission during solar flares. The method.e., the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms of the spectral image) to obtain smoothed (regularized

Piana, Michele

63

Analysis and Development of a Three Body Heaving Wave Energy Scott J. Beatty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Development of a Three Body Heaving Wave Energy Converter by Scott J. Beatty BASc Body Heaving Wave Energy Converter by Scott J. Beatty BASc, University of British Columbia, 2003 A relative motion based heaving point absorber wave energy converter is being co- developed by researchers

Victoria, University of

64

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines A project pursuant is to investigate the characteristics of mine blast seismic waves in southern Indiana. Coal mines are prevalent implications for understanding different seismic sources, earthquake structures in Indiana, and wave

Polly, David

65

Radiation flux and spectral analysis of the multi-temperature Z dynamic hohlraum  

SciTech Connect

Experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Z-machine, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico produce hot ({approx}220 eV) plasmas. X-ray emission from the plasma is used to drive radiation flow experiments. Our standard plasma diagnostic suite consists of x-ray diodes (XRDs), silicon photodiodes, and nickel thin film bolometers. Small diagnostic holes allow us to view the hot plasma from the side, top axial anode side, and bottom axial cathode side. Computer software has been written to process the raw data to calculate data quality, fold in detector spectral response and experiment geometry for emitted flux, calculate a multidetector spectral unfold, and yield an equivalent time-dependent Planckian temperature profile. Spectral unfolds of our XRD data generally yield a Planckian-like spectrum. In our presentation we will compare our diagnostic techniques, analysis, and results to more accurately characterize spectral unfolds in order to establish better drive conditions for our experiments.

Lockard, T. E.; Idzorek, G. C.; Tierney, T. E. IV; Watt, R. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

IMPLODING IGNITION WAVES. I. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We show that converging spherical and cylindrical shock waves may ignite a detonation wave in a combustible medium, provided the radius at which the shocks become strong exceeds a critical radius, R{sub crit}. An approximate analytic expression for R{sub crit} is derived for an ideal gas equation of state and a simple (power-law-Arrhenius) reaction law, and shown to reproduce the results of numerical solutions. For typical acetylene-air experiments we find R{sub crit} {approx} 100 {mu}m (spherical) and R{sub crit} {approx} 1 mm (cylindrical). We suggest that the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) observed in these systems may be due to converging shocks produced by the turbulent deflagration flow, which reaches sub- (but near) sonic velocities on scales >>R{sub crit}. Our suggested mechanism differs from that proposed by Zel'dovich et al., in which a fine-tuned spatial gradient in the chemical induction time is required to be maintained within the turbulent deflagration flow. Our analysis may be readily extended to more complicated equations of state and reaction laws. An order of magnitude estimate of R{sub crit} within a white dwarf at the pre-detonation conditions believed to lead to Type Ia supernova explosions is 0.1 km, suggesting that our proposed mechanism may be relevant for DDT initiation in these systems. The relevance of our proposed ignition mechanism to DDT initiation may be tested by both experiments and numerical simulations.

Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Livne, Eli [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Simulation and Analysis of Superconducting Traveling-Wave Parametric Amplifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting parametric amplifiers have great promise for quantum-limited readout of superconducting qubits and detectors. Until recently, most superconducting parametric amplifiers had been based on resonant structures, limiting their bandwidth and dynamic range. Broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifiers based both on the nonlinear kinetic inductance of superconducting thin films and on Josephson junctions are in development. By modifying the dispersion property of the amplifier circuit, referred to as dispersion engineering, the gain can be greatly enhanced and the size can be reduced. We present two theoretical frameworks for analyzing and understanding such parametric amplifiers: (1) generalized coupled-mode equations and (2) a finite difference time domain (FDTD) model combined with a small signal analysis. We show how these analytical and numerical tools may be used to understand device performance.

Saptarshi Chaudhuri; Jiansong Gao; Kent Irwin

2015-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

68

Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Plasmoids as magnetic flux ropes  

SciTech Connect

Observational constraints on the magnetic topology and orientation of plasmoids is examined using a magnetic field model. The authors develop a magnetic flux rope model to examine whether principal axis analysis (PAA) of magnetometer signatures from a single satellite pass is sufficient to determine the magnetic topology of plasmoids and if plasmoid observations are best explained by the flux rope, closed loop, or large-amplitude wave picture. Satellite data are simulated by extracting the magnetic field along a path through the model of a magnetic flux rope. They then examine the results using PAA. They find that the principal axis directions (and therefore the interpretation of structure orientation) is highly dependent on several parameters including the satellite trajectory through the structure. Because of this they conclude that PAA of magnetometer data from a single satellite pass is insufficient to differentiate between magnetic closed loop and flux rope models. They also compare the model results to ISEE 3 magnetometer data of plasmoid events in various coordinate frames including principal axis and geocentric solar magnetospheric. They find that previously identified plasmoid events that have been explained as closed loop structures can also be modeled as flux ropes. They also searched the literature for previously reported flux rope and closed loop plasmoid events to examine if these structures had any similarities and/or differences. The results of the modeling efforts and examination of both flux rope and plasmoid events lead them to favor the flux rope model of plasmoid formation, as it is better able to unify the observations of various magnetic structures observed by ISEE 3.

Moldwin, M.B.; Hughes, W.J. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Quadratic-in-spin effects in the orbital dynamics and gravitational-wave energy flux of compact binaries at the 3PN order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dynamics of spinning binaries of compact objects at the next-to-leading order in the quadratic-in-spin effects, which corresponds to the third post-Newtonian order (3PN). Using a Dixon-type multipolar formalism for spinning point particles endowed with spin-induced quadrupoles and computing iteratively in harmonic coordinates the relevant pieces of the PN metric within the near zone, we derive the post-Newtonian equations of motion as well as the equations of spin precession. We find full equivalence with available results. We then focus on the far-zone field produced by those systems and obtain the previously unknown 3PN spin contributions to the gravitational-wave energy flux by means of the multipolar post-Minkowskian (MPM) wave generation formalism. Our results are presented in the center-of-mass frame for generic orbits, before being further specialized to the case of spin-aligned, circular orbits. We derive the orbital phase of the binary based on the energy balance equation and brief...

Bohé, Alejandro; Marsat, Sylvain; Porter, Edward K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Horizontal internal-tide fluxes support elevated phytoplankton productivity over the inner continental shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Estimating internal wave energy fluxes in the ocean.fluxes of internal-wave energy (Kunze et al. 2002; Nash etvariability to internal-wave energy-flux calculations). [21

Lucas, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Non-Paraxial Wave Analysis of 3D Airy Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 3D Airy beam (AiB) is thoroughly explored from a wave-theory point of view. We utilize the exact spectral integral for the AiB to derive local ray-based solutions that do not suffer from the limitations of the conventional parabolic equation (PE) solution, and are valid far beyond the paraxial zone and for longer ranges. The ray topology near the main lobe of the AiB delineates a hyperbolic umilic diffraction catastrophe, consisting of a cusped double-layered caustic, but this caustic is deformed in the far range where the field loses its beam shape. The field in the vicinity of this caustic is described uniformly by a hyperbolic umilic canonical integral which is structured explicitly on the local geometry of the caustic as obtained from the initial field distribution. In order to accommodate the finite-energy AiB we also modify the canonical integral by adding a complex loss parameter. The canonical integral is calculated using a series expansion and the results are used to identify the validity zone of the conventional PE solution. The analysis is performed within the framework of the non-dispersive AiB where the aperture field is scaled with frequency such that the ray skeleton is frequency-independent. This scaling enables an extension of the theory to the ultra wide band (UWB) regime and ensures that the pulsed field propagates along the curved beam trajectory without dispersion, as will be demonstrated in a subsequent publication.

Y. Kaganovsky; E. Heyman

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Frequency spectrum analysis of electromagnetic waves radiated by electrical discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we analyzed the frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic waves radiated by an electric discharge as a basic method for developing an on-line diagnostic technique for power equipment installed inside closed-switchboards. In order to simulate ... Keywords: closed-switchboard, electromagnetic shielding room, electromagnetic wave, frequency spectrum, local discharge, series arc discharge

Hyeon-Kyu Cha; Sun-Jae Kim; Dae-Won Park; Gyung-Suk Kil

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Small break LOCA analysis of the ONRL high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect

A digital simulation program, HFIRSYS, was developed using MMS to analyze small break loss of coolant events in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor. The code evaluates the response of the primary reactor system including automatic controls actions resulting from breaks in auxiliary piping connected to the primary. The primary output of the code is the margin to the onset of nucleate boiling expressed as a ratio of heat flux which would cause boiling to the current hot channel heat flux. A description of the model, validation results and a sample transient are presented.

Wilson, T.L. Jr.; Cook, D.H.; Sozer, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR PERIODIC TRAVELING WAVES OF THE BOUSSINESQ EQUATION AND THE KGZ SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR PERIODIC TRAVELING WAVES OF THE BOUSSINESQ EQUATION AND THE KGZ stability of spatially periodic waves for the Boussinesq equa- tion (the cases p = 2, 3) and the Klein interest will be mainly in two PDE - the Boussinesq equation and the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov system, although

Stanislavova, Milena

76

LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR PERIODIC TRAVELING WAVES OF THE BOUSSINESQ EQUATION AND THE KGZ SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR PERIODIC TRAVELING WAVES OF THE BOUSSINESQ EQUATION AND THE KGZ stability of spatially periodic waves for the Boussinesq equa- tion (the cases p = 2, 3) and the Klein in two PDEs - the Boussinesq equation and the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov system, although the methods that we

Stanislavova, Milena

77

Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Ralf Starzmann Fluid the water wave motion into a bi-directional air flow, which in turn drives an air turbine. The Wells turbine the environmental impact of an in situ Wells turbine in more detail requires an in depth understanding

Frandsen, Jannette B.

78

A power analysis and data acquisition system for ocean wave energy device testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the testing of ocean wave energy devices, the demand for a portable and robust data acquisition and electrical loading system has become apparent. This paper investigates the development of a 30 kW inclusive system combining loading capabilities, real-time power analysis, and data acquisition for the testing of deployed ocean wave energy devices. Hardware results for ocean testing are included.

Ean Amon; Ted K.A. Brekken; Annette von Jouanne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Original articles: Intelligent multichannel sensors for pulse wave analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aortic pulse wave velocity is an independent predictive indicator for all cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. Unfortunately it is only invasively accessible and thus the A. carotis-A. femoralis pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is recommended as ... Keywords: Arterial stiffness, BP, Cardiovascular risk, ECG, Electrocardiography, FIR, ICA, INA, Idxao, Idxo, Idxs, LED, PTT, PW, PWV, Pulse transit time, Pulse wave velocity, SD, cfPWV, dBP, p'(Idxo), p'(Idxs), p(Idxo), p(Idxs), sBP

S. Rosenkranz; C. Mayer; J. Kropf; S. Wassertheurer

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Analysis of a Fivefold Symmetric Superposition of Plane Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that a symmetric superposition of five standing plane waves can be expressed as an infinite series of terms of decreasing wavenumber, where each term is a product of five plane waves. We show that this series converges pointwise in R^2 and uniformly in any disk domain in R^2. Using this series, we provide a heuristic argument for why the locations of the local extrema of a symmetric superposition of five standing plane waves can be approximated by the vertices of a Penrose tiling.

Michael H. Schwarz; Robert A. Pelcovits

2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Dispersion, Wave Propagation and Efficiency Analysis of Nanowire Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the electromagnetic properties of InP/InAs nanowire solar cells for different geometries. We address both eigenvalue calculations to determine the wave propagation as well...

Kupec, J; Witzigmann, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of ocean waves and wave forces by a filtering technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l i b r a r y A &M COLLEGE OF TEXAS AH ALTS 2S CP XIAN WAVES AND WAVE FORCES BY A FILTERING TECHNIQUE A Dis0?rt*tlon li b r a a y j a t r t 6ooipy?? tj ?p j???? t?? ?p????? ?t?ii ??tairt? p? ?prra???? ??t? p? ??oti?r??? ?t? ???? LIBRARY... fulfillment of the requires*nta far the degree of ?????? ?? ?????????? May 1955 ?6??? ???????? ??????6? ????????????? ???6????6??? A&MCO LLEG a ?? ?? l F ?? 6?????????????? ??? tb??pi ?it???b??? t???p??????j ??? b?j???aj? ???o p? ?ip??jjpij ?? ?? ??a...

Blumberg, Randolph

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

An analysis of pavement heat flux to optimize the1 water efficiency of a pavement-watering method2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of pavement heat flux to optimize the1 water efficiency of a pavement-watering method2 Martin HENDEL1,2,3* , Morgane COLOMBERT2 , Youssef DIAB2,4 , Laurent ROYON3 3 1 Paris City Hall, Water.hendel@paris.fr)8 9 Preprint version. Uploaded on May 12th , 2014.10 Abstract: Pavement-watering as a technique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

Bispectral Analysis of Energy Transfer within the Two-Dimensional Oceanic Internal Wave Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bispectral analysis of the numerically reproduced spectral responses of the two-dimensional oceanic internal wave field to the incidence of the low-mode semidiurnal internal tide is performed. At latitudes just equatorward of 30°, the low-mode ...

Naoki Furuichi; Toshiyuki Hibiya; Yoshihiro Niwa

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Wave load computation in direct strength analysis of semi-submersible platform structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A wave load computation approach in direct strength analysis of semi-submersible platform structures was presented in this paper. Considering ... adopted for generating the wet surface mesh of platform. The hydro...

Hai-bin Zhang; Hui-long Ren; Yang-shan Dai…

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Analysis of static and wave-induced pore pressures in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF STATIC AND WAVE-INDUCED PORE PRESSURES IN MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by GARRETT EDWIN WILLIAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALII University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of I1ASTER DF... SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject. : Civil Engineering ANALYSIS OF STATIC AND WAVE-INDUCED PORE PRESSURES IN MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by GARRETT EDWIN WILLIAMS Approved as to style and content by: Wayne A. Dunlap (CE)(Chairm of Committee) Harry...

Williams, Garrett Edwin

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Lie symmetry analysis of electron–electromagnetic wave interaction under condition of the anomalous Doppler effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lie symmetry analysis is applied for a problem of interaction of electron cyclotron oscillators with a slow electromagnetic wave under condition of the anomalous Doppler effect. This analysis reveals scaling invariance of the system and existence of self-similar solutions which describe amplification of a short electromagnetic pulse with its subsequent compression. The results of theoretical analysis are confirmed by numerical simulations.

N.M. Ryskin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose a simple graphic and statistical method for processing short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectivity spectra of alteration minerals, which classifies spectra according to their shape and absorption features, thus obtaining groups of spectra equivalent to mineral assemblages. It also permits selection of fewer samples for further mineralogical verification.

89

Linear stability analysis and the speed of gravitational waves in dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity  

SciTech Connect

We perform a linear stability analysis of dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity in the geometric optics approximation and find that it is linearly stable on the backgrounds considered. Our analysis also reveals that gravitational waves in the modified theory travel at the speed of light in Minkowski spacetime. However, on a Schwarzschild background the characteristic speed of propagation along a given direction splits into two modes, one subluminal and one superluminal. The width of the splitting depends on the azimuthal components of the propagation vector, is linearly proportional to the mass of the black hole, and decreases with the third inverse power of the distance from the black hole. Radial propagation is unaffected, implying that as probed by gravitational waves the location of the event horizon of the spacetime is unaltered. The analysis further reveals that when a high frequency, pure gravitational wave is scattered from a black hole, a scalar wave of comparable amplitude is excited, and vice versa.

Garfinkle, David [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States) and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 (United States); Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Nanofiltration of hazardous Congo red dye: Performance and flux decline analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effectiveness of nanofiltration (NF) for dye wastewater treatment has been well established. However, detailed study on the fouling phenomena during the NF of dye is still limited. This paper provides the understanding on the performance and fouling phenomena of the polypiperazine amide nanofiltration (PA–NF) membrane for the treatment of hazardous Congo red (CR) dye. The 20 mg L?1 dye at pH 9 was successfully 100% removed with minimum flux decline under the specific conditions: room temperature (25 °C) and trans-membrane pressure 5 bar. In addition, the membrane retained more Na2SO4 (62–91%) than NaCl (14–31%), owing to the ion size and negative charges on the membrane surface. The experimental results showed that fouling was the significant reason of the membrane flux decline which principally caused by the favourable/irreversible adsorption. Mechanisms of the PA–NF membrane fouling were investigated using the linearized forms according to Wiesner and Aptel equations. It had been found that the fouling mechanisms were influenced by the solution pH and concentration. Under 20 mg L?1 of initial CR concentration at pH 9, the decline of permeate flux was due to standard blocking mechanism during the initial filtration. The cake formation took place rapidly at the second stage of filtration which contributed to the relatively constant permeate flux decline.

Nur Hanis Hayati Hairom; Abdul Wahab Mohammad; Abdul Amir Hassan Kadhum

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and consistent estimates of the energy spreading parameter and mean wave direction of directional seas based on a cosine-2s model. In this approach, a Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) is employed. Because it is more tolerant of errors in the estimated cross...

Zhang, Shaosong

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

92

Complex component analysis of shear-wave splitting: case studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......geophones (Bush & Crampin 1987). We shall process only the S1 offset at 272m. This case...of the two shear-wave arrivals. The process depends on the coherency of the polarization...azimuthal anisotropy, 56th Ann. h i . SEG Mtg, Houston, Expanded Abstracts, pp......

Xiang-Yang Li; Stuart Crampin

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Heat Flux Analysis of a Reacting Thermite Spray Impingent on a Substrate  

SciTech Connect

Spray combustion from a thermite reaction is a new area of research relevant to localized energy generation applications, such as welding or cutting. In this study, we characterized the heat flux of combustion spray impinging on a target from a nozzle for three thermite mixtures. The reactions studied include aluminum (Al) with iron oxide (Fe2O3), Al with copper oxide (CuO), and Al with molybdenum oxide (MoO3). Several standoff distances (i.e., distance from the nozzle exit to the target) were analyzed. A fast response heat flux sensor was engineered for this purpose and is discussed in detail. Results correlated substrate damage to a threshold heat flux of 4550 W/cm2 for a fixed-nozzle configuration. Also, higher gas-generating thermites were shown to produce a widely dispersed spray and be less effective at imparting kinetic energy damage to a target. These results provide an understanding of the role of thermal and physical properties (i.e., such as heat of combustion, gas generation, and particle size) on thermite spray combustion performance measured by damaging a target substrate.

Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael A. Daniels; Daniel J. Prentice; Eric D. Steffler; Steven P. D'Arche

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Quasilinear analysis of absorption of ion Bernstein waves by electrons  

SciTech Connect

The effects induced on plasma electrons by an externally launched ion Bernstein wave (IBW), in the presence of a lower hybrid wave (LHW) in the current drive regime, are studied by analytical integration of the IBW ray-tracing equations along with the amplitude transport equation (Poynting theorem). The electric field amplitude parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the quasilinear diffusion coefficient, and the modified electron distribution function are analytically calculated in the case of IBW. The analytical calculation is compared to the numerical solution obtained by using a 2-D Fokker-Planck code for the distribution function, without any approximation for the collision operator. The synergy between the IBW and LHW can be accounted for, and the absorption of the IBW power when the electron distribution function presents a tail generated by the LHW in the current drive regime can be calculated.

Cardinali, A. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Rome (Italy); Paoletti, F. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Bernabei, S.; Ono, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Millimeter wave analysis of the dielectric properties of oil shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural sedimentation processes give rise to fine layers in shales. If these layers alternate between organic-rich and organic-poor sediments, then the contrast in dielectric properties gives rise to an effective birefringence as the presence of hydrocarbons suppresses the dielectric constant of the host rock. We have measured these effects with a quasioptical millimeter wave setup that is rapid and noncontacting. We find that the strength of this birefringence and the overall dielectric permittivity provide two useful diagnostic of the organic content of oil shales.

John A. Scales; Michael Batzle

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

Millimeter wave analysis of the dielectric properties of oil shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural sedimentation processes give rise to fine layers in shales. If these layers alternate between organic-rich and organic-poor sediments then the contrast in dielectric properties gives rise to an effective birefringence as the presence of hydrocarbons suppresses the dielectric constant of the host rock. We have measured these effects with a quasioptical millimeter wave setup that is rapid and noncontacting. We find that the strength of this birefringence and the overall dielectricpermittivity provide two useful diagnostics of the organic content of oil shales.

John A. Scales; Michael Batzle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Spectral Analysis of Wave Motions in the Region of Temperature Minimum of the Sun’s Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present some results of an analysis of the spatial spectrum and two-dimensional distribution of horizontally running waves of five-minute oscillations.

V. E. Merkulenko; V. I. Polyakov; V. S. Loskutnikov

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Flux analysis of the human proximal colon using anaerobic digestion model 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The colon can be regarded as an anaerobic digestive compartment within the gastro intestinal tract (GIT). An in silico model simulating the fluxes in the human proximal colon was developed on basis of the anaerobic digestion model 1 (ADM1), which is traditionally used to model waste conversion to biogas. Model calibration was conducted using data from in vitro fermentation of the proximal colon (TIM-2), and, amongst others, supplemented with the bio kinetics of prebiotic galactooligosaccharides (GOS) fermentation. The impact of water and solutes absorption by the host was also included. Hydrolysis constants of carbohydrates and proteins were estimated based on total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia production in vitro. Model validation was established using an independent dataset of a different in vitro model: an in vitro three-stage continuous culture system. The in silico model was shown to provide quantitative insight in the microbial community structure in terms of functional groups, and the substrate and product fluxes between these groups as well as the host, as a function of the substrate composition, pH and the solids residence time (SRT). The model confirms the experimental observation that methanogens are washed out at low pH or low SRT-values. The in silico model is proposed as useful tool in the design of experimental setups for in vitro experiments by giving insight in fermentation processes in the proximal human colon.

Anne Marieke Motelica-Wagenaar; Arjen Nauta; Ellen G.H.M. van den Heuvel; Robbert Kleerebezem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Development and analysis of non-linearity in the pressure waves resulting from thermoacoustic heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplies the heat to the stack) and an ambient heat exchanger (which rejects the waste heat to the ambientDevelopment and analysis of non-linearity in the pressure waves resulting from thermoacoustic heat heat engines are intrinsically simple, reliable, environmentally friendly and reasonably efficient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

TEMPORAL INFORMATION OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR LAMB WAVES FOR FATIGUE DAMAGE LOCALIZATION: ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEMPORAL INFORMATION OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR LAMB WAVES FOR FATIGUE DAMAGE LOCALIZATION: ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS Ming Hong1,2 , Zhongqing Su*1,3 , Ye Lu2 , Li Cheng1,3 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering widely applied to locate gross damage in plate structures, which may greatly facilitate the localization

Boyer, Edmond

102

A DATA-CENTERED COLLABORATION PORTAL TO SUPPORT GLOBAL CARBON-FLUX ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-climate, like other environmental sciences, has been changing. Large-scalesynthesis studies are becoming more common. These synthesis studies are often conducted by science teams that are geographically distributed and on datasets that are global in scale. A broad array of collaboration and data analytics tools are now available that could support these science teams. However, building tools that scientists actually use is hard. Also, moving scientists from an informal collaboration structure to one mediated by technology often exposes inconsistencies in the understanding of the rules of engagement between collaborators. We have developed a scientific collaboration portal, called fluxdata.org, which serves the community of scientists providing and analyzing the global FLUXNET carbon-flux synthesis dataset. Key things we learned or re-learned during our portal development include: minimize the barrier to entry, provide features on a just-in-time basis, development of requirements is an on-going process, provide incentives to change leaders and leverage the opportunity they represent, automate as much as possible, and you can only learn how to make it better if people depend on it enough to give you feedback. In addition, we also learned that splitting the portal roles between scientists and computer scientists improved user adoption and trust. The fluxdata.org portal has now been in operation for ~;;1.5 years and has become central to the FLUXNET synthesis efforts.

Agarwal, Deborah A.; Humphrey, Marty; Beekwilder, Norm; Jackson, Keith; Goode, Monte; van Ingen, Catharine

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wind/Wave Misalignment in the Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Wind resources far from the shore and in deeper seas have encouraged the offshore wind industry to look into floating platforms. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is developing a new technical specification for the design of floating offshore wind turbines that extends existing design standards for land-based and fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. The work summarized in this paper supports the development of best practices and simulation requirements in the loads analysis of floating offshore wind turbines by examining the impact of wind/wave misalignment on the system loads under normal operation. Simulations of the OC3-Hywind floating offshore wind turbine system under a wide range of wind speeds, significant wave heights, peak-spectral periods and wind/wave misalignments have been carried out with the aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool FAST [4]. The extreme and fatigue loads have been calculated for all the simulations. The extreme and fatigue loading as a function of wind/wave misalignment have been represented as load roses and a directional binning sensitivity study has been carried out. This study focused on identifying the number and type of wind/wave misalignment simulations needed to accurately capture the extreme and fatigue loads of the system in all possible metocean conditions considered, and for a down-selected set identified as the generic US East Coast site. For this axisymmetric platform, perpendicular wind and waves play an important role in the support structure and including these cases in the design loads analysis can improve the estimation of extreme and fatigue loads. However, most structural locations see their highest extreme and fatigue loads with aligned wind and waves. These results are specific to the spar type platform, but it is expected that the results presented here will be similar to other floating platforms.

Barj, L.; Stewart, S.; Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Altered swelling and ion fluxes in articular cartilage as a biomarker in osteoarthritis and joint immobilization: a computational analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Altered swelling and ion fluxes in articular...Aragon Institute of Engineering Research (I3A...Spain 2 Mechanical Engineering Department, School of Engineering and Architecture...tissue. Swelling and ion flux alteration as...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Reactor physics input to the safety analysis report for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

HFIR specific, few group neutron and coupled neutron-gamma libraries have been prepared. These are based on data from ENDF/B-V and beginning-of-life (BOL) conditions. The neutron library includes actinide data for curium target rods. Six critical experiments, collectively designated HFIR critical experiment 4, were analyzed. Calculated k-effective was 2% high at BOL-typical conditions but was 1.0 at end-of-life-typical conditions. The local power density distributions were calculated for each of the critical experiments. The axially averaged values at a given radius were frequently within experimental error. However at individual points, the calculated local power densities were significantly different from the experimentally derived values (several times greater than experimental uncertainty). A reassessment of the foil activation data with transport theory techniques seems desirable. Using the results of the critical experiments study, a model of current HFIR configuration was prepared. As with the critical experiments, BOL k-effective was high (3%). However, end-of-life k-effective was high (2%). The end-of-life concentrations of fission products were compared to those generated using the ORIGEN code. Agreement was generally good through differences in the inventories of some important nuclides, Xe and I, need to be understood. End-of-cycle curium target isotopics based on measured, discharged target rods were compared to calculated values and agreement was good. Axial flux plots at various irradiation positions were generated. Time-dependent power distributions based on two-dimensional calculations were provided.

Primm, R.T. III.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Design and Analysis for a Floating Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a recent study on the design and analysis of an oscillating surge wave energy converter. A successful wave energy conversion design requires the balance between the design performance and cost. The cost of energy is often used as the metric to judge the design of the wave energy conversion system. It is often determined based on the device power performance, the cost for manufacturing, deployment, operation and maintenance, as well as the effort to ensure the environmental compliance. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the importance of a cost driven design strategy and how it can affect a WEC design. Three oscillating surge wave energy converter (OSWEC) designs were used as the example. The power generation performance of the design was modeled using a time-domain numerical simulation tool, and the mass properties of the design were determined based on a simple structure analysis. The results of those power performance simulations, the structure analysis and a simple economic assessment were then used to determine the cost-efficiency of selected OSWEC designs. Finally, a discussion on the environmental barrier, integrated design strategy and the key areas that need further investigation is also presented.

Yu, Y. H.; Li, Y.; Hallett, K.; Hotimsky, C.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Incremental wind-wave analysis of the structural capacity of offshore wind turbine support structures under extreme loading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Offshore wind turbine (OWT) support structures are subjected to non-proportional environmental wind and wave load patterns with respect to increases in wave height and with respect to wind and wave combined loading. Traditional approaches to estimating the ultimate capacity of offshore support structures are not ideally suited to analysis of OWTs. In this paper, the concept of incremental wind-wave (IWWA) analysis of the structural capacity of OWT support structures is proposed. The approach uses static pushover analysis of OWT support structures subject to wind and wave combined load patterns corresponding to increasing mean return period (MRP). The IWWA framework can be applied as a one-parameter approach (IWWA1) in which the MRP for the wind and wave conditions is assumed to be the same or a two-parameter approach (IWWA2) in which the \\{MRPs\\} associated with wind and wave conditions are related to a joint probability density function characterizing the wind and wave conditions at the site. Example calculations for monopile and jacket supported \\{OWTs\\} at Atlantic marine sites are performed under both one parameter and two parameters IWWA framework. The analyses illustrate that: the results of an IWWA analysis are site specific; and structural response can be dominated by either wind or wave conditions depending on structural characteristics and site conditions. Finally, reliability analyses for both examples excluding uncertainties in structural resistance are estimated based on their IWWA results and probabilistic models for site environmental conditions.

Kai Wei; Sanjay R. Arwade; Andrew T. Myers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Single-wavenumber Representation of Nonlinear Energy Spectrum in Elastic-Wave Turbulence of {F}öppl-von {K}ármán Equation: Energy Decomposition Analysis and Energy Budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A single-wavenumber representation of nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., stretching energy spectrum is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wavenumber space, and analytical expressions of detailed energy budget in the nonlinear interactions are obtained for the first time in wave turbulence systems. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic and bending energies are comparable with each other at large wavenumbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, the stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wavenumbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode $a_{\\bm{k}}$ and its companion mode $a_{-\\bm{k}}$ is observed at the small wavenumbers. Energy transfer shows that the energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wavenumbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wavenumbers. A total-energy flux consistent with the energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

Naoto Yokoyama; Masanori Takaoka

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Computational and theoretical analysis of weak and strong transverse-wave structures in gaseous detonations  

SciTech Connect

Two-dimensional simulation results are presented that capture at great detail the temporal evolution of Mach reflection triple point sub-structures intrinsic to gaseous detonation waves. The observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis for realistic, thermally perfect but nonreactive gases. A diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed and found to be in good agreement with the computational results.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Earthquake Damage Detection in the Imperial County Services Building III: Analysis of Wave Travel Times via Impulse Response Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, one such method is explored using strong motion data from the 1979 Imperial Valley Earthquake recorded1 Earthquake Damage Detection in the Imperial County Services Building III: Analysis of Wave Travel in the former Imperial County Services (ICS) Building, severely damaged by this earthquake. Shear wave travel

Southern California, University of

112

Abstract--A hybrid wave-pipeline multiplier architecture is described in this paper. Mathematical analysis is provided to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- A hybrid wave-pipeline multiplier architecture is described in this paper. Mathematical analysis is provided to show the performance gains possible with hybrid wave-pipeline over conventional pipeline architectures. The clock period in conventional pipeline scheme is proportional to the maximum

Delgado-Frias, José G.

113

Fuel-Coolant-Interaction modeling and analysis work for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

A brief historical background and a description of short- and long-term task plan development for effective closure of this important safety issue for the HFIR are given. Short-term aspects deal with Fuel-Coolant-Interaction (FCI) issues experimentation, modeling, and analysis for the flow-blockage-induced steam explosion events in direct support of the SAR. Long-term aspects deal with addressing FCI issues resulting from other accidents in conjunction with issues dealing with aluminum ignition, which can result in an order of magnitude increase in overall energetics. Problem formulation, modeling, and computer code simulation for the various phases of steam explosions are described. The evaluation of core melt initiation propagation, and melt superheat are described. Core melt initiation and propagation have been studied using simple conservative models as well as from modeling and analysis using RELAP5. Core debris coolability, heatup, and melting/freezing aspects have been studied by use of the two-dimensional melting/freezing analysis code 2DKO, which was also benchmarked with MELCOR code predictions. Descriptions are provided for the HM, BH, FCIMOD, and CTH computer codes that have been implemented for studying steam explosion energetics from the standpoint of evaluating bounding loads by thermodynamic models or best-estimate loads from one- and two-dimensional simulations of steam explosion energetics. Vessel failure modeling and analysis was conducted using the principles of probabilistic fracture mechanics in conjunction with ADINA code calculations. Top head bolts failure modeling has also been conducted where the failure criterion was based upon stresses in the bolts exceeding the material yield stress for a given time duration. Missile transport modeling and analysis was conducted by setting up a one-dimensional mathematical model that accounts for viscous dissipation, virtual mass effects, and material inertia.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Nestor, C.W.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.; Gat, U.; Lepard, B.L.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Luttrell, C.; Kirkpatrick, J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials  

SciTech Connect

New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

Paul Wosko; Sundram, S. K.

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

115

Analysis and Design of a High Power Density Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Machine Used for Stirling System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

a high power density axial flux permanent magnet linear synchronous machine and the stirling system will be introduced. This machine is a tubular axial flux permanent magnet machine. It comprises two parts: stator and mover. With the 2D finite-element ... Keywords: permanent magnet, stirling engine, linear motor

Ping Zheng; Xuhui Gan; Lin Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Injection and movement/saturation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a geological formation will cause changes in seismic velocities. We investigate the capability of coda-wave interferometry technique for estimating CO2-induced seismic velocity changes using time-lapse synthetic vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data and the field VSP datasets acquired for monitoring injected CO2 in a brine aquifer in Texas, USA. Synthetic VSP data are calculated using a finite-difference elastic-wave equation scheme and a layered model based on the elastic Marmousi model. A possible leakage scenario is simulated by introducing seismic velocity changes in a layer above the CO2 injection layer. We find that the leakage can be detected by the detection of a difference in seismograms recorded after the injection compared to those recorded before the injection at an earlier time in the seismogram than would be expected if there was no leakage. The absolute values of estimated mean velocity changes, from both synthetic and field VSP data, increase significantly for receiver positions approaching the top of a CO2 reservoir. Our results from field data suggest that the velocity changes caused by CO2 injection could be more than 10% and are consistent with results from a crosswell tomogram study. This study demonstrates that time-lapse VSP with coda-wave interferometry analysis can reliably and effectively monitor geological carbon sequestration.

Zhou, R.; Huang, L.; Rutledge, J.T.; Fehler, M.; Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

annulus arises due to a wave energy flux differential acrossprincipal collisionless wave energy dissipation channel inOn the other hand, wave energy can be dissipated by ion

Zhao, Lei

118

The relative importance of wind and ship waves in the littoral zone of ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Lake Constance, ship-generated waves are as important as wind-generated waves and contribute about 41% of the annual mean wave energy flux to shore.

119

An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our ?-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

F. Mostafaei; F.E. McNeill; D.R. Chettle; W. Matysiak; C. Bhatia; W.V. Prestwich

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Identifying the top of the tropical tropopause layer from vertical mass flux analysis and CALIPSO lidar cloud observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

defined as the level of zero net radiative heating, which occurs near 14.5­15 km [e.g., Folkins et al layer (TTL) by analyzing the vertical mass flux profile based on radiative transfer calculations will rise into the stratosphere. Thus convection has to transport air at least to the zero radiative heating

Hochberg, Michael

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121

Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by ?-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist ?-naphthoflavone (?NF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 ?M ?NF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by ?NF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to ?NF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

Nault, Rance, E-mail: naultran@msu.edu [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Abdul-Fattah, Hiba [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Moon, Thomas W. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

SAID Partial Wave Analyses from CNS DAC (Center for Nuclear Studies Data Analysis Center)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

George Washington University (GW) has one of the largest university-based nuclear-physics groups in the nation. Many of the current and future projects are geared to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) at Newport News, VA. JLab is the world's premier electron accelerator for nuclear physics, and GW is one of the charter members of the governing body of JLab, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA). The George Washington Data Analysis Center (DAC) was created in 1998 by an agreement among the Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, and the GW Center for Nuclear Studies.The activities of the DAC fall into four distinct categories: 1) Performing partial-wave analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions; 2) Maintenance of databases associated with these reactions; 3) Development of software to disseminate DAC results (as well as the results of competing model-independent analyses and potential approaches); and 4) Phenomenological and theoretical investigations which bridge the gap between theory and experiment; in particular, the extraction of N* and D * hadronic and electromagnetic couplings. Partial Wave Analyses (and the associated databases) available at GW are: Pion-Nucleon, Kaon-Nucleon, Nucleon-Nucleon, Pion Photoproduction, Pion Electroproduction, Kaon Photoproduction, Eta Photoproduction, Eta-Prime Photoproduction, Pion-Deuteron (elastic), and Pion-Deuteron to Proton+Proton. [Taken from http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm">http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm

123

Unusual flux-distance relationship for pulsars suggested by analysis of the Australia national telescopy facility pulsar catalogue  

SciTech Connect

We analyze pulsar fluxes at 1400 MHz (S(1400)) and distances d taken from the Australia National Telescope Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalogue. Under the assumption that pulsar populations in different parts of the Galaxy are similar, we find that either (a) pulsar fluxes diminish with distance according to a non-standard power law (we suggest S(1400){proportional_to} 1/d rather than {proportional_to} 1/d{sup 2}) or (b) that there are very significant (i.e. order of magnitude) errors in the distance estimates quoted in the ATNF Catalogue. The former conclusion (a) supports a recent model for pulsar emission that has also successfully explained the frequency spectrum of the Crab pulsar over 16 orders of magnitude of frequency, whilst alternative (b) would necessitate a radical re-evaluation of both the dispersion method for estimating pulsar distances and current ideas about the distribution of pulsars within our Galaxy.

Singleton, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perez, M R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Singleton, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ardavan, H [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Ardavan, A [UNIV OF OXFORD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Partial wave analysis of $?(2S) \\to p \\bar{p}?$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a sample of $1.06 \\times 10^{8}$ $\\psi(2S)$ events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII, the decay $\\psi(2S) \\to p \\bar{p}\\eta$ is studied. A partial wave analysis determines that the intermediate state N(1535) with a mass of $1524\\pm5^{+10}_{-4}$ MeV/$c^2$ and a width of $130^{+27+57}_{-24-10}$ MeV/$c^2$ is dominant in the decay; the product branching fraction is determined to be $B(\\psi(2S) \\to N(1535)\\bar{p})\\times B(N(1535)\\to p\\eta)+c.c. = (5.2\\pm0.3^{+3.2}_{-1.2})\\times 10^{-5}$. Furthermore, the branching fraction of $\\psi(2S) \\to \\eta p \\bar{p}$ is measured to be $(6.4\\pm0.2\\pm0.6)\\times 10^{-5}$.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; N. Berger; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; C. Q. Feng; P. Friedel; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; D. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. U. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; J. X. Wamg; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. X. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; Li Li Zhang; R. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Zhenghao Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. Z. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; Z. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Partial-Wave Analysis of the Centrally Produced ?+?- System in pp Reactions at COMPASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS which investigates the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. During nine weeks in 2008 and 2009, a 190 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target was used in order to study the production of exotic mesons and glueball candidates at central rapidities. As no bias on the production mechanism was introduced by the trigger system, the contribution from diffractive dissociation of the beam proton poses a challenge. We select a centrally produced sample by kinematic cuts and introduce a model to describe the data in terms of partial waves. Preliminary fits are presented, which are consistent with results from previous experiments. Particular attention is paid to the ambiguities in the amplitude analysis of the two-pseudoscalar final state.

A. Austregesilo; T. Schlueter; for the COMPASS collaboration

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mechanical (acoustic?like) wave propagation along a vortex array in the superconducting heterostructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic flux can penetrate the type ? II superconductor in the form of Abrikosov vortices (also called flux lines flux tubes or fluxons) each carrying a quantum of magnetic flux. These tiny vortices of supercurrent tend to arrange themselves in a triangular or quadratic flux?line lattice. Since the vortices are formed by the applied magnetic field around of each of them the supercurrent flows. Moreover there also exist some Lorentz force interactions among them. Those interactions form an origin of an additional mechanical (stress) field occurring in the type?II superconductor. The paper deals with an analysis of elastic (acoustic?like) wave propagation solely along vortices in a heterostructure consisted of the superconducting layer put on the superconducting substrate. Dispersion and the amplitude distribution of those waves in the vortex field existing in that structure has been presented.

Bogdan T. Maruszewski; Andrzej Drzewiecki; Roman Starosta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Numerical prediction of heat-flux to massive calorimeters engulfed in regulatory fires with the cask analysis fire environment (CAFE) model  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations show that the thermal boundary conditions within large-scale fires are significantly affected by the presence of thermally massive objects. These objects cool the soot and gas near their surfaces, and these effects reduce the incoming radiant heat-flux to values lower than the levels expected from simple {sigma}T{sub fire}{sup 4} models. They also affect the flow and temperature fields in the fire far from their surfaces. The Cask Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to provide an enhanced fire boundary condition for the design of radioactive material packages. CAFE is a set of computer subroutines that use computational fluid mechanics methods to predict convective heat transfer and mixing. It also includes models for fuel and oxygen transport, chemical reaction, and participating-media radiation heat transfer. This code uses two-dimensional computational models so that it has reasonably short turnaround times on standard workstations and is well suited for design and risk studies. In this paper, CAFE is coupled with a commercial finite-element program to model a large cylindrical calorimeter fully engulfed in a pool fire. The time-dependent heat-flux to the calorimeter and the calorimeter surface temperature are determined for several locations around the calorimeter circumference. The variation of heat-flux with location is determined for calorimeters with different diameters and wall thickness, and the observed effects discussed.

KOSKI,JORMAN A.; SUO-ANTITLA,AHTI; KRAMER,M. ALEX; GREINER,MILES

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Detecting transient gravitational waves in non-Gaussian noise with partially redundant analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a broad class of astrophysical sources that produce detectable, transient, gravitational waves. Some searches for transient gravitational waves are tailored to known features of these sources. Other searches make ...

Biswas, Rahul

129

Analysis and development of a three body heaving wave energy converter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A relative motion based heaving point absorber wave energy converter is being co-developed by researchers at the University of Victoria and SyncWave Systems Inc. To… (more)

Beatty, Scott, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of wave energy using GIS based analysis: The case study of Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of this paper is to establish an economic modelling of wave energy through a Geographical Information System (GIS). Furthermore, this method has been tested for the particular case of the Portuguese coast. It determines the best sea areas to install wave energy converters in this region, using spatial analysis of the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE). Several economic parameters, as capital or O&M costs, have been considered. In addition, a sensitivity analysis has been performed by varying the discount rate in three different scenarios. Several types of physical restrictions have been taken into account: bathymetry, submarine electrical cables, seabed geology, environmental conditions, protected areas in terms of heritage, navigation areas, seismic fault lines, etc. Spatial operations have been carried out to complete the procedure, using Model Builder of GIS software. Results indicate the most suitable areas in economic terms in Portugal to install wave energy devices.

Laura Castro-Santos; Geuffer Prado Garcia; Ana Estanqueiro; Paulo A.P.S. Justino

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux Roel Sniedera) Center for Wave in acoustics from measurements of the energy flux through an arbitrary closed surface surrounding both sources locations, rA and rB. In these experiments one first measures the total energy flux through a closed surface

Snieder, Roel

132

Molecular Basis for Anaerobic Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Xylose, Investigated by Global Gene Expression and Metabolic Flux Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with the Significance Analysis of Micro-arrays...genome-wide gene expression analysis. To identify significant...concentrations in the reactor off-gas were determined...online mass spectrometry analysis. A previously developed...thus confirming the reliability of the stoichiometric...

Marco Sonderegger; Marie Jeppsson; Bärbel Hahn-Hägerdal; Uwe Sauer

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

James, L. Allan

134

Electromagnetic full wave modal analysis of frequency-dependent underground cables.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a new method has been proposed for calculating the frequencydependent parameters of underground cables. The method uses full wave formulation for calculating… (more)

Habib, Md. Shahnoor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

On the analysis of wave motions in a multi-layered solid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......associated with PS waves is found to exhibit some numerical instabilities when ? becomes large. To deal with the issue, one may rede fi ne (see also (9)) the vectors of propagating PS waves via ~ w j d m = M d j w j d m, ~ w j u m = M u j w j u m, j......

B. B. Guzina; R. Y. S. Pak

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Acoustic emission from magnetic flux tubes in the solar network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the excitation of waves in the magnetic network of the Sun due to footpoint motions of a magnetic flux tube. We consider motions that typically mimic granular buffeting and vortex flows and implement them as driving motions at the base of the flux tube. The driving motions generates various MHD modes within the flux tube and acoustic waves in the ambient medium. The response of the upper atmosphere to the underlying photospheric motion and the role of the flux tube in channeling the waves is investigated. We compute the acoustic energy flux in the various wave modes across different boundary layers defined by the plasma and magnetic field parameters and examine the observational implications for chromospheric and coronal heating.

Vigeesh, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows  

SciTech Connect

We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

Uchava, E. S. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Nodia Institute of Geophysics, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Shergelashvili, B. M. [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); CODeS, KU Leuven Campus Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, 8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Tevzadze, A. G. [Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Center (LMCC), KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis...

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

P- and SV-wave transversely isotropic phase velocities analysis from VSP data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Measured anisotropy in Pierre Shale, Geophys. Prosp., 31...been applied to the Pierre Shale data (White, Martineau...elastic wave propagation in anisotropic media is the fact that the...al. (1983) in the Pierre Shale where two neighbouring wells......

J. de Parscau

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

X-Pipeline: an analysis package for autonomous gravitational-wave burst searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous gravitational-wave searches—fully automated analyses of data that run without human intervention or assistance—are desirable for a number of reasons. They are necessary for the rapid identification of ...

Sutton, Patrick J.

142

Time domain analysis of a gyrotron traveling wave amplifier with misaligned electron beam  

SciTech Connect

This article develops a time-domain theory to study the beam-wave interaction in gyrotron traveling wave amplifier (gyro-TWA) with a misaligned electron beam. The effects of beam misalignment on the TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWA operating at the fundamental are discussed. Numerical results show that the effect of misalignment is less obvious when the input power is larger, and the influences of misalignment on the stable gain and the stable time are basically opposite.

Wang, Qiushi, E-mail: qiushiwork@gmail.com; Peng, Shuyuan [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2652, Beijing 100080 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Luo, Jirun [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2652, Beijing 100080 (China)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Lidar Scanning of Momentum Flux in and above the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods to measure the vertical flux of horizontal momentum using both continuous wave and pulsed Doppler lidar profilers are evaluated. The lidar measurements are compared to momentum flux observations performed with sonic anemometers over flat ...

J. Mann; A. Peña; F. Bingöl; R. Wagner; M. S. Courtney

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Pulse flux measuring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA  

SciTech Connect

Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, M., E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es, E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es [Departament de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

147

Statistical energy analysis prediction of the response of offshore structures to random wave excitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The principle of reciprocity is applied to dynamic response prediction of structures excited by ocean waves. It is shown that the modal wave force spectrum may be expressed in terms of the modal radiation damping coefficient. This leads to the familiar SEA result: that the damping controlled response of the resonator (a mode of an offshore structure) has an upper bound which occurs when the ratio of the radiation to the total damping approaches unity. This result is embodied in a general method for predicting the damping controlled response of a broad variety of oceanstructures. The method includes the effects of the highly directional nature of ocean wave spectra. Example calculations are presented for fixed and floating structures and the results of full scale tests are reported.

J. Kim Vandiver

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Stability analysis for two-dimensional ion-acoustic waves in quantum plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The quantum hydrodynamic model is applied to two-dimensional ion-acoustic waves in quantum plasmas. The two-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model is used to obtain a deformed Kortewegde Vries (dKdV) equation by reductive perturbation method. By using the solution of auxiliary ordinary equations, a extended direct algebraic method is described to construct the exact solutions for nonlinear quantum dKdV equation. The present results are describing the generation and evolution of such waves, their interactions, and their stability.

Seadawy, A. R., E-mail: Aly742001@yahoo.com [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, Al-Ula (Saudi Arabia); Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University (Egypt)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Seasonal variation of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric equatorial waves over the tropical Pacific  

SciTech Connect

Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric wind data spanning 31 years from 1964 to 1994 were analyzed at rawinsonde stations in the central/western Pacific. Traditional spectral and cross-spectral analysis led to the conclusion that there is a significant signal with periods between 3 and 4.5 days, which the authors link with the dominant antisymmetric waves predicted by theory to have these periods, mixed Rossby-gravity waves, and equatorial Rossby waves. Then the authors applied the seasonally varying spectral analysis method developed by Madden to study the average seasonal variation of these waves. The seasonally varying analysis suggested that there are significant twice-yearly maxima in equatorial wave activity throughout the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, with peaks occurring in late winter-spring and in late summer-fall. The twice-yearly signal was most prominent at the 70-hPa and 100-hPa levels. Similar and consistent results were also shown by an autoregressive cyclic spectral analysis. The cyclic spectral analysis suggested that the frequency characteristics of the v-wind wave power are different during the two maxima at some stations. In addition, the seasonally varying squared coherence between the u and v winds and the associated phase implied that there is horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves and that the sign of the flux is different during the two maxima. The differences in wave characteristics during the maxima periods may be related to different wave modes, seasonal variation of the basic zonal state, or possibly to different equatorial wave forcing mechanisms (i.e., convective versus lateral excitations). 52 refs., 12 figs.

Wikle, C.K.; Tsing-Chang Chen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Madden, R.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Impulsive Flux Transfer Events and Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......s-'. (v) Restoration of magneticfield...flux) into the system. To quotefrom...waves across the system. The impulsive...leadingto the restoration of the normal...state or in the power required to maintain...on the global system size), the...A., 1964. Handbook o f mathematicalfunctions......

A. Bratenahl; P. J. Baum

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Design and demonstration of an analysis Information system for magnetic flux leakage inspection of natural gas pipeline. Final letter report  

SciTech Connect

A staff exchange was conducted for the mutual benefit of the Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute (GRI), Vetco Pipeline Services Inc. (VPSI), and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This staff exchange provided direct exposure by a Laboratory staff member knowledgeable in inspection, integrity assessment, and robotic capabilities of the Laboratory to the needs of the natural gas pipeline industry. The project included an assignment to the GRI Pipeline Simulation Facility (PSF) during the period preceding the commissioning of the flow loop. GRI is interested in exploiting advanced technology at the National Laboratories. To provide a sense of the market impact, it is estimated that $3 billion was spent in 1993 for the repair, renovation, and replacement of distribution piping. GRI has goals of saving the distribution industry $500 million in Operations and Maintenance costs and having an additional $250M savings impact on transmission pipelines. The objectives of the project included: (1) For PNNL staff to present technology to GRI and PSF staff on non- destructive evaluation, robotics, ground penetrating radar, and risk based inspection guidelines for application to the operation and maintenance of natural gas pipelines. (2) For GRI and PSF staff to discuss with PNNL staff opportunities for improving the industrial competitiveness of operation and maintenance services. (3) To explore the basis for partnership with GRI and PSF staff on technology transfer topics. In this project, staff exchanges were conducted to GRI`s Pipeline Simulation Facility and to VPSI. PNNL . staff had access to the $10M GRI Pipeline Simulation Facility (PSF) at West Jefferson, Ohio. The facility has a 4,700-ft. long pipe loop, an NDE laboratory, and a data analysis laboratory. PNNL staff had access to the VPSI`s facility in Houston, TX. VPSI has developed some of the most sophisticated inspection tools currently used in the pipeline inspection industry.

Schuster, G.J.; Saffell, B.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Rigorous Time-Domain Analysis of Full--Wave Electromagnetic Cloaking (Invisibility)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is currently a great deal of interest in the theoretical and practical possibility of cloaking objects from the observation by electromagnetic waves. The basic idea of these invisibility devices \\cite{glu1, glu2, le},\\cite{pss1} is to use anisotropic {\\it transformation media} whose permittivity and permeability $\\var^{\\lambda\

Ricardo Weder

2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gain analysis of higher-order-mode amplification in a dielectric-implanted multi-beam traveling wave structure  

SciTech Connect

A multi-beam traveling wave amplifier designed with an overmoded staggered double grating array was examined by small signal analysis combined with simulation. Eigenmode and S-parameter analyses show that the 2 cm long slow wave structure (SWS) has 1–5 dB insertion loss over the passband (TM{sub 31} mode) with ?28% cold bandwidth. Analytic gain calculation indicates that in the SWS, TM{sub 31}-mode is amplified with 15–20 dB/beam at 64–84 GHz with three elliptical beams of 10 kV and 150 mA/beam, which was compared with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PIC analysis on the analysis of instability with zero-input driving excitations demonstrated that background noises and non-operating lower order modes are noticeably suppressed by implanting equidistant dielectric absorbers; the overmoded structure only allowed the desired 3rd order mode to propagate in the structure. The designed circuit structure can be widely applied to multi-beam devices for high power RF generation.

Gee, Anthony [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Shin, Young-Min [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States) [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center (APC), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons  

SciTech Connect

Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

Salgado, Carlos W. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weygand, Dennis P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Comparison and analysis of Envisat ASAR ocean wave spectra with buoy data in the northern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The validation and assessment of Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) ocean wave spectra products are important to their application in ocean wave numerical predictions. Six-year ASAR wave ... co-loca...

Qifeng Ren ???; Jie Zhang ??…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Quasi-linear analysis of the extraordinary electron wave destabilized by runaway electrons  

SciTech Connect

Runaway electrons with strongly anisotropic distributions present in post-disruption tokamak plasmas can destabilize the extraordinary electron (EXEL) wave. The present work investigates the dynamics of the quasi-linear evolution of the EXEL instability for a range of different plasma parameters using a model runaway distribution function valid for highly relativistic runaway electron beams produced primarily by the avalanche process. Simulations show a rapid pitch-angle scattering of the runaway electrons in the high energy tail on the 100–1000??s time scale. Due to the wave-particle interaction, a modification to the synchrotron radiation spectrum emitted by the runaway electron population is foreseen, exposing a possible experimental detection method for such an interaction.

Pokol, G. I.; Kómár, A.; Budai, A. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary); Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Gravity Waves in the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present numerical simulations of penetrative convection and gravity wave excitation in the Sun. Gravity waves are self-consistently generated by a convective zone overlying a radiative interior. We produce power spectra for gravity waves in the radiative region as well as estimates for the energy flux of gravity waves below the convection zone. We calculate a peak energy flux in waves below the convection zone to be three orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates for m=1. The simulations show that the linear dispersion relation is a good approximation only deep below the convective-radiative boundary. Both low frequency propagating gravity waves as well as higher frequency standing modes are generated; although we find that convection does not continually drive the standing g-mode frequencies.

Tamara M. Rogers; Gary A. Glatzmaier

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES  

SciTech Connect

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

Okamoto, Takenori J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Relativistic distorted-wave analysis of quasielastic proton-nucleus scattering  

SciTech Connect

A relativistic distorted-wave impulse approximation formalism is presented for the calculation of quasielastic proton-nucleus scattering. It is shown that the double differential cross section may be written as a contraction between the hadronic tensor (describing the projectile and ejectile) and the polarization tensor (describing the nuclear target) and that this mathematical structure also holds for the case where distortions are included. The eikonal approximation is used to introduce distortions in the wave functions, and the nuclear response is described using a Fermi gas model. The highly oscillatory nine-dimensional integrand contained in the expression for the double differential cross section is computed using a novel technique based on combining traditional Gaussian integration methods with the powerful fitting functions in the matlab programming language. This work has successfully calculated the distorted-wave quasielastic differential cross section for proton-nucleus scattering within a fully relativistic framework. It is found that the distortions lead to a reduction in the double differential cross section and have a negligible effect on the computed spin observables.

Titus, N. P.; Ventel, B. I. S. van der; Niekerk, D. D. van; Hillhouse, G. C. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); University for Information Science and Technology, Partizanska Street, Ohrid 6000 (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Neutron flux and energy characterization of a plutonium-beryllium isotopic neutron source by Monte Carlo simulation with verification by neutron activation analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research was to characterize the neutron energy distribution and flux emitted from the UNLV plutonium-beryllium source, serial number MRC-N-W PuBe 453.… (more)

Harvey, Zachary R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Finite difference analysis of mass transfer effects on flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical plate in dissipative fluid and constant heat flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A finite-difference solution to the flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical plate is derived by assuming 1) presence of species concentration like water vapour, CO2 etc. and 2) constant heat flux at th...

J. N. Das; S. N. Ray; Prof. Dr. V. M. Soundalgekar

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

163

Energy flux as a tool in locating tsunami secondary Kowalik Zygmunt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy flux as a tool in locating tsunami secondary sources Kowalik Zygmunt Institute Marine waves. Using these tsunami events we demonstrate that sudden changes caused by higher energy pulses in the intermittent tsunami wave trains can be assessed by energy fluxes. Therefore, to delineate the regions

Kowalik, Zygmunt

164

Phase analysis of vibrational wave packets in the ground and excited states in polydiacetylene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular vibration of several modes in blue-phase polydiacetylene-3-butoxycarbonylmethylurethane (PDA-3BCMU) was real-time observed by 5-fs pump-probe measurement. The contribution of the vibrational wave packets in the ground state and in the excited state in the signal were separated by multichannel measurement. The C?C stretching mode in the ground state starts to oscillate ?-out-of-phase with the C?C stretching mode. The structure of PDA-3BCMU in the geometrically relaxed state is not pure butatriene type but more like acetylene type. The frequencies of C?C and C?C stretching modes there were determined by singular value decomposition method to be 1472±6cm?1 and 2092±6cm?1, respectively. The double and triple bond stretching frequencies in the ground state are 1463±6cm?1 and 2083±6cm?1, respectively.

Mitsuhiro Ikuta; Yoshiharu Yuasa; Tatsumi Kimura; Hiroo Matsuda; Takayoshi Kobayashi

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

Polyspectral technique for the analysis of stress-waves characteristics and species recognition in wood veneers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work a simple technique to obtain information about the species of wood samples using stress-wave sounds in the audible range is presented. However, spectra of wood sounds generated by pendulum impact are very complex and feature extraction for classification purposes is very difficult. Polyspectral techniques have been successfully applied to several problems from radar pattern recognition to medical signal processing. Following this approach, convolution of four different sound impacts has been done. This permits to extract clear polyspectral features suitable for wood species recognition with possible applications to both human assisted and automatic wood identification systems with minimal intersample variability. Results indicate that using this technique only the two most intense polyspectral peaks are enough for species recognition.

R. Sánchez Montero; P.L. López Espí; J. Alpuente; J.A.M. Rojas; S. Vignote

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nonlinear analysis of an actuated seafloor-mounted carpet for a high-performance wave energy extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carpet for a high-performance wave energy extraction Mohammad-Reza Alam...seabed carpet in harvesting ocean wave energy is the subject of this article...performance of our proposed carpet of wave energy conversion (CWEC) against a spectrum...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A real-time heart rate analysis for a remote millimeter wave I-Q sensor.  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes heart rate (HR) information from physiological tracings collected with a remote millimeter wave (mmW) I-Q sensor for biometric monitoring applications. A parameter optimization method based on the nonlinear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used. The mmW sensor works at 94 GHz and can detect the vital signs of a human subject from a few to tens of meters away. The reflected mmW signal is typically affected by respiration, body movement, background noise, and electronic system noise. Processing of the mmW radar signal is, thus, necessary to obtain the true HR. The down-converted received signal in this case consists of both the real part (I-branch) and the imaginary part (Q-branch), which can be considered as the cosine and sine of the received phase of the HR signal. Instead of fitting the converted phase angle signal, the method directly fits the real and imaginary parts of the HR signal, which circumvents the need for phase unwrapping. This is particularly useful when the SNR is low. Also, the method identifies both beat-to-beat HR and individual heartbeat magnitude, which is valuable for some medical diagnosis applications. The mean HR here is compared to that obtained using the discrete Fourier transform.

Bakhtiari, S.; Liao, S.; Elmer, T.; Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Full-wave analysis of superconducting microstrip lines on anisotropic substrates using equivalent surface impedance approach  

SciTech Connect

A computationally efficient full-wave technique is developed to analyze single and coupled superconducting microstrip lines on anisotropic substrates. The optic axis of the dielectric is in the plane of the substrate at an arbitrary angle with respect to the propagation direction. A dyadic Green's function for layered, anisotropic media is used to formulate an integral equation for the current in the strips. To increase the efficiency of the method, the superconducting strips are replaced by equivalent surface impedances which account for the loss and kinetic inductance of the superconductors. The validity of this equivalent surface impedance (ESI) approach is verified by comparing the calculated complex propagation constant and characteristic impedance for superconducting microstrip lines on an isotropic substrate to measured results, and to numerical results by the more rigorous volume-integral equation method. The results calculated using the ESI approach for perfectly conducting coupled lines on an anisotropic substrate agree with the results by the finite-difference time-domain method. This efficient ESI technique is then used to study the effects of the optic axis orientation and the strip width on the characteristics of single and coupled superconducting microstrip lines on M-plane sapphire. The effects of the line separation and operating temperature on the coupled lines are also investigated.

Lee, L.H.; Lyons, W.G.; Orlando, T.P.; Ali, S.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science); Lyons, W.G. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.); Withers, R.S. (Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Climatology of the Gravest Waves in the Equatorial Lower and Middle Stratosphere: Method and Results for the ERA-40 Re-Analysis and the LMDz GCM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, in final form 22 October 2008) ABSTRACT A climatology of the three-dimensional life cycle and Results for the ERA-40 Re-Analysis and the LMDz GCM FRANC¸ OIS LOTT, JAYANARAYANAN KUTTIPPURATH, AND FRANC fields (horizontal wind, temperature, and geopotential height) and relates the equatorial waves

Lott, Francois

171

Color Magnetic Flux Tubes in Dense QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QCD is expected to be in the color-flavor locking phase in high baryon density, which exhibits color superconductivity. The most fundamental topological objects in the color superconductor are non-Abelian vortices which are topologically stable color magnetic flux tubes. We present numerical solutions of the color magnetic flux tube for diverse choices of the coupling constants. We also analytically study its asymptotic profiles and find that they are different from the case of usual superconductors. We propose the width of color magnetic fluxes and find that it is larger than naive expectation of the Compton wave length of the massive gluon when the gluon mass is larger than the scalar mass.

Minoru Eto; Muneto Nitta

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method and apparatus for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux for analysis of same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A charged particle detector and method are disclosed providing for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux in a measurement cycle. The detector provides multiple and independently selectable levels of integration and/or gain in a fully addressable readout manner.

Denton, M. Bonner (Tucson, AZ); Sperline, Roger (Tucson, AZ), Koppenaal, David W. (Richland, WA), Barinaga, Charles J. (Richland, WA), Hieftje, Gary (Bloomington, IN), Barnes, IV, James H. (Santa Fe, NM); Atlas, Eugene (Irvine, CA)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Identification of circumferential acoustic waves propagating around the tube by multiresolution analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The backscattering complex pressure in far filled of the cylindrical shell immersed in water (Fig. 1) is given (MRA) of the wavelet transform. This technique is applied for decomposition of the original acoustic is specially concerned with the application of the Multiresolution analysis of the wavelet transform

Boyer, Edmond

174

Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect

The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

175

Precipitation Banding in Idealized Baroclinic Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moist idealized baroclinic-wave simulations show the development of precipitation bands from a zonally uniform initial midlatitude jet. For a frictionless lower boundary, and with no latent-heat release or surface heat and moisture fluxes, warm ...

Jesse Norris; Geraint Vaughan; David M. Schultz

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mirror force induced wave dispersion in Alfvén waves  

SciTech Connect

Recent hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulations of global scale standing shear Alfvén waves along the Earth's closed dipolar magnetic field lines show that the upward parallel current region within these waves saturates and broadens perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and that this broadening increases with the electron temperature. Using resistive MHD simulations, with a parallel Ohm's law derived from the linear Knight relation (which expresses the current-voltage relationship along an auroral field line), we explore the nature of this broadening in the context of the increased perpendicular Poynting flux resulting from the increased parallel electric field associated with mirror force effects. This increased Poynting flux facilitates wave energy dispersion across field lines which in-turn allows for electron acceleration to carry the field aligned current on adjacent field lines. This mirror force driven dispersion can dominate over that associated with electron inertial effects for global scale waves.

Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Generation of internal waves in the deep ocean J. Nycander  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

topography. The geographical distribution of the energy flux from tides to internal waves is determined essential to determine the energy flux from tides to internal waves. [3] The total dissipation of the M2 tide, which accounts for about two thirds of the energy of all tidal components combined, is known

Nycander, Jonas

178

Wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves receive their energy from the wind by means of a ... whose yield is not yet clearly understood. Energy in the wave is more concentrated than in the wind ... density. For this reason a motor utilizing wave p...

Ferruccio Mosetti

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-multiple of the wavelength: n 2 L ,n 1,2,... . A vibrating string is an example of a transverse wave: its oscillation2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand

Glashausser, Charles

180

Cluster Dynamics of Planetary Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of nonlinear atmospheric planetary waves is determined by a small number of independent wave clusters consisting of a few connected resonant triads. We classified the different types of connections between neighboring triads that determine the general dynamics of a cluster. Each connection type corresponds to substantially different scenarios of energy flux among the modes. The general approach can be applied directly to various mesoscopic systems with 3-mode interactions, encountered in hydrodynamics, astronomy, plasma physics, chemistry, medicine, etc.

Elena Kartashova; Victor S. L'vov

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research  

SciTech Connect

Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

Law, B E

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_(Lewicki_%26_Oldenburg)&oldid=508144" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

183

Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Solar coronal heating by magnetosonic waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......presence of MHD waves in the solar corona. Saba Strong...data acquired by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM...emission lines came the SOHO project (Doyle, Teriaca Banerjee...calculated the Alfven wave energy flux density as for...and a combination of Solar Untraviolet Measurements......

E. R. Pekünlü; Ö. Çakirli; E. Özetken

2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Environmental Data Collection Using Autonomous Wave Gliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Data Collection Using Autonomous Wave Gliders LCDR Kate Hermsdorfer Qing Wang model ­AIRMAR PB200 weather station Pressure, Temperature, Wind Speed and Direction 10 min averaged sea conditions Bulk flux estimates 2-D wave spectra Water temperature profile Autonomous

186

Asymptotic analysis of: I. Wave propagation in dispersive optical media with quadratic nonlinearity. II. A hypersonic wing with three-dimensional self-similarity  

SciTech Connect

An asymptotic analysis is presented for two distinct and independent problems: (I) Wave propagation in dispersive optical media with quadratic nonlinearity (II) Hypersonic flows with three dimensional self-similarity. In the optics problem, we at first study single and multiple input propagating waves at frequencies away from dielectric resonances. Here we compare the Slowly Varying Envelope Approximation to the Method of Multiple Scales and show that the Method of Multiple Scales is a superior technique that can be applied self consistently to any perturbation order which in turn predicts new physical effects. For the single slowly modulated input wave problem, under appropriate conditions, we shown that at the O({epsilon}{sup 2}) perturbation, we obtain the cubic nonlinear Schrodinger equation. This means that for the single input wave propagating in a quadratic nonlinear medium, self-modulation effects and soliton behavior may be observed depending on the boundary conditions. For the single input wave near a classical dielectric resonance, we find that the wave number becomes amplitude dependent. The method of multiple scales is replaced by Whitham`s averaged Lagrangian. We derive the associated modulated envelope equations. We investigate an effective medium regime and the full nonlinear problem. The hypersonic flow problem requires the use of asymptotic matching that arises from the geometry from the problem. Here the pressure field and lift to drag C{sup 3/2}{sub L}/C{sub D} is evaluated for a wide delta wing with small power law curvature. Use is made of Hypersonic Small Disturbance Theory and three dimensional power law similarity. It is shown that an improvement for C{sup 3/2}{sub L}/C{sub D} occurs for wings with power law curvatures greater than one, when compared to flat delta wings. This improvement in performance agrees qualitatively with other types of concave wings.

Kalocsai, A.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MaCarthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MacArthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MacArthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Rogue Waves and Explorations of Coastal Wave Characteristics Primary Investigator: Paul C. Liu -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rogue Waves and Explorations of Coastal Wave Characteristics Primary Investigator: Paul C. Liu engineering, University of Wisconsin Overview Freak waves are unusually large waves. They have been observed. As the cause of freak waves is still unknown, measurements and analysis of this phenomena are extremely rare

191

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Diurnal and semidiurnal internal tide energy flux at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tide energy flux at a continental slope in the South China Sea Timothy F. Duda and Luc Rainville Woods A F T September 21, 2007, 1:08pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 DUDA AND RAINVILLE: INTERNAL TIDE ENERGY FLUX T #12;DUDA AND RAINVILLE: INTERNAL TIDE ENERGY FLUX X - 3 1. Introduction Internal gravity waves

Duda, Timothy F.

192

A comparative analysis of the environmental impacts of a Pelamis Wave Energy device with existing off shore developments and installations.   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scotland is currently at the forefront of development and expansion of wave energy, especially with recent renewable energy targets. Research and development has increased greatly off the Scottish coastline. Various adjectives can be used...

Quinn, Eoghan

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

Self-field and magnetic-flux quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-field and quantized magnetic-flux are employed to generate the quantum numbers n, m, and l of atomic physics. Wave-particle duality is shown to be a natural outcome of having a particle and its self-field.

Paul Harris

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

194

Parametric amplification by coupled flux qubits  

SciTech Connect

We report parametric amplification of a microwave signal in a Kerr medium formed from superconducting qubits. Two mutually coupled flux qubits, embedded in the current antinode of a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator, are used as a nonlinear element. Shared Josephson junctions provide the qubit-resonator coupling, resulting in a device with a tunable Kerr constant (up to 3?×?10{sup ?3}) and a measured gain of about 20?dB. This arrangement represents a unit cell which can be straightforwardly extended to a quasi one-dimensional quantum metamaterial with large tunable Kerr nonlinearity, providing a basis for implementation of wide-band travelling wave parametric amplifiers.

Rehák, M.; Neilinger, P.; Grajcar, M. [Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Science, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Oelsner, G.; Hübner, U.; Meyer, H.-G. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, P.O. Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Il'ichev, E. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, P.O. Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Ave., 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

Transmission of acoustic?gravity waves through air?water interface.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was demonstrated recently that air?water interface which is usually an almost perfect reflector of acoustic waves becomes anomalously transparent and the power flux in the wave transmitted into air increases dramatically when a compact sound source in water approaches the interface within a fraction of wavelength [O. A. Godin Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 164301 (2006)]. Powerful underwater explosions and certain natural sources such as underwater landslides generate very low?frequency waves in water and air for which both fluid buoyancy and compressibility simultaneously serve as restoring forces. In this paper analysis of sound transmission through air?water interface is extended to acoustic?gravity waves (AGWs). It is found that as for sound the interface becomes anomalously transparent for sufficiently shallow compact sources of AGWs. Depending on the source type the increase in wave power flux into air due to diffraction effects can reach several orders of magnitude. Physical mechanisms responsible for the anomalous transparency are discussed. Excitation of an interfacewave by an underwater source is shown to be an important channel of AGW transmission into atmosphere which has no counterpart in the case of sound.

Iosif M. Fuks; Oleg A. Godin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Analysis of the Validity of the Asymptotic Techniques in the Lower Hybrid Wave Equation Solution For Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect

Conscious that the wave propagation of the LH in tokamak plasmas can be correctly described only with a full wave approach based on full numerical techniques or on a semi-analytical approach, in this paper we solve asymptotically the LH wave equation by the WKB approximation for the first two orders of the expansion parameter, obtaining the phase at the lowest and the amplitude at the next order. The non-linear PDE for the phase will be solved in a pseudo-toroidal geometry (circular and concentric magnetic surfaces) by the method of characteristics as described. The associated system of ODE'S for the position and the wave-number is obtained and analytically solved by choosing an appropriate expansion parameter. The quasi-linear PDE for the WKB amplitude is also analytically solved, allowing the reconstruction of the wave electric field inside the plasma. The solution will be also solved numerically, and a comparison with the analytical solution will be addressed. A discussion of the validity of the WKB approximation based on the obtained results will be also given.

Cardinali, A.; Morini, L.; Zonca, F. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.P. 65 - I-00044 - Frascati, Rome (Italy)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Design of a flux buffer based on the flux shuttle  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design considerations for a flux buffer based on the flux-shuttle concept. Particular attention is given to the issues of flux popping, stability of operation and saturation levels for a large input. Modulation techniques used in order to minimize 1/f noise, in addition to offsets are also analyzed. Advantages over conventional approaches using a SQUID for a flux buffer are discussed. Results of computer simulations are presented.

Gershenson, M. (Naval Coastal Systems Lab., Panama City, FL (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Wave energy devices with compressible volumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...author and source are credited. Wave energy devices with compressible volumes Adi...1BJ, UK We present an analysis of wave energy devices with air-filled compressible...wave period range of about-4s. wave energy|compressible volume|axisymmetric device...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Momentum Flux Budget across the AirSea Interface under Uniform and Tropical Cyclone Winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into ocean currents is equal to the flux from air (wind stress). However, when the surface wave field grows into currents under TCs. 1. Introduction The passage of a tropical cyclone (TC) over a warm ocean represents one is mainly due to the vertical turbulent mixing induced by the strong momentum flux into ocean currents

Rhode Island, University of

200

Experimental investigation of small-scale breaking waves : flow visualization across the air-water interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of breaking waves significantly affect air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, mass and energy across the ocean interface. Breaking waves also contribute considerable loading to offshore and coastal structures, and ...

McDonald, Angus Kai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

High flux compact neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Flux Compact Neutron Generators ‡ J. Reijonen §,1 , T-Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at thevoltage feed through of the generator is shown in Fig. 4.

Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Flux, Volume 1, Issue 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

&24; Table of Contents flux a publication of the national high magnetic field laboratory PG. 3 ... What is Flux? An introduction to our new publication. PG. 4 ... How Magnet...

203

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and...

204

OBSERVATION OF FLUX-TUBE CROSSINGS IN THE SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect

Current sheets are ubiquitous in the solar wind. They are a major source of the solar wind MHD turbulence intermittency. They may result from nonlinear interactions of the solar wind MHD turbulence or are the boundaries of flux tubes that originate from the solar surface. Some current sheets appear in pairs and are the boundaries of transient structures such as magnetic holes and reconnection exhausts or the edges of pulsed Alfven waves. For an individual current sheet, discerning whether it is a flux-tube boundary or due to nonlinear interactions or the boundary of a transient structure is difficult. In this work, using data from the Wind spacecraft, we identify two three-current-sheet events. Detailed examination of these two events suggests that they are best explained by the flux-tube-crossing scenario. Our study provides convincing evidence supporting the scenario that the solar wind consists of flux tubes where distinct plasmas reside.

Arnold, L.; Li, G.; Li, X. [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)] [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Yan, Y., E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

An analysis of the travel times of S waves to North American stations in the distance range 28° to 82°  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...i o-,.s ~.... ~ ,, ~ ,,/ \\Lt ~ ..... o'~ ', ,' , t / -%, o WWSS stoflons \\ / \\ \\ = CaHech slo'iions 1.6 Fzo. 2. Map of S Residuals for.U.S. Stations. TRAVEL TIMES OF S WAVES 767 l I I I I I I I I I I I i I I x x I...

H. A. Doyle; A. L. Hales

206

APRIL 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APRIL 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM1 , J. M. KLYMAK2. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear internal waves. Unlike linear internal waves, the pressure-velocity energy flux up includes important

207

SEPTEMBER 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEPTEMBER 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM1 , J. M of coastline. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear internal waves. Unlike linear internal waves, the pressure-velocity energy flux up includes

208

Multi-Dimensional Error Analysis of Nearshore Wave Modeling Tools, with Application Toward Data-Driven Boundary Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. .................................................................................... 47 3.18 Velocity field from EOF data and Swirl Strength estimate ...................... 48 3.19 Swirl Strength estimate (top) and identification marks for eddy structures (bottom) of EOF mode 1....2). The wave gauge arrangements and general map of the bathymetry at Duck is shown in Fig. 1.3. A bathymetry survey for the so-called ?mini- grid?, which is marked by the box, was conducted daily during the intensive study 7 period. The mini-grid surveys...

Jiang, Boyang

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Semiclassical Distorted Wave Model Analysis of Backward Proton Emission from $(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ Reactions at Intermediate Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A semiclassical distorted wave (SCDW) model with Wigner transform of one-body density matrix is presented for multistep direct $(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ reactions to the continuum. The model uses Wigner distribution functions obtained in methods which include nucleon-nucleon correlations to a different extent, as well as Woods-Saxon (WS) single-particle wave function. The higher momentum components of target nucleons that play a crucial role in reproducing the high-energy part of the backward proton spectra are properly taken into account. This SCDW model is applied to analyses of multistep direct processes in $^{12}$C$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$, $^{40}$Ca$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ and $^{90}$Zr$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ in the incident energy range of 150--392 MeV. The double differential cross sections are calculated up to three-step processes. The calculated angular distributions are in good agreement with the experimental data, in particular at backward angles where the previous SCDW calculations with the WS single-particle wave function showed large underestimation. It is found that the result with the Wigner distribution function based on the coherent density fluctuation model provides overall better agreement with the experimental data over the whole emission energies.

M. K. Gaidarov; Y. Watanabe; K. Ogata; M. Kohno; M. Kawai; A. N. Antonov

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

wave energy ? Wellenenergie f [Die einer Schwerewelle innewohnende potentielle und kinetische Energie. Sie ist etwa proportional dem Quadrat der Wellenhöhe. Zeichen: E we ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Vacuum Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

Paul S. Wesson

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

212

Electromagnetic waves and electron anisotropies downstream of supercritical interplanetary shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present waveform observations of electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler waves with f_ci 1.01. Thus, the whistler mode waves appear to be driven by a heat flux instability and cause perpendicular heating of the halo electrons. The lower hybrid waves show a much weaker correlation between \\partialB and normalized heat flux magnitude and are often observed near magnetic field gradients. A third type of event shows fluctuations consistent with a mixture of both lower hybrid and whistler mode waves. These results suggest that whistler waves may indeed be regulating the electron heat flux and the halo temperature anisotropy, which is important for theories and simulations of electron distribution evolution from the sun to the earth.

Wilson, L B; Szabo, A; Breneman, A; Cattell, C A; Goetz, K; Kellogg, P J; Kersten, K; Kasper, J C; Maruca, B A; Pulupa, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Gauge-invariant and infrared-improved variational analysis of the Yang-Mills vacuum wave functional  

SciTech Connect

We study a gauge-invariant variational framework for the Yang-Mills vacuum wave functional. Our approach is built on gauge-averaged Gaussian trial functionals which substantially extend previously used trial bases in the infrared by implementing a general low-momentum expansion for the vacuum-field dispersion (which is taken to be analytic at zero momentum). When completed by the perturbative Yang-Mills dispersion at high momenta, this results in a significantly enlarged trial-functional space which incorporates both dynamical mass generation and asymptotic freedom. After casting the dynamics associated with these wave functionals into an effective action for collections of soft vacuum-field orbits, the leading infrared improvements manifest themselves as four-gradient interactions. Those turn out to significantly lower the minimal vacuum energy density, thus indicating a clear overall improvement of the vacuum description. The dimensional transmutation mechanism and the dynamically generated mass scale remain almost quantitatively robust, however, which ensures that our prediction for the gluon condensate is consistent with standard values. Further results include a finite group velocity for the soft gluonic modes due to the higher-gradient corrections and indications for a negative differential color resistance of the Yang-Mills vacuum.

Forkel, Hilmar [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

Fischer, M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Use of Exact Solutions of Wave Propagation Problems to Guide Implementation of Nonlinear Seismic Ground Response Analysis Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?1992?. SUMDES: A nonlinear procedure for response analysisusing ?nite element procedures and incorporating a compliantGround Response Analysis Procedures Annie O. L. Kwok, M.ASCE

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the Ecliptic is known...Helios, Ulysses, and Wind...covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind....

G. Le Chat; K. Issautier; N. Meyer-Vernet

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Internal tides, nonlinear internal wave trains, and mixing in the FaroeShetland Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The depthintegrated M2 internal tide energy flux was 140 W m-1 upslope and 154 W m-1 alongslope to the southwest the observed internal tide energy flux, by assuming that all the energy in the pycnocline was dissipated for by the internal tide, even if the majority of the energy was reflected. The nonlinear internal wave energy flux

Williams, Ric

218

Estimating wave energy from a wave record  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This note is concerned with the calculation of wave energy from a time series record of wave heights. Various methods are used to estimate the wave energy. For wave records that contain a number of different ... ...

Sasithorn Aranuvachapun; John A. Johnson

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Partial Wave Analysis of $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma (K^{\\pm}K_S^{0}\\pi^{\\mp})$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BES data on $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma (K^{\\pm} K_S^0 \\pi^{\\mp})$ are presented.There is a strong peak due to $\\eta(1440)/\\iota$, which is fitted with aBreit-Wigner amplitude with $s$-dependent widths for decays to $K^*K$, $\\kappaK$, $\\eta \\pi\\pi$ and $\\rho\\rho$; $\\kappa$ refers to the $K\\pi$ S-wave. At a$K\\bar{K}\\pi$ mass of $\\sim 2040$ MeV, there is a second peak with width $\\sim400$ MeV; $J^P = 0^-$ is preferred over $1^+$ and $2^-$ respectively by 5.2 and6.8 standard deviations. It is a possible candidate for a $0^-$ $s\\bar sg$hybrid partner of $\\pi(1800)$.

Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Chen, A D; Chen, G P; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen Jia Chao; Chen, X D; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng Bao Sen; Cui, X Z; Ding, H L; Dong, L Y; Du, Z Z; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, S Q; Gu, J H; Gu, S D; Gu, W X; Guo, Y N; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Han, Y; He, J; He, J T; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hu, G Y; Hu, H M; Hu, J L; Hu, Q H; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X P; Huang, Y Z; Jiang, C H; Jin, Y; Ju, X; Ke, Z J; Lai, Y F; Lang, P F; Li, C G; Li, D; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, P Q; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X H; Li Xiao Nan; Li Xue Qian; Li Zhong Chao; Liu, B; Liu, F; Liu, F; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z X; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, X L; Ma, E C; Ma, J M; Mao, H S; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Qi, N D; Qi, X R; Qian, C D; Qiu, J F; Qu, Y H; Que, Y K; Rong, G; Shao, Y Y; Shen, B W; Shen, D L; Shen, H; Shen, H Y; Shen, X Y; Shi, F; Shi, H Z; Song, X F; Sun, H S; Sun, L F; Sun, Y Z; Tang, S Q; Tong, G L; Wang, F; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, L Z; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S M; Wang, Y Y; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y G; Xi, D M; Xia, X M; Xie, Y; Xie, Y H; Xu, G F; Xue, S T; Yan, J; Yan, W G; Yang, C M; Yang, C Y; Yang, H X; Yang, X F; Ye, M H; Ye Shu Wei; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, C X; Yu, G W; Yu Yu Hei; Yu, Z Q; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, D; Zhang, H L; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L; Zhang, L; Zhang, L S; Zhang, P; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhao, D X; Zhao, H W; Zhao, J; Zhao Jia Wei; Zhao, M; Zhao Wei Ren; Zhao, Z G; Zheng Jian Ping; Zheng Lin Sheng; Zheng Zhi Peng; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Bugg, D V; Zou Bing Song

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

222

Gravitational waves: a foundational review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard linear approach to the gravitational waves theory is critically reviewed. Contrary to the prevalent understanding, it is pointed out that this theory contains many conceptual and technical obscure issues that require further analysis.

J. G. Pereira

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Data-analysis strategy for detecting gravitational-wave signals from inspiraling compact binaries with a network of laser-interferometric detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A data-analysis strategy based on the maximum-likelihood method (MLM) is presented for the detection of gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries with a network of laser-interferometric detectors having arbitrary orientations and arbitrary locations around the globe. For simplicity, we restrict ourselves to the Newtonian inspiral wave form. However, the formalism we develop here is also applicable to a wave form with post-Newtonian (PN) corrections. The Newtonian wave form depends on eight parameters: the distance r to the binary, the phase ?c of the wave form at the time of final coalescence, the polarization-ellipse angle ?, the angle of inclination ? of the binary orbit to the line of sight, the source-direction angles {?,?}, the time of final coalescence tc at the fiducial detector, and the chirp time ?. All these parameters are relevant for a chirp search with multiple detectors, unlike the case of a single detector. The primary construct on which the MLM is based is the network likelihood ratio (LR). We obtain this ratio here. For the Newtonian inspiral wave form, the LR is a function of the eight signal parameters. In the MLM-based detection strategy, the LR must be maximized over all of these parameters. Here, we show that it is possible to maximize it analytically with respect to four of the eight parameters, namely, {r,?c,?,?}. Maximization over the time of arrival is handled most efficiently by using the fast-Fourier-transform algorithm, as in the case of a single detector. This not only allows us to scan the parameter space continuously over these five parameters but also cuts down substantially on the computational costs. The analytical maximization over the four parameters yields the optimal statistic on which the decision must be based. The value of the statistic also depends on the nature of the noises in the detectors. Here, we model these noises to be mainly Gaussian, stationary, and uncorrelated for every pair of detectors. Instances of non-Gaussianity, as are present in detector outputs, can be accommodated in our formalism by implementing vetoing techniques similar to those applied for single detectors. Our formalism not only allows us to express the likelihood ratio for the network in a very simple and compact form, but also is at the basis of giving an elegant geometric interpretation to the detection problem. Maximization of the LR over the remaining three parameters is handled as follows. Owing to the arbitrary locations of the detectors in a network, the time of arrival of a signal at any detector will, in general, be different from those at the others and, consequently, will result in signal time delays. For a given network, these time delays are determined by the source-direction angles {?,?}. Therefore, to maximize the LR over the parameters {?,?} one needs to scan over the possible time delays allowed by a network. We opt for obtaining a bank of templates for the chirp time and the time delays. This means that we construct a bank of templates over ?, ?, and ?. We first discuss “idealized” networks with all the detectors having a common noise curve for simplicity. Such an exercise nevertheless yields useful estimates about computational costs, and also tests the formalism developed here. We then consider realistic cases of networks comprising the LIGO and VIRGO detectors: These include two-detector networks, which pair up the two LIGOs or VIRGO with one of the LIGOs, and the three-detector network that includes VIRGO and both the LIGOs. For these networks we present the computational speed requirements, network sensitivities, and source-direction resolutions.

Archana Pai, Sanjeev Dhurandhar, and Sukanta Bose

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Coherence waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1955 Wolf noticed that the mutual coherence function ? obeys two wave equations [Proc. R. Soc. London230, 246 (1955)]. The physical optics of this finding is thoroughly presented in...

Lohmann, Adolf W; Mendlovic, David; Shabtay, Gal

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general ...

Agathos, M.

226

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

227

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

228

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

229

Flux, Vol. 1, Issue 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

&24; flux a publication of the national high magnetic field laboratory Introduction &24; In a weak economy, U.S. research funding tends to become more heavily weighted toward applied...

230

Long Wave/Short Wave Resonance in Equatorial Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that resonant coupling between ultra long equatorial Rossby waves and packets of either short Rossby or short westward-traveling gravity waves is possible. Simple analytic formulas give the discrete value of the packet wave number k, ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Peer Review of "Analysis and Simulation of Near-Field Wave Motion Data from the Source Physics Experiment Explosions," Antoun, et al, 2011 Monitoring Research Review  

SciTech Connect

The following is primarily a review of 'Analysis and Simulation of Near-Field Wave Motion Data from the Source Physics Experiment Explosions,' Antoun, et al, published by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) after SPE-1 in 2011 (Ref. 1). However, LLNL analysis of SPE-2 (Ref. 2) will also be discussed. A review by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel of Reference 1 finds both the evidence of the effects of joints on the data and the correlation of calculations with the data weak. This conclusion is made on three separate levels: (1) Fundamental observations made of the various referenced figures taken as presented; (2) Observations made following corrections to errors and omissions to the selected data; and (3) Observations made after considering likely errors in the raw data set. The evidence presented in the referenced papers relies on subjective interpretation of various figures. This is the nature of this technical field of study and, indeed, much of our observation is also subjective.

Steedman, David W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

232

Partial Wave Analysis of the Reaction $p(3.5 GeV)+p \\to pK^+?$ to Search for the "$ppK^-$" Bound State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employing the Bonn-Gatchina partial wave analysis framework (PWA), we have analyzed HADES data of the reaction $p(3.5GeV)+p\\to pK^{+}\\Lambda$. This reaction might contain information about the kaonic cluster "$ppK^-$" via its decay into $p\\Lambda$. Due to interference effects in our coherent description of the data, a hypothetical $\\overline{K}NN$ (or, specifically "$ppK^-$") cluster signal must not necessarily show up as a pronounced feature (e.g. a peak) in an invariant mass spectra like $p\\Lambda$. Our PWA analysis includes a variety of resonant and non-resonant intermediate states and delivers a good description of our data (various angular distributions and two-hadron invariant mass spectra) without a contribution of a $\\overline{K}NN$ cluster. At a confidence level of CL$_{s}$=95\\% such a cluster can not contribute more than 2-12\\% to the total cross section with a $pK^{+}\\Lambda$ final state, which translates into a production cross-section between 0.7 $\\mu b$ and 4.2 $\\mu b$, respectively. The range of the upper limit depends on the assumed cluster mass, width and production process.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; T. Kunz; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; J. Michel; C. Müntz; R. Münzer; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; A. V. Sarantsev

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general relativity (GR) for the first time. We present a data analysis pipeline called TIGER (Test Infrastructure for GEneral Relativity), which is designed to utilize detections of compact binary coalescences to test GR in this regime. TIGER is a model-independent test of GR itself, in that it is not necessary to compare with any specific alternative theory. It performs Bayesian inference on two hypotheses: the GR hypothesis $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm GR}$, and $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, which states that one or more of the post-Newtonian coefficients in the waveform are not as predicted by GR. By the use of multiple sub-hypotheses of $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, in each of which a different number of parameterized deformations of the GR phase are allowed, an arbitrarily large number of 'testing parameters' can be used without having to worry about a model being insufficiently parsimonious if the true number of extra parameters is in fact small. TIGER is well-suited to the regime where most sources have low signal-to-noise ratios, again through the use of these sub-hypotheses. Information from multiple sources can trivially be combined, leading to a stronger test. We focus on binary neutron star coalescences, for which sufficiently accurate waveform models are available that can be generated fast enough on a computer to be fit for use in Bayesian inference. We show that the pipeline is robust against a number of fundamental, astrophysical, and instrumental effects, such as differences between waveform approximants, a limited number of post-Newtonian phase contributions being known, the effects of neutron star spins and tidal deformability on the orbital motion, and instrumental calibration errors.

Michalis Agathos; Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Van Den Broeck; John Veitch; Salvatore Vitale

2013-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves Hiu Ning Chan (1 waves; Long-short resonance PACS Classification: 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg #12;2 ABSTRACT A resonance between long and short waves will occur if the phase velocity of the long wave matches the group velocity

235

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

236

Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

DeSalvo, Riccardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

1. First coincidence experiments between cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational-wave detectors. 2. Development of a thin-film superconducting transducer for a gravitational-wave antenna  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation is concerned with two aspects of detecting gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources. First, the data collection and analysis for a coincidence experiment conducted in 1986 using gravitational wave detectors operated by Stanford University, the university of Rome, and Louisiana State University are described. This experiment was important for several reasons: (1) it was the first coincidence experiment between cryogenic resonant-mass detectors; (2) it improved the observational upper limit on the flux of impulsive gravitational waves that impinge upon the earth; and (3) it lead to the development of a data analysis method for converting the experimental results into an astrophysically meaningful limit on the flux of gravitational radiation from impulsive events. Second, the development of a superconducting thin-film motion transducer intended for use on an ultra-low temperature detector now under construction is described. The sensitivity goal is h = 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}20}. To reach this goal the physical temperature of the detector will be lowered to 40 mK, a lower-noise SQUID amplifier will be used, and a new motion transducer will be developed.

Stevenson, T.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Vortices in Brain waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Vortices in Brain Waves 62. M. E. Raichle, ScienceVORTICES IN BRAIN WAVES WALTER J. FREEMAN Department ofthat is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG).

Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energy Losses Due to Vortex Shedding from the Lower Edge of a Vertical Plate Attacked by Surface Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Vertical Plate Attacked by Surface Waves M. Stiassnie E. Naheer Irina Boguslavsky...The ratio between the flux of the energy taken out by the vortex generation process , and the incoming wave energy flux , is shown to be given by where...

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Thermality of the Hawking flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is the Hawking flux "thermal"? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word "thermal". The original 1850's notions of thermality --- based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized "black bodies" or "lamp black surfaces" --- when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900's, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but "without" any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, and quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only "approximately" Planck-shaped over a bounded frequency range. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is "approximately" Planck-shaped from both above and below --- the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

Matt Visser

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of two-variable maximum power point tracking control for ocean wave energy converters utilizing a power analysis and data acquisition system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ocean wave energy shows great potential as a developing form of renewable energy. However, challenges arise in maturing this technology to achieve cost-effective energy conversion.… (more)

Amon, Ean A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Pre-asymptotic Error Analysis of CIP-FEM and FEM for Helmholtz Equation with High Wave Number. Part II: $hp$ version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, which is part II in a series of two, the pre-asymptotic error analysis of the continuous interior penalty finite element method (CIP-FEM) and the FEM for the Helmholtz equation in two and three dimensions is continued. While part I contained results on the linear CIP-FEM and FEM, the present part deals with approximation spaces of order $p \\ge 1$. By using a modified duality argument, pre-asymptotic error estimates are derived for both methods under the condition of $\\frac{kh}{p}\\le C_0\\big(\\frac{p}{k}\\big)^{\\frac{1}{p+1}}$, where $k$ is the wave number, $h$ is the mesh size, and $C_0$ is a constant independent of $k, h, p$, and the penalty parameters. It is shown that the pollution errors of both methods in $H^1$-norm are $O(k^{2p+1}h^{2p})$ if $p=O(1)$ and are $O\\Big(\\frac{k}{p^2}\\big(\\frac{kh}{\\sigma p}\\big)^{2p}\\Big)$ if the exact solution $u\\in H^2(\\Om)$ which coincide with existent dispersion analyses for the FEM on Cartesian grids. Here $\\si$ is a constant independent of $k, h, p$, and t...

Zhu, Lingxue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

247

Beta ray flux measuring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

249

THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN MAGNETIZED SOLAR ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

We present results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in a solar magnetic flux tube. Our study aims at understanding the properties of a range of MHD wave modes generated by different photospheric motions. We consider two scenarios observed in the lower solar photosphere, namely, granular buffeting and vortex-like motion, among the simplest mechanism for the generation of waves within a strong, localized magnetic flux concentration. We show that granular buffeting is likely to generate stronger slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves as compared to swirly motions. Correspondingly, the energy flux transported differs as a result of the driving motions. We also demonstrate that the waves generated by granular buffeting are likely to manifest in stronger emission in the chromospheric network. We argue that different mechanisms of wave generation are active during the evolution of a magnetic element in the intergranular lane, resulting in temporally varying emission at chromospheric heights.

Vigeesh, G. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R. [SP2RC, Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hasan, S. S. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore (India)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

2, 10671085, 2005 Flux measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.50 m. The study site consisted of grass (10% of area), bean5 (15%), corn (15%) and rice (60 in the components of the surface energy balance and in CO2 flux. Results show that the pattern of energy parti- tion suddenly increased after thunderstorm events. We examined the energy budget closure and found

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

251

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Vorticity Preserving Flux Corrected Transport Scheme for the Acoustic Equations  

SciTech Connect

Long term research goals are to develop an improved cell-centered Lagrangian Hydro algorithm with the following qualities: 1. Utilizes Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) to achieve second order accuracy with multidimensional physics; 2. Does not rely on the one-dimensional Riemann problem; and 3. Implements a form of vorticity control. Short term research goals are to devise and implement a 2D vorticity preserving FCT solver for the acoustic equations on an Eulerian mesh: 1. Develop a flux limiting mechanism for systems of governing equations with symmetric wave speeds; 2. Verify the vorticity preserving properties of the scheme; and 3. Compare the performance of the scheme to traditional MUSCL-Hancock and other algorithms.

Lung, Tyler B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roe, Phil [University of Michigan; Morgan, Nathaniel R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Experimental Investigation Of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges  

SciTech Connect

Microwave atmospheric pressure discharge in neon sustained by surface waves in a dielectric tube is considered. The plasma column length was measured versus absorbed microwave power for different discharge conditions. This gives a view on the wave propagation characteristics. The predicted dependence of discharge length on the total flux of wave power based on the modified model of non-equilibrium plasma is compared with experimental values. Moreover, we present results of spectroscopic investigations of the electron density. The electron density was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H{beta} spectral line. The spectroscopic results we shall use developing of a model of propagation of surface wave.

Czylkowski, D.; Jasinski, M.; Nowakowska, H.; Zakrzewski, Z. [The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk (Poland)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Nonlinear Essence of Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A critical review of gravitational wave theory is made. It is pointed out that the usual linear approach to the gravitational wave theory is neither conceptually consistent nor mathematically justified. Relying upon that analysis it is then argued that -- analogously to a Yang-Mills propagating field, which must be nonlinear to carry its gauge charge -- a gravitational wave must necessarily be nonlinear to transport its own charge -- that is, energy-momentum.

R. Aldrovandi; J. G. Pereira; K. H. Vu

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Plane waves Lumped systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems S x y z Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · open tube #12;2 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · closed tube Impedance · Cylindrical waves z x y r #12;3 Impedance · Cylindrical waves ­ Circumferential part n=0 n=1 n=2 n=3 Impedance · Cylindrical

Berlin,Technische Universität

258

Thermal neutron flux contours from criticality event  

SciTech Connect

The generation of thermal neutron flux contours from a criticality event is demonstrated for an idealized building with a criticality event in one of the rooms. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code is used to calculate the thermal neutron flux.

Carter, L.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation of surface flux adjustments made to the initial NCEP re-analysis-1 products. During the state estimation the boundary current regions, they are consistent with known large-scale deficiencies in the NCEP products

260

High-flux solar photon processes  

SciTech Connect

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Effect of Inaccuracies in Weather-Ship Data on Bulk-Derived Estimates of Flux, Stability and Sea-Surface Roughness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical error analysis (or sensitivity study) is performed for the momentum, heat, and humidity flux estimates made from weather-ship observations by using the bulk flux method. Bulk-derived stability and roughness errors are also examined. ...

Theodore V. Blanc

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Relaxation of spheromak configurations with open flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relaxation of several kink unstable equilibria with open flux representative of spheromaks sustained by dc helicity injection is studied by means of three-dimensional resistivemagnetohydrodynamic simulations. No external driving is applied but the initial conditions are chosen to reproduce the current profiles existing in a gun driven spheromak which has a high current density in the open flux region and a low current density in the closed flux region. The growth and nonlinear saturation of various unstable modes the dynamo action which converts toroidal flux into poloidal flux and the evolution of the ? profile ( ? = ? 0 J ? B / B 2 ) are studied. An initial condition is found which results in a dynamo that produces enough poloidal flux to compensate the resistive losses occurred during a characteristic time of the instability. The flux amplification factor around which this case oscillates is consistent with existing experimental data. During the relaxation the central open flux tube develops a helical distortion and the closed flux surfaces are destroyed. After the relaxation event close flux surfaces form again but the final profiles are not fully relaxed and the central open flux tube remains distorted. The effect of the Lundquist number on the evolution and its impact on the required level of fluctuations are evaluated. Finally the dynamics of the system for different current levels in the open flux region is studied.

Pablo Luis García-Martínez; Ricardo Farengo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Today's Material Gauss' Law and Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the contents of the box, the box must contain zero net electric charge. Slide 27-31 #12;Gauss' Law and Flux: · The Concept of Flux · Calculating Electric Flux · Symmetry · Gauss's Law · Using Gauss's Law · Conductors that the box must contain net positive electric charge. Slide 27-29 #12;© 2013 Pearson Education, Inc

Ashlock, Dan

264

How to Estimate Energy Lost to Gravitational Waves (revised)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy--momentum radiated in gravitational waves by an isolated source is given by a formula of Bondi. This formula is highly non--local: the energy--momentum is not given as the integral of a well--defined local density. It has therefore been unclear whether the Bondi formula can be used to get information from gravity--wave measurements. In this note, we obtain, from local knowledge of the radiation field, a lower bound on the Bondi flux.

Adam D. Helfer

1993-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

Climatology of wave breaking and mixing in the Northern Hemisphere summer stratosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the EP-flux divergence is clearly nonzero, which means the zonal-mean zonal flow is forced by waves in this region. Close examination of the individual zonal wavenumber contributions to the climatological monthly-mean El'-flux divergence shows...

Wagner, Richard Emmett

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Statistics of the Prompt-to-Afterglow GRB Flux Ratios and the Supercritical Pile GRB Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the statistics of the ratio, ${\\mathrm R}$, between the prompt and afterglow "plateau" fluxes of GRB. This we define as the ratio between the mean prompt energy flux in the {\\em Swift} BAT and the {\\em Swift} XRT, immediately following the steep transition between these two states and the beginning of the afterglow stage referred to as the "plateau". Like the distribution of other GRB observables, the histogram of ${\\mathrm R}$ is close to log-normal, with maximum at ${\\mathrm R = R}_{\\rm m} \\simeq 2,000$, FWHM of about 2 decades and with the entire distribution spanning about 6 decades in the value of ${\\mathrm R}$. We note that the peak of the distribution is close to the proton-to-electron mass ratio $({\\mathrm R}_{\\rm m} \\simeq m_p/m_e = 1836)$, as proposed by us earlier, on the basis of a specific model for the conversion of the GRB blast wave kinetic energy into radiation, before any similar analysis were made. It therefore appears that, in addition to the values of the energy of peak luminos...

Kazanas, D; Sultana, J; Mastichiadis, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

FINAL REPORT: EDDY-COVARIANCE FLUX TOWER AND TRACER TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA PROPOSAL: FROM TOWER TO PIXEL: INTEGRATION OF PATCH-SIZE NEE USING EXPERIMENTAL MODELING FOOTPRINT ANALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory has been funded since October of 2000 to provide assistance to the University of Georgia in conducting footprint analyses of individual towers based on meteorology and trace gas measurements. Brookhaven researchers conducted air flow measurements using perfluorocarbon tracers and meteorological instrumentation for three experimental campaigns at an AmeriFlux research site maintained by Dr. Monique Leclerc near Gainesville, FL. In addition, BNL provided assistance with remote data collection and distribution from remote field sites operated by Dr. John Hom of the US Forest Service in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and at FACE research sites in North Carolina and Wisconsin.

LEWIN,K.F.; NAGY, J.; WATSON, T.B.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

270

Noncollinear orientation of external magnetic field and flux lines penetrating an isotropic hard superconductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Penetration by Abrikosov flux lines of an isotropic hard superconductor in the ... induced by changes in the orientation of external magnetic field has been theoretically investigated. The analysis has ... forces...

S. E. Savel’ev; L. M. Fisher…

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

818 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ADVANCED PACKAGING, VOL. 31, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2008 Full-Wave Analysis of Large-Scale Interconnects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Seattle, WA 98195 USA. He is now with the Memory Products Group, Micron Technology, Inc., Boise, ID 83707 of analyzing whole printed circuit boards (PCBs) and packages using full-wave electromag- netic (EM) methods USA (e-mail: ong_chong_jin@hotmail.com). L. Tsang is with the Department of Electrical Engineering

Tsang, Leung

272

Analysis of collective spin-wave modes at different points within the hysteresis loop of a one-dimensional magnonic crystal comprising alternative-width nanostripes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and forbidden magnonic energy bands. The measured frequencies as a function of the exchanged wave vector have Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via Campi 213A, I-41125 Modena, Italy 4 Information Storage Materials Laboratory and can be considered as a model system for reprogrammable dynamical response, where the band structure

Adeyeye, Adekunle

273

Relativistic detonation waves and bubble growth in false vacuum decay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After reviewing the current understanding of relativistic shock waves, a detailed analysis of relativistic detonation waves is presented. It is proposed that the motion of a detonation wave is analogous to the growth of a bubble nucleated during false vacuum decay at finite temperatures. Some possible applications of these results to cosmology are discussed.

Paul Joseph Steinhardt

1982-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field Frank M. Lee,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in global ocean mixing, it is important to understand the power present in the internal wave fieldExperimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data Frank M. Lee to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux J and total radiated power P

Morrison, Philip J.,

275

Category:Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Flux Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Gas Flux Sampling Add.png Add a new Gas Flux Sampling...

276

Validation/Uncertainty Quantification for Large Eddy Simulations of the heat flux in the Tangentially Fired Oxy-Coal Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task is to produce predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for the heat flux in commercial-scale, tangentially fired, oxy-coal boilers. Validation data came from the Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF) for tangentially fired, oxy-coal operation. This task brings together experimental data collected under Alstom’s DOE project for measuring oxy-firing performance parameters in the BSF with this University of Utah project for large eddy simulation (LES) and validation/uncertainty quantification (V/UQ). The Utah work includes V/UQ with measurements in the single-burner facility where advanced strategies for O2 injection can be more easily controlled and data more easily obtained. Highlights of the work include: • Simulations of Alstom’s 15 megawatt (MW) BSF, exploring the uncertainty in thermal boundary conditions. A V/UQ analysis showed consistency between experimental results and simulation results, identifying uncertainty bounds on the quantities of interest for this system (Subtask 9.1) • A simulation study of the University of Utah’s oxy-fuel combustor (OFC) focused on heat flux (Subtask 9.2). A V/UQ analysis was used to show consistency between experimental and simulation results. • Measurement of heat flux and temperature with new optical diagnostic techniques and comparison with conventional measurements (Subtask 9.3). Various optical diagnostics systems were created to provide experimental data to the simulation team. The final configuration utilized a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) camera to measure heat flux and temperature, which was synchronized with a high-speed, visible camera to utilize two-color pyrometry to measure temperature and soot concentration. • Collection of heat flux and temperature measurements in the University of Utah’s OFC for use is subtasks 9.2 and 9.3 (Subtask 9.4). Several replicates were carried to better assess the experimental error. Experiments were specifically designed for the generation of high-fidelity data from a turbulent oxy-coal flame for the validation of oxy-coal simulation models. Experiments were also conducted on the OFC to determine heat flux profiles using advanced strategies for O2 injection. This is important when considering retrofit of advanced O2 injection in retrofit configurations.

Smith, P.J.; Eddings, E.G.; Ring, T.; Thornock, J.; Draper, T.; Isaac, B.; Rezeai, D.; Toth, P.; Wu, Y.; Kelly, K.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Breaking wind waves as a source of ambient noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical model for the prediction of ambient noise level due to collective oscillations of air bubbles under breaking wind waves is presented. The model uses a budget of the energy flux from the breaking waves to quantify acoustic power radiation by a bubble cloud. A shift of the noise spectra to lower frequency due to collective bubble oscillation is assumed. The model derives good estimates of the magnitude slope and frequency range of the noise spectra using the wind speed or height of breaking waves.

Pavlo Tkalich; Eng Soon Chan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ozone heating and the destabilization of traveling waves during summer  

SciTech Connect

The effects of ozone heating on the linear stability of lower stratospheric traveling waves of the summertime, extratropical circulation are examined. Based on coupled equations for the quasigeostrophic potential vorticity and ozone volume mixing ratio, it is shown that the diabatic heating arising from ozone advection can offset the damping due to Newtonian cooling, leading to wave amplification and significant changes in the structure and zonally rectified fluxes of the wave fields in both the lower stratosphere and troposphere. The vertical profile of the zonal mean wind plays a crucial role in determining whether the ozone heating destabilizes eastward and/or westward traveling disturbances.

Nathan, T.R.; Cordero, E.C.; Li, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Contents of Gravitational Waves in Teleparallel Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conserved quantities, that are, gravitational energy-momentum and its relevant quantities are investigated for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity using the Hamiltonian approach. For both cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves, we obtain definite energy and constant momentum. The constant momentum shows consistency with the results available in General Relativity and teleparallel gravity. The angular momentum for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves also turn out to be constant. Further, we evaluate their gravitational energy-momentum fluxes and gravitational pressure.

M. Sharif; Sumaira Taj

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Energy flux pattern of inverse Goos-Hanchen shift in photonic crystals with negative index of refraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy flux patterns of inverse Goos-Hanchen (GH) shift around the interface between air and negatively refractive photonic crystal (NRPhC) with different surface terminations is investigated. Results show that NRPhC exhibits inverse GH shift in TM and TE polarization, and the localization and pattern of energy flux differ in TM and TE polarizations and are strongly affected by surface termination. This is different to the condition of negative permittivity materials (i.e., metal), which only presents inverse GH shift in TM polarization. In the case of TE polarization, the energy flux pattern exhibits the flux of backward wave whose localization changes from the surface to inside of NRPhC with the variation of surface termination. In the case of TM polarization, the energy flux pattern is always confined within the surface of NRPhC, whereas its pattern changes from the flux of backward wave to vortices at the surface of NRPhC, which is different to the energy flux of TM polarization of metal. By properly ...

Hu, Jinbing; Chen, Jiabi; Jiang, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Zhuang, Songlin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of the United States ocean wave energy resource.

283

Metamaterial anisotropic flux concentrators and magnetic arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A metamaterial magnetic flux concentrator is investigated in detail in combination with a Halbach cylinder of infinite length. A general analytical solution to the field is determined and the magnetic figure of merit is determined for a Halbach cylinder with a flux concentrator. It is shown that an ideal flux concentrator will not change the figure of merit of a given magnet design, while the non-ideal will always lower it. The geometric parameters producing maximum figure of merit, i.e. the most efficient devices, are determined. The force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders with flux concentrators is determined and the maximum torque is found. Finally, the effect of non-ideal flux concentrators and the practical use of flux concentrators, as well as demagnetization issues, is discussed.

Bjørk, R; Bahl, C R H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Universality in PP-Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a universality property of any covariant field theory in space-time expanded around pp-wave backgrounds. According to this property the space-time lagrangian density evaluated on a restricted set of field configurations, called universal sector, turns out to be same around all the pp-waves, even off-shell, with same transverse space and same profiles for the background scalars. In this paper we restrict our discussion to tensorial fields only. In the context of bosonic string theory we consider on-shell pp-waves and argue that universality requires the existence of a universal sector of world-sheet operators whose correlation functions are insensitive to the pp-wave nature of the metric and the background gauge flux. Such results can also be reproduced using the world-sheet conformal field theory. We also study such pp-waves in non-polynomial closed string field theory (CSFT). In particular, we argue that for an off-shell pp-wave ansatz with flat transverse space and dilaton independent of transverse coordinates the field redefinition relating the low energy effective field theory and CSFT with all the massive modes integrated out is at most quadratic in fields. Because of this simplification it is expected that the off-shell pp-waves can be identified on the two sides. Furthermore, given the massless pp-wave field configurations, an iterative method for computing the higher massive modes using the CSFT equations of motion has been discussed. All our bosonic string theory analyses can be generalised to the common Neveu-Schwarz sector of superstrings.

Partha Mukhopadhyay

2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

Magnetic flux tubes on the Sun  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... there are three waves. They are analogous to the modes of oscillation of an elastic string. 11,16-18. One mode is a torsional wave propagating at the Alfvn speed ... consists of a wave front moving with the speed cp trailed by a 'wake', oscillating at the frequency O.

H. C. Spruit; B. Roberts

1983-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

286

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Experimental Investigation on Density Wave Instability of Sodium Boiling Two-Phase Flow in an Annulus  

SciTech Connect

Experiments of density wave instability in a liquid sodium boiling two-phase flow experiments in an annulus were carried out in the following parameters range: heat flux from 80 kW/m{sup 2} to 976 kW/m{sup 2}, inlet subcooling from 25.6 deg. C to 226.8 deg. C, mass flow rate from 7.92 kg/h to 68.9 kg/h, system pressure from 2600 Pa to 0.12 Mpa. Not only the mechanism of the instability, critical conditions and oscillation period, but also the effects of pressure, mass flow rate and inlet subcooling on the density wave instability were explored experimentally and theoretically. From the experimental data, it was found that the lower the inlet temperature was, the higher the system pressure and the mass flow rate that could result in a more stable boiling two-phase flow were. A correlation for the density wave instability was obtained on from the dimensional analysis for the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. (authors)

Suizheng Qiu; Dounan Jia [Xi'an Jiaotong University, No.28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710049 (China); Minoru Takahashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW BLAST WAVES ENCOUNTERING SUDDEN CIRCUMBURST DENSITY CHANGE  

SciTech Connect

Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power-law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreading, collimation, and edge effects of the blast wave as it encounters the change in circumburst medium. In all cases considered in this paper, we find that a flare will not be observed for any of the density changes studied.

Gat, Ilana; Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Estimating the potential of ocean wave power resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The realistic assessment of an ocean wave energy resource that can be converted to an electrical power at various offshore sites depends upon many factors, and these include estimating the resource recognizing the random nature of the site-specific wave field, and optimizing the power conversion from particular wave energy conversion devices. In order to better account for the uncertainty in wave power resource estimates, conditional probability distribution functions of wave power in a given sea-state are derived. Theoretical expressions for the deep and shallow water limits are derived and the role of spectral width is studied. The theoretical model estimates were compared with the statistics obtained from the wave-by-wave analysis of JONSWAP based ocean wave time-series. It was shown that the narrow-band approximation is appropriate when the variability due to wave period is negligible. The application of the short-term models in evaluating the long-term wave power resource at a site was illustrated using wave data measured off the California coast. The final example illustrates the procedure for incorporating the local wave data and the sea-state model together with a wave energy device to obtain an estimate of the potential wave energy that could be converted into a usable energy resource.

Amir H. Izadparast; John M. Niedzwecki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE  

SciTech Connect

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Separation of gas mixtures by thermoacoustic waves.  

SciTech Connect

Imposing sound on a binary gas mixture in a duct separates the two gases along the acoustic-propagation axis. Mole-fraction differences as large as 10% and separation fluxes as high as 0.001 M-squared c, where M is Mach number and c is sound speed, are easily observed. We describe the accidental discovery of this phenomenon in a helium-xenon mixture, subsequent experiments with a helium-argon mixture, and theoretical developments. The phenomenon occurs because a thin layer of the gas adjacent to the wall is immobilized by viscosity while the rest of the gas moves back and forth with the wave, and the heat capacity of the wall holds this thin layer of the gas at constant temperature while the rest of the gas experiences temperature oscillations due to the wave's oscillating pressure. The oscillating temperature gradient causes the light and heavy atoms in the gas to take turns diffusing into and out of the immobilized layer, so that the oscillating motion of the wave outside the immobilized layer tends to carry light-enriched gas in one direction and heavy-enriched gas in the opposite direction. Experiment and theory are in very good agreement for the initial separation fluxes and the saturation mole-fraction differences.

Swift, G. W. (Gregory W.); Geller, D. A. (Drew A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Solar Wind Power from Magnetic Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of the fast, high-latitude solar wind throughout Ulysses' three orbits show that solar wind power correlates remarkably well with the Sun's total open magnetic flux. These observations support a recent model of the solar wind energy and particle sources, where magnetic flux emergence naturally leads to an energy flux proportional to the strength of the large-scale magnetic field. This model has also been shown to be consistent with X-ray observations of the Sun and a variety of other stars over 12 decades of magnetic flux. The observations reported here show that the Sun delivers ~600 kW Wb?1 to power the solar wind, and that this power to magnetic flux relation has been extremely stable over the last 15 years. Thus, the same law that governs energy released in the corona and from other stars also applies to the total energy in the solar wind.

N. A. Schwadron; D. J. McComas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Wave-particle interaction and Hamiltonian dynamics investigated in a traveling wave tube  

SciTech Connect

For wave-particle interaction studies, the one-dimensional (1-D) beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT). This led us to a detailed experimental analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and a small either cold or warm beam. More recently, a test electron beam has been used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s). The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is investigated with a trochoidal energy analyzer that records the beam energy distribution at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave responsible for Landau damping is observed. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is also observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap leading to a typical 'devil's staircase' behavior. A new strategy for the control of chaos is tested.

Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe Turbulence Plasma, Case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains.

J. I. Arana; L. L. Bonilla; H. T. Grahn

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

LABORATORY OBSERVATIONS AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE EFFECTS OF AN ARRAY OF WAVE ENERGY CONVERTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LABORATORY OBSERVATIONS AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE EFFECTS OF AN ARRAY OF WAVE ENERGY of wave energy converters (WECs) on water waves through the analysis of extensive laboratory experiments absorption is a reasonable predictor of the effect of WECs on the far field. Keywords: wave- energy; spectral

Haller, Merrick

297

Kelvin Waves around Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean allows circumpolar structure and the Antarctic coastline plays a role as a waveguide for oceanic Kelvin waves. Under the cyclic conditions, the horizontal wavenumbers and frequencies for circumpolarly propagating waves are ...

Kazuya Kusahara; Kay I. Ohshima

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Achieving high flux amplification in a gun-driven, flux-core spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new means of operating flux-core spheromaks with possibly increased stability, confinement and pulse length is analysed by a resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. High amplification of the bias poloidal flux, required to minimize ohmic losses, is achieved by reducing the bias rapidly in a plasma formed at a lower amplification. The plasma separatrix is predicted to expand and incorporate the removed bias flux maintaining the total poloidal flux within the spheromak's flux-conserving wall. MHD energy on open magnetic field lines is reduced, reducing magnetic fluctuation levels. A means of experimental verification is suggested that may point the way to fusion-relevant spheromaks.

E.B. Hooper; D.N. Hill; H.S. McLean; C.A. Romero-Talamás; R.D. Wood

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of...

Rudolph, Jan; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for portable high-precision quantum sensors.

Jan Rudolph; Waldemar Herr; Christoph Grzeschik; Tammo Sternke; Alexander Grote; Manuel Popp; Dennis Becker; Hauke Müntinga; Holger Ahlers; Achim Peters; Claus Lämmerzahl; Klaus Sengstock; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gravity perturbed Crapper waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waves are known to have multi-valued height. Using...gravity-capillary waves with multi-valued height. The...of single-valued and multi-valued travelling waves...absence of gravity, a family of exact solutions is...elliptic functions. Building upon the work by Tanveer...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Coupled flow and heat transfer in viscoelastic fluid with Cattaneo–Christov heat flux model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This letter presents a research for coupled flow and heat transfer of an upper-convected Maxwell fluid above a stretching plate with velocity slip boundary. Unlike most classical works, the new heat flux model, which is recently proposed by Christov, is employed. Analytical solutions are obtained by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The effects of elasticity number, slip coefficient, the relaxation time of the heat flux and the Prandtl number on velocity and temperature fields are analyzed. A comparison of Fourier’s Law and the Cattaneo–Christov heat flux model is also presented.

Shihao Han; Liancun Zheng; Chunrui Li; Xinxin Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

304

The Effect of Wave Breaking on the Wave Energy Spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of wave breaking on the wave energy spectral shape is examined. The Stokes wave-breaking criterion is first extended to random waves and a breaking wave model is established in which the elevation of breaking waves is expressed in ...

C. C. Tung; N. E. Huang

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Study of cavity type antenna structure of large-area 915 MHz ultra-high frequency wave plasma device based on three-dimensional finite difference time-domain analysis  

SciTech Connect

A large-area planar plasma source with a resonant cavity type launcher driven by a 915 MHz ultra-high frequency wave was developed. Theoretical analysis with the three-dimensional finite difference time-domain simulation was carried out to determine the optimized launcher structure by analyzing the resonant transverse magnetic mode in the resonant cavity. Numerical result expects that the resonant electric field distribution inside the cavity dominantly consists of the TM{sub 410} mode. The resonant cavity type launcher having 8 holes in an octagonal geometry was designed to fit the resonant transverse magnetic mode. Adjusting 8 hole positions of the launcher to the field pattern of the resonant TM{sub 410} mode, we found that the plasma density increased about 40%?50% from 1.0?1.1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup ?3} to ?1.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup ?3} at the same incident power of 2.5 kW, compared with the previous results with the launcher having 6 holes in the hexagonal geometry. It is also noted that the electron density changes almost linearly with the incident wave power without any mode jumps.

Chang, Xijiang [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China) [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Kunii, Kazuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University,3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University,3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Liang, Rongqing [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China)] [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Nagatsu, Masaaki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan) [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University,3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Barotropic Impacts of Surface Friction on Eddy Kinetic Energy and Momentum Fluxes: An Alternative to the Barotropic Governor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barotropic Impacts of Surface Friction on Eddy Kinetic Energy and Momentum Fluxes: An Alternative energy decreases, a response that is inconsistent with the conventional barotropic governor mechanism on eddy momentum fluxes and eddy kinetic energy. Analysis of the pseudomomentum budget shows

Garfinkel, Chaim I.

307

Nonlocal fluxes at a plasma sheath  

SciTech Connect

The particle and energy fluxes of electrons at the boundary of a plasma in contact with a perfectly absorbing plate are considered. In general, the fluxes are shown not to be determined by the plasma temperature and density at the plate but rather by a convolution of the plasma profiles in the vicinity of the plate. A simple empirical expression is proposed for the nonlocal fluxes, which approximately reproduces the results of a full kinetic calculation. The implications of this, to divertor plasmas near the neutralizer plate, are discussed.

Marchand, R.; Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Matte, J.P. (INRS-Energie, C. P. 1020, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2, Canada (CA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

On the Toroidal Plasma Rotations Induced by Lower Hybrid Waves  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric fi eld initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a fi nite- difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow pro file and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves. __________________________________________________

Xiaoyin Guan, Hong Qin, Jian Liu and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

Configuration mixing of angular-momentum projected triaxial relativistic mean-field wave functions. II. Microscopic analysis of low-lying states in magnesium isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently developed structure model that uses the generator coordinate method to perform configuration mixing of angular-momentum projected wave functions, generated by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes (3DAMP+GCM), is applied in a systematic study of ground states and low-energy collective states in the even-even magnesium isotopes $^{20-40}$Mg. Results obtained using a relativistic point-coupling nucleon-nucleon effective interaction in the particle-hole channel, and a density-independent $\\delta$-interaction in the pairing channel, are compared to data and with previous axial 1DAMP+GCM calculations, both with a relativistic density functional and the non-relativistic Gogny force. The effects of the inclusion of triaxial degrees of freedom on the low-energy spectra and E2 transitions of magnesium isotopes are examined.

J. M. Yao; H. Mei; H. Chen; J. Meng; P. Ring; D. Vretenar

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

Emission Origin for the Wave of Quanta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that certain assumptions about the process of the emission of the quanta by their (oscillating) emitter provide for their changing (oscillatory) flux at any location. This mechanism underlying (such) wave phenomena is not based, both, on the newtonian notion of force and the field concept (of Faraday, Maxwell, Lorentz and Einstein). When applied to the case of thermal radiation, this emission origin for the wave of quanta is shown here to be consistent with the laws of the black body radiation. We conclude therefore also that a conceptual framework, which is not rooted in the notion of force and in the field concept, may provide a deterministic basis underlying the probabilistic methods of the quantum theory.

Sanjay M Wagh

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Global surface wave resonances of the earth magnetosphere and their possible manifestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper global surface wave modes supported by plasma discontinuities at both the magnetopause and the plasmapause are considered. The ionosphere at the ends of the magnetic field lines of the earth outer magnetosphere is considered as reflecting boundaries of the surface waves that propagate along the plasma boundaries. As a result a standing wave structure along the magnetic field fluxes of the outer magnetosphere, i.e. surface wave resonance structure can be formed. Due to quantized wavenumbers along the magnetic field lines, the surface wave resonance possesses quantified frequencies in a following way: f = nfres, where fres is frequency of the corresponding fundamental surface wave resonance and n is an integer. Global Pc5 pulsations have been observed and interpreted mostly as cavity modes of the earth magnetosphere. The global Pc5 pulsations however could alternatively be interpreted as ultra low-frequency surface wave resonances of the earth magnetosphere that do not necessarily involve the cavi...

Nenovski, Petko

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Exergy of boson and fermion fluxes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particles with zero and non-zero rest mass are considered in both the classical and ultra-relativistic limits. Relationships that may be used for both fermions and bosons are derived. The exergy flux of free particles involves an efficiency-like factor affecting the energy flux. This factor contains the ambient temperature and the effective particle flux temperature and it is generally different from both the usual Carnot factor and the Petela factor appearing in the exergy of blackbody radiation fluxes, respectively. Some particular cases considered here show that free Fermi particles carry less available work than Bose particles and that the classical approximation yields higher values of the efficiency-like factors than the ultra-relativistic assumption.

Viorel Badescu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Muon Fluxes From Dark Matter Annihilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the muon flux from annihilation of the dark matter in the core of the Sun, in the core of the Earth and from cosmic diffuse neutrinos produced in dark matter annihilation in the halos. We consider model-independent direct neutrino production and secondary neutrino production from the decay of taus produced in the annihilation of dark matter. We illustrate how muon energy distribution from dark matter annihilation has a very different shape than muon flux from atmospheric neutrinos. We consider both the upward muon flux, when muons are created in the rock below the detector, and the contained flux when muons are created in the (ice) detector. We contrast our results to the ones previously obtained in the literature, illustrating the importance of properly treating muon propagation and energy loss. We comment on neutrino flavor dependence and their detection.

Arif Emre Erkoca; Mary Hall Reno; Ina Sarcevic

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Micromorphic Balances and Source-flux Duality  

SciTech Connect

This is a further note on the (Gauss-Maxwell) force-flux construct proposed previously (Goddard, J. D., A note on Eringen's moment balances, Int. J. Eng. Sci., in the press, 2011). Motivated in part by its promise as a homogenization technique for constructing micromorphic continua, the present work is focused rather on some additional representations and on novel applications, such as the derivation of dissipative thermodynamic potentials from force-flux relations.

Goddard, J. D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

315

Soft pion emission from fat flux tubes  

SciTech Connect

The emission of pions from multiquark flux tubes is examined as an explanation of the soft pion puzzle. Although the soft pion spectra from the decay of fat flux tubes can account for some low {ital p}{sub {perpendicular}} enhancement, the dependence on the number of involved quarks is too weak to provide a plausible explanation of the observed enhancement in the pion spectrum at low transverse momenta.

Kusnezov, D.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (USA))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Alfven Wave Solar Model: Part 1, Coronal Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the new Alfven Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a global model from the upper chromosphere to the corona and the heliosphere. The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are addressed with low-frequency Alfven wave turbulence. The injection of Alfven wave energy at the inner boundary is such that the Poynting flux is proportional to the magnetic field strength. The three-dimensional magnetic field topology is simulated using data from photospheric magnetic field measurements. This model does not impose open-closed magnetic field boundaries; those develop self-consistently. The physics includes: (1) The model employs three different temperatures, namely the isotropic electron temperature and the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures. The firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities due to the developing ion temperature anisotropy are accounted for. (2) The Alfven waves are partially reflected by the Alfven speed gradient and the vorticity along the field lines. The resulting counter-propagat...

van der Holst, Bart; Meng, Xing; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Harvesting Broadband Kinetic Impact Energy from Mechanical Triggering/Vibration and Water Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(13) Although efforts in utilizing ocean wave energy could be dated back to 1890,(13) there has not been any commercial wave power farms up to now. ... This demonstrates that in addition to water wave energy harvesting our TENG also has the potential for hydrological analysis, which is a very important function for a wave energy farming system. ... Last but not least, the major component for ocean wave harvesting is the offshore wind power. ...

Xiaonan Wen; Weiqing Yang; Qingshen Jing; Zhong Lin Wang

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

318

Antiproton Flux in Cosmic Ray Propagation Models with Anisotropic Diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently a cosmic ray propagation model has been introduced, where anisotropic diffusion is used as a mechanism to allow for $\\mathcal{O}(100)$ km/s galactic winds. This model predicts a reduced antiproton background flux, suggesting an excess is being observed. We implement this model in GALPROP v50.1 and perform a $\\chi^2$ analysis for B/C, $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be, and the recent PAMELA $\\bar{p}/p$ datasets. By introducing a power-index parameter $\\alpha$ that dictates the dependence of the diffusion coefficient $D_{xx}$ on height $|z|$ away from the galactic plane, we confirm that isotropic diffusion models with $\\alpha=0$ cannot accommodate high velocity convective winds suggested by ROSAT, while models with $\\alpha=1$ ($D_{xx}\\propto |z|$) can give a very good fit. A fit to B/C and $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be data predicts a lower $\\bar{p}/p$ flux ratio than the PAMELA measurement at energies between approximately 2 GeV to 20 GeV. A combined fit including in addition the $\\bar{p}/p$ data is marginal, suggesting only a partial contribution to the measured antiproton flux.

Phillip Grajek; Kaoru Hagiwara

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

319

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of...

320

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

322

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

323

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A...

324

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

325

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

326

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

327

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Electric Machine R&D...

328

Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

329

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments...

330

Search for periodicities in the B8 solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A search has been made for sinusoidal periodic variations in the B8 solar neutrino flux using data collected by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory over a 4-year time interval. The variation at a period of 1 yr is consistent with modulation of the B8 neutrino flux by the Earth’s orbital eccentricity. No significant sinusoidal periodicities are found with periods between 1 d and 10 years with either an unbinned maximum likelihood analysis or a Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis. The data are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the results of the recent analysis by Sturrock et al., based on elastic scattering events in Super-Kamiokande, can be attributed to a 7% sinusoidal modulation of the total B8 neutrino flux.

B. Aharmim et al. (SNO Collaboration)

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Kinetic Alfvén wave turbulence and formation of localized structures  

SciTech Connect

This work presents non-linear interaction of magnetosonic wave with kinetic Alfvén wave for intermediate ?-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i}???1). A set of dimensionless equations have been developed for analysis by considering ponderomotive force due to pump kinetic Alfvén wave in the dynamics of magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis has been done to study modulational instability or linear growth rate. Further, numerical simulation has been carried out to study the nonlinear stage of instability and resulting power spectrum applicable to solar wind around 1 AU. Due to the nonlinearity, background density of magnetosonic wave gets modified which results in localization of kinetic Alfvén wave. From the obtained results, we observed that spectral index follows k{sup ?3.0}, consistent with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU. The result shows the steepening of power spectrum which may be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind.

Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Modi, K. V. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India) [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001 (India)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hysteresis of ionization waves  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H. [Institut fuer Physik, E.-M.-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Wilke, C. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung und Technologie, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer of the Subject II. Introduction­Historical Perspective III. Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations IV. Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics V. Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions VI

Hereman, Willy A.M.

334

Sources of Gravitational Waves: Theory and Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational-wave astronomy will soon become a new tool for observing the Universe. Detecting and interpreting gravitational waves will require deep theoretical insights into astronomical sources. The past three decades have seen remarkable progress in analytical and numerical computations of the source dynamics, development of search algorithms and analysis of data from detectors with unprecedented sensitivity. This Chapter is devoted to examine the advances and future challenges in understanding the dynamics of binary and isolated compact-object systems, expected cosmological sources, their amplitudes and rates, and highlights of results from gravitational-wave observations. All of this is a testament to the readiness of the community to open a new window for observing the cosmos, a century after gravitational waves were first predicted by Albert Einstein.

Buonanno, Alessandra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sources of Gravitational Waves: Theory and Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational-wave astronomy will soon become a new tool for observing the Universe. Detecting and interpreting gravitational waves will require deep theoretical insights into astronomical sources. The past three decades have seen remarkable progress in analytical and numerical computations of the source dynamics, development of search algorithms and analysis of data from detectors with unprecedented sensitivity. This Chapter is devoted to examine the advances and future challenges in understanding the dynamics of binary and isolated compact-object systems, expected cosmological sources, their amplitudes and rates, and highlights of results from gravitational-wave observations. All of this is a testament to the readiness of the community to open a new window for observing the cosmos, a century after gravitational waves were first predicted by Albert Einstein.

Alessandra Buonanno; B. S. Sathyaprakash

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

336

Matter Waves and Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classical four-dimensional relativity gives a most natural and harmonious interpretation of the three basic phenomena of nature: gravity, electricity, and the wave structure of matter, provided that the basic assumptions of the Einsteinian theory are modified in two respects: (1) the fundamental invariant of the action principle is chosen as a quadratic instead of a linear function of the curvature components; (2) the static equilibrium of the world is replaced by a dynamic equilibrium. Electricity comes out as a second-order resonance effect of the matter waves. The matter waves are gravitational waves but superposed not on an empty Euclidean space but on a space of high average curvature.

Cornelius Lanczos

1942-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

kinetic wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

kinetic wave energy ? kinetische Wellenenergie f [Teil der Wellenlänge, die im Feld der Orbitalgeschwindigkeiten unter der Welle enthalten ist und als Orbitalbewegung am Ort verbleibt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

potential wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

potential wave energy ? potentielle Wellenenergie f [Der für die Auslenkung des Wasserspiegels zum Ruhewasserspiegel erforderliche Teil der Wellenenergie, die mit der Wellengeschwindigkeit fortbewegt...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

RAPID GAMMA-RAY FLUX VARIABILITY DURING THE 2013 MARCH CRAB NEBULA FLARE  

SciTech Connect

We report on a bright flare in the Crab Nebula detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The period of significantly increased luminosity occurred in 2013 March and lasted for approximately two weeks. During this period, we observed flux variability on timescales of approximately 5 hr. The combined photon flux above 100 MeV from the pulsar and its nebula reached a peak value of (12.5 ± 0.8) · 10{sup –6} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} on 2013 March 6. This value exceeds the average flux by almost a factor of six and implies a ?20 times higher flux for the synchrotron component of the nebula alone. This is the second brightest flare observed from this source. Spectral and temporal analysis of the LAT data collected during the outburst reveal a rapidly varying synchrotron component of the Crab Nebula while the pulsar emission remains constant in time.

Mayer, M.; Buehler, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Hays, E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cheung, C. C.; Grove, J. E. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)] [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Dutka, M. S. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)] [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Kerr, M. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ojha, R., E-mail: michael.mayer@desy.de, E-mail: rolf.buehler@desy.de, E-mail: elizabeth.a.hays@nasa.gov [ORAU/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Formation of a flux core spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An alternate design for compact tori specifically of the spheromak type is studied. In this design the ‘‘flux core spheromak’’ [Nucl. Fusion 29 219 (1989)] the externally imposed bias field links the confinement region of closed flux surfaces. The advantages of this configuration are: (i) it enjoys greater stability to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes particularly the tilt and shift; (ii) it has a poloidal divertor and an amount of poloidal flux separating the closed flux surface region from the walls; and (iii) it might be sustained by helicity injection. Results are presented showing the dependence of the geometry on the distribution of bias flux on the conducting walls and showing the optimization of the 2?D formation scheme to minimize the contact of the plasma with coils electrodes and walls. This last topic involves taking advantage of current sheet formation and subsequent tearing as in formation of the MS spheromak [Phys. Fluids 28 3154 (1985)]. The parameters which can be varied to produce this favorable formation scheme via tearing rather than a formation that proceeds off the reversal coils are explored. In addition it is found that there is strong viscous heating of the ions in this early reconnection phase.

John M. Finn; Parvez N. Guzdar

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Improving the assessment of wave energy resources by means of coupled wave-ocean numerical modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sea waves energy represents a renewable and sustainable energy resource, that nevertheless needs to be further investigated to make it more cost-effective and economically appealing. A key step in the process of Wave Energy Converters (WEC) deployment is the energy resource assessment at a sea site either measured or obtained through numerical model analysis. In these kind of studies, some approximations are often introduced, especially in the early stages of the process, viz. waves are assumed propagating in deep waters without underneath ocean currents. These aspects are discussed and evaluated in the Adriatic Sea and its northern part (Gulf of Venice) using locally observed and modeled wave data. In particular, to account for a “state of the art” treatment of the Wave–Current Interaction (WCI) we have implemented the Simulating \\{WAves\\} Nearshore (SWAN) model and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), fully coupled within the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) system. COAWST has been applied to a computational grid covering the whole Adriatic Sea and off-line nested to a high-resolution grid in the Gulf of Venice. A 15-year long wave data set collected at the oceanographic tower “Acqua Alta”, located approximately 15 km off the Venice coast, has also been analyzed with the dual purpose of providing a reference to the model estimates and to locally assess the wave energy resource. By using COAWST, we have quantified for the first time to our best knowledge the importance of the WCI effect on wave power estimation. This can vary up to 30% neglecting the current effect. Results also suggest the Gulf of Venice as a suitable testing site for WECs, since it is characterized by periods of calm (optimal for safe installation and maintenance) alternating with severe storms, whose wave energy potentials are comparable to those ordinarily encountered in the energy production sites.

Francesco Barbariol; Alvise Benetazzo; Sandro Carniel; Mauro Sclavo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heat conduction: hyperbolic self-similar shock-waves in solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytic solutions for cylindrical thermal waves in solid medium is given based on the nonlinear hyperbolic system of heat flux relaxation and energy conservation equations. The Fourier-Cattaneo phenomenological law is generalized where the relaxation time and heat propagation coefficient have a general power law temperature dependence. From such laws one cannot form a second order parabolic or telegraph-type equation. We consider the original non-linear hyperbolic system itself with the self-similar Ansatz for the temperature distribution and for the heat flux. As results continuous and shock-wave solutions are presented. For physical establishment numerous materials with various temperature dependent heat conduction coefficients are mentioned.

Imre Ferenc Barna; Robert Kersner

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Free-Wave Energy Dissipation in Experimental Breaking Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several transient wave trains containing an isolated plunging or spilling breaker at a prescribed location were generated in a two-dimensional wave flume using an energy focusing technique. Surface elevation measurements of each transient wave ...

Eustorgio Meza; Jun Zhang; Richard J. Seymour

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A STUDY OF ALFVÉN WAVE PROPAGATION AND HEATING THE CHROMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

Alfvén wave propagation, reflection, and heating of the chromosphere are studied for a one-dimensional solar atmosphere by self-consistently solving plasma, neutral fluid, and Maxwell's equations with incorporation of the Hall effect and strong electron-neutral, electron-ion, and ion-neutral collisions. We have developed a numerical model based on an implicit backward difference formula of second-order accuracy both in time and space to solve stiff governing equations resulting from strong inter-species collisions. A non-reflecting boundary condition is applied to the top boundary so that the wave reflection within the simulation domain can be unambiguously determined. It is shown that due to the density gradient the Alfvén waves are partially reflected throughout the chromosphere and more strongly at higher altitudes with the strongest reflection at the transition region. The waves are damped in the lower chromosphere dominantly through Joule dissipation, producing heating strong enough to balance the radiative loss for the quiet chromosphere without invoking anomalous processes or turbulences. The heating rates are larger for weaker background magnetic fields below ?500 km with higher-frequency waves subject to heavier damping. There is an upper cutoff frequency, depending on the background magnetic field, above which the waves are completely damped. At the frequencies below which the waves are not strongly damped, the interaction of reflected waves with the upward propagating waves produces power at their double frequencies, which leads to more damping. The wave energy flux transmitted to the corona is one order of magnitude smaller than that of the driving source.

Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul [Physics Department and Center for Atmospheric Research, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Color magnetic flux tubes in dense QCD  

SciTech Connect

QCD is expected to be in the color-flavor locking phase in high baryon density, which exhibits color superconductivity. The most fundamental topological objects in the color superconductor are non-Abelian vortices which are topologically stable color magnetic flux tubes. We present numerical solutions of the color magnetic flux tube for diverse choices of the coupling constants based on the Ginzburg-Landau Lagrangian. We also analytically study its asymptotic profiles and find that they are different from the case of usual superconductors. We propose the width of color magnetic fluxes and find that it is larger than naive expectation of the Compton wavelength of the massive gluon when the gluon mass is larger than the scalar mass.

Eto, Minoru [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

347

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

348

XSophe-Sophe-XeprView®. A computer simulation software suite (v. 1.1.3) for the analysis of continuous wave EPR spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The XSophe-Sophe-XeprView® computer simulation software suite enables scientists to easily determine spin Hamiltonian parameters from isotropic, randomly oriented and single crystal continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW EPR) spectra from radicals and isolated paramagnetic metal ion centers or clusters found in metalloproteins, chemical systems and materials science. \\{XSophe\\} provides an X-windows graphical user interface to the Sophe programme and allows: creation of multiple input files, local and remote execution of Sophe, the display of sophelog (output from Sophe) and input parameters/files. Sophe is a sophisticated computer simulation software programme employing a number of innovative technologies including; the Sydney \\{OPera\\} HousE (SOPHE) partition and interpolation schemes, a field segmentation algorithm, the mosaic misorientation linewidth model, parallelization and spectral optimisation. In conjunction with the SOPHE partition scheme and the field segmentation algorithm, the SOPHE interpolation scheme and the mosaic misorientation linewidth model greatly increase the speed of simulations for most spin systems. Employing brute force matrix diagonalization in the simulation of an EPR spectrum from a high spin Cr(III) complex with the spin Hamiltonian parameters ge=2.00, D=0.10 cm?1, E/D=0.25, Ax=120.0, Ay=120.0, Az=240.0×10?4 cm?1 requires a SOPHE grid size of N=400 (to produce a good signal to noise ratio) and takes 229.47 s. In contrast the use of either the SOPHE interpolation scheme or the mosaic misorientation linewidth model requires a SOPHE grid size of only N=18 and takes 44.08 and 0.79 s, respectively. Results from Sophe are transferred via the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) to \\{XSophe\\} and subsequently to XeprView® where the simulated CW EPR spectra (1D and 2D) can be compared to the experimental spectra. Energy level diagrams, transition roadmaps and transition surfaces aid the interpretation of complicated randomly oriented CW EPR spectra and can be viewed with a web browser and an OpenInventor scene graph viewer.

Graeme R. Hanson; Kevin E. Gates; Christopher J. Noble; Mark Griffin; Anthony Mitchell; Simon Benson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

351

Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium  

SciTech Connect

The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period ? is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods ? between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

Hayrapetyan, A.G., E-mail: armen@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G. [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Fritzsche, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany) [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

WAVE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND CLIMATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parcel dynamics, linear modes, balan- ced models, gravity waves, weather and climate prediction Introduction Numerical weather and climate prediction is complicated because only the flow scales larger thanWAVE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND CLIMATE PREDICTION Onno Bokhove Numerical Analysis

Vellekoop, Michel

353

Wave energy: a Pacific perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...study by Cornett used wind/wave hindcasting to assess Canada's offshore wave energy resource...will probably attract offshore birds, possibly leading...related projects, such as offshore wind farms. If wave energy development...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Rainbow trapping of guided waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rainbow trapping of guided waves Javier Polanco and Rosa M.the propagation of a wave packet that is a superpositionof three s-polarized guided waves with different frequencies

Polanco, Javier; Fitzgerald, Rosa M; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus and efficiency of seismic processing algorithms, especially for application to regions of structural complexity

356

Surface preparation of the S-1 Spheromak flux core liner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different methods of preparing the S-1 Spheromak flux core liner for exposure to plasma (i.e. cleaning and polishing techniques) were studied with the goal of reducing the net impurity resources available for contaminating the plasma during Spheromak formation. The S-1 Inconel 601 liner is described together with an analysis of topography and surface and/or near-surface composition of various Inconel samples subjected to mechanical, electrochemical and chemical preparation techniques. The general conclusion based on the analysis of the samples is that the different techniques are roughly competitive on the basis of surface composition, while less preparation tends to give better results in terms of the criteria mentioned above. This has helped to simplify the liner preparation.

R. Moore; C. Macey; S. Cohen; A. Janos

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Wave equations with energy dependent potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study wave equations with energy dependent potentials. Simple analytical models are found useful to illustrate difficulties encountered with the calculation and interpretation of observables. A formal analysis shows under which conditions such equations can be handled as evolution equation of quantum theory with an energy dependent potential. Once these conditions are met, such theory can be transformed into ordinary quantum theory.

J. Formanek; R. J. Lombard; J. Mares

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Production of High Energy Tail Electrons by Electron Bernstein Waves during the Current Start-up Discharges in the LATE Device  

SciTech Connect

Toroidal plasma current is started and ramped up by injecting microwave power in the electron cyclotron range of frequency without induction in the LATE device. Radial scanning with hard X-ray pulse height analysis reveals the production of high energy electrons with average energy {approx}100 keV in the radial region from R = 28 cm to 40.5 cm, which are heated by electron Bernstein wave. The radial profile of photon counts in the energy range from 25 to 200 keV is very similar to that of perpendicular pressure obtained by magnetic measurement and equilibrium analysis, suggesting that a significant portion of trapped electrons exists outside the last closed flux surface. The plasma current inside the LCFS is carried mainly by passing electrons, while some portion of the outside current may be generated as a result of the toroidal precession of trapped electrons.

Tanaka, H.; Uchida, M.; Watanabe, F.; Noguchi, Y.; Maekawa, T. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

List of Wave Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveEnergy&oldid267203" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

360

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Piñon Ridge Property in western Montrose County, Colorado. The Piñon Ridge Mill includesURANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PI�ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Submitted To: Energy Fuels Resources Corporation 44 Union Boulevard, Suite 600 Lakewood, Colorado 80228

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

2, 181212, 2002 The flux of carbonyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, coal combustion, sulfur recovery, etc.), and is removed by terrestrial vegetation, soils, pho-25/181/ c European Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions The flux, 60054 Frankfurt am Main, Germany * now at Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany Received: 9

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

Muon Flux at the Geographical South Pole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The muon flux at the South-Pole was measured for five zenith angles, $0^{\\circ}$, $15^{\\circ}$, $35^{\\circ}$, $82.13^{\\circ}$ and $85.15^{\\circ}$ with a scintillator muon telescope incorporating ice Cherenkov tank detectors as the absorber. We compare the measurements with other data and with calculations.

X. Bai; T. K. Gaisser; A. Karle; K. Rawlins; G. M. Spiczak; Todor Stanev

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

6, 52515268, 2006 Turbulent fluxes over  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´exico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico Received: 24 March 2006 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2006 ­ Published: 26 June 2006 wind speed conditions (up to 25 ms -1 ). The estimates of total momentum flux and turbulent kinetic energy can be represented very5 accurately (r2 =0.99, when data are binned every 1 ms-1 ) by empirical

Boyer, Edmond

364

Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Power Incorporated Flux Power Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name Flux Power Incorporated Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product California-based FLux Ppower was created in late-2009 to provide monitoring, diagnostics and charging technology aimed at extending the life of lithium-ion batteries. The company signed a supply deal with Wheego in January 2010. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Mapping the nano-Hertz gravitational wave sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new method for extracting gravitational wave signals from pulsar timing data. We show that any gravitational wave signal can be decomposed into an orthogonal set of sky maps, with the number of maps equal to the number of pulsars in the timing array. These maps may be used as a basis to construct gravitational wave templates for any type of source, including collections of point sources. A variant of the standard Hellings-Downs correlation analysis is recovered for statistically isotropic signals. The template based approach allows us to probe potential anisotropies in the signal and produce maps of the gravitational wave sky.

Neil J. Cornish; Rutger van Haasteren

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

Dynamic topology and flux rope evolution during non-linear tearing of 3D null point current sheets  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the dynamic magnetic field within a tearing-unstable three-dimensional current sheet about a magnetic null point is described in detail. We focus on the evolution of the magnetic null points and flux ropes that are formed during the tearing process. Generally, we find that both magnetic structures are created prolifically within the layer and are non-trivially related. We examine how nulls are created and annihilated during bifurcation processes, and describe how they evolve within the current layer. The type of null bifurcation first observed is associated with the formation of pairs of flux ropes within the current layer. We also find that new nulls form within these flux ropes, both following internal reconnection and as adjacent flux ropes interact. The flux ropes exhibit a complex evolution, driven by a combination of ideal kinking and their interaction with the outflow jets from the main layer. The finite size of the unstable layer also allows us to consider the wider effects of flux rope generation. We find that the unstable current layer acts as a source of torsional magnetohydrodynamic waves and dynamic braiding of magnetic fields. The implications of these results to several areas of heliophysics are discussed.

Wyper, P. F., E-mail: peterw@maths.dundee.ac.uk; Pontin, D. I., E-mail: dpontin@maths.dundee.ac.uk [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

wave | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281559 Varnish cache server wave Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. Source Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Date Released December 05th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

368

Steady wave drift force on basic objects of symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exponential growth in the offshore industry has resulted in a corresponding increase in demand for quick, accurate, and implementable designs. With the increase in size of the structure relative to the wave amplitude, analysis should be performed...

Gupta, Anupam

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Transient Ocean Currents Induced by Wind and Growing Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical nonlinear model for wind- and wave-induced currents in a viscous, rotating ocean is developed. The analysis is based on a Lagrangian description of motion. The nonlinear drift problem is formulated such that the solution depends on ...

Jan Erik Weber; Arne Melsom

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis quantitative chemical Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Availability Relief Systems Analysis Safety... Engineering Systems Engineering Complex Fluids Chemical Waves in Hdyrogels Crystallization......

371

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

372

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli MIT E .J. Porkolab Sherwood/Spring APS Denver May 2009 #12; 2 Participants in the Center for Simulation of Wave hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance

Wright, John C.

373

On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sediment-water fluxes of mercury in Lavaca Bay, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The aqueous flux of inorganic Hg and monomethyl Hg from sediments to the water column was determined at several sites in Lavaca Bay, an estuary along the Texas Coast, historically impacted by Hg discharges. Diffusive fluxes were calculated at 15 sites using interstitial pore water gradients and compared to direct flux measurements obtained at two sites using benthic flux chambers. The diffusive flux of monomethyl mercury (MMHg), when modeled as a chloride species, varied over 3 orders /of magnitude from 0.2 to 1500 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}. Diffusive fluxes determined at a single site revealed that MMHg fluxes varied seasonally; maximal fluxes occurred in late winter to early spring. Flux chamber deployments at an impacted site revealed t hat MMHg was the Hg species entering the water column from sediments and the flux was not in steady-state; there was a strong diurnal signal with most of the MMHg flux occurring during dark periods. The flux of inorganic Hg was smaller and not as easily discernible by this method. The MMHg flux during the dark period was about 6 times greater than the estimated diffusional flux for MMHgCl, suggesting that biological and/or chemical processes near the sediment-water interface were strongly mediating the sediment-water exchange of MMHg.

Gill, G.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States); Bloom, N.S. [Frontier Geosciences Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Frontier Geosciences Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Cappellino, S. [Parametrix, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)] [Parametrix, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Driscoll, C.T. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dobbs, C.; McShea, L. [Aluminum Co. of America, Point Comfort, TX (United States)] [Aluminum Co. of America, Point Comfort, TX (United States); Mason, R. [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.] [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.; Rudd, J.W.M. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Freshwater Inst.] [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Freshwater Inst.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

High-resolution numerical simulation and analysis of Mach reflection structures in detonation waves in low-pressure H2 - O2 - Ar mixtures: a summary of results obtained with the adaptive mesh refinement framework AMROC  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multi-dimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the non-equilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniques in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, i.e. under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Current transport along grain boundaries in d-wave superconductors.  

SciTech Connect

The use of a classic phase retrieval algorithm has been previously used to determine the local critical current J{sub c}(x) along the length of grain boundary Josephson junctions that can be characterized using a standard s-wave model. The phase retrieval approach has been modified for use with d-wave dominated superconductors to allow for negative local currents along the boundary. In general solutions to the 1-D phase problem are not unique, however in the present work special constraints are employed experimentally to ensure uniqueness. The various current distribution solutions and their possible uniqueness are explored. The solutions are consistent with most existing d-wave Josephson junction boundary models and can be used to understand the basic current distribution along 45 degree YaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} grain boundary junctions as well as providing a means for mapping the location of self-generated flux cores.

Carmody, M.; Marks, L. D.; Merkle, K. L.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and observe an integrated effect from what is called an upwind footprint area. Previous such studies have been limited to a few cities: Nemitz et al. (2002) and Dorsey et al. (2002) measured particle and CO 2 fluxes above the city of Edinburgh, UK, while M... intercomparison tests ..................................... 28 2.5.2. Quantification............................................................................. 30 2.5.3. Footprint analysis...

Park, Chang Hyoun

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Traveling-wave photodetector  

SciTech Connect

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager (Flash format)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager > (Flash) Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager > (Flash) Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Remote Vital Sign Monitoring System Preventing the Worst (by CNN) Engineering Development & Applications Argonne's Nuclear Science & Technology Legacy Other Multimedia Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Detection & Diagnostic Systems - Multimedia Bookmark and Share Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager Argonne National Laboratory Read full story Argonne has developed a passive compressive sensing system that uses millimeter waves (MMWs) to rapidly image targets with high resolution and

380

Nonlinear electron acoustic waves in presence of shear magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear electron acoustic waves are studied in a quasineutral plasma in the presence of a variable magnetic field. The fluid model is used to describe the dynamics of two temperature electron species in a stationary positively charged ion background. Linear analysis of the governing equations manifests dispersion relation of electron magneto sonic wave. Whereas, nonlinear wave dynamics is being investigated by introducing Lagrangian variable method in long wavelength limit. It is shown from finite amplitude analysis that the nonlinear wave characteristics are well depicted by KdV equation. The wave dispersion arising in quasineutral plasma is induced by transverse magnetic field component. The results are discussed in the context of plasma of Earth's magnetosphere.

Dutta, Manjistha; Khan, Manoranjan [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)] [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ghosh, Samiran [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Oceanic Internal-Wave Field: Theory of Scale-Invariant Spectra YURI V. LVOV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a nearly universal internal-wave energy spectrum in the ocean, first described by Garrett and Munk (Garrett framework that allows a detailed analysis of power-law spectra of internal waves in the ocean. WeOceanic Internal-Wave Field: Theory of Scale-Invariant Spectra YURI V. LVOV Rensselaer Polytechnic

Tabak, Esteban G.

382

P and T-wave Delineation in ECG Signals Using a Bayesian Approach and a Partially  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 P and T-wave Delineation in ECG Signals Using a Bayesian Approach and a Partially Collapsed Gibbs-waves are important parts in the analysis and interpretation of ECG signals. This report approaches this problem using Bayesian inference to represent a priori relationships among ECG wave components. Based on the recently

Tourneret, Jean-Yves

383

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0.4 Radiance Radiance is the energy flux density per solid angle.[W/(m2 � steradian)] 6.0.5 Radiant Intensity Radiant intensity is the energy flux per solid angle [W/steradian] (radiometry) 6.0.6 Intensity Intensity)· ^Ndt (6.4) Intensity is again measured in [W/m2 ] 6.0.7 Fluence Fluence is radiant energy per area

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

384

Soft Capacitors for Wave Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave energy harvesting could be a substantial renewable energy source without impact on the global climate and ecology, yet practical attempts have struggle d with problems of wear and catastrophic failure. An innovative technology for ocean wave energy harvesting was recently proposed, based on the use of soft capacitors. This study presents a realistic theoretical and numerical model for the quantitative characterization of this harvesting method. Parameter regio ns with optimal behavior are found, and novel material descriptors are determined which simplify analysis dramatically. The characteristics of currently ava ilable material are evaluated, and found to merit a very conservative estimate of 10 years for raw material cost recovery.

Karsten Ahnert; Markus Abel; Matthias Kollosche; Per Jørgen Jørgensen; Guggi Kofod

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

Modulation of whistler waves in nonthermal plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The modulation of whistler waves in nonthermal plasmas is investigated. The dynamics of the magnetized plasma is described by the fluid equations and the electron velocity distribution function is modeled via a nonthermal {kappa} distribution. A multiscale perturbation analysis based on the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky method is carried out and the nonlinear Schroedinger equation governing the modulation of the high-frequency whistler is obtained. The effect of the superthermal electrons on the stability of the wave envelope and soliton formation is discussed and a comparison with previous results is presented.

Rios, L. A.; Galvao, R. M. O. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave...

387

Flow instabilities of magnetic flux tubes IV. Flux storage in the solar overshoot region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the effects of material flows on the dynamics of toroidal magnetic flux tubes located close to the base of the solar convection zone, initially within the overshoot region. The problem is to find the physical conditions in which magnetic flux can be stored for periods comparable to the dynamo amplification time, which is of the order of a few years. We carry out nonlinear numerical simulations to investigate the stability and dynamics of thin flux tubes subject to perpendicular and longitudinal flows. We compare the simulations with the results of simplified analytical approximations. We determine ranges of the flow parameters for which a linearly Parker-stable magnetic flux tube is stored in the middle of the overshoot region for a period comparable to the dynamo amplification time. The residence time for magnetic flux tubes with fluxes of 2x10^{21} Mx in the convective overshoot layer is comparable to the dynamo amplification time, provided that the average speed and the duration of the downflow...

Isik, Emre

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Mathematical Caricature of Large Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kadomtsev-Petviiashvili equation is considered as a mathematical caricature of large and rogue waves.

Mikhail Kovalyov

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Clustering of floaters by waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study experimentally how waves affect distribution of particles that float on a water surface. We show that clustering of small particles in a standing wave is a nonlinear effect with the clustering time decreasing as the square of the wave amplitude. In a set of random waves, we show that small floaters concentrate on a multi-fractal set.

P. Denissenko; G. Falkovich; S. Lukaschuk

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

390

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES Tuning Wave Dispersion in Resonant Networks Eyal Feigenbaum with meta-atoms. Resonant guided wave networks (RGWNs) are a new class of artificial photonic material,5 distinct from photonic crystals and metamateri- als, in which localized waves resonate in closed paths

Atwater, Harry

391

Definition: Stoneley Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stoneley Analysis Stoneley Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stoneley Analysis A type of large-amplitude interface, or surface, wave generated by a sonic tool in a borehole. Stoneley waves can propagate along a solid-fluid interface, such as along the walls of a fluid-filled borehole and are the main low-frequency component of signal generated by sonic sources in boreholes. Analysis of Stoneley waves can allow estimation of the locations of fractures and permeability of the formation. Stoneley waves are a major source of noise in vertical seismic profiles.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A Stoneley wave is a high-amplitude surface wave (or interface wave) that typically propagates along a solid-solid interface. When found at a liquid-solid interface, this wave is referred to as a Scholte wave. The

392

Selection Rules for the Nonlinear Interactions of Internal Gravity Waves and Inertia-Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal Gravity Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.1 Twodimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . . . . .Three dimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . .

Jiang, Chung-Hsiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Various Boussinesq solitary wave solutions  

SciTech Connect

The generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations have been used to model nonlinear wave evolution over variable topography and wave interactions with structures. Like the KdV equation, the gB equations support a solitary wave solution which propagates without changing shape, and this solitary wave is often used as a primary test case for numerical studies of nonlinear waves using either the gB or other model equations. Nine different approximate solutions of the generalized Boussinesq equations are presented with simple closed form expressions for the wave elevation and wave speed. Each approximates the free propagation of a single solitary wave, and eight of these solutions are newly obtained. The author compares these solutions with the well known KdV solution, Rayleigh`s solution, Laitone`s higher order solution, and ``exact`` numerical integration of the gB equations. Existing experimental data on solitary wave shape and wave speed are compared with these models.

Yates, G.T. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

395

High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status  

SciTech Connect

A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Comparison of neutron diffusion and Monte Carlo simulations of a fission wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

common con- figuration a fertile material, such as depleted uranium, is subjected to a fast neutron flux). The fresh fuel zone consisted of depleted uranium groups have shown that fission waves could form in uranium and potentially be used as the basis

Deinert, Mark

397

Impact of midlatitude stationary waves on regional Hadley cells Rodrigo Caballero1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of midlatitude stationary waves on regional Hadley cells and ENSO Rodrigo Caballero1 correlated with interannual variability in Hadley cell strength. A separate line of research has shown flux impinging on the subtropical central Pacific affects the local Hadley cell. The associated changes

Caballero, Rodrigo

398

Heat flux dynamics in dissipative cascaded systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of heat flux in the thermalization process of a pair of identical quantum system that interact dissipatively with a reservoir in a {\\it cascaded} fashion. Despite the open dynamics of the bipartite system S is globally Lindbladian, one of the subsystems "sees" the reservoir in a state modified by the interaction with the other subsystem and hence it undergoes a non-Markovian dynamics. As a consequence, the heat flow exhibits a non-exponential time behaviour which can greatly deviate from the case where each party is independently coupled to the reservoir. We investigate both thermal and correlated initial states of $S$ and show that the presence of correlations at the beginning can considerably affect the heat flux rate. We carry out our study in two paradigmatic cases -- a pair of harmonic oscillators with a reservoir of bosonic modes and two qubits with a reservoir of fermionic modes -- and compare the corresponding behaviours. In the case of qubits and for initial thermal states, we find that the trace distance discord is at any time interpretable as the correlated contribution to the total heat flux.

Salvatore Lorenzo; Alessandro Farace; Francesco Ciccarello; G. Massimo Palma; Vittorio Giovannetti

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

Flux noise in high-temperature superconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spontaneously created vortex-antivortex pairs are the predominant source of flux noise in high-temperature superconductors. In principle, flux noise measurements allow to check theoretical predictions for both the distribution of vortex-pair sizes and for the vortex diffusivity. In this paper the flux-noise power spectrum is calculated for the highly anisotropic high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+?, both for bulk crystals and for ultrathin films. The spectrum is basically given by the Fourier transform of the temporal magnetic-field correlation function. We start from a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type theory and incorporate vortex diffusion, intrapair vortex interaction, and annihilation of pairs by means of a Fokker-Planck equation to determine the noise spectrum below and above the superconducting transition temperature. We find white noise at low frequencies ? and a spectrum proportional to 1/?3/2 at high frequencies. The crossover frequency between these regimes strongly depends on temperature. The results are compared with earlier results of computer simulations.

Carsten Timm

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy flux in viscoelastic anisotropic media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Burns P.W.,1995. Energy conserving reflection...in Solids , Wiley, New York . Borcherdt R.D. ,1973. Energy and plane waves in...Poncelet O.,1997. Energy velocity of complex...Crystals , Plenum, New York . Frazer L.N......

Vlastislav ?erveny; Ivan Pšen?ík

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

An Index for the Dirac Operator on D3 Brane withBackground Fluxes  

SciTech Connect

We study the problem of instanton generated superpotentials in Calabi-Yau orientifold compactifications directly in type IIB string theory. To this end, we derive the Dirac equation on a Euclidean D3 brane in the presence of background fluxes. We propose an index which governs whether the generation of a superpotential in the effective 4d theory by D3 brane instantons is possible. Applying the formalism to various classes of examples, including the K3 x T{sup 2}/Z{sub 2} orientifold, in the absence and presence of fluxes, we show that our results are consistent with conclusions attainable via duality from an M-theory analysis.

Bergshoeff, Eric; /Groningen U.; Kallosh, Renata; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto; Kashani-Poor, Amir-Kian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Sorokin, Dmitri; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves P. Junga: a subexcitable photosensitive Belousov­Zhabotinsky reaction, hippocampal slices of rat brains, and astrocyte of such a behavior for calcium wave net- works in interconnected brain cells. I. INTRODUCTION Since the early days

Showalter, Kenneth

403

PSI of the Internal Tide on a ? Plane: Flux Divergence and Near-Inertial Wave Propagation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of a forced, low-mode oceanic internal tide propagating poleward on a ? plane are investigated numerically. The focus is on the transfer of energy from the tide to near-inertial oscillations (NIOs) initiated by a weakly nonlinear ...

J. Hazewinkel; K. B. Winters

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

405

Surface heat fluxes in the Western Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of the components of the surface heat flux in the Western Equatorial Pacific Ocean are presented for a 22-day period, ... found that the net heat flux into the ocean over the 22-day period is not...

N. C. Wells

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Sampling Activity Date - 2008 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09082006 to 10242006) by the eddy...

407

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

408

Multidimensional Characterization of Fibrillatory Wave Amplitude on Surface ECG to Describe Catheter Ablation Impact on Persistent Atrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multidimensional Characterization of Fibrillatory Wave Amplitude on Surface ECG to Describe of principal component analysis (PCA), surface electrocardiogram (ECG) spatial diversity is exploited influences f- wave amplitude during the procedure as quantified by ECG inter-lead spatial variability

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

409

Sixteen-moment approximation for a collisionless space plasma: Waves and instabilities  

SciTech Connect

A study is carried out of waves and instabilities in an anisotropic collisionless plasma. In a strongly magnetized plasma, the velocity distributions along and across the magnetic field lines are different, which results in anisotropy of the total pressure and gives rise to an anisotropic heat flux. The fluid description of the plasma is based on the 16-moment integral transport equations, which are integral equations obtained from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation. For small incompressible perturbations in a homogeneous plasma, the general dispersion relation implies that there are not only firehose modes, but also three additional modes, and that all four wave modes interact with each other if a heat flux is present. Heat fluxes do not change the properties of conventional firehose modes. The conditions for the onset of instabilities are investigated as functions of the parameters of the problems. Qualitative estimates for conditions typical of the solar corona are presented.

Kuznetsov, V. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (Russian Federation); Dzhalilov, N. S. [Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Shemakha Astrophysical Observatory (Azerbaijan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April 2006 that further funding for the project would be suspended. Remaining funds have been used to prepare and irradiate mini-plates of the proposed booster fuel. The current baseline design is for a set of three test positions inside an in-pile tube with a thermal neutron absorber and heat sink made of aluminum mixed with hafnium. Operating the ATR at power levels needed to achieve the required fast flux will result in an estimated increase in ATR fuel consumption between 15 and 20% above present rates and a reduction in the time between fuel replacements. Preliminary safety analyses conducted have indicted safe operation of the ATR with the GTL under normal, abnormal, and postulated accident conditions. More comprehensive analyses are needed.

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Generation of electromagnetic structures via modulational instability of drift waves  

SciTech Connect

Generation mechanism for large scale electromagnetic structures (blobs) is considered by employing the technique of four-wave interactions (modulational instability). It is shown that primary electrostatic turbulence may generate elongated electromagnetic structures with poloidal modulations. Such structures are principally related to drift-Alfven waves. The analysis fully takes into account finite ion temperature effects and associated diamagnetic contributions to Reynolds stress. The turbulent generation of blobs has instability growth rates which scale similar to the zonal flow instabilities, {gamma}{approx}, where q is a characteristic wave vector of large scale modes, and V-tilde is a characteristic amplitude of the velocity of turbulent fluctuations. This analysis is shown to be fully consistent with results of an earlier analysis by using the wave kinetic equation.

Smolyakov, A. I. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Nuclear Fusion Institute, Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', 1 Kurchatov Square, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified...

413

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

414

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

SEDIMENT FLUX THROUGH THE RIO GRANDE RIVER: A MONSOONAL EFFECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEDIMENT FLUX THROUGH THE RIO GRANDE RIVER: A MONSOONAL EFFECT Troy C.Hiatt A thesis submitted University August 2010 Copyright © 2010 Troy C. Hiatt All Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Sediment Flux through Climate has historically been recognized as an influence on sediment flux and deposition. The North

Seamons, Kent E.

417

Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Shear fragmentation of unstable flux flow Milind N. Kunchur,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in resistivity. At high-flux densities B, the relatively incompressible vortex matter fragments into domains vortices containing an elementary quantum of flux o hc/2e. A transport cur- rent density j exerts a Lorentz film in a perpendicular applied flux density B along z^, with j and the electric field E vB/c along y

Kunchur, Milind N.

420

Dependence of synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave and electron cyclotron wave on the frequency and parallel refractive index of electron cyclotron wave for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The physical mechanism of the synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW) in tokamaks is investigated using theoretical analysis and simulation methods in the present paper. Research shows that the synergy relationship between the two waves in velocity space strongly depends on the frequency ? and parallel refractive index N{sub //} of ECW. For a given spectrum of LHW, the parameter range of ECW, in which the synergy current exists, can be predicted by theoretical analysis, and these results are consistent with the simulation results. It is shown that the synergy effect is mainly caused by the electrons accelerated by both ECW and LHW, and the acceleration of these electrons requires that there is overlap of the resonance regions of the two waves in velocity space.

Huang, J.; Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China) [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PEAK FLUX DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR RADIO TYPE-I BURSTS FROM HIGHLY RESOLVED SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

Iwai, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Nobeyama, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H., E-mail: kazumasa.iwai@nao.ac.jp [Planetary Plasma and Atmospheric Research Center, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Finding AGN in Deep X-ray Flux States with Swift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on our ongoing project of finding Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) that go into deep X-ray flux states detected by Swift. Swift is performing an extensive study on the flux and spectral variability of AGN using Guest Investigator and team fill-in programs followed by triggering XMM_Newton for deeper follow-up observations. So far this program has been very successful and has led to a number of XMM-Newton follow up observations, including Mkn 335, PG 0844+349, and RX J2340.8-5329. Recent analysis of new Swift AGN observations reveal several AGN went into a very low X-ray flux state, particularly Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. One of these is RX J2317-4422, which dropped by a factor of about 60 when compared to the ROSAT All-Sky Survey.

Grupe, Dirk; Bush, Mason; Pruett, Chelsea; Ernst, Sonny; Barber, Taylor; Carter, Jen; Schartel, Norbert; Rodriguez, Pedro; Santos-Lleó, Maria

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Zero-flux planes, flux reversals and diffusion paths in ternary and quaternary diffusion  

SciTech Connect

During isothermal multicomponent diffusion, interdiffusion fluxes of individual components can go to zero at zero-flux planes (ZFP) and exhibit flux reversals from one side to the other of such planes. Interdiffusion fluxes as well as the locations and compositions of ZFPs for components are determined directly from the concentration profiles of diffusion couples without the need for prior knowledge of interdiffusion coefficients. The development and identification of ZFPs is reviewed with the aid of single phase and two-phase diffusion couples investigated in the Cu-Ni-Zn system at 775/sup 0/C. ZFP locations in the diffusion zone nearly correspond to sections where the activity of a component is the same as its activity in either of the terminal alloys of a couple. Path slopes at ZFPs are uniquely dictated by the atomic mobility and thermodynamic data for the components. Discontinuous flux reversals for the components can also occur at interfaces in multiphase couples. Identification of ZFPs is also presented for diffusion in the Cu-Ni-Zn-Mn quaternary system. Analytical representation of diffusion paths for both ternary and quaternary diffusion couples is presented with the aid of characteristic path parameters.

Dayananda, M.A.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

425

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

426

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The energy of high frequency waves in the low solar Chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High frequency acoustic waves have been suggested as a source of mechanical heating in the chromosphere. In this work the radial component of waves in the frequency interval 22mHz to 1mHz are investigated. Observations were performed using 2D spectroscopy in the spectral lines of Fe I 543.45nm and Fe I 543.29nm at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife, Spain. Speckle reconstruction has been applied to the observations. We have used Fourier and wavelet techniques to identify oscillatory power. The energy flux is estimated assuming that all observed oscillations are acoustics running waves. We find that the estimated energy flux is not sufficient to cover the chromospheric radiative losses.

Aleksandra Andic

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Direct ion flux measurements at high-pressure-depletion conditions for microcrystalline silicon deposition  

SciTech Connect

The contribution of ions to the growth of microcrystalline silicon thin films has been investigated in the well-known high-pressure-depletion (HPD) regime by coupling thin-film analysis with plasma studies. The ion flux, measured by means of a capacitive probe, has been studied in two regimes, i.e., the amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition regime and a low-to-high power regime; the latter regime had been investigated to evaluate the impact of the plasma power on the ion flux in collisional plasmas. The ion flux was found not to change considerably under the conditions where the deposited material undergoes a transition from the amorphous to the microcrystalline silicon phase; for solar-grade material, an ion-to-Si deposition flux of ?0.30 has been determined. As an upper-estimation of the ion energy, a mean ion energy of ?19 eV has been measured under low-pressure conditions (<1 mbar) by means of a retarding field energy analyzer. Combining this upper-estimate with an ion per deposited Si atom ratio of ?0.30, it is concluded that less than 6 eV is available per deposited Si atom. The addition of a small amount of SiH{sub 4} to an H{sub 2} plasma resulted in an increase of the ion flux by about 30% for higher power values, whereas the electron density, deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, decreased. The electron temperature, also deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, reveals a slight decrease with power. Although the dominant ion in the HPD regime is SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, i.e., a change from H{sub 3}{sup +} in pure hydrogen HPD conditions, the measured larger ion loss can be explained by assuming steeper electron density profiles. These results, therefore, confirm the results reported so far: the ion-to-Si deposition flux is relatively large but has neither influence on the microcrystalline silicon film properties nor on the phase transition. Possible explanations are the reported high atomic hydrogen to deposition flux ratio, mitigating the detrimental effects of an excessive ion flux.

Bronneberg, A. C.; Kang, X.; Palmans, J.; Janssen, P. H. J.; Lorne, T. [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Creatore, M. [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands) [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Solliance Solar Research, High Tech Campus 5, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sanden, M. C. M. van de [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), P.O. Box 1207, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

430

Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions  

SciTech Connect

A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis of Short-Bunch Production with the APS Booster and a Bunch Compressor Michael Borland, AOD/OAG ∗ August 8, 2003 1 Abstract There is significant interest among x-ray scientists in short-pulse x-rays. The x-rays from the APS ring, although very bright, are produced by an electron bunch with an rms length of more than 30 ps. Typically, it is only a linear accelerator that can produce a very short bunch. An idea was brought to my attention by Glenn Decker that might allow us to produce a short bunch using the APS booster. This idea involves extracting the beam from the booster at 3 to 4 GeV, while it is still relatively short, then compressing it with a magnetic bunch compressor. In this note, we present a preliminary analysis of this idea, along with the related idea of using a nonequilibrium beam from the APS photoinjector. 2 Background We will begin with an examination of the ideal result

432

Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Poon, Siu-Joe (Palo Alto, CA); Duwez, Pol E. (Pasadena, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Wave Loading on Floating Platforms by Internal Solitary Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morison’s equation is used for estimating internal solitary wave-induced forces exerted on SPAR and semi-submersible platforms. And the results we got have also ... estimate internal wave loading even for SPAR an...

H. Q. Zhang; J. C. Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

Yuksel, Cem

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

435

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. (2005) “Modeling guided wave propagation with applicationMultiple Guided Ultrasonic Wave Features,” ASME Journal ofto-spar joints using guided waves and macro fiber composite

Bartoli, Ivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Interferometric Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (IMASW)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Number 08HQGR0068 and by the Department of Energy (DOE) under award number DE-EE0002758 with the disclaimer http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/tools_directory/disclaimer.cfm (last accessed June 2011). References Abrahamson, N...

Daniel R. H. O’Connell; James P. Turner

439

Parameterization and Statistical Analysis of Hurricane Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delineation. Application to Corpus Christi, TX. Figure and method by PhD student Chih-Hung Hsu (AaronHsu@tamu.edu). ..………………………..… 83 Figure 5.5 SRF zones for Panama City, FL. Each zone has a corresponding... damaged and forcing nine oil refineries to close (U.S. Department of Commerce 2006). One of the major reasons for the extensive     2   damage during hurricane Katrina was the high surge levels seen in low lying cities such as New Orleans, many...

Mclaughlin, Patrick William

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

440

Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

Walsh, Donald Eugene

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave flux analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

442

Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the Wave Hub experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of wave energy on biodiversity...accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent...in the form of wind, wave and tidal...Rajapandian2007A review of wind energy technologiesRenew...emergence and the challenges it facesRefocus...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Plane wave solution for elastic wave scattering by a heterogeneous ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A plane-wave method for computing the three-dimensional scattering of propagating elastic waves ... boundary conditions also called linear slip interface conditions, and therefore, called the ... good agreement between measured waves and theoretical ..... tribution with a mean and a standard deviation of the com-.

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Effect of the Sea Ice Freshwater Flux on Southern Ocean Temperatures in CCSM3: Deep-Ocean Warming and Delayed Surface Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the role of sea ice freshwater and salt fluxes in modulating twenty-first-century surface warming in the Southern Ocean via analysis of sensitivity experiments in the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3). In ...

Clark H. Kirkman IV; Cecilia M. Bitz

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Resuspension of Clays Under Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Owing to their complex form, very small size and relatively low density, clays freshly deposited in a bay are vulnerable to resuspension when agitated by waves. The model of resuspension of clays under wave motio...

Prida Thimakorn

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

MHD Waves in Astrophysical Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the wave velocities on the angle ? between the undisturbed field B 0 and the wave vector k is clearly demonstrated in a polar diagram—the phase velocity diagram. In Fig.?15.2, th...

Boris V. Somov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Elgen Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elgen Wave Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elgen Wave Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:www.elgenwave.com This company is listed in the Marine...

448

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

California at Davis, University of

449

The Nonlinear Equatorial Kelvin Wave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the method of strained coordinates, a uniformly valid approximation to the nonlinear equatorial Kelvin wave is derived. It is shown that nonlinear effects are negligible for the Kelvin waves associated with the Gulf of Guinea upwelling. The ...

John P. Boyd

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A numerical scheme for ionizing shock waves  

SciTech Connect

A two-dimensional (2D) visual computer code to solve the steady state (SS) or transient shock problems including partially ionizing plasma is presented. Since the flows considered are hypersonic and the resulting temperatures are high, the plasma is partially ionized. Hence the plasma constituents are electrons, ions and neutral atoms. It is assumed that all the above species are in thermal equilibrium, namely, that they all have the same temperature. The ionization degree is calculated from Saha equation as a function of electron density and pressure by means of a nonlinear Newton type root finding algorithms. The code utilizes a wave model and numerical fluctuation distribution (FD) scheme that runs on structured or unstructured triangular meshes. This scheme is based on evaluating the mesh averaged fluctuations arising from a number of waves and distributing them to the nodes of these meshes in an upwind manner. The physical properties (directions, strengths, etc.) of these wave patterns are obtained by a new wave model: ION-A developed from the eigen-system of the flux Jacobian matrices. Since the equation of state (EOS) which is used to close up the conservation laws includes electronic effects, it is a nonlinear function and it must be inverted by iterations to determine the ionization degree as a function of density and temperature. For the time advancement, the scheme utilizes a multi-stage Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm with time steps carefully evaluated from the maximum possible propagation speed in the solution domain. The code runs interactively with the user and allows to create different meshes to use different initial and boundary conditions and to see changes of desired physical quantities in the form of color and vector graphics. The details of the visual properties of the code has been published before (see [N. Aslan, A visual fluctuation splitting scheme for magneto-hydrodynamics with a new sonic fix and Euler limit, J. Comput. Phys. 197 (2004) 1-27]). The two-dimensional nature of ION-A was presented by a planar shock wave propagating over a circular obstacle. It was demonstrated that including the effects of ionization in calculating complex flows is important, even when they appear initially negligible. This code can be used to accurately simulate the nonlinear time dependent evolution of neutral or ionized plasma flows from supersonic to hypersonic regimes.

Aslan, Necdet [Yeditepe University, Physics Department, Kayisda g-circumflex i, 34755 Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: naslan@yeditepe.edu.tr; Mond, Michael [Ben Gurion University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Beer Sheva (Israel)

2005-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

The wave energy resource along Australia’s Southern margin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Southern Australian margin is one of the most energetic regions in the world suitable for the extraction of waveenergy for electricity generation. We have produced a data set in which the deep-water waveenergy resource for the region is described by three representative deep-water wave states equivalent to the 10th 50th and 90th percentiles of the deep-water waveenergy flux derived from archives of the USA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WaveWatch III (NWW3) operational wavemodel. The Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) wavemodel is then applied along the full Southern Australian margin to propagate these representative wave states into the near-shore region to quantify the effects of shallow water processes such as refraction shoaling and bottom friction. The waveenergy incident on the 25-m isobath ( ? 30 – 50 ? kW / m ) is approximately 35%–50% less than the World Energy Council estimates of offshore waveenergy but is approximately 20% greater than the energy observed from long-term buoy deployments on the midshelf. The latter discrepancy is attributed to an overestimation of significant wave height along the Southern Australian margin by the NWW3 model. The near-shore model applied in this study adequately simulates the attenuation of wave heights across the continental shelf when compared with estimates of wave height attenuation obtained from the Topex satellite altimeter. The attenuation of waveenergy across the continental shelf reduces the estimates of offshore waveenergy as given by the World Energy Council; however the waveenergy resource incident on the Southern Australian margin remains considerable. We estimate that if 10% of the incident near-shore energy in this region which is an ambitious target when conversion efficiency is considered were converted to electricity approximately 130 TW?h/yr (one-half of Australia’s total present-day electricity consumption) would be produced.

M. A. Hemer; D. A. Griffin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Research on ponderomotive driven Vlasov–Poisson system in electron acoustic wave parametric region  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical analysis and corresponding 1D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of ponderomotive driven Vlasov–Poisson system in electron acoustic wave (EAW) parametric region are demonstrated. Theoretical analysis identifies that under the resonant condition, a monochromatic EAW can be excited when the wave number of the drive ponderomotive force satisfies 0.26?k{sub d}?{sub D}?0.53. If k{sub d}?{sub D}?0.26, nonlinear superposition of harmonic waves can be resonantly excited, called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear waves. Numerical simulations have demonstrated these wave excitation and evolution dynamics, in consistence with the theoretical predictions. The physical nature of these two waves is supposed to be interaction of harmonic waves, and their similar phase space properties are also discussed.

Xiao, C. Z.; Huang, T. W. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; He, X. T. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Qiao, B. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Long Wave Resonance in Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate: the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A wavelet analysis is preferred to a complex EOF analysis to investigate the resonance of long waves in the tropical ocean. If the two methods are similar for ... typical frequency domain analyses, i.e. the power

Jean-Louis Pinault

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Nonlinear waves in strongly interacting relativistic fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past decades the study of strongly interacting fluids experienced a tremendous progress. In the relativistic heavy ion accelerators, specially the RHIC and LHC colliders, it became possible to study not only fluids made of hadronic matter but also fluids of quarks and gluons. Part of the physics program of these machines is the observation of waves in this strongly interacting medium. From the theoretical point of view, these waves are often treated with li-nearized hydrodynamics. In this text we review the attempts to go beyond linearization. We show how to use the Reductive Perturbation Method to expand the equations of (ideal and viscous) relativistic hydrodynamics to obtain nonlinear wave equations. These nonlinear wave equations govern the evolution of energy density perturbations (in hot quark gluon plasma) or baryon density perturbations (in cold quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter). Different nonlinear wave equations, such as the breaking wave, Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers equations, are obtained from different equations of state (EOS). In nuclear matter, the Walecka EOS may lead to a KdV equation. We explore equations of state such as those extracted from the MIT Bag Model and from QCD in the mean field theory approach. Some of these equations are integrable and have analytical solitonic solutions. We derive these equations also in spherical and cylindrical coordinates. We extend the analysis to two and three dimensions to obtain the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, which is the generalization of the KdV. The KP is also integrable and presents analytical solitonic solutions. In viscous relativistic hydrodynamics we have second order patial derivatives which physically represent dissipation terms. We present numerical solutions and their corresponding algorithms for the cases where the equations are not integrable.

D. A. Fogaça; F. S. Navarra; L. G. Ferreira Filho

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

The role of tides in shelf-scale simulations of the wave energy resource  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many regions throughout the world that are suitable for exploitation of the wave energy resource also experience large tidal ranges and associated strong tidal flows. However, tidal effects are not included in the majority of modelling studies which quantify the wave energy resource. This research attempts to quantify the impact of tides on the wave energy resource of the northwest European shelf seas, a region with a significant wave energy resource, and where many wave energy projects are under development. Results of analysis based on linear wave theory, and the application of a non-linear coupled wave-tide model (SWAN–ROMS), suggest that the impact of tides is significant, and can exceed 10% in some regions of strong tidal currents (e.g. headlands). Results also show that the effect of tidal currents on the wave resource is much greater than the contribution of variations in tidal water depth, and that regions which experience lower wave energy (and hence shorter wave periods) are more affected by tides than high wave energy regions. While this research provides general guidelines on the scale of the impact in regions of strong tidal flow, high resolution site-specific coupled wave-tide models are necessary for more detailed analysis.

M. Reza Hashemi; Simon P. Neill

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Modelling the Effect of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric and Ocean Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean waves, in addition to generating direct forces on fixed and floating offshore wind generator structures, also have significant indirect effects via their influence on the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers above and below the water surface. In the atmospheric boundary layer the waves act as roughness elements, influencing the turbulent flow and the vertical wind speed profile, and induce oscillatory motions in the airflow. Spray droplets from breaking wave crests enhance structure corrosion, and may lead to icing under low-temperature conditions. Below the water surface, the air-sea momentum flux and mechanical energy flux, mediated by the waves and wave-generated turbulence, affect the vertical profiles of ocean current, temperature, and salinity. Effects include modifying the structural forces and dynamics, and the movement and dispersion of marine organisms, pollutants, and air bubbles generated by breaking waves, with consequences for fouling, corrosion, and environmental impact. Measurement of relevant airflow and ocean dynamical variables is also challenging, as near the water surface it is often necessary to use instruments mounted on moving measurement platforms. Modelling such boundary-layer effects is a complex task, as a result of feedbacks between the airflow, wave field, current field, and turbulence in the atmosphere and the ocean. We present results from a coupled model study of the North Sea and Norwegian Sea area. We employ a mesoscale atmosphere model (WRF) and a spectral wave model (WAM), running simultaneously and coupled using the open-source coupler MCEL which can interpolate between different model grids and time steps. To investigate the ocean boundary layer, one-dimensional model experiments were performed for an idealized Ekman layer and for locations in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean, and the northern Pacific, using a version of the GOTM turbulence model, modified to take wave dynamics into account. Results show how the wave field alters the ocean's aerodynamic roughness and the air–sea momentum flux, depending on the relation between the surface wind speed and the propagation speed of the wave crests (the wave age). These effects will feed back into the airflow, wind speed and turbulence profile in the boundary layer. The ocean dynamics experiments showed results which compare favourably with field observations from the LOTUS3 and PROVESS experiments in the north Atlantic and North Sea, and Ocean Weather Station Papa in the Pacific Ocean.

Alastair D. Jenkins; Mostafa Bakhoday Paskyabi; Ilker Fer; Alok Gupta; Muralidhar Adakudlu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Spherical waves r Legendre polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Impedance · Spherical waves r er e e Impedance · Legendre polynomials P0(x) = 1 P1(x) = x P2(x · Spherical waves ­ Spherical Hankel functions hn (2)(kr)=jn(kr)-iyn(kr) Impedance · Spherical waves Order: 0 1 4 Circumferential And azimuthal: 0,0 1,1 3,2 #12;3 Impedance · Spherical waves ­ Arbitrary

Berlin,Technische Universität

458

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study the topology of field lines threading buoyant magnetic flux struc- tures. The magnetic structures on the parameters, the system exhibits varying degrees of symmetry. By integrating along magnetic field lines of the evolution, and therefore the degree of symmetry, the resulting magnetic structures can have field lines

459

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms at station 139. Keywords: wave energy, survivability, breaking waves, joint distribution, OWEC INTRODUCTION

Haller, Merrick

460

Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Remote Vital Sign Monitoring System Preventing the Worst (by CNN) Engineering Development & Applications Argonne's Nuclear Science & Technology Legacy Other Multimedia Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Detection & Diagnostic Systems Multimedia Compressive Passive Millimeter-Wave Imager Video | Other sizes/formats available Other available versions of this video: Problems viewing the video in this page? Choose another format/size from the menu below; this video is available in Flash Video Flash, Quicktime video Quicktime or Windows Media video Windows Media format

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461

2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker, meterstick, sound tube apparatus, thermometer, microphone INTRODUCTION traveling wave of sinusoidal shape

Glashausser, Charles

462

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

463

Energy Loss by Breaking waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of the frequency of wind wave breaking in deep water are combined with laboratory estimates of the rate of energy loss a from single breaking wave to infer the net rate of energy transfer to the mixed layer from breaking waves, as a ...

S. A. Thorpe

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

Ryu, Yong Uk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

465

Gravitational wave astronomy - astronomy of the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An enigmatic prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity is gravitational waves. With the observed decay in the orbit of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar agreeing within a fraction of a percent with the theoretically computed decay from Einstein's theory, the existence of gravitational waves was firmly established. Currently there is a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves with interferometric gravitational wave observatories or detectors and several such detectors have been built or being built. The initial detectors have reached their design sensitivities and now the effort is on to construct advanced detectors which are expected to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. The era of gravitational wave astronomy has arrived. This article describes the worldwide effort which includes the effort on the Indian front - the IndIGO project -, the principle underlying interferometric detectors both on ground and in space, the principal noise sources that plague such detectors, the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves that one expects to detect by these detectors and some glimpse of the data analysis methods involved in extracting the very weak gravitational wave signals from detector noise.

S. V. Dhurandhar

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

ORIGIN OF MACROSPICULE AND JET IN POLAR CORONA BY A SMALL-SCALE KINKED FLUX TUBE  

SciTech Connect

We report an observation of a small-scale flux tube that undergoes kinking and triggers the macrospicule and a jet on 2010 November 11 in the north polar corona. The small-scale flux tube emerged well before the triggering of the macrospicule and as time progresses the two opposite halves of this omega-shaped flux tube bent transversely and approach each other. After {approx}2 minutes, the two approaching halves of the kinked flux tube touch each other and an internal reconnection as well as an energy release takes place at the adjoining location and a macrospicule was launched which goes up to a height of 12 Mm. Plasma begins to move horizontally as well as vertically upward along with the onset of the macrospicule and thereafter converts into a large-scale jet in which the core denser plasma reaches up to {approx}40 Mm in the solar atmosphere with a projected speed of {approx}95 km s{sup -1}. The fainter and decelerating plasma chunks of this jet were also seen up to {approx}60 Mm. We perform a two-dimensional numerical simulation by considering the VAL-C initial atmospheric conditions to understand the physical scenario of the observed macrospicule and associated jet. The simulation results show that reconnection-generated velocity pulse in the lower solar atmosphere steepens into slow shock and the cool plasma is driven behind it in the form of macrospicule. The horizontal surface waves also appeared with shock fronts at different heights, which most likely drove and spread the large-scale jet associated with the macrospicule.

Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, Abhishek K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263129 (India); Murawski, K. [Group of Astrophysics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Tripathi, Durgesh, E-mail: pradeep.kashyap@aries.res.in, E-mail: aks@aries.res.in, E-mail: kmur@kft.umcs.lublin.pl, E-mail: durgesh@iucaa.ernet.in [Inter-University Centre for Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since radar involves the transmission, propagation and scattering of EM waves by various is the electrostatic force between two point charges. #12;Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves Electric fields

Rutledge, Steven

468

Solving three-body-breakup problems with outgoing-flux asymptotic conditions  

SciTech Connect

An analytically solvable three-body collision system (s wave) model is used to test two different theoretical methods. The first one is a configuration interaction expansion of the scattering wave function using a basis set of Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF) with purely outgoing flux (CISF), introduced recently in A. L. Frapicinni, J. M. Randazzo, G. Gasaneo, and F. D. Colavecchia [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43, 101001 (2010)]. The second one is a finite element method (FEM) calculation performed with a commercial code. Both methods are employed to analyze different ways of modeling the asymptotic behavior of the wave function in finite computational domains. The asymptotes can be simulated very accurately by choosing hyperspherical or rectangular contours with the FEM software. In contrast, the CISF method can be defined both in an infinite domain or within a confined region in space. We found that the hyperspherical (rectangular) FEM calculation and the infinite domain (confined) CISF evaluation are equivalent. Finally, we apply these models to the Temkin-Poet approach of hydrogen ionization.

Randazzo, J. M.; Frapiccini, A. L.; Colavecchia, F. D. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and CONICET, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Buezas, F.; Gasaneo, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur and CONICET, 8000 Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model  

SciTech Connect

A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

SEED BANKS FOR MAGNETIC FLUX COMPRESSION GENERATORS  

SciTech Connect

In recent years the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been conducting experiments that require pulsed high currents to be delivered into inductive loads. The loads fall into two categories (1) pulsed high field magnets and (2) the input stage of Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG). Three capacitor banks of increasing energy storage and controls sophistication have been designed and constructed to drive these loads. One bank was developed for the magnet driving application (20kV {approx} 30kJ maximum stored energy.) Two banks where constructed as MFCG seed banks (12kV {approx} 43kJ and 26kV {approx} 450kJ). This paper will describe the design of each bank including switching, controls, circuit protection and safety.

Fulkerson, E S

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

471

Anomalous diffusion modifies solar neutrino fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Density and temperature conditions in the solar core suggest that the microscopic diffusion of electrons and ions could be nonstandard: diffusion and friction coefficients are energy dependent, collisions are not two-body processes and retain memory beyond the single scattering event. A direct consequence of nonstandard diffusion is that the equilibrium energy distribution of particles departs from the Maxwellian one (tails goes to zero more slowly or faster than exponentially) modifying the reaction rates. This effect is qualitatively different from temperature and/or composition modification: small changes in the number of particles in the distribution tails can strongly modify the rates without affecting bulk properties, such as the sound speed or hydrostatic equilibrium, which depend on the mean values from the distribution. This mechanism can considerably increase the range of predictions for the neutrino fluxes allowed by the current experimental values (cross sections and solar properties) and can be u...

Kaniadakis, G; Lissia, M; Quarati, P

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

473

Atom interferometric gravitational wave detection using heterodyne laser links  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a scheme based on a heterodyne laser link that allows for long baseline gravitational wave detection using atom interferometry. While the baseline length in previous atom-based proposals is constrained by the need for a reference laser to remain collimated as it propagates between two satellites, here we circumvent this requirement by employing a strong local oscillator laser near each atom ensemble that is phase locked to the reference laser beam. Longer baselines offer a number of potential advantages, including enhanced sensitivity, simplified atom optics, and reduced atomic source flux requirements.

Hogan, Jason M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

475

Waves in Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Quadratic corrections to the metaplectic formulation of mode conversions. In this work we showed how to systematically deal with quadratic corrections beyond the usual linearization of the dispersion matrix at a conversion. The linearization leads to parabolic cylinder functions as the local approximation to the full-wave behavior, but these do not include the variation in amplitude associated with ray refraction in the neighborhood of the conversion. Hence, the region over which they give a good fit to the incoming and outgoing WKB solutions is small. By including higher order corrections it is possible to provide a much more robust matching. We also showed that it was possible, in principle, to extend these methods to arbitrary order. A new normal form for mode conversion. This is based upon our earlier NSF-DOE-funded work on ray helicity. We have begun efforts to apply these new ideas in practical ray tracing algorithms. Group theoretical foundation of path integrals and phase space representations of wave problems. Using the symbol theory of N. Zobin, we developed a new understanding of path integrals on phase space. The initial goal was to find practical computational tools for dealing with non-standard mode conversions. Along the way we uncovered a new way to represent wave functions directly on phase space without the intermediary of a Wigner function. We are exploring the use of these ideas for numerical studies of conversion, with the goal of eventually incorporating kinetic effects. Wave packet studies of gyroresonance crossing. In earlier work, Huanchun Ye and Allan Kaufman -- building upon ideas due to Lazar Friedland -- had shown that gyroresonance crossings could be treated as a double conversion. This perspective is one we have used for many of our papers since then. We are now performing a detailed numerical comparison between full-wave and ray tracing approaches in the study of minority-ion gyroresonance crossing. In this study, a fast magnetosonic wave -- supported by a majority-ion species such as deuterium -- crosses the resonance layer associated with a minority species, such as hydrogen. By using wave packets instead of harmonic solutions, it becomes easy to see the evolution in k-space of the minority-ion disturbance, and the time delay for emission of the reflected fast-wave packet. Iterated conversion in a cavity. When mode conversion occurs in a cavity where rays are trapped, multiple conversions will occur and the resulting absorption profile will typically have a complicated spatial dependence due to overlapping interference patterns. The goal of this work is to develop fast and efficient ray-based methods for computing the cavity response to external driving, and to compute the spatial absorption profile. We have introduced a new approach that allows us to visualize in great detail the underlying iterated ray geometry, and should lead to simpler methods for identifying parameter values where global changes occur in the qualitative response (e.g. global bifurcations).

Tracy, Eugene R

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

476

Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND  

SciTech Connect

We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from {sup 8}B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.32(syst) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis threshold is driven by {sup 208}Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic {sup 11}Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with standard solar model predictions which include matter-enhanced neutrino oscillation.

Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M.P.

2011-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

477

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

478

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

479

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

480

Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z