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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Parameter assignment for improved connectivity and security in randomly deployed wireless sensor networks via hybrid omni/uni-directional antennas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,omni-directional antennas have been used for communication in wireless sensor net-works. In this thesis, a hybrid communication model is presented where-in, nodes ina network are capable of both omni-directional and uni-directional communication.The eect of such a model...

Shankar, Sonu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Optimization Online - Approximate Uni-directional Benders ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 30, 2014 ... Thus, we aim at finding good quality feasible solutions in the first iteration. ... Category 1: Applications -- OR and Management Sciences.

Christina N Burt

2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Approximate Uni-directional Benders Decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tention of visiting as many markets as is necessary to meet demand for a set of ... K. The markets may have lim- ited quantities of each product (capacity C).

C N Burt, N Lipovetzky, A R Pearce, P J Stuckey

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Directed Relativistic Blast Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

Andrei Gruzinov

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

6

Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 Backgrounds.........................................................................................1 1.2 Objectives.............................................................................................5 II DIRECTIONAL HYBRID WAVE MODEL... ......................................................................41 V ANALYSIS OF DIRECTIONAL WAVE FIELDS WITH STRONG CURRENT ...............................................................................................45 5.1 Introduction...

Zhang, Shaosong

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

Generation and analysis of multi-directional waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real sea states cannot be represented adequately by a single sine wave. Indeed, wind-generated waves in the ocean have obviously different amplitudes and frequencies, but also come from different directions. Consequently, the distribution of energy...

Liagre, Pierre-Yves Francois Bernard

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print The electronic properties of a metal are determined by the dynamical behavior of its conduction electrons. Conventional...

9

Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO ...

Aggarwal, Nancy

10

Simulations of Direct Ion Acceleration with Beating Electrostatic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gardineer, IV , Benjamin Jorns , and Edgar Y. Choueiri Electric Propulsion and Plasma Dynamics Laboratory Wave Thruster (BWT) ­ an electrodeless electric propulsion concept based on direct ion acceleration. The ultimate goal is for this acceleration mechanism to form the basis of a new plasma propulsion system called

Choueiri, Edgar

11

Computer simulations for direct conversion of the HF electromagnetic wave into the upper hybrid wave in ionospheric heating experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer simulations for direct conversion of the HF electromagnetic wave into the upper hybrid emissions (SEE). A direct conversion process is proposed as an excitation mech- anism of the upper hybrid, 1996) The electrostatic waves at the UH resonance were assumed to be excited via ``direct conversion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Asymmetry in Directional Spreading Function of Random Waves due to Refraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for deep water conditions. Analytic directional spreading functions take the form cos2 - p Pierson et al. Introduction Water waves generated by the wind are multidirectional random waves. The wave energy increases, 1970 , the Joint North Sea Wave Project JONSWAP spectrum Hassel- mann et al. 1973 , and the TEXEL storm

Haller, Merrick

13

Numerical modeling of extreme rogue waves generated by directional energy focusing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical modeling of extreme rogue waves generated by directional energy focusing Christophe angle of directional energy focusing. We find that an over- turning rogue wave can have different are characterized by their brief occurrence in space and time, resulting from a local focusing of wave energy

Grilli, Stéphan T.

14

Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation Ravish Mehra, Lakulish realistic acoustic effects produced by wave-based sound propagation for directional sources and listeners at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

15

Inferring Propagation Direction of Nonlinear Internal Waves in a Vertically Sheared Background Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inferring Propagation Direction of Nonlinear Internal Waves in a Vertically Sheared Background Flow are resistant to heaving. The beamwise method provides accurate predictions of wave propagation angle for cases 2005). Determining the wave propagation di- rection, so that one may in turn identify potential lo

Kelley, Dan

16

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

superconductivity in novel materials. Unfortunately, lattice vibrations and spin waves have similar energy scales, hindering detailed study. Researchers have taken a new...

17

Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores This experimental...

18

Ultrahigh-intensity optical slow-wave structure for direct laser electron acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVEGUIDE Ultraintense laser­plasma interaction applications in- cluding x-ray lasers, coherentUltrahigh-intensity optical slow-wave structure for direct laser electron acceleration Andrew G of corrugated slow-wave plasma guiding structures with application to quasi- phase-matched direct laser

Milchberg, Howard

19

The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better than both the KdV and BBM equations.

Daulet Moldabayev; Henrik Kalisch; Denys Dutykh

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimisation and comparison of integrated models of direct-drive linear machines for wave energy conversion   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined electrical and structural models of five types of permanent magnet linear electrical machines suitable for direct-drive power take-off on wave energy applications are presented. Electromagnetic models were ...

Crozier, Richard Carson

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves Using LIGO S5 Science Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as stochastic backgrounds. We perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for ...

Barnum, Sam

23

Direct Visualization of Laser-Driven Focusing Shock Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct real-time visualization and measurement of laser-driven shock generation, propagation, and 2D focusing in a sample are demonstrated. A substantial increase of the pressure at the convergence of the cylindrical ...

Pezeril, Thomas

24

Three Dimensional MHD Wave Propagation and Conversion to Alfven Waves near the Solar Surface. I. Direct Numerical Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficacy of fast/slow MHD mode conversion in the surface layers of sunspots has been demonstrated over recent years using a number of modelling techniques, including ray theory, perturbation theory, differential eigensystem analysis, and direct numerical simulation. These show that significant energy may be transferred between the fast and slow modes in the neighbourhood of the equipartition layer where the Alfven and sound speeds coincide. However, most of the models so far have been two dimensional. In three dimensions the Alfven wave may couple to the magneto-acoustic waves with important implications for energy loss from helioseismic modes and for oscillations in the atmosphere above the spot. In this paper, we carry out a numerical ``scattering experiment'', placing an acoustic driver 4 Mm below the solar surface and monitoring the acoustic and Alfvenic wave energy flux high in an isothermal atmosphere placed above it. These calculations indeed show that energy conversion to upward travelling Alfven waves can be substantial, in many cases exceeding loss to slow (acoustic) waves. Typically, at penumbral magnetic field strengths, the strongest Alfven fluxes are produced when the field is inclined 30-40 degrees from the vertical, with the vertical plane of wave propagation offset from the vertical plane containing field lines by some 60-80 degrees.

P. S. Cally; M. Goossens

2007-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

25

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUS DepartmentARM'sARPES Provides Direct Evidence of

26

Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet at sea surface is studied both analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet, in connection with the problem of oceanic rogue waves. In the framework of Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2D) hyperbolic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived, which determines the evolution of coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description for the process of nonlinear spatio-temporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system is integrated in quadratures, which fact allows us to understand qualitative differences between the linear and nonlinear regimes of the focusing of wave packet. Comparison of the Gaussian model predictions with results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-cres...

Ruban, V P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Direct imaging of the acoustic waves generated by femtosecond filaments in air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct imaging of the acoustic waves generated by femtosecond filaments in air J. K. Wahlstrand, N of spatial single- and higher-mode 50 fs, 800 nm pulses in air at 10 Hz and 1 kHz repetition rates. Results in air [9]. They claimed a positive gas density perturba- tion on axis with a microsecond lifetime

Milchberg, Howard

28

A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Placing 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center, we reach ~3.35x10^-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliá; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; S. Deléglise; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endröczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

29

Forecast Constraints on Inflation from Combined CMB and Gravitational Wave Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, BBO (Big Bang Observer), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parameterization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Christopher Gordon; Joseph Silk; Naoshi Sugiyama

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

30

2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral variations in Q for northern Italy relative to California.

Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

Implications of the B-mode Polarization Measurement for Direct Detection of Inflationary Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prospects for direct measurements of inflationary gravitational waves by next generation interferometric detectors inferred from the possible detection of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background are studied. We compute the spectra of the gravitational wave background and the signal-to-noise ratios by two interferometric detectors (DECIGO and BBO) for large-field inflationary models in which the tensor-to-scalar ratio is greater than the order of 0.01. If the reheating temperature $T_{\\rm RH}$ of chaotic inflation with the quadratic potential is high ($T_{\\rm RH}>7.9\\times10^6$ GeV for upgraded DECIGO and $T_{\\rm RH}> 1.8\\times 10^{6}$ GeV for BBO), it will be possible to reach the sensitivity of the gravitational background in future experiments at $3\\sigma$ confidence level. The direct detection is also possible for natural inflation with the potential $V(\\phi)=\\Lambda^4 [1-\\cos(\\phi/f)]$, provided that $f>4.2 M_{\\rm pl}$ (upgraded DECIGO) and $f>3.6 M_{\\rm pl}$ (BBO) with $T_{\\rm RH}$ higher than $10^8$ GeV. The quartic potential $V(\\phi)=\\lambda \\phi^4/4$ with a non-minimal coupling $\\xi$ between the inflaton field $\\phi$ and the Ricci scalar $R$ gives rise to a detectable level of gravitational waves for $|\\xi|$ smaller than the order of 0.01, irrespective of the reheating temperature.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Shinji Tsujikawa; Takeshi Chiba; Naoshi Sugiyama

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

Direct electrical observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-based two-dimensional electron gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, signatures of plasma waves in GaN-based high electron mobility transistors were observed by direct electrical measurement at room temperature. Periodic grating-gate device structures were fabricated and characterized by on-wafer G-band (140–220?GHz) s-parameter measurements as a function of gate bias voltage and device geometry. A physics-based equivalent circuit model was used to assist in interpreting the measured s-parameters. The kinetic inductance extracted from the measurement data matches well with theoretical predictions, consistent with direct observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-channel devices at room temperature. This observation of electrically significant room-temperature plasma-wave effects in GaN-channel devices may have implications for future millimeter-wave and THz device concepts and designs.

Zhao, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, W.; Zhu, M.; Yue, Y.; Song, B.; Encomendero, J.; Xing, H.; Fay, P., E-mail: pfay@nd.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Sensale-Rodriguez, B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

Forecast constraints on cosmic string parameters from gravitational wave direct detection experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves (GWs) are one of the key signatures of cosmic strings. If GWs from cosmic strings are detected in future experiments, not only their existence can be confirmed but also their properties might be probed. In this paper, we study the determination of cosmic string parameters through direct detection of GW signatures in future ground-based GW experiments. We consider two types of GWs, bursts and the stochastic GW background, which provide us with different information about cosmic string properties. Performing the Fisher matrix calculation on the cosmic string parameters, such as parameters governing the string tension $G\\mu$ and initial loop size $\\alpha$ and the reconnection probability $p$, we find that the two different types of GW can break degeneracies in some of these parameters and provide better constraints than those from each measurement.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Koichi Miyamoto; Toyokazu Sekiguchi; Keitaro Takahashi; Joseph Silk

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

Quantum Monte Carlo: Direct calculation of corrections to trial wave functions and their energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The wave functions and energies for these systems are corrected to the fixed-node values desirable features of: good wave function in/better wave function out ... good energy in/better energy out wave function, and Eref is a reference energy. Making use of the difference 0 and defining another

Anderson, James B.

35

Direct and Inverse Problems for Wave Propagation in Random Media February 29, 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vector and #27;(z) is the dissipation. The local acoustic sound speed is given by c(z) = s K(z) #26;(z Abstract The propagation of waves (acoustic, elastic, electromagnetic) in randomly layered media is highly that our work on the acoustic wave equation can be generalized to elastic waves and electromagnetic waves

Asch, Mark

36

Quantification of the influence of directional sea state parameters over the performances of wave energy converters   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate predictions of the annual energy yield from wave energy converters are essential to the development of the wave industry. The current method based on power matrices uses only a small part of the data available ...

Pascal, Remy Claude Rene

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Direct simulation and deterministic prediction of large-scale nonlinear ocean wave-field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite its coarse approximation of physics, the phase-averaged wave spectrum model has been the only type of tool available for ocean wave prediction in the past 60 years. With the rapid advances in sensing technology, ...

Wu, Guangyu, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

ccsd-00022730,version2-20Apr2006 Direct observation of a "devil's staircase" in wave-particle interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd-00022730,version2-20Apr2006 Direct observation of a "devil's staircase" in wave-J´er^ome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 We report the experimental observation of a "devil's staircase" in a time exhibits a "devil's staircase" behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

39

Forecast constraints on cosmic strings from future CMB, pulsar timing and gravitational wave direct detection experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study future observational constraints on cosmic string parameters from various types of next-generation experiments: direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs), pulsar timing array, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We consider both GW burst and stochastic GW background searches by ground- and space-based interferometers as well as GW background detection in pulsar timing experiments. We also consider cosmic string contributions to the CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies. These different types of observations offer independent probes of cosmic strings and may enable us to investigate cosmic string properties if the signature is detected. In this paper, we evaluate the power of future experiments to constrain cosmic string parameters, such as the string tension Gmu, the initial loop size alpha, and the reconnection probability p, by performing Fisher information matrix calculations. We find that combining the information from the different types of observations breaks parameter degeneracies and provides more stringent constraints on the parameters. We also find future space-borne interferometers independently provide a highly precise determination of the parameters.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Koichi Miyamoto; Toyokazu Sekiguchi; Keitaro Takahashi; Joseph Silk

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Direct observation of a "devil's staircase'' in wave-particle interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the experimental observation of a "devil's staircase'' in a time dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large scale chaos in the universality class of hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a Travelling Wave Tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a "devil's staircase'' behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

Fabrice Doveil; Alessandro Macor; Yves Elskens

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Direct observation of a 'devil's staircase' in wave-particle interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the experimental observation of a 'devil's staircase' in a time-dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large-scale chaos in the universality class of Hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a traveling wave tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a 'devil's staircase' behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro; Elskens, Yves [Physique des interactions ioniques et moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe turbulence plasma, case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Sinc-based method for an efficient solution in the direct space of quantum wave equations with periodic boundary conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solution of differential problems, and in particular of quantum wave equations, can in general be performed both in the direct and in the reciprocal space. However, to achieve the same accuracy, direct-space finite-difference approaches usually involve handling larger algebraic problems with respect to the approaches based on the Fourier transform in reciprocal space. This is the result of the errors that direct-space discretization formulas introduce into the treatment of derivatives. Here, we propose an approach, relying on a set of sinc-based functions, that allows us to achieve an exact representation of the derivatives in the direct space and that is equivalent to the solution in the reciprocal space. We apply this method to the numerical solution of the Dirac equation in an armchair graphene nanoribbon with a potential varying only in the transverse direction.

Marconcini, Paolo; Logoteta, Demetrio; Macucci, Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, Università di Pisa, Via Caruso 16, I-56122 Pisa (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, Università di Pisa, Via Caruso 16, I-56122 Pisa (Italy)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

Experimental demonstration of directive Si3N4 optical leaky wave antenna with semiconductor perturbations at near infrared frequencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Directive optical leaky wave antennas (OLWAs) with tunable radiation pattern are promising integrated optical modulation and scanning devices. OLWAs fabricated using CMOS-compatible semiconductor planar waveguide technology have the potential of providing high directivity with electrical tunability for modulation and switching capabilities. We experimentally demonstrate directive radiation from a silicon nitride ($Si_3N_4$) waveguide-based OLWA. The OLWA design comprises 50 crystalline Si perturbations buried inside the waveguide, with a period of 1 {\\mu}m, each with a length of 260 nm and a height of 150 nm, leading to a directive radiation pattern at telecom wavelengths. The measured far-field radiation pattern at the wavelength of 1540 nm is very directive, with the maximum intensity at the angle of 84.4{\\deg} relative to the waveguide axis and a half-power beam width around 6.2{\\deg}, which is consistent with our theoretical predictions. The use of semiconductor perturbations facilitates electronic radiat...

Zhao, Qiancheng; Huang, Yuewang; Campione, Salvatore; Capolino, Filippo; Boyraz, Ozdal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Seismic experiments provide new clues to earthquake wave directionality and growth speed PASADENA, Calif.--In recent years, seismologists thought they were getting a handle on how an earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic experiments provide new clues to earthquake wave directionality and growth speed PASADENA that direction. The phenomenon has to do with the basic ways rupture fronts (generating seismic waves

46

Direct Electron Heating Observed by Fast Waves in ICRF Range on a Low-Density Low Temperature Tokamak ADITYA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast wave electron heating experiments are carried out on Aditya tokamak [R = 0.75 m, a = 0.25m,Bt = 0.75T,ne{approx}1-3E13/cc,Te{approx}250eV] with the help of indigenously developed 200 kW, 20-40 MHz RF heating system. Significant direct electron heating is observed by fast waves in hydrogen plasma with prompt rise in electron temperature with application of RF power and it increases linearly with RF power. A corresponding increase in plasma beta and hence increase in stored diamagnetic energy is also observed in presence of RF. We observe an improvement of energy confinement time from 2-4msec during ohmic heating phase to 3-6msec in RF heating phase. This improvement is within the ohmic confinement regime for the present experiments. The impurity radiation and electron density do not escalate significantly with RF power. The direct electron heating by fast wave in Aditya is also predicted by ion cyclotron resonance heating code TORIC.

Mishra, K.; Kulkarni, S.; Rathi, D.; Varia, A.; Jadav, H.; Parmar, K.; Kadia, B.; Joshi, R.; Srinivas, Y.; Singh, R.; Kumar, S.; Dani, S.; Gayatri, A.; Yogi, R.; Singh, M.; Joisa, Y.; Rao, C.; Kumar, S.; Jha, R.; Manchanda, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

47

Directions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Directions Where We Are Directions The Bradbury Science Museum is located at 1350 Central Avenue Los Alamos, NM 87544 Los Alamos (elevation 7,355 feet) is perched high atop the...

48

Bearing options, including design and testing, for direct drive linear generators in wave energy converters.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The key focus of this research was to investigate the bearing options most suited to operation in a novel direct drive linear generator. This was… (more)

Caraher, Sarah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Bearing options, including design and testing, for direct drive linear generators in wave energy converters   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The key focus of this research was to investigate the bearing options most suited to operation in a novel direct drive linear generator. This was done through bearing comparisons, modelling and testing. It is fundamental ...

Caraher, Sarah

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

Please cite this article in press as: Yao, H., et al., Estimation of surface wave Green's functions from correlation of direct waves, coda waves, and ambient noise in SE Tibet. Phys. Earth Planet. In. (2009), doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2009.07.002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from correlation of direct waves, coda waves, and ambient noise in SE Tibet. Phys. Earth Planet. In. (2009), doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2009.07.002 ARTICLE IN PRESSG Model PEPI-5177; No.of Pages11 Physics with (plane wave) beamforming of the energy contributing to EGF construction. Beamforming also demonstrates

van der Hilst, Robert Dirk

51

Study of directional ocean wavefield evolution and rogue wave occurrence using large-scale phase-resolved nonlinear simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is challenging to obtain accurate predictions of ocean surface wavefield evolutions due to several complex dynamic processes involved, including nonlinear wave interaction, wave breaking and wind forcing, and also wave ...

Xiao, Wenting, 1982-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Numerical study of the direct pressure effect of acoustic waves in planar premixed flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the unsteady response of 1-D premixed flames to acoustic pressure waves for the range of frequencies below and above the inverse of the flame transit time was investigated experimentally using OH chemiluminescence Wangher (2008). They compared the frequency dependence of the measured response to the prediction of an analytical model proposed by Clavin et al. (1990), derived from the standard flame model (one-step Arrhenius kinetics) and to a similar model proposed by McIntosh (1991). Discrepancies between the experimental results and the model led to the conclusion that the standard model does not provide an adequate description of the unsteady response of real flames and that it is necessary to investigate more realistic chemical models. Here we follow exactly this suggestion and perform numerical studies of the response of lean methane flames using different reaction mechanisms. We find that the global flame response obtained with both detailed chemistry (GRI3.0) and a reduced multi-step model by Peters (1996) lies slightly above the predictions of the analytical model, but is close to experimental results. We additionally used an irreversible one-step Arrhenius reaction model and show the effect of the pressure dependence of the global reaction rate in the flame response. Our results suggest first that the current models have to be extended to capture the amplitude and phase results of the detailed mechanisms, and second that the correlation between the heat release and the measured OH* chemiluminescence should be studied deeper. (author)

Schmidt, H. [BTU Cottbus, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); Jimenez, C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Effects of nonlinearity and wave directionality on the use of Morison equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;, 8j)(k; cos8; ? kj cos 81)(w; ? wj) g[k, ? kj[ ? (w; ? wj)' Je ? ~l'~ [(zr + h) ? ~I I lk, -s sg 1 (98) (b) transverse direction g: Substitute equation (13) & (18) into equation (92) M = f Fg ~ (h+ z)dz eq 22 C pV'(')(-) (k+. )d. ?D A(ai, a..., h) glk* ? kjI ? (~i ? ~j)' (18) and where: (19) (2) Convective term: finite water depth Applying the gradiant operator to the first-order potential function equation (4): c) -, c) - c) - " a, gcoshk;(z+ h) a;g coshk;(z+ k) [ ' k, (cos...

Chen, Weida

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Direct  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDirac Charge Dynamcs inDirect

55

the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

Winokur, Michael

56

Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ?2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Austin, M. E. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Torino (Italy); Porkolab, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Turco, F. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

57

Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from binary systems: parameter-space metrics and optimal Scorpius X-1 sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive simple analytic expressions for the (coherent and semi-coherent) phase metrics of continuous-wave sources in low-eccentricity binary systems, both for the long-segment and short- segment regimes (compared to the orbital period). The resulting expressions correct and extend previous results found in the literature. We present results of extensive Monte-Carlo studies comparing metric mismatch predictions against the measured loss of detection statistic for binary parameter offsets. The agreement is generally found to be within ~ 10%-30%. As an application of the metric template expressions, we estimate the optimal achievable sensitivity of an Einstein@Home directed search for Scorpius X-1, under the assumption of sufficiently small spin wandering. We find that such a search, using data from the upcoming advanced detectors, would be able to beat the torque- balance level [1,2] up to a frequency of ~ 500 - 600 Hz, if orbital eccentricity is well-constrained, and up to a frequency of ~ 160 - 200 Hz for m...

Leaci, Paola

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 053617 (2011) Controlling directed transport of matter-wave solitons using the ratchet effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ratchet effect M. Rietmann,1,* R. Carretero-Gonz´alez,1 and R. Chac´on2 1 Nonlinear Dynamical Systems that the dependence of the directed soliton current on the number of atoms is a consequence of the ratchet The ratchet effect, that is, directed transport without any net external force [1,2], has attracted enormous

Carretero, Ricardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Development of African Easterly Waves in Late Summer, 2003-07  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Episodic events of both Saharan dust outbreaks and African easterly waves (AEWs) are observed to move westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between the warm, dry, and dusty Saharan air layer on the nearby storms has been the subject of considerable debate. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model is used to investigate the radiative effect of dust on the development of AEWs during August and September, the months of maximumtropical cyclone activity, in years 2003–07. The simulations show that dust radiative forcing enhances the convective instability of the environment. As a result, mostAEWsintensify in the presence of a dust layer. The Lorenz energy cycle analysis reveals that the dust radiative forcing enhances the condensational heating, which elevates the zonal and eddy available potential energy. In turn, available potential energy is effectively converted to eddy kinetic energy, in which local convective overturning plays the primary role. The magnitude of the intensification effect depends on the initial environmental conditions, including moisture, baroclinity, and the depth of the boundary layer. The authors conclude that dust radiative forcing, albeit small, serves as a catalyst to promote local convection that facilitates AEW development.

Ma, Po-Lun; Zhang, Kai; Shi, Jainn Jong; Matsui, Toshihisa; Arking, Albert

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Millimeter-wave InP/InGaAs HPT optoelectronic mixers and their application to 60GHz bi-directional radio-on-fiber systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Millimeter-wave InP/InGaAs HPT optoelectronic mixers and their application to 60GHz bi demonstrate the use of InP/InGaAs heterojunction phototransistors as optoelectronic mixers for bi are frequency up-converted to millimeter-wave band signals in InP HPT optoelectronic mixer with remotely

Choi, Woo-Young

62

Gravity Waves Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;14/03/2014 6 H L H L L Phase & Group Velocity #12;14/03/2014 7 Doppler Effect #12;14/03/2014 8 Shock Waves #12;14/03/2014 14 Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Supernova blast waves #12;14/03/2014 15 Tycho's Remnant (SN 1572AD A SNR flythrough Theory of Supernova Blast Waves Supernovae: Type Ia Subsonic deflagration wave turning

Weijgaert, Rien van de

63

Low-EVM Adaptive Millimeter-Wave Transmit and Receive Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate (Low-EVM) Millimeter-wave Direct-conversion I/Qmillimeter-wave direct-conversion modulators,” MicrowaveLow-EVM, Millimeter-Wave Direct-Conversion Modulators”, IEEE

Gupta, Arpit Kumar

64

Control of molecular rotation in the limit of extreme rotational excitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser control of molecular rotation is an area of active research. A number of recent studies has aimed at expanding the reach of rotational control to extreme, previously inaccessible rotational states, as well as controlling the directionality of molecular rotation. Dense ensembles of molecules undergoing ultrafast uni-directional rotation, known as molecular superrotors, are anticipated to exhibit unique properties, from spatially anisotropic diffusion and vortex formation to the creation of powerful acoustic waves and tuneable THz radiation. Here we describe our recent progress in controlling molecular rotation in the regime of high rotational excitation. We review two experimental techniques of producing uni-directional rotational wave packets with a "chiral train" of femtosecond pulses and an "optical centrifuge". Three complementary detection methods, enabling the direct observation, characterization and control of the superrotor states, are outlined: the one based on coherent Raman scattering, and two...

Milner, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand the differences between transverse and longitudinal waves. APPARATUS: Buzzer board with string, meter stick

Glashausser, Charles

67

Developing de Broglie Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

2006-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

A high-frequency gravitational-wave burst search with LIGO's Hanford site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of long-arm interferometers designed to directly measure gravitational-wave strain. Direct observation of gravitational waves would provide a test ...

Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A high-frequency gravitational-wave burst search with LIGO's Hanford site .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of long-arm interferometers designed to directly measure gravitational-wave strain. Direct observation of gravitational waves would provide… (more)

Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Directives Tools  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Useful links and resources for Directives Writers, Directives Point of Contact (DPCs), Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and Draft Directive Reviewers.

72

Nonlinear dust acoustic waves and shocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe experiments on (1) nonlinear dust acoustic waves and (2) dust acoustic shocks performed in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma. First, we describe experiments showing nonlinear dust acoustic waves characterized by waveforms of the dust density that are typically sharper in the wave crests and flatter in the wave troughs (compared to sinusoidal waves), indicating the development of wave harmonics. We discuss this behavior in terms of a second-order fluid theory for dust acoustic waves. Second, experimental observations of the propagation and steepening of large-amplitude dust acoustic waves into dust acoustic shock waves are presented. The observed shock wave evolution is compared with numerical calculations based on the Riemann solution of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for dust acoustic waves.

Merlino, R. L.; Heinrich, J. R.; Hyun, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Gravitational wave astronomy and cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first direct observation of gravitational waves' action upon matter has recently been reported by the BICEP2 experiment. Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are being installed. They will soon be commissioned, and then begin searches for high-frequency gravitational waves at a sensitivity level that is widely expected to reach events involving compact objects like stellar mass black holes and neutron stars. Pulsar timing arrays continue to improve the bounds on gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies, and may detect a signal on roughly the same timescale as ground-based detectors. The science case for space-based interferometers targeting millihertz sources is very strong. The decade of gravitational-wave discovery is poised to begin. In this writeup of a talk given at the 2013 TAUP conference, we will briefly review the physics of gravitational waves and gravitational-wave detectors, and then discuss the promise of these measurements for making cosmological measurements in the near future.

Scott A. Hughes

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Creating Wave-Focusing Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

A. G. Ramm

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

75

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

76

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

An Introduction to Wave-Current Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale wave focusing across a storm can re-direct the wind-stress? #12;1. Adiabatic interaction StartAn Introduction to Wave-Current Interactions Jerry Smith, MPL-SIO-UCSD jasmith@ucsd.edu http just want to hold up your hand. #12;Some Questions in Wave-Current Interaction Physics 1. Adiabatic

Smith, Jerome A.

78

Visualizing the kinematics of relativistic wave packets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article investigates some solutions of the time-dependent free Dirac equation. Visualizations of these solutions immediately reveal strange phenomena that are caused by the interference of positive- and negative-energy waves. The effects discussed here include the Zitterbewegung, the opposite direction of momentum and velocity in negative-energy wave packets, and the superluminal propagation of the wave packet's local maxima.

Bernd Thaller

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

Property:Wave Direction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to:USGSMeanReservoirTemp Jump to: navigation,Volume

80

Directed Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Directed Energy The Directed Energy Program provides laser systems design, engineering and production for specific applications and missions, experimentally validated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vacuum Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

Paul S. Wesson

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

82

Two-wave interaction in ideal magnetohydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The weakly nonlinear interaction of sound and linearly polarised Alfv{\\'e}n waves propagating in the same direction along an applied magnetic field is studied. It is found that a sound wave is coupled to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave with double period and wavelength when the sound and Alfv{\\'e}n speeds are equal. The Alfv{\\'e}n wave drives the sound wave through the ponderomotive force, while the sound wave returns energy back to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave through the parametric (swing) influence. As a result, the two waves alternately exchange their energy during propagation. The process of energy exchange is faster for waves with stronger amplitudes. The phenomenon can be of importance in astrophysical plasmas, including the solar atmosphere and solar wind.

T. V. Zaqarashvili; B. Roberts

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

83

Primordial Gravitational Waves Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconsider the enhancement of primordial gravitational waves that arises from a quantum gravitational model of inflation. A distinctive feature of this model is that the end of inflation witnesses a brief phase during which the Hubble parameter oscillates in sign, changing the usual Hubble friction to anti-friction. An earlier analysis of this model was based on numerically evolving the graviton mode functions after guessing their initial conditions near the end of inflation. The current study is based on an equation which directly evolves the normalized square of the magnitude. We are also able to make a very reliable estimate for the initial condition using a rapidly converging expansion for the sub-horizon regime. Results are obtained for the energy density per logarithmic wave number as a fraction of the critical density. These results exhibit how the enhanced signal depends upon the number of oscillatory periods; they also show the resonant effects associated with particular wave numbers.

Maria G. Romania; N. C. Tsamis; R. P. Woodard

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Collective behavior of stabilized reaction-diffusion waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stabilized wave segments in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction are directionally controlled with intensity gradients in the applied illumination. The constant-velocity waves behave like self-propelled particles, and multiple waves interact via an applied interaction potential. Alignment arises from the intrinsic properties of the interacting waves, leading to processional and rotational behavior.

Steele, Aaron J.; Tinsley, Mark; Showalter, Kenneth [Department of Chemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6045 (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Propagation Analysis of Electromagnetic Waves: Application to Auroral Kilometric Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12 Propagation Analysis of Electromagnetic Waves: Application to Auroral Kilometric Radiation, containing waves which simultaneously propagate in different directions and/or wave modes the concept emission is found to propagate predominantly in the R-X mode with wave energy distributed in relatively

Santolik, Ondrej

87

Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at new wave- lengths, including most directly soft X-rays (which show the direct thermal emission of a coronal shock front; only the non-thermal signatures such as radio waves or particle acceleration can in the heliosphere should have the character of bow waves; if the disturbance propagates into a region of reduced

Hudson, Hugh

88

Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at new wave- lengths, including most directly soft X-rays (which show the direct thermal emission of a coronal shock front; only the non-thermal signatures such as radio waves or particle acceleration can the character of bow waves; if the disturbance propagates into a region of reduced Alfvén speed, a high Mach

California at Berkeley, University of

89

Wave EnergyFocusing in aThree-dimensional Numerical WaveTank C. Fochesato*, F. Dias**, S. Grilli***  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave EnergyFocusing in aThree-dimensional Numerical WaveTank C. Fochesato*, F. Dias**, S. Grilli Department (University of Rhode Island), Narragansett, RI, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Directional wave energy focusing in space is one of the mechanisms that may contribute to the generation of a rogue wave in the ocean

Grilli, Stéphan T.

90

SHOCK WAVES AND SOLITARY WAVES IN BCC CRYSTALS Institut fr Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, Universitt Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHOCK WAVES AND SOLITARY WAVES IN BCC CRYSTALS J. Roth Institut für Theoretische und Angewandte waves in bcc crystals have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction]. Depending on the strength of the shock wave and the propagation direction different phase transition

Roth, Johannes

91

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

92

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cluster Dynamics of Planetary Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of nonlinear atmospheric planetary waves is determined by a small number of independent wave clusters consisting of a few connected resonant triads. We classified the different types of connections between neighboring triads that determine the general dynamics of a cluster. Each connection type corresponds to substantially different scenarios of energy flux among the modes. The general approach can be applied directly to various mesoscopic systems with 3-mode interactions, encountered in hydrodynamics, astronomy, plasma physics, chemistry, medicine, etc.

Elena Kartashova; Victor S. L'vov

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Phase Diagram of a Holographic Superconductor Model with s-wave and d-wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a holographic model with a scalar field, a tensor field and a direct coupling between them as a superconductor with an s-wave and a d-wave. We find a rich phase structure in the model. The model exhibits a phase of coexistence of the s-wave and the d-wave, or a phase of an order competition. Furthermore, it has a triple point.

Mitsuhiro Nishida

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

96

A parametric study of directional sea modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examines the effect due to wave loading described by the directional sea spectrum on the response of offshore structures. The use of directional seas in design is expected to provide a better representation of the ocean surface and associated kinematics... as compared to unidirectional theory. This in turn should provide a basis for minimizing the overdesign of offshore structures. Several of the more popular directional wave spreading functions are intro- duced. A parametric study is conducted in order...

Whatley, Christopher Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Inhomogeneous High Frequency Expansion-Free Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a natural inhomogeneous generalization of high frequency plane gravitational waves. The waves are high frequency waves of the Kundt type whose null propagation direction in space-time has vanishing expansion, twist and shear but is not covariantly constant. The introduction of a cosmological constant is discussed in some detail and a comparison is made with high frequency gravity waves having wave fronts homeomorphic to 2-spheres.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

98

What Is Sound? Sound is a pressure wave which is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Is Sound? Sound is a pressure wave which is created by a vibrating object. This vibrations set the medium. Since the particles are moving in parallel direction to the wave movement, the sound wave of a sine wave (C~crests, R~troughs) The speed of a sound pressure wave in air is 331.5+0.6Tc m/s , Tc

Toronto, University of

99

Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves Hiu Ning Chan (1 waves; Long-short resonance PACS Classification: 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg #12;2 ABSTRACT A resonance between long and short waves will occur if the phase velocity of the long wave matches the group velocity

100

Vortices in Brain waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003). Vortices in Brain Waves 62. M. E. Raichle, ScienceVORTICES IN BRAIN WAVES WALTER J. FREEMAN Department ofthat is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG).

Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria Oleg A. Igoshin*, Roy Welch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria Oleg A. Igoshin*, Roy Welch , Dale Kaiser'' characterized by traveling linear, concentric, and spiral waves. These waves are different from the waves communicate by direct contact. The difference is most dramatic when waves collide: rather than annihilating

Igoshin, Oleg

102

Environmental Data Collection Using Autonomous Wave Gliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Data Collection Using Autonomous Wave Gliders LCDR Kate Hermsdorfer Qing Wang model ­AIRMAR PB200 weather station Pressure, Temperature, Wind Speed and Direction 10 min averaged sea conditions Bulk flux estimates 2-D wave spectra Water temperature profile Autonomous

103

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD FROM ANALYSES OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

104

Directives System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Department of Energy (DOE) Directives System is the means by which DOE policies, requirements, and responsibilities are developed and communicated throughout the Department. Directives are used to inform, direct, and guide employees in the performance of their jobs, and to enable employees to work effectively within the Department and with agencies, contractors, and the public. Cancels: DOE O 251.1, DOE M 251.1-1

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

Snieder, Roel

106

Wave optics and image formation in gravitational lensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss image formation in gravitational lensing systems using wave optics. Applying the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction formula to waves scattered by a gravitational potential of a lens object, we demonstrate how images of source objects are obtained directly from wave functions without using a lens equation for gravitational lensing.

Yasusada Nambu

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Direct observation of tetrahertz electromagnetic waves emitted from intrinsic Josephson junctions in single crystallie Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have observed intense, coherent, continuous and monochromatic electromagnetic (EM) emission at terahertz frequencies generated from a single crystalline mesa structure of the high-T{sub c} superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} intrinsic Josephson junction system. The mesa is fabricated by the Argon-ion-milling and photolithography techniques on the cleaved surface of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} single crystal. The frequency, {nu}, of the EM radiation observed from the sample obeys simple relations: {nu} = c/n{lambda} = c/2nw and {nu} = 2eV/hN, where c is the light velocity in vacuum, n the refractive index of a superconductor, {lambda} the wave length of the EM emission in vacuum, w the shorter width of the mesa, V the voltage applied to the mesa, N the number of layers of intrinsic Josephson junctions, e and h are the elementary charge and the Planck constant, respectively. These two relations strongly imply that the mechanism of the emission is, firstly, due to the geometrical resonance of EM waves to the mesa like a cavity resonance occuring in the mesa structure, and forming standing waves as cavity resonance modes, and secondly, due to the ac-Josephson effect, which works coherently in all intrinsic Josephson junctions. The peculiar temperature dependence of the power intensity emitted form samples shows a broad maximum in a temperature region between 20 and 40 K, suggesting that the nonequilibrium effect plays an essential role for the emission of EM waves in this system. The estimated total power is significantly improved in comparison with the previous report [L. Ozyuzer et al., Science 318 (2007) 1291, K. Kadowaki, et al., Physica C 437-438 (2006) 111, I.E. Batov, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 262504], and reached as high as 5 {micro}W from single mesa with w = 60 {micro}m at 648 GHz, which enables us to use it for some of applications. So far, we succeeded in fabricating the mesa emitting EM waves up to 960 GHz in the fundamental mode in the w = 40 {micro}m mesa, whereas the higher harmonics up to the 4-th order were observed, resulting in a frequency exceeding 2.5 THz. In sharp contrast to the previous reports [K. Kadowaki, et al., Physica C 437-438 (2006) 111, M.-H. Bae, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, (2007) 027002], all the present measurements were done in zero magnetic field. Lastly, a plausible theoretical model for the mechanism of emission is discussed.

Kadowaki, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kawamata, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Minami, H.; Kakeya, I.; Welp, U.; Ozyuzer, L.; Koshelev, A.; Kurter, C.; Gray, K. E.; Kwok, W.-K.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Tsukuba; Izmir Inst. of Tech.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

One-Directional Perfect Cloak Created With Homogeneous Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-directional invisibility cloak is presented in this letter. Perfect invisibility can be achieved for TM waves along certain directions. The parameters are just homogeneously anisotropic and relatively easy for practical ...

Xi, Sheng

109

Geodesic deviation and gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of gravitational waves based on the geodesic deviation equation is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the only non-vanishing components of the wave field in the conventional traceless-transverse gauge in linearized general relativity do not enter the geodesic deviation equation, and therefore, apparently, no effect is predicted by that equation in that specific gauge. The reason is traced back to the fact that the geodesic deviation equation is written in terms of a coordinate distance, which is not a directly measurable quantity. On the other hand, in the proper Lorentz frame of the detector, the conventional result described in standard textbooks holds.

M. Leclerc

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

Directives Help  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All DOE directives are available through this site. While it may seem overwhelming, given the number of documents, we have provided a number of ways in which you may get to the information you need.

111

Initial data for Einstein's equations with superposed gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is presented to construct initial data for Einstein's equations as a superposition of a gravitational wave perturbation on an arbitrary stationary background spacetime. The method combines the conformal thin sandwich formalism with linear gravitational waves, and allows detailed control over characteristics of the superposed gravitational wave like shape, location and propagation direction. It is furthermore fully covariant with respect to spatial coordinate changes and allows for very large amplitude of the gravitational wave.

Harald P. Pfeiffer; Lawrence E. Kidder; Mark A. Scheel; Deirdre Shoemaker

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

112

Plane waves Lumped systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems S x y z Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · open tube #12;2 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · closed tube Impedance · Cylindrical waves z x y r #12;3 Impedance · Cylindrical waves ­ Circumferential part n=0 n=1 n=2 n=3 Impedance · Cylindrical

Berlin,Technische Universität

113

SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

115

Smooth sandwich gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves which are smooth and contain two asymptotically flat regions are constructed from the homogeneous pp-waves vacuum solution. Motion of free test particles is calculated explicitly and the limit to an impulsive wave is also considered.

J. Podolsky

1998-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

116

Degenerate weakly nonlinear elastic plane waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weakly nonlinear plane waves are considered in hyperelastic crystals. Evolution equations are derived at a quadratically nonlinear level for the amplitudes of quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse waves propagating in arbitrary anisotropic media. The form of the equations obtained depends upon the direction of propagation relative to the crystal axes. A single equation is found for all propagation directions for quasi-longitudinal waves, but a pair of coupled equations occurs for quasi-transverse waves propagating along directions of degeneracy, or acoustic axes. The coupled equations involve four material parameters but they simplify if the wave propagates along an axis of material symmetry. Thus, only two parameters arise for propagation along an axis of two-fold symmetry, and one for a three-fold axis. The transverse wave equations decouple if the axis is four-fold or higher. In the absence of a symmetry axis it is possible that the evolution equations of the quasi-transverse waves decouple if the third order elastic moduli satisfy a certain identity. The theoretical results are illustrated with explicit examples.

W?odzimierz Doma?ski; Andrew N. Norris

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Waves and propagation failure in discrete space models with nonlinear coupling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves and propagation failure in discrete space models with nonlinear coupling and feedback Markus by the linearisation ahead of the wave front. Wave propagation (and failure) is studied when the homogeneous dynamics are bistable. Simulations show that waves may propagate in either direction, or may be pinned. A Lyapunov

119

Parametric instability of a monochromatic Alfven wave: Perpendicular decay in low beta plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the parametric decay of a monochromatic Alfven wave in low beta plasma. Both the linearly and left-hand polarized pump Alfven waves are considered in the paper. For the linearly polarized pump Alfven wave, either a parallel or obliquely propagating wave can lead to the decay along the perpendicular direction. Initially, the parametric decay takes place along the propagating direction of the pump wave, and then the decay occurs in the perpendicular direction. With the increase of the amplitude and the propagating angle of the pump wave (the angle between the propagating direction of the pump wave and the ambient magnetic field), the spectral range of the excited waves becomes broad in the perpendicular direction. But the effects of the plasma beta on the spectral range of the excited waves in perpendicular direction are negligible. However, for the left-hand polarized pump Alfven wave, when the pump wave propagates along the ambient magnetic field, the parametric decay occurs nearly along the ambient magnetic field, and there is no obvious decay in the perpendicular direction. Significant decay in the perpendicular direction can only be found when the pump wave propagates obliquely.

Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Shan, Lican; Wang, Shui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Li, Xing [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Full-wave description of the lower hybrid reflection of whistler waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quasi-electrostatic whistler wave propagating in the direction of increasing lower hybrid resonance (LHR) frequency experiences reflection from the region in which its frequency becomes lower than the LHR frequency. This phenomenon is usually described in the framework of geometrical optics. For a wave propagating along a magnetospheric trajectory, the LHR reflection frequently takes place in the ionospheric region in which electron-neutral collisions are essential and lead to wave attenuation. In this case, the wave approach to the description of the LHR reflection is most consistent. This work is aimed at developing such an approach. The coefficients of the wave reflection are calculated for different plasma parameters. The relation between the problem under consideration and the problem of exit of whistler-mode waves to the ground is considered.

Kuzichev, I. V., E-mail: mar-cuss@yandex.ru; Shklyar, D. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Time symmetry in wave function collapse models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A framework for wave function collapse models that is symmetric under time reversal is presented. Within this framework there are equivalent pictures of collapsing wave functions evolving in both time directions. The backwards-in-time Born rule can be broken by an initial condition on the Universe resulting in asymmetric behaviour. Similarly the forwards-in-time Born rule can in principle be broken by a final condition on the Universe.

Daniel Bedingham

2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Water Waves Roger Grimshaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

123

Interaction for solitary waves in coasting charged particle beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method, the collision of solitary waves in a coasting charged particle beams is studied. The results show that the system admits a solution with two solitary waves, which move in opposite directions and can be described by two Korteweg-deVries equation in small-amplitude limit. The collision of two solitary waves is elastic, and after the interaction they preserve their original properties. Then the weak phase shift in traveling direction of collision between two solitary waves is derived explicitly.

Liu, Shi-Wei; Hong, Xue-Ren; Shi, Yu-Ren; Duan, Wen-shan, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic an Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMPCAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)] [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic an Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMPCAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Han, Jiu-Ning [College of Physics and Electromechanical Engineering, Hexi University, Zhangye 734000 (China)] [College of Physics and Electromechanical Engineering, Hexi University, Zhangye 734000 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Generalized Darboux transformation and localized waves in coupled Hirota equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we construct a generalized Darboux transformation to the coupled Hirota equations with high-order nonlinear effects like the third dispersion, self-steepening and inelastic Raman scattering terms. As application, an Nth-order localized wave solution on the plane backgrounds with the same spectral parameter is derived through the direct iterative rule. In particular, some semi-rational, multi-parametric localized wave solutions are obtained: (1) Vector generalization of the first- and the second-order rogue wave solution; (2) Interactional solutions between a dark-bright soliton and a rogue wave, two dark-bright solitons and a second-order rogue wave; (3) Interactional solutions between a breather and a rogue wave, two breathers and a second-order rogue wave. The results further reveal the striking dynamic structures of localized waves in complex coupled systems.

Xin Wang; Yuqi Li; Yong Chen

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

125

The search for gravitational wave bursts in data from the second LIGO science run  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The network of detectors comprising the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are among a new generation of detectors that seek to make the first direct observation of gravitational waves. While providing ...

Chatterji, Shourov Keith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

Okamoto, Takenori J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Variation of seismic-wave velocities in westerly granite under stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wave Results. S-wave Results. SUMMARY. REFERENCES. . . . :. 10 . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . 17 . . . . . 21 . . . . . 24 . . . . . 24 . . . . . 28 . . . . . 35 . . . . . . . 36 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE la. Compressional-wave velocities, Vp.... . 17 Figure 7 Crosscorrelation between two P-wave traces along one direction at two different pressure levels to determine the relative time delays. . . . . 20 Figure 8. (a, b and c). P-wave traces measured at the center of the faces along x-, y...

Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz Muhareb

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The various manifestations of collisionless dissipation in wave propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of an electrostatic wave packet inside a collisionless and initially Maxwellian plasma is always dissipative because of the irreversible acceleration of the electrons by the wave. Then, in the linear regime, the wave packet is Landau damped, so that in the reference frame moving at the group velocity, the wave amplitude decays exponentially with time. In the nonlinear regime, once phase mixing has occurred and when the electron motion is nearly adiabatic, the damping rate is strongly reduced compared to the Landau one, so that the wave amplitude remains nearly constant along the characteristics. Yet, we show here that the electrons are still globally accelerated by the wave packet, and in one dimension, this leads to a non local amplitude dependence of the group velocity. As a result, a freely propagating wave packet would shrink, and therefore, so would its total energy. In more than one dimension, not only does the magnitude of the group velocity nonlinearly vary, but also its direction. In the weakly nonlinear regime, when the collisionless damping rate is still significant compared to its linear value, the group velocity is directed towards the outside of the wave packet and tends to increase its transverse extent, while the opposite is true once the wave is essentially undamped. The impact of the nonlinear variation of the group velocity on the transverse size of the wave packet is quantified, and compared to that induced by the self-focussing due to wave front bowing.

Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Photon wave function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, the photon wave function exists as long as it can be precisely defined and made useful.

Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

Naoto Yokoyama

2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

132

Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ferrimagnetic Spin Wave Resonance and Superconductivity in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenon of ferrimagnetic spin wave resonance [uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin wave resonance] has been detected for the first time. It has been observed in carbon nanotubes, produced by high energy ion beam modification of diamond single crystals in $\\ $ direction. Peculiarities of spin wave resonance observed allow to insist on the formation in given nanotubes of $s^+$ superconductivity at room temperature, coexisting with uncompensated antiferromagnetic ordering.

Yerchuck, Dmitri; Stelmakh, Vyacheslav; Dovlatova, Alla; Alexandrov, Andrey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cold Plasma Wave Analysis in Magneto-Rotational Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to investigate the cold plasma wave properties. The analysis has been restricted to the neighborhood of the pair production region of the Kerr magnetosphere. The Fourier analyzed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations are dealt under special circumstances and dispersion relations are obtained. We find the $x$-component of the complex wave vector numerically. The corresponding components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. The direction and dispersion of waves are investigated.

M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

New wave generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

Mercier, Matthieu J.

136

Standing waves in the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At first, a review of our knowledge on the distribution of galaxies at large-scale, leading to a foam-like large-scale structure of the Universe, is presented in the Introduction. Then, it is shown how, according to the present theory for the formation of superclusters, wave scalar perturbations of the same frequency traveling in opposite directions give rise to standing waves, which cause a motion of the cosmic material towards the nodes, resulting in the concentration of the cosmic material around the nodes. Generalizing this effect to two (three) dimensions, the cosmic material is concentrated around the node lines (node surfaces). It is proposed that the three-dimensional effect is responsible for the foam-like large-scale structure of the Universe.

Evangelos Chaliasos

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

Wave-climate assessment by satellite remote sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satellite remote sensing based on radar altimetry and the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be used for accurate ocean-wave climatology globally. The altimeter provides significant wave height and wind speed whereas SAR in principle gives the full wave spectrum. Over the next few years, altimeter-derived wave heights will become the basic data sources for open-ocean statistics and SAR, in combination with results from global wave models, will provide the corresponding directional statistics. In addition, SAR may be used for studying wave conditions in near coastal areas. In the Norwegian Sea and elsewhere, real-time SAT and altimeter data are now being used operationally for forecasting and assimilation into numerical wave models.

Barstow, S.; Krogstad, H.E. [SINTEF, Trodheim (Norway)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

DISSIPATIVE ENERGIZATION OF BAROCLINIC WAVES BY SURFACE EKMAN PUMPING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISSIPATIVE ENERGIZATION OF BAROCLINIC WAVES BY SURFACE EKMAN PUMPING Sukyoung Lee Department-geostrophic model is used to study the effect of lower boundary Ekman pumping on the energetics of baroclinic waves. Although the direct impact of the Ekman pumping is to damp the total eddy energy, either the eddy available

Lee, Sukyoung

139

Alfv'en Wave Solitons and Solar Intermediate Drift Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

propagate at velocities of the order of the Alfv'en veloc­ ity in a direction inclined to the magnetic field, the solar wind, and possibly accretion disks, and extra­ galactic jets. In such magnetized plasmas Alfv'en waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v

Guedel, Manuel

140

Generation of internal waves in the deep ocean J. Nycander  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of internal waves in the deep ocean by tides J. Nycander Department of Meteorology; published 29 October 2005. [1] A direct computation of the tidal generation of internal waves over and to nonlinear effects caused by supercritical bottom slope. Citation: Nycander, J. (2005), Generation

Nycander, Jonas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

142

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

Merlino, Robert L.

143

Propagation of shear Alven waves in two-ion species plasmas confined by a nonuniform magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propagation of shear Alven waves in two-ion species plasmas confined by a nonuniform magnetic field for waves originally propagating along the magnetic field direction. Calculations are performed for waves propagating across the confinement magnetic field, typically the compressional or fast Alfven wave

California at Los Angles, University of

144

APPROXIMATE HARTREE TYPE WAVE FUNCTIONS AND MATRIX ELEMENTS FOR...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

APPROXIMATE HARTREE TYPE WAVE FUNCTIONS AND MATRIX ELEMENTS FOR THE K AND L SHELLS OF ATOMS AND IONS Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Meyerott, R.E. Temp Data Storage 3:...

145

Streamers generation by small-scale drift-Alfvén waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excitation of streamers by modulationally unstable small-scale drift-Alfvén wave (SSDAW) is investigated. It is found that the excitation depends strongly on the propagation direction of the SSDAW, and the ion and electron diamagnetic drift waves are both unstable due to the generation of streamers. It is also shown that zonal flows can be effectively excited by the SSDAW with the propagation direction different from that for streamer excitation.

Zhao, J. S. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China and Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Directives Help - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Directives Help by Website Administrator All DOE directives are available through this site. While it may seem overwhelming, given the number of documents, we have provided a...

147

A comparison between matter wave and light wave interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate and compare the response of light wave interferometers and matter wave interferometers to gravitational waves. We find that metric matter wave interferometers will not challenge kilometric light wave interferometers such as Virgo or LIGO, but could be a good candidate for the detection of very low frequency gravitational waves.

Pacôme Delva; Marie-Christine Angonin; Philippe Tourrenc

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

On the propagation of sound waves in a stellar wind traversed by periodic strong shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been claimed that in stellar winds traversed by strong shocks the mechanism for driving the wind by sound wave pressure cannot operate because sound waves cannot propagate past the shocks. It is shown here that sound waves can propagate through shocks in one direction and that this is a sufficient condition for the sound wave pressure mechanism to work. A strong shock amplifies a sound wave passing through it and can drag the sound wave away from the star. It is immaterial for the sound wave pressure gradient that the sound wave vector points towards the star. Since the strong shocks drag the sound waves away, the star itself is the source for the sound waves propagating towards it.

F. P. Pijpers

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

PLANE-WAVE DECOMPOSITION OF A SOUND SCENE USING A CYLINDRICAL MICROPHONE ARRAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANE-WAVE DECOMPOSITION OF A SOUND SCENE USING A CYLINDRICAL MICROPHONE ARRAY Dmitry N. Zotkin] and for the cylindrical array [2]. An alternative approach is to note that in the plane-wave basis [9] a sound field of converting a sound field into the plane-wave basis de- composes it into directional components. In a recent

Zotkin, Dmitry N.

150

Propagation of Kelvin waves along irregular coastlines in finite-difference models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propagation of Kelvin waves along irregular coastlines in finite-difference models David J. Schwaba of Kelvin wave phase speed on offshore grid resolution and propagation direction relative to the numerical propagating along a straight coastline; (2) Kelvin wave propagating at a 45 angle to the numerical grid along

151

Wind-wave measurements in a shallow estuary: Trinity Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

direction changes. The Shallow WAves Nearshore numerical model was implemented in a Galveston Bay (GB; encompassing TB) computational domain. The model was forced with wind speeds and directions measured on-site and in four surrounding locations maintained...

Dupuis, Keith Wade

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Gravitational wave radiometry: Mapping a stochastic gravitational wave background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of the detection and mapping of a stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB), either cosmological or astrophysical, bears a strong semblance to the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and polarization, which too is a stochastic field, statistically described in terms of its correlation properties. An astrophysical gravitational wave background (AGWB) will likely arise from an incoherent superposition of unmodelled and/or unresolved sources and cosmological gravitational wave backgrounds (CGWB) are also predicted in certain scenarios. The basic statistic we use is the cross correlation between the data from a pair of detectors. In order to ''point'' the pair of detectors at different locations one must suitably delay the signal by the amount it takes for the gravitational waves (GW) to travel to both detectors corresponding to a source direction. Then the raw (observed) sky map of the SGWB is the signal convolved with a beam response function that varies with location in the sky. We first present a thorough analytic understanding of the structure of the beam response function using an analytic approach employing the stationary phase approximation. The true sky map is obtained by numerically deconvolving the beam function in the integral (convolution) equation. We adopt the maximum likelihood framework to estimate the true sky map using the conjugate gradient method that has been successfully used in the broadly similar, well-studied CMB map-making problem. We numerically implement and demonstrate the method on signal generated by simulated (unpolarized) SGWB for the GW radiometer consisting of the LIGO pair of detectors at Hanford and Livingston. We include 'realistic' additive Gaussian noise in each data stream based on the LIGO-I noise power spectral density. The extension of the method to multiple baselines and polarized GWB is outlined. In the near future the network of GW detectors, including the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors that will be sensitive to sources within a thousand times larger spatial volume, could provide promising data sets for GW radiometry.

Mitra, Sanjit [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Souradeep, Tarun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Lazzarini, Albert; Mandic, Vuk; Ballmer, Stefan [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 18-34, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bose, Sukanta [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nonlinear spherical Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an one-dimensional numerical study of Alfven waves propagating along a radial magnetic field. Neglecting losses, any spherical Alfven wave, no matter how small its initial amplitude is, becomes nonlinear at sufficiently large radii. From previous simulations of Alfven waves in plane parallel atmospheres we did expect the waves to steepen and produce current sheets in the nonlinear regime, which was confirmed by our new calculations. On the other hand we did find that even the least nonlinear waves were damped out almost completely before 10 solar radii. A damping of that kind is required by models of Alfven wave-driven winds from old low-mass stars as these winds are mainly accelerated within a few stellar radii.

Ulf Torkelsson; G. Christopher Boynton

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects of Global Warming?8Department ofDepartmentto

155

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUS DepartmentARM's ClimateDepartmente's

156

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUS DepartmentARM's ClimateDepartmente'sARPES

157

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUS DepartmentARM's ClimateDepartmente'sARPESARPES

158

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUS DepartmentARM's

159

Hysteresis of ionization waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H. [Institut fuer Physik, E.-M.-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Wilke, C. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung und Technologie, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

Berlin,Technische Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived #12;66 2. Wave Propagation Theory quantities of the quiescent (time independent) medium are identified perturbations is much smaller than the speed of sound. 2.1.1 The Nonlinear Wave Equation Retaining higher

162

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

US Army Corps of Engineers

163

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer of the Subject II. Introduction­Historical Perspective III. Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations IV. Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics V. Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions VI

Hereman, Willy A.M.

164

New wave generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (2007). This mechanism, which involves a tunable source comprised of oscillating plates, has so far been used for a few fundamental studies of internal waves, but its full potential has yet to be realized. Our studies reveal that this approach is capable of producing a wide variety of two-dimensional wave fields, including plane waves, wave beams and discrete vertical modes in finite-depth stratifications. The effects of discretization by a finite number of plates, forcing amplitude and angle of propagation are investigated, and it is found that the method is remarkably efficient at generating a complete wave field despite forcing only one velocity component in a controllable manner. We furthermore find that the nature of the radiated wave field is well predicted using Fourier transforms of the spatial structure of the wave generator.

Mercier, Matthieu J; Mathur, Manikandan; Gostiaux, Louis; Peacock, Thomas; Dauxois, Thierry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Departmental Directives Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order is the primary directive for administering the Department's directives Program. Cancels: DOE O 251.1A

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wave–current interaction in the presence of a three-dimensional bathymetry: Deep water wave focusing in opposing current conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large scale experiments were carried out in the Ocean Engineering Basin FIRST, France. A tri-dimensional bathymetry consisting of two symmetrical submerged mounds was displayed on the flat bed on both sides of the basin. Regular waves of frequency corresponding to deep water conditions above the bathymetry were generated in opposing current conditions. A strong tri-dimensional behaviour is observed for the wave amplitude, leading to a strong focusing (up to twice the incident amplitude) of the wave energy towards the central deeper zone. This amplification cannot be ascribed to the increase of the current intensity in the main wave direction, nor to a current gradient normally to the wave direction. A wave phase gradient, normal to its main direction, is observed up-wave (or downstream) the mounds. This phase lag depends on the wave amplitude, it is the higher for the moderate amplitude case. The experimental data are compared with calculations of a refraction-diffraction model assuming a depth-averaged current. If the model qualitatively predicts the wave amplification in the centerline of the basin, discrepancies are observed in the vicinity of the depth changes. The observed mean current vertical profile shape is then supposed to play a significant role in the wave focusing, especially near the steep slopes down-stream the mounds. In addition, the waves are found to modify substantially both horizontal and vertical current fields.

Rey, V., E-mail: rey@univ-tln.fr; Charland, J., E-mail: jenna.charland@univ-tln.fr; Touboul, J., E-mail: julien.touboul@univ-tln.fr [Université de Toulon, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), UM 110, F-83957 La Garde (France); Aix Marseille Université, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), UM 110, 13288 Marseille, Cedex (France)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis...

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 51, NO. 5, MAY 2003 1 Integrated Antenna With Direct Conversion Circuitry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Antenna With Direct Conversion Circuitry for Broad-Band Millimeter-Wave Communications Ji, and Tatsuo Itoh, Life Fellow, IEEE Abstract--A compact integrated antenna with direct quadra- ture conversion-wave circuit, direct quadrature conversion, integrated patch antenna. I. INTRODUCTION CURRENTLY, many

Itoh, Tatsuo

171

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

172

Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

173

Secondary dust density waves excited by nonlinear dust acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary dust density waves were observed in conjunction with high amplitude (n{sub d}/n{sub d0}>2) dust acoustic waves (DAW) that were spontaneously excited in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma in the moderately coupled, {Gamma}{approx}1, state. The high amplitude dust acoustic waves produced large dust particle oscillations, displacements, and trapping. Secondary dust density waves were excited in the wave troughs of the high amplitude DAWs. The waveforms, amplitudes, wavelengths, and wave speeds of the primary DAWs and the secondary waves were measured. A dust-dust streaming instability is discussed as a possible mechanism for the production of the secondary waves.

Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus and efficiency of seismic processing algorithms, especially for application to regions of structural complexity

175

Rainbow trapping of guided waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rainbow trapping of guided waves Javier Polanco and Rosa M.the propagation of a wave packet that is a superpositionof three s-polarized guided waves with different frequencies

Polanco, Javier; Fitzgerald, Rosa M; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

177

Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Diagonalization of pp-waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

B. V. Ivanov

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

179

Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

Guidelines in Wave Energy Conversion System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

absorber systems are used in arrays, where multiple devices are attached in series or parallel to capture more energy. Point absorbers can be used offshore in various depths of water. Submerged Pressure Differentials SPDs are completely submerged... that they can capture the most effective bending motion. Most attenuators are used near shore, but there are some designs that could be used further offshore. Attenuators need to be positioned parallel with the wave direction of travel in order to capture...

Guiberteau, K. L.; Liu, Y.; Lee, J.; Kozman, T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Wave Function and Quantum Reality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the meaning of the wave function by analyzing the mass and charge density distributions of a quantum system. According to protective measurement, a charged quantum system has effective mass and charge density distributing in space, proportional to the square of the absolute value of its wave function. In a realistic interpretation, the wave function of a quantum system can be taken as a description of either a physical field or the ergodic motion of a particle. The essential difference between a field and the ergodic motion of a particle lies in the property of simultaneity; a field exists throughout space simultaneously, whereas the ergodic motion of a particle exists throughout space in a time-divided way. If the wave function is a physical field, then the mass and charge density will be distributed in space simultaneously for a charged quantum system, and thus there will exist gravitational and electrostatic self-interactions of its wave function. This not only violates the superposition principle of quantum mechanics but also contradicts experimental observations. Thus the wave function cannot be a description of a physical field but be a description of the ergodic motion of a particle. For the later there is only a localized particle with mass and charge at every instant, and thus there will not exist any self-interaction for the wave function. It is further argued that the classical ergodic models, which assume continuous motion of particles, cannot be consistent with quantum mechanics. Based on the negative result, we suggest that the wave function is a description of the quantum motion of particles, which is random and discontinuous in nature. On this interpretation, the square of the absolute value of the wave function not only gives the probability of the particle being found in certain locations, but also gives the probability of the particle being there. The suggested new interpretation of the wave function provides a natural realistic alternative to the orthodox interpretation, and it also implies that the de Broglie-Bohm theory and many-worlds interpretation are wrong and the dynamical collapse theories are in the right direction by admitting wavefunction collapse.

Gao Shan [Unit for History and Philosophy of Science and Centre for Time, SOPHI, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks J. C. Wright , P. T. Bonoli , C hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron

Wright, John C.

184

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

185

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

186

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli MIT E .J. Porkolab Sherwood/Spring APS Denver May 2009 #12; 2 Participants in the Center for Simulation of Wave hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance

Wright, John C.

187

On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

188

Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Wave Propagation in Lipid Monolayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound waves are excited on lipid monolayers using a set of planar electrodes aligned in parallel with the excitable medium. By measuring the frequency dependent change in the lateral pressure we are able to extract the sound velocity for the entire monolayer phase diagram. We demonstrate that this velocity can also be directly derived from the lipid monolayer compressibility and consequently displays a minimum in the phase transition regime. This minimum decreases from v0=170m/s for one component lipid monolayers down to vm=50m/s for lipid mixtures. No significant attenuation can be detected confirming an adiabatic phenomenon. Finally our data propose a relative lateral density oscillation of \\Delta\\rho/\\rho ~ 2% implying a change in all area dependent physical properties. Order of magnitude estimates from static couplings therefore predict propagating changes in surface potential of 1-50mV, 1 unit in pH (electrochemical potential) and 0.01{\\deg}K in temperature and fall within the same order of magnitude as physical changes measured during nerve pulse propagation. These results therefore strongly support the idea of propagating adiabatic sound waves along nerves as first thoroughly described by Kaufmann in 1989 and recently by Heimburg and Jackson, but claimed by Wilke already in 1912.

J. Griesbauer; A. Wixforth; M. F. Schneider

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

190

Directives Quarterly Updates  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Listings of new Justification Memoranda and new or revised Directives that have been posted to the DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Portal. Updated quarterly.

191

Another face of DIRECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

authors, see for example, tree-Direct [5]. This paper ..... [4] J.M. Gablonsky, Modifications of the DIRECT Algorithm, Ph.D. Thesis, North Carolina State. University ...

chiter

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Surface wave interferometry   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

Halliday, David Fraser

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

Traveling-wave photodetector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave...

196

Smith-Purcell radiation on a surface wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the radiation from an electron in flight over a surface wave of an arbitrary profile excited in a plane interface. For an electron bunch the conditions are specified under which the overall radiation essentially exceeds the incoherent part. It is shown that the radiation from the bunch with asymmetric density distribution of electrons in the longitudinal direction is partially coherent for waves with wavelengths much shorter than the characteristic longitudinal size of the bunch.

A. A. Saharian

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

Smith-Purcell radiation on a surface wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the radiation from an electron in flight over a surface wave of an arbitrary profile excited in a plane interface. For an electron bunch the conditions are specified under which the overall radiation essentially exceeds the incoherent part. It is shown that the radiation from the bunch with asymmetric density distribution of electrons in the longitudinal direction is partially coherent for waves with wavelengths much shorter than the characteristic longitudinal size of the bunch.

Saharian, A A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mathematical Caricature of Large Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kadomtsev-Petviiashvili equation is considered as a mathematical caricature of large and rogue waves.

Mikhail Kovalyov

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

199

Clustering of floaters by waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study experimentally how waves affect distribution of particles that float on a water surface. We show that clustering of small particles in a standing wave is a nonlinear effect with the clustering time decreasing as the square of the wave amplitude. In a set of random waves, we show that small floaters concentrate on a multi-fractal set.

P. Denissenko; G. Falkovich; S. Lukaschuk

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

200

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES Tuning Wave Dispersion in Resonant Networks Eyal Feigenbaum with meta-atoms. Resonant guided wave networks (RGWNs) are a new class of artificial photonic material,5 distinct from photonic crystals and metamateri- als, in which localized waves resonate in closed paths

Atwater, Harry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Autoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wave, the pump and the wave will phase lock at very low wave amplitude. When the pump reachesAutoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves J. Fajans E. Gilson U.C. Berkeley L. Friedland Hebrew of phase with the oscillator, and the os- cillator's amplitude will decrease, eventually reaching zero

Wurtele, Jonathan

202

Selection Rules for the Nonlinear Interactions of Internal Gravity Waves and Inertia-Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Gravity Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.1 Twodimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . . . . .Three dimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . .

Jiang, Chung-Hsiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; H.L. Rappaport

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Most fish have a forward undulatory swimming mechanism that involves a kinematic propulsive wave travelling down the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most fish have a forward undulatory swimming mechanism that involves a kinematic propulsive wave backwards in a similar way. We compared the kinematics (wave speed, cycle frequency, amplitude, local in the direction opposite to that of swimming. We observe two major kinematic differences. First, the slope of wave

D'Août, Kristiaan

205

Asymmetric Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves through a Planar Chiral Structure V. A. Fedotov,1,* P. L. Mladyonov,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymmetric Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves through a Planar Chiral Structure V. A. Fedotov,1 of the effect would be reversed for an electromag- netic wave propagating in opposite directions. It is a polarization sensitive transmission effect asymmetric with respect to the direc- tion of wave propagation

Zheludev, Nikolay

206

Geophys. J. Znt. (1991) 107, 531-543 Effects of point singularities on shear-wave propagation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geophys. J. Znt. (1991) 107, 531-543 Effects of point singularities on shear-wave propagation In most directions of propagation in anisotropic solids, seismic shear waves split in regular small to cause conventional cusps on the group-velocity wave surfaces. The effects of propagation near

Edinburgh, University of

207

Coastal Dynamics 2013 A 3-D PHASE-AVERAGED MODEL FOR SHALLOW WATER FLOW WITH WAVES IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coastal Dynamics 2013 1915 A 3-D PHASE-AVERAGED MODEL FOR SHALLOW WATER FLOW WITH WAVES in coastal vegetated waters with short waves. The model adopts the 3-D phase-averaged shallow water flow mesh in the vertical direction. The flow model is coupled with a spectral wave deformation model called

US Army Corps of Engineers

208

TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general ...

Agathos, M.

209

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves P. Junga: a subexcitable photosensitive Belousov­Zhabotinsky reaction, hippocampal slices of rat brains, and astrocyte of such a behavior for calcium wave net- works in interconnected brain cells. I. INTRODUCTION Since the early days

Showalter, Kenneth

210

Explicit dispersion relations for elastic waves in extremely deformed soft matter with application to nearly incompressible and auxetic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the propagation of elastic waves in soft materials subjected to finite deformations. We derive explicit dispersion relations, and apply these results to study elastic wave propagation in (i) nearly incompressible materials such as biological tissues and polymers, and (ii) negative Poisson's ratio or auxetic materials. We find that for nearly incompressible materials transverse wave velocities exhibit strong dependence on direction of propagation and initial strain state, whereas the longitudinal component is not affected significantly until extreme levels of deformations are attained. For highly compressible materials, we show that both pressure and shear wave velocities depend strongly on initial deformation and direction of propagation. When compression is applied, longitudinal wave velocity decreases in positive bulk modulus materials, and increases for negative bulk modulus materials; this is regardless the direction of wave prorogation. We demonstrate that finite deformations influence elastic wave propagation through combinations of induced effective compressibility and stiffness.

Pavel Galich; Stephan Rudykh

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Direct-current-like Phase Space Manipulation Using Chirped Alternating Current Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waves in plasmas can accelerate particles that are resonant with the wave. A dc electric field also accelerates particles, but without a resonance discrimination, which makes the acceleration mechanism profoundly different. Whereas wave-particle acceleration mechanisms have been widely discussed in the literature, this work discusses the direct analogy between wave acceleration and dc field acceleration in a particular parameter regime explored in previous works. Apart from the academic interest of this correspondence, there may be practical advantages in using waves to mimic dc electric fields, for example, in driving plasma current with high efficiency.

P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Directives Quarterly Updates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: https://www.directives.doe.gov/directives/directives

213

Electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We carried out a series of particle simulations to study electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves generated by an electron ring distribution. The electron ring distribution leads to excitations of X-mode waves mainly in the perpendicular direction, Z-mode waves in the perpendicular and parallel directions, and whistler-mode waves mainly in the parallel direction. The parallel Z- and whistler-mode waves can lead to an effective acceleration of ring electrons. The electron acceleration is mainly determined by the wave amplitude and phase velocity, which in turn is affected by the ratio of electron plasma to cyclotron frequencies. For the initial kinetic energy ranging from 100 to 500 keV, the peak energy of the accelerated electrons is found to reach 2–8 times the initial kinetic energy. We further study the acceleration process by test-particle calculations in which electrons interact with one, two, or four waves. The electron trajectories in the one-wave case are simple diffusion curves. In the multi-wave cases, electrons are accelerated simultaneously by counter-propagating waves and can have a higher final energy.

Lee, K. H. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Omura, Y. [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)] [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Lee, L. C. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Measuring ocean waves from space; Proceedings of the Symposium, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD, Apr. 15-17, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers are presented on ocean-wave prediction; the quasi-universal form of the spectra of wind-generated gravity waves at different stages of their development; the limitations of the spectral measurements and observations of the group structure of surface waves; the effect of swell on the growth of wind wave; operational wave forecasting; ocean-wave models, and seakeeping using directional wave spectra. Consideration is given to microwave measurements of the ocean-wave directional spectra; SIR research; estimating wave energy spectra from SAR imagery, with the radar ocean-wave spectrometer, and SIR-B; the wave-measurement capabilities of the surface contour radar and the airborne oceanographic lidar; and SIR-B ocean-wave enhancement with fast-Fourier transform techniques. Topics discussed include wave-current interaction; the design and applicability of Spectrasat; the need for a global wave monitoring system; the age and source of ocean swell observed in Hurricane Josephine; and the use of satellite technology for insulin treatment.

Beal, R.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Wave Control Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device with wind turbine a new device with a more direct energy conversion? #12

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

216

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

IR Hot Wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

Graham, T. B.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Observation of negative-frequency waves in a water tank: A classical analogue to the Hawking effect?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conversion of positive-frequency waves into negative-frequency waves at the event horizon is the mechanism at the heart of the Hawking radiation of black holes. In black-hole analogues, horizons are formed for waves propagating in a medium against the current when and where the flow exceeds the wave velocity. We report on the first direct observation of negative-frequency waves converted from positive-frequency waves in a moving medium. The measured degree of mode conversion is significantly higher than expected from theory.

Germain Rousseaux; Christian Mathis; Philippe Maissa; Thomas G. Philbin; Ulf Leonhardt

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

Yuksel, Cem

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

Direct/Indirect Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Direct Loan Program (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Connecticut Development Authority’s Direct Loan Program provides direct senior and subordinated loans and mezzanine investments to companies creating or maintaining jobs. Up to $20,000 per job...

225

mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. (2005) “Modeling guided wave propagation with applicationMultiple Guided Ultrasonic Wave Features,” ASME Journal ofto-spar joints using guided waves and macro fiber composite

Bartoli, Ivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Propagation of seismic waves through liquefied soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mechanisms of wave propagation and ARTICLE IN PRESS M.Numerical analysis Wave propagation Earthquake Liquefactionenergy during any wave propagation. This paper summarizes

Taiebat, Mahdi; Jeremic, Boris; Dafalias, Yannis; Kaynia, Amir; Cheng, Zhao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

Walsh, Donald Eugene

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Directives System Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1A, Directives System, dated 1-30-98.

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Direct process for explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A direct process of making ethylenediamine dinitrate through the reaction of ethylenediamine and ammonium nitrate is described.

Akst, I.B.; Stinecipher, M.M.

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

Heating of ions by high frequency electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heating of ions by high frequency electrostatic waves in magnetically confined plasmas has been a paradigm for studying nonlinear wave-particle interactions. The frequency of the waves is assumed to be much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency and the waves are taken to propagate across the magnetic field. In fusion type plasmas, electrostatic waves, like the lower hybrid wave, cannot access the core of the plasma. That is a domain for high harmonic fast waves or electron cyclotron waves—these are primarily electromagnetic waves. Previous studies on heating of ions by two or more electrostatic waves are extended to two electromagnetic waves that propagate directly across the confining magnetic field. While the ratio of the frequency of each wave to the ion cyclotron frequency is large, the frequency difference is assumed to be near the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear wave-particle interaction is studied analytically using a two time-scale canonical perturbation theory. The theory elucidates the effects of various parameters on the gain in energy by the ions—parameters such as the amplitudes and polarizations of the waves, the ratio of the wave frequencies to the cyclotron frequency, the difference in the frequency of the two waves, and the wave numbers associated with the waves. For example, the ratio of the phase velocity of the envelope formed by the two waves to the phase velocity of the carrier wave is important for energization of ions. For a positive ratio, the energy range is much larger than for a negative ratio. So waves like the lower hybrid waves will impart very little energy to ions. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with numerical simulations of the exact dynamical equations. The analytical results are used to construct mapping equations, simplifying the derivation of the motion of ions, which are, subsequently, used to follow the evolution of an ion distribution function. The heating of ions can then be properly quantified in terms of the wave parameters and can be conveniently used to find ideal conditions needed to heat ions by high frequency electromagnetic waves.

Zestanakis, P. A.; Kominis, Y.; Hizanidis, K. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, Zographou GR-15773 (Greece)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, Zographou GR-15773 (Greece); Ram, A. K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

James, L. Allan

235

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Zonal flow and field generation by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zonal flow and field generation by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves P. N magnetic fields by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves is presented. The analysis by electrostatic drift waves to finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves. The drift wave driven

Rubloff, Gary W.

237

Sound Wave in Hot Dense Matter Created in Heavy Ion Collision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model to study the sound wave in hot dense matter created in heavy ion collisions by jet is proposed.The preliminary data of jet shape analysis of PHENIX Collaboration for all centralities and two directions is well explained in this model. Then the wavelength of the sound wave, the natural frequency of the hot dense matter and the speed of sound wave are estimated from the fit.

X. Sun; Z. Yang

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

California at Davis, University of

239

Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys������� that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate high-resolution (fine scale, very near-field) fluid/structure interaction simulations of buoy motions, as well as array-scale, phase-resolving wave scattering simulations. These modeling efforts will utilize state-of-the-art research quality models, which have not yet been brought to bear on this complex problem of large array wave/structure interaction problem.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Haller, Merrick C.; Ozkan-Haller, H. Tuba

2013-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

240

Wave guide impedance matching method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for modifying the end portion of a wave guide, whether hollow or solid, carrying electromagnetic, acoustic or optical energy, to produce a gradual impedance change over the length of the end portion, comprising the cutting of longitudinal, V-shaped grooves that increase in width and depth from beginning of the end portion of the wave guide to the end of the guide so that, at the end of the guide, no guide material remains and no surfaces of the guide as modified are perpendicular to the direction of energy flow. For hollow guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the interior surface; for solid guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the exterior surface. One or more resistive, partially conductive or nonconductive sleeves can be placed over the exterior of the guide and through which the grooves are cut to smooth the transition to free space.

Kronberg, James W. (Beech Island, SC)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Spherical waves r Legendre polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Spherical waves r er e e Impedance · Legendre polynomials P0(x) = 1 P1(x) = x P2(x · Spherical waves ­ Spherical Hankel functions hn (2)(kr)=jn(kr)-iyn(kr) Impedance · Spherical waves Order: 0 1 4 Circumferential And azimuthal: 0,0 1,1 3,2 #12;3 Impedance · Spherical waves ­ Arbitrary

Berlin,Technische Universität

242

Directives Templates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates by Website Administrator Directives

243

2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NHESSD 2, 7017­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

244

2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker, meterstick, sound tube apparatus, thermometer, microphone INTRODUCTION traveling wave of sinusoidal shape

Glashausser, Charles

245

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

246

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

Ryu, Yong Uk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

247

Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number characteristics 14 3.5. Characteristics of the primary pressure wave 21 3.6. Pressure propagation over a hard

248

Temporally propagated optical pulses, and what they reveal about dispersion handling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I derive a temporally propagated uni-directional optical pulse equation valid in the few cycle limit. Temporal propagation is advantageous because it naturally preserves causality, unlike the competing spatially propagated models. The approach generates exact coupled bi-directional equations, which can be efficiently approximated down to a uni-directional form in cases where an optical pulse changes little over one optical cycle. It also also allows a direct term-to-term comparison of an exact bi-directional theory with an approximate uni-directional theory. Notably, temporal propagation handles dispersion in a different way, and this difference serves to highlight existing approximations inherent in spatially propagated treatments of dispersion. Accordingly, I emphasise the need for future work in clarifying the limitations of the dispersion conversion required by these types of approaches; since the only alternative in the few cycle limit may be to resort to the much more computationally intensive full Maxw...

Kinsler, Paul

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Ralf Starzmann Fluid the water wave motion into a bi-directional air flow, which in turn drives an air turbine. The Wells turbine the environmental impact of an in situ Wells turbine in more detail requires an in depth understanding

Frandsen, Jannette B.

250

Laser Excitation of a Fracture Source for Elastic Waves Thomas E. Blum* and Kasper van Wijk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Excitation of a Fracture Source for Elastic Waves Thomas E. Blum* and Kasper van Wijk a transparent sample by focusing laser light directly onto this fracture. The associated displacement field, measured by a laser interferometer, has pronounced waves that are diffracted at the fracture tips. We

Snieder, Roel

251

LASER-INDUCED SHOCK WAVES IN CONDENSED MATTER: SOME TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER-INDUCED SHOCK WAVES IN CONDENSED MATTER: SOME TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS S. N. LUOa,Ã? , D. C, NV 89154, USA; c GPS Division, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA Laser pressure physics. We briefly review some techniques in laser-induced shock waves, including direct laser

Asimow, Paul D.

252

Universal properties of two-port scattering, impedance, and admittance matrices of wave-chaotic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universal properties of two-port scattering, impedance, and admittance matrices of wave matrices of two-port wave-chaotic systems are studied experimentally using a chaotic microwave cavity. We remove the direct processes introduced by the nonideally coupled driving ports through a matrix

Anlage, Steven

253

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since radar involves the transmission, propagation and scattering of EM waves by various is the electrostatic force between two point charges. #12;Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves Electric fields

Rutledge, Steven

254

Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains NearMaster University Tsunamis and ocean waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent

Craig, Walter

255

Intersections of S-branes with Waves and Monopoles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct intersections of S-branes with waves and Kaluza-Klein monopoles. There are several possible ways to add a monopole to an S-brane solution similar to p-branes. On the other hand, one may add a wave only to the transverse space of an S-brane unlike a p-brane where wave resides on its worldvolume. The metric function of the wave is a harmonic function of the remaining transverse directions and an extra condition on integration constants is needed. We also show that it is not possible to add an S-brane to p-brane intersections whose near horizon geometry has an AdS part.

Mert Besken; Nihat Sadik Deger

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Predicted giant magnetic moment on non-{n0m} surfaces of d-wave superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the [1 (1) over bar 0] direction. Observing these predictions in high-T(c) superconductors can provide a strong confirmation of the d-wave scenario for such materials. [S0163-1829(99)50942-9]....

Hu, Chia-Ren; Yan, XZ.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Waves and instabilities in dissipative rotating superfluid neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss wave propagation in rotating superfluid neutron star cores, taking into account the vortex mediated mutual friction force. For models where the two fluids co-rotate in the unperturbed state, our analysis clarifies the role of chemical coupling and entrainment for sound and inertial waves. We also investigate the mutual friction damping, providing results that demonstrate the well-known fact that sound waves propagating along a vortex array are undamped. We show that the same is not true for inertial waves, which are damped by the mutual friction regardless of the propagation direction. We then include the vortex tension, which arises due to local vortex curvature. Focussing on purely transverse inertial waves, we derive the small correction that the tension induces in the wave frequency. Finally, we allow for a relative linear flow in the background (along the rotation axis). In this case we show how the mutual friction coupling may induce a dynamical instability in the inertial waves. We discuss the critical flow required for the instability to be present, its physical interpretation and the possible relevance it may have for neutron star physics.

T. Sidery; N. Andersson; G. L. Comer

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: the same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analysed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a "chaotic diode", where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

Stefano Lepri; Arkady Pikovsky

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

Spinneken, Johannes, E-mail: j.spinneken@imperial.ac.uk; Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

CHRISTOPHNIEMANN A new wave of start-ups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHRISTOPHNIEMANN 20 INNOVATION A new wave of start-ups wants to install rooftop solar panels. Installing a rooftop ar- ray of solar panels large enough to produce all of the energy required by a building a pool of cash to pay for the solar panels. Directly or indirectly, homeowners buy the electricity

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Directional emission of stadium-shaped micro-lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The far-field emission of two dimensional (2D) stadium-shaped dielectric cavities is investigated. Micro-lasers with such shape present a highly directional emission. We provide experimental evidence of the dependance of the emission directionality on the shape of the stadium, in good agreement with ray numerical simulations. We develop a simple geometrical optics model which permits to explain analytically main observed features. Wave numerical calculations confirm the results.

M. Lebental; J. -S. Lauret; J. Zyss; C. Schmit; E. Bogomolny

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Direct observation of Rydberg-Rydberg transitions via CPmmW spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rydberg-Rydberg transitions of BaF molecules have been directly observed in our lab. The key to the experimental success is our ability to combine two powerful and new technologies, Chirped-Pulse millimeter-Wave spectroscopy ...

Zhou, Yan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

J. Cabaret; P. Béquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control de...

Cabaret, J; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

DNA waves and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fractional Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

SECONDARY WAVES AND/OR THE 'REFLECTION' FROM AND 'TRANSMISSION' THROUGH A CORONAL HOLE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2.2 FLARE OBSERVED WITH SDO/AIA AND STEREO/EUVI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time, the kinematic evolution of a coronal wave over the entire solar surface is studied. Full Sun maps can be made by combining images from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory satellites, Ahead and Behind, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, thanks to the wide angular separation between them. We study the propagation of a coronal wave, also known as the 'Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope' wave, and its interaction with a coronal hole (CH) resulting in secondary waves and/or reflection and transmission. We explore the possibility of the wave obeying the law of reflection. In a detailed example, we find that a loop arcade at the CH boundary cascades and oscillates as a result of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave passage and triggers a wave directed eastward that appears to have reflected. We find that the speed of this wave decelerates to an asymptotic value, which is less than half of the primary EUV wave speed. Thanks to the full Sun coverage we are able to determine that part of the primary wave is transmitted through the CH. This is the first observation of its kind. The kinematic measurements of the reflected and transmitted wave tracks are consistent with a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic wave interpretation. Eventually, all wave tracks decelerate and disappear at a distance. A possible scenario of the whole process is that the wave is initially driven by the expanding coronal mass ejection and subsequently decouples from the driver and then propagates at the local fast-mode speed.

Olmedo, Oscar; Vourlidas, Angelos [Space Science Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Zhang Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cheng Xin, E-mail: oscar.olmedo.ctr@nrl.navy.mil [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Directives System Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1, which establishes requirements for the development, coordination, and sunset review of DOE directives.

1995-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Departmental Directives Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish directives as the primary means to set, communicate, and institutionalize policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors.

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

Direct Loan Program (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Direct Loan Program, is designed to allow businesses to obtain the long term financing needed to encourage growth. The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority (KEDFA) may participate...

271

DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Su Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li Hui [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 6078471 (Japan)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

Departmental Directives System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes the directives system to be used for publishing permanent and temporary directives issued by DOE Headquarters and addressed to Headquarters and/or field elements. Chg 1 dated 3-14-85. Cancels DOE 1321.1A.

1983-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Concentration of near-inertial waves in anticyclones: an energetic argument  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overlooked conservation law for near-inertial waves propagating in a background flow provides a new perspective on the concentration of these waves in regions of anticyclonic vorticity. The conservation law implies that this concentration is a direct consequence of the decrease in spatial scales and associated increase in potential energy experienced by an initially homogeneous wave field. Scaling arguments and numerical simulations of a reduced-gravity model of mixed-layer near-inertial waves confirm this interpretation and elucidate the influence of the strength of the background flow relative to the dispersion.

Danioux, Eric; Bühler, Oliver

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Gravitational Wave Sources from New Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forthcoming advances in direct gravitational wave detection from kilohertz to nanohertz frequencies have unique capabilities to detect signatures from or set meaningful constraints on a wide range of new cosmological phenomena and new fundamental physics. A brief survey is presented of the post-inflationary gravitational radiation backgrounds predicted in cosmologies that include intense new classical sources such as first-order phase transitions, late-ending inflation, and dynamically active mesoscopic extra dimensions. LISA will provide the most sensitive direct probes of such phenomena near TeV energies or Terascale. LISA will also deeply probe the broadband background, and possibly bursts, from loops of cosmic superstrings predicted to form in current models of brane inflation.

Craig J. Hogan

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel pricesDirections

276

Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. The DesertDirections The Laboratory is on theArea

277

Directives Help - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. The DesertDirections The Laboratory is on theAreaHelp by

278

Directives Quarterly Updates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. The DesertDirections The Laboratory is on theAreaHelp

279

Directives Tools - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. The DesertDirections The Laboratory is on

280

Spin waves in the (  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

Lipscombe, O. J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, G. F. [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fang, Chen [Purdue University; Perring, T. G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Wang, Nanlin [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Hu, Jiangping [Purdue University and Chinese Academy of Sciences; Dai, Pengcheng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gravity Waves in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present numerical simulations of penetrative convection and gravity wave excitation in the Sun. Gravity waves are self-consistently generated by a convective zone overlying a radiative interior. We produce power spectra for gravity waves in the radiative region as well as estimates for the energy flux of gravity waves below the convection zone. We calculate a peak energy flux in waves below the convection zone to be three orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates for m=1. The simulations show that the linear dispersion relation is a good approximation only deep below the convective-radiative boundary. Both low frequency propagating gravity waves as well as higher frequency standing modes are generated; although we find that convection does not continually drive the standing g-mode frequencies.

Tamara M. Rogers; Gary A. Glatzmaier

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. ...

Courtney, Amy; 10.1016/j.mehy.2008.08.015

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Directives Quarterly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: https://www.directives.doe.gov/directives/directives July

284

Directives Quarterly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: https://www.directives.doe.gov/directives/directives July

285

Directives Quarterly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: https://www.directives.doe.gov/directives/directives July

286

Guided wave propagation in 0.67Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2/3...O30.33PbTiO3 single crystal plate poled along 001c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guided wave propagation in 0.67Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2/3...O3­0.33PbTiO3 single crystal plate poled along 001c relations of Lamb waves and shear horizontal SH waves propagating in the 100 and 110 directions of 0.67Pb Mg, respectively, for waves propagating along 100 and 110 directions. These limiting velocities

Cao, Wenwu

287

Wave Packet under Continuous Measurement via Bohmian Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new quantum mechanical description of the dynamics of wave packet under continuous measurement is formulated via Bohmian mechanics. The solution to this equation is found through a wave packet approach which establishes a direct correlation between a classical variable with a quantum variable describing the dynamics of the center of mass and the width of the wave packet. The approach presented in this paper gives a comparatively clearer picture than approaches using restrited path integrals and master equation approaches. This work shows how the extremely irregular character of classical chaos can be reconciled with the smooth and wavelike nature of phenomena on the atomic scale. It is demonstrated that a wave packet under continuous quantum measurement displays both chaotic and non-chaotic features. The Lyapunov characteristic exponents for the trajectories of classical particle and the quantum wave packet center of mass are calculated and their chaoticities are demonstrated to be about the same. Nonetheless, the width of the wave packet exhibits a non-chaotic behavior and allows for the possibility to beat the standard quantum limit by means of transient, contractive states.

Antonio B. Nassar

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydroelastic response of a floating runway to cnoidal waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydroelastic response of mat-type Very Large Floating Structures (VLFSs) to severe sea conditions, such as tsunamis and hurricanes, must be assessed for safety and survivability. An efficient and robust nonlinear hydroelastic model is required to predict accurately the motion of and the dynamic loads on a VLFS due to such large waves. We develop a nonlinear theory to predict the hydroelastic response of a VLFS in the presence of cnoidal waves and compare the predictions with the linear theory that is also developed here. This hydroelastic problem is formulated by directly coupling the structure with the fluid, by use of the Level I Green-Naghdi theory for the fluid motion and the Kirchhoff thin plate theory for the runway. The coupled fluid structure system, together with the appropriate jump conditions are solved in two-dimensions by the finite-difference method. The numerical model is used to study the nonlinear response of a VLFS to storm waves which are modeled by use of the cnoidal-wave theory. Parametric studies show that the nonlinearity of the waves is very important in accurately predicting the dynamic bending moment and wave run-up on a VLFS in high seas.

Ertekin, R. C., E-mail: ertekin@hawaii.edu [Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Xia, Dingwu [Engineering Services, British Petroleum GoM, Houston, Texas 77079 (United States)] [Engineering Services, British Petroleum GoM, Houston, Texas 77079 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Reconsideration of Matter Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matter waves were discovered in the early 20th century from their wavelength, predicted by DeBroglie, Planck's constant divided by the particle's momentum, that is, lmw = h/mv. But, the failure to obtain a reasonable theory for the matter wave frequency resulted somewhat in loss of further interest. It was expected that the frequency of the matter wave should correspond to the particle kinetic energy, that is, fmw = 1/2mv^2/h but the resulting velocity of the matter of the particle, v = fmw x lmw, is that the matter wave moves at one half the speed of the particle, obviously absurd as the particle and its wave must move together. If relativistic mass is used (as it should in any case) the problem remains, the same mass appearing in numerator and denominator and canceling. It is no help to hypothesize that the total energy, not just the kinetic energy, yields the matter wave. That attributes a matter wave to a particle at rest. It also gives the resulting velocity as c^2/v, the wave racing ahead of its particle. A reinterpretation of Einstein's derivation of relativistic kinetic energy (which produced his famous E = mc^2) leads to a valid matter wave frequency and a new understanding of particle kinetics and of the atom's stable orbits.

Roger Ellman

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

Detecting Beyond-Einstein Polarizations of Continuous Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct detection of gravitational waves with the next generation detectors, like Advanced LIGO, provides the opportunity to measure deviations from the predictions of General Relativity. One such departure would be the existence of alternative polarizations. To measure these, we study a single detector measurement of a continuous gravitational wave from a triaxial pulsar source. We develop methods to detect signals of any polarization content and distinguish between them in a model independent way. We present LIGO S5 sensitivity estimates for 115 pulsars.

Isi, Maximiliano; Mead, Carver; Pitkin, Matthew

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

Williams, Jeremiah D. [Physics Department, Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio 45504 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Metal-insulator Transition by Holographic Charge Density Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a gravity dual for charge density waves (CDW) in which the translational symmetry along one spatial direction is spontaneously broken. Our linear perturbation calculation on the gravity side produces the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity, which exhibits the two familiar features of charge density waves, namely the pinned collective mode and gapped single-particle excitation. These two features indicate that our gravity dual also provides a new mechanism to implement the metal to insulator phase transition by CDW, which is further supported by the fact that d.c. conductivity decreases with the decreased temperature below the critical temperature.

Yi Ling; Chao Niu; Jianpin Wu; Zhuoyu Xian; Hongbao Zhang

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

Art Directable Tornadoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................... 25 2. Directional Force ........................................................... 26 3. Vortex Force .................................................................. 26 4. Lattice... ................................................................... 7 7 Tornado in its rope stage before disappearing ........................................... 9 8 Fire vortex and Waterspout ........................................................................ 10 9 Landspout and Gustnado...

Dwivedi, Ravindra

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

294

Direct Discharge Permit (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A direct discharge permit is required if a project involves the discharge of pollutants to state waters. For generation purposes, this involves the withdrawal of surface water for cooling purposes...

295

Seismic isolation of Advanced LIGO gravitational waves detectors: Review of strategy, instrumentation, and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isolating ground-based interferometric gravitational wave observatories from environmental disturbances is one of the great challenges of the advanced detector era. In order to directly observe gravitational waves, the detector components and test masses must be highly inertially decoupled from the ground motion not only to sense the faint strain of space-time induced by gravitational waves, but also to maintain the resonance of the very sensitive 4 km interferometers. This article presents the seismic isolation instrumentation and strategy developed for Advanced LIGO interferometers. It reviews over a decade of research on active isolation in the context of gravitational wave detection, and presents the performance recently achieved with the Advanced LIGO observatory. Lastly, it discusses prospects for future developments in active seismic isolation and the anticipated benefits to astrophysical gravitational wave searches. Beyond gravitational wave research, the goal of this article is to provide detailed is...

Matichard, F; Mittleman, R; Mason, K; Kissel, J; McIver, J; Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Abbott, S; Allwine, E; Barnum, S; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Celerier, C; Clark, D; Coyne, D; DeBra, D; DeRosa, R; Evans, M; Foley, S; Fritschel, P; Giaime, J A; Gray, C; Grabeel, G; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Hillard, M; Hua, W; Kucharczyk, C; Landry, M; Roux, A Le; Lhuillier, V; Macleod, D; Macinnis, M; Mitchell, R; Reilly, B O; Ottaway, D; Paris, H; Pele, A; Puma, M; Radkins, H; Ramet, C; Robinson, M; Ruet, L; Sarin, P; Shoemaker, D; Stein, A; Thomas, J; Vargas, M; Venkateswara, K; Warner, J; Wen, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

New Directions in Direct Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present the status of direct dark matter detection with specific attention to the experimental results and their phenomenological interpretation in terms of dark matter interactions. In particular I review a new and more general approach to study signals in this field based on non-relativistic operators which parametrize more efficiently the dark matter-nucleus interactions in terms of a very limited number of relevant degrees of freedom. Then I list the major experimental results, pointing out the main uncertainties that affect the theoretical interpretation of the data. Finally, since the underlying theory that describes both the dark matter and the standard model fields is unknown, I address the uncertainties coming from the nature of the interaction. In particular, the phenomenology of a class of models in which the interaction between dark matter particles and target nuclei is of a long-range type is discussed.

Paolo Panci

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

Chen, Yi-Chiuan, E-mail: YCChen@math.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shyan-Shiou, E-mail: sschen@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Juan-Ming, E-mail: jmyuan@pu.edu.tw [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Discrete wave turbulence of rotational capillary water waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the discrete wave turbulent regime of capillary water waves with constant non-zero vorticity. The explicit Hamiltonian formulation and the corresponding coupling coefficient are obtained. We also present the construction and investigation of resonance clustering. Some physical implications of the obtained results are discussed.

Adrian Constantin; Elena Kartashova; Erik Wahlén

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Laboratory Studies of Nonlinear and Breaking Surface Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Breaking-wave generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the wave tank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On steep gravity waves meeting a vertical wall: a triple

Drazen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

SHORELINE DEVELOPMENT, LONGSHORE TRANSPORT AND SURFACE WAVE DYNAMICS 1675 Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Earth Surf. Process. Landforms 29, 16751690 (2004)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave energy and direction which in turn is the integrated result of wind direction, wind intensity). However, wave energy transport from the north had limited fetch (c. 100 km), implying that wind intensity and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA 3 Department of Geography, University of Utah

Johnson, Cari

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wave Evolution On the Evolution of Curvelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curvelets Wave Evolution On the Evolution of Curvelets by the Wave Equation Hart F. Smith of Curvelets by the Wave Equation #12;Curvelets Wave Evolution Curvelets and the Second Dyadic Decomposition Curvelets A curvelet frame {} is a wave packet frame on L2(R2) based on second dyadic decomposition. f

Smith, Hart F.

302

Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computed by Wheeler Stretching and Linear Extrapolation modifications to Linear Random Wave Theory and the Hybrid Wave Model. Extreme wave acceleration fields arc compared with Hybrid Wave Model acceleration fields only. Comparisons between measurements...

Longridge, Jonathon Kent

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Approximate analytical method and its use for calculation of phase velocities of acoustic plane waves in crystals for example LiNbO3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of the offered analytical method the determinant relation for a phase velocities of elastic waves for an arbitrary propagation directions in a piezoelectric crystal are received. The phase velocities of three normal elastic waves for the crystal of LiNbO3 are calculated. Results of this calculation for each of waves are presented graphically in the form of the cards allowing easily to define phase velocities in any given direction in crystal.

A. A. Golubeva

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

HOMOLOGOUS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVES IN THE EMERGING FLUX REGION OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations, we present four homologous extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves within 3 hr on 2010 November 11. All EUV waves emanated from the same emerging flux region (EFR), propagated in the same direction, and were accompanied by surges, weak flares, and faint coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The waves had the basically same appearance in all EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO. The waves propagated at constant velocities in the range of 280-500 km s{sup -1}, with little angular dependence, which indicated that the homologous waves could be likely interpreted as fast-mode waves. The waves are supposed to likely involve more than one driving mechanism, and it was most probable that the waves were driven by the surges, due to their close timing and location relations. We also propose that the homologous waves were intimately associated with the continuous emergence and cancellation of magnetic flux in the EFR, which could supply sufficient energy and trigger the onsets of the waves.

Zheng Ruisheng; Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Hong Junchao; Yang, B.; Yang Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Waves Transmission and Generation in Turbine Stages in a Combustion-Noise Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the acoustic behavior of the turbine blade rows must be known to evaluate the noise due to combustionWaves Transmission and Generation in Turbine Stages in a Combustion-Noise Framework M. Leyko SNECMA-engines could have two different origins: (a) the well-known direct combustion noise,2 which is directly

Nicoud, Franck

307

Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

B. V. Ivanov

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Momentum Imparted by Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate momentum imparted by colliding gravitational waves in a closed Friedmann Robertson-Walker background and also by gravitational waves with toroidal wavefronts using an operational procedure. The results obtained for toroidal wavefronts are well behaved and reduce to the spherical wavefronts for a special choice.

M. Sharif

2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possibilities for strong localization of electromagnetic radiation in a dense and ultracold atomic gas sample an ultracold atomic rubidium gas sample, showing the coherent backscattering cone. The angular width of electrical excita- tion of condensed samples.3 Ongoing experimental and theoretical research directed toward

310

Direct-to-digital holography reduction of reference hologram noise and fourier space smearing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods are described for reduction of reference hologram noise and reduction of Fourier space smearing, especially in the context of direct-to-digital holography (off-axis interferometry). A method of reducing reference hologram noise includes: recording a plurality of reference holograms; processing the plurality of reference holograms into a corresponding plurality of reference image waves; and transforming the corresponding plurality of reference image waves into a reduced noise reference image wave. A method of reducing smearing in Fourier space includes: recording a plurality of reference holograms; processing the plurality of reference holograms into a corresponding plurality of reference complex image waves; transforming the corresponding plurality of reference image waves into a reduced noise reference complex image wave; recording a hologram of an object; processing the hologram of the object into an object complex image wave; and dividing the complex image wave of the object by the reduced noise reference complex image wave to obtain a reduced smearing object complex image wave.

Voelkl, Edgar

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri approve the attached thesis Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri Principal

Wood, Stephen L.

312

Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank S. Ryu and the resulting kinematics. In the present paper, the variation of wave amplitude and wave length and minimize wave reflections from the down- stream wall. Nonlinear wave kinematics as a result of nonlinear

Lynett, Patrick

313

Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear ...

Zheng, Yingcai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

2011 Interference -1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Interference - 1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES The objectives of this experiment are: · To measure the wavelength, frequency, and propagation speed of ultrasonic sound waves. · To observe interference phenomena with ultrasonic sound waves. APPARATUS: Oscilloscope, function generator, ultrasonic

Glashausser, Charles

316

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy................................................................. 21 #12;ii List of Tables Table 1 California Small Hydropower And Ocean Wave Energy Resources Table 2

317

Surface Acoustic Wave Devices for Harsh Environment Wireless Sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harshenvironment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.

Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Bandwidth broadening and asymmetric softening of collective spin waves in magnonic crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the dependence on the applied field of the frequency/wavevector dispersion relations of collective spin waves in arrays of dots, close to a magnetic transition. In particular, we focus on the low frequency “soft” modes in three different cases: end modes in the transition between two different saturated states in ellipses, fundamental mode in the saturated-to-vortex transition in disks, and gyrotropic mode in the vortex-to-saturated transition in disks. Noteworthy, the spin waves with nonzero Bloch wavevector along the direction of the applied field happen to soften earlier than spin waves with a Bloch wavevector along different directions, and this feature is responsible for an asymmetric broadening of the bandwidth along the different lattice directions. This is particularly useful in magnonic/spin-logic device research, if different binary digits are associated to modes with the same cell function but different propagation directions.

Montoncello, F., E-mail: montoncello@fe.infn.it; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, CNISM-University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Emilia-Romagna I-44100 (Italy)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

Directives Points of Contact  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel pricesDirectionsDirectives

320

A numerical scheme for ionizing shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (2D) visual computer code to solve the steady state (SS) or transient shock problems including partially ionizing plasma is presented. Since the flows considered are hypersonic and the resulting temperatures are high, the plasma is partially ionized. Hence the plasma constituents are electrons, ions and neutral atoms. It is assumed that all the above species are in thermal equilibrium, namely, that they all have the same temperature. The ionization degree is calculated from Saha equation as a function of electron density and pressure by means of a nonlinear Newton type root finding algorithms. The code utilizes a wave model and numerical fluctuation distribution (FD) scheme that runs on structured or unstructured triangular meshes. This scheme is based on evaluating the mesh averaged fluctuations arising from a number of waves and distributing them to the nodes of these meshes in an upwind manner. The physical properties (directions, strengths, etc.) of these wave patterns are obtained by a new wave model: ION-A developed from the eigen-system of the flux Jacobian matrices. Since the equation of state (EOS) which is used to close up the conservation laws includes electronic effects, it is a nonlinear function and it must be inverted by iterations to determine the ionization degree as a function of density and temperature. For the time advancement, the scheme utilizes a multi-stage Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm with time steps carefully evaluated from the maximum possible propagation speed in the solution domain. The code runs interactively with the user and allows to create different meshes to use different initial and boundary conditions and to see changes of desired physical quantities in the form of color and vector graphics. The details of the visual properties of the code has been published before (see [N. Aslan, A visual fluctuation splitting scheme for magneto-hydrodynamics with a new sonic fix and Euler limit, J. Comput. Phys. 197 (2004) 1-27]). The two-dimensional nature of ION-A was presented by a planar shock wave propagating over a circular obstacle. It was demonstrated that including the effects of ionization in calculating complex flows is important, even when they appear initially negligible. This code can be used to accurately simulate the nonlinear time dependent evolution of neutral or ionized plasma flows from supersonic to hypersonic regimes.

Aslan, Necdet [Yeditepe University, Physics Department, Kayisda g-circumflex i, 34755 Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: naslan@yeditepe.edu.tr; Mond, Michael [Ben Gurion University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Beer Sheva (Israel)

2005-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A dimension-breaking phenomenon for water waves with weak surface tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that the water-wave problem with weak surface tension has small-amplitude line solitary-wave solutions which to leading order are described by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The present paper contains an existence theory for three-dimensional periodically modulated solitary-wave solutions which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of propagation and are periodic in the transverse direction; they emanate from the line solitary waves in a dimension-breaking bifurcation. In addition, it is shown that the line solitary waves are linearly unstable to long-wavelength transverse perturbations. The key to these results is a formulation of the water wave problem as an evolutionary system in which the transverse horizontal variable plays the role of time, a careful study of the purely imaginary spectrum of the operator obtained by linearising the evolutionary system at a line solitary wave, and an application of an infinite-dimensional version of the classical Lyapunov centre theorem.

Mark D. Groves; Shu-Ming Sun; Erik Wahlén

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

Walking Wave as a Model of Particle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of walking wave is introduced from classical relativistic positions. One- and three-dimensional walking waves considered with their wave equations and dispersion equations. It is shown that wave characteristics (de Broglie's and Compton's wavelengths) and corpuscular characteristics (energy-momentum vector and the rest mass) of particle may be expressed through parameters of walking wave. By that the new view on a number concepts of physic related with wave-particle duality is suggested.

A. V. Goryunov

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Are "EIT Waves" Fast-Mode MHD Waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the nature of large-scale, coronal, propagating wave fronts (``EIT waves'') and find they are incongruous with solutions using fast-mode MHD plane-wave theory. Specifically, we consider the following properties: non-dispersive single pulse manifestions, observed velocities below the local Alfven speed, and different pulses which travel at any number of constant velocities, rather than at the ``predicted'' fast-mode speed. We discuss the possibility of a soliton-like explanation for these phenomena, and show how it is consistent with the above-mentioned aspects.

M. J. Wills-Davey; C. E. DeForest; J. O. Stenflo

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Direct from CDC's Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT Daniel M. Harper, M.P.H. A Diverse Environmental Public Health Workforce to Meet the Diverse Environmental Health Challenges on environmental health and to build part nerships in the profession. In pursuit of these goals, we will feature

325

Direct from CDC's Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT John Sarisky, R.S., M.P.H. Developing Environmental Public Health Leadership Editor's note: NEHA strives to provide up to of these goals, we will feature a column from the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers

326

Direct from CDC's Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch Daneen Farrow Collier, M.S.P.H. Editor's note: NEHA strives to pro vide up-to-date and relevant informa tion on environmental health the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers for Disease Control and Pre vention (CDC) in every

327

Direct from CDC's Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch Brian Hubbard, M.P.H. Editor the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers for Disease Con trol and Prevention (CDC) in every environmental health programs and professionals to antici pate, identify, and respond to adverse envi ronmental

328

Direct fired heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Directional gamma detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Extension of DOE Directives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Notice extends the following directives until 2/16/04: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99-7/1/00.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Extension of DOE Directives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The following directives are extended until 8-12-04. DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, dated 11/1/99. DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99.

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

Extension of DOE Directives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The following directives are extended until 8-12-05: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Security Systems, dated 11-1-99 and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11-23-99. No cancellations.

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fast wave current drive in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The non-inductive current drive from fast Alfven waves launched by a directional four-element antenna was measured in the DIII-D tokamak. The fast wave frequency (60 MHz) was eight times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma center. An array of rf pickup loops at several locations around the torus was used to verify the directivity of the four-element antenna. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For discharges with steady plasma current, up to 110 kA of FWCD was inferred from an analysis of the loop voltage, with a maximum non-inductive current (FWCD, ECCD, and bootstrap) of 195 out of 310 kA. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with central electron temperature. For low current discharges, the FWCD efficiency was degraded due to incomplete fast wave damping. The experimental FWCD was found to agree with predictions from the CURRAY ray-tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modeling along with multiple pass damping.

Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Forest, C.B.; Freeman, R.L.; Gohil, P.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.-R. [and others

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nondestructive testing using stress waves: wave propagation in layered media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of stress waves in several civil engineering applications such as nondestructive testing of soil deposits or pavement systems has become extremely popular over the last few years. In all cases, a dynamic impulse is applied to the surface...

Ortega, Jose Alberto

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

Branes are Waves and Monopoles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a recent paper it was shown that fundamental strings are null waves in Double Field Theory. Similarly, membranes are waves in exceptional extended geometry. Here the story is continued by showing how various branes are Kaluza-Klein monopoles of these higher dimensional theories. Examining the specific case of the E7 exceptional extended geometry, we see that all branes are both waves and monopoles. Along the way we discuss the O(d; d) transformation of localized brane solutions not associated to an isometry and how true T-duality emerges in Double Field Theory when the background possesses isometries.

David S. Berman; Felix J. Rudolph

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Backreacting p-wave Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the gravitational backreaction of the non-abelian gauge field on the gravity dual to a 2+1 p-wave superconductor. We observe that as in the $p+ip$ system a second order phase transition exists between a superconducting and a normal state. Moreover, we conclude that, below the phase transition temperature $T_c$ the lowest free energy is achieved by the p-wave solution. In order to probe the solution, we compute the holographic entanglement entropy. For both $p$ and $p+ip$ systems the entanglement entropy satisfies an area law. For any given entangling surface, the p-wave superconductor has lower entanglement entropy.

Raúl E. Arias; Ignacio Salazar Landea

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

Plasma waves driven by gravitational waves in an expanding universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with zero spatial curvature, we consider the interaction of the gravitational waves with the plasma in the presence of a weak magnetic field. Using the relativistic hydromagnetic equations it is verified that large amplitude magnetosonic waves are excited, assuming that both, the gravitational field and the weak magnetic field do not break the homogeneity and isotropy of the considered FRW spacetime.

D. B. Papadopoulos

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

Internal energy relaxation in shock wave structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck (WCU) equation is numerically integrated to characterize the internal structure of Mach 3 and Mach 5 shock waves in a gas with excitation in the internal energy states for the treatment of inelastic collisions. Elastic collisions are modeled with the hard sphere collision model and the transition rates for the inelastic collisions modified appropriately using probabilities based on relative velocities of the colliding particles. The collision integral is evaluated by the conservative discrete ordinate method [F. Tcheremissine, “Solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation for high-speed flows,” Comput. Math. Math. Phys. 46, 315–329 (2006); F. Cheremisin, “Solution of the Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck equation,” Dokl. Phys. 47, 487–490 (2002)] developed for the Boltzmann equation. For the treatment of the diatomic molecules, the internal energy modes in the Boltzmann equation are described quantum mechanically given by the WCU equation. As a first step in the treatment of the inelastic collisions by the WCU equation, a two- and three-quantum system is considered to study the effect of the varying of (1) the inelastic cross section and (2) the energy gap between the quantum energy states. An alternative method, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, is used for the Mach 3 shock wave to ensure the consistency of implementation in the two methods and there is an excellent agreement between the two methods. The results from the WCU implementation showed consistent trends for the Mach 3 and Mach5 standing shock waves simulations. Inelastic contributions change the downstream equilibrium state and allow the flow to transition to the equilibrium state further upstream.

Josyula, Eswar, E-mail: Eswar.Josyula@us.af.mil; Suchyta, Casimir J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Boyd, Iain D. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Vedula, Prakash [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)] [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Determination of soil parameters for wave equation analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Soil Parameters for Wave Equation Analysis (August 1973) William J. Berger, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. Harry M. Coyle Load distribution versus depth data are used from static load test results and the amount of load... provided by Dr. Harry M. Coyle, Chairman of the writer's Graduate Advisory Committee and chief investigator for the project. Dr. Robert M. Olson snd Dr. Christopher C. Mathewson, members of the writer' s Graduate Advisory Committee, also furnished...

Berger, William John

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Harmonic waves in a fluid-solid waveguide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's equations of motion, and the strain- displacement equations. These equations are combined to give three second-ordered coupled partial differential equations for the three displacement components. Considering a plane wave propagating in the xt...-direction under plane strain conditions, u& = 0 and 8( )/Bxz = 0, the particle motion is confined in the xt-x3 plane. Thus for plane strain conditions, the displacements and stresses of an isotropic solid can be expressed in terms of two potentials consistent...

Yapura, Carlos Ludwig

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wilks, Scott C. (Santa Monica, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Theory of steady-state plane tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of band-to-band and trap-assisted tunneling on the properties of steady-state plane ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} structures is theoretically analyzed. It is shown that such tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves do not differ in a qualitative sense from ordinary impact ionization waves propagating due to the avalanche multiplication of uniformly distributed seed electrons and holes. The quantitative differences of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves from impact ionization waves are reduced to a slightly different relation between the wave velocity u and the maximum field strength E{sub M} at the front. It is shown that disregarding impact ionization does not exclude the possibility of the existence of tunneling-assisted ionization waves; however, their structure radically changes, and their velocity strongly decreases for the same E{sub M}. A comparison of the dependences u(E{sub M}) for various ionization-wave types makes it possible to determine the conditions under which one of them is dominant. In conclusion, unresolved problems concerning the theory of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves are discussed and the directions of further studies are outlined.

Kyuregyan, A. S., E-mail: ask@vei.ru [Lenin All-Russian Electrical-Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Waves in the ocean Nick Hall, LEGOS, University of Toulouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of waves 2) Deep and shallow water waves 3) Internal waves 4) Waves in geophysical fluids 5) Tides Books: Waves, tides and shallow water processes, Open University, Vibrations and waves in physics, Main and wavenumber #12;Wave kinematics Consider a propagating sinusoidal wave equivalently so and we note

344

Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

Direct drive wind turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

Direct drive wind turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Direct drive wind turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Direct drive wind turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

349

Second-order diffraction forces on an array of vertical cylinders in bichromatic bidirectional waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complete second-order solution is presented for the hydrodynamic forces due to the action of bichromatic, bidirectional waves on an array of bottom-mounted, surface-piercing cylinders of arbitrary cross section in water of uniform finite depth. Based on the constant structural cross section, the first-order problem is solved utilizing a two-dimensional Green function approach, while an assisting radiation potential approach is used to obtain the hydrodynamic loads due to the second-order potential. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of wave directionality on the second-order sum and difference frequency hydrodynamic forces on a two-cylinder array. It is found that wave directionality may have a significant influence on the second-order hydrodynamic forces on these arrays and that the assumption of unidirectional waves does not always lead to conservative estimates of the second-order loading.

Vazquez, J.H. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Williams, A.N. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Gravitational waves: a foundational review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard linear approach to the gravitational waves theory is critically reviewed. Contrary to the prevalent understanding, it is pointed out that this theory contains many conceptual and technical obscure issues that require further analysis.

J. G. Pereira

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

Directional drilling sub  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A directional drilling ''sub'' provides a shifting end portion which allows the sub to be rotated from a first in-line axially straight orientation with the drill string to a second angled or ''bent'' position which second position is normally associated with conventional bent ''subs'' which are permanently structured in the bent position. The device shifts from the first (In-line) position to the second (Bent) position upon the application of torsional force thereto which torsional force can be applied, for example, by the actuation of a ''turbodrill'' (Normally attached thereto in operation). The device can be manufactured or machined to provide varying angles to the sub in its bent position to satisfy differing directional drilling situations. The axially aligned first position allows easy entry of the drill string, sub , and turbodrill into the well hole, while the second bend position is used to commence directional drilling. The sub will return gradually to its original axially aligned position when the device is withdrawn from the wellhole, as such position is the path of minimum resistance for the withdrawing drill string and torsion is not present to hold the sub in the bent position.

Benoit, L.F.

1980-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nanogap Transducer for Broadband Gravitational Wave Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By changing from a resonant multimode paradigm to a free mass paradigm for transducers in resonant mass gravitational wave detection, an array of six spheres can achieve a sensitivity response curve competitive with interferometers, being as sensitive as GEO600 and TAMA300 in the 3 to 6 kHz band and more sensitive than LIGO for 50 percent of the 6 to 10 kHz band. We study how to assemble a klystron resonant cavity that has a 1 nm gap by understanding the stability of the forces applied at it (Casimir force, elastic force, weight). This approach has additional benefits. First, due to the relatively inexpensive nature of this technology (around US$ 1 million), it is accessible to a broader part of the world scientific community. Additionally, spherical resonant mass detectors have the ability to discern both the direction and polarization resolutions.

Guilherme L. Pimentel; Odylio D. Aguiar; Michael E. Tobar; Joaquim J. Barroso; Rubens de M. Marinho

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

Wave function as geometric entity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new approach to the geometrization of the electron theory is proposed. The particle wave function is represented by a geometric entity, i.e., Clifford number, with the translation rules possessing the structure of Dirac equation for any manifold. A solution of this equation is obtained in terms of geometric treatment. Interference of electrons whose wave functions are represented by geometric entities is considered. New experiments concerning the geometric nature of electrons are proposed.

B. I. Lev

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Two-photon wave mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The position-representation wave function for multi-photon states and its equation of motion are introduced. A major strength of the theory is that it describes the complete evolution (including polarization and entanglement) of multi-photon states propagating through inhomogeneous media. As a demonstration of the two-photon wave function's use, we show how two photons in an orbital-angular-momentum entangled state decohere upon propagation through a turbulent atmosphere.

Brian J. Smith; M. G. Raymer

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; R. Abbott; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; R. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; S. Ballmer; H. Bantilan; B. C. Barish; C. Barker; D. Barker; B. Barr; P. Barriga; M. A. Barton; M. Bastarrika; K. Bayer; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; R. Biswas; E. Black; K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; M. Brinkmann; A. Brooks; D. A. Brown; G. Brunet; A. Bullington; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. B. Camp; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; J. Cao; L. Cardenas; T. Casebolt; G. Castaldi; C. Cepeda; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; D. Clark; J. Clark; T. Cokelaer; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. Corbitt; D. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; R. M. Cutler; J. Dalrymple; K. Danzmann; G. Davies; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. Degree; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; J. Dickson; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; R. W. P. Drever; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; R. J. Dupuis; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; L. S. Finn; K. Flasch; N. Fotopoulos; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; J. Garofoli; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. Goggin; G. González; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. Harry; E. Harstad; K. Hayama; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; M. Hennessy; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; D. Hosken; J. Hough; S. H. Huttner; D. Ingram; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kamat; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; F. Ya. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; C. Kim; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. K. Kopparapu; D. Kozak; I. Kozhevatov; B. Krishnan; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; M. M. Lang; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; V. Leonhardt; I. Leonor; K. Libbrecht; H. Lin; P. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lück; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; V. Mandic; S. Márka; Z. Márka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; I. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. McKechan; K. McKenzie; T. Meier; A. Melissinos; G. Mendell; R. A. Mercer; S. Meshkov; C. J. Messenger; D. Meyers; J. Miller; J. Minelli; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; O. Miyakawa; B. Moe; S. Mohanty; G. Moreno; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; H. Mukhopadhyay; H. Müller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. Murray; E. Myers; J. Myers; T. Nash; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; K. Numata; J. O'Dell; G. Ogin; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; V. Parameshwaraiah; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; S. Penn; A. Perreca; T. Petrie; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; M. Principe; R. Prix; V. Quetschke; F. Raab; D. S. Rabeling; H. Radkins; N. Rainer; M. Rakhmanov; M. Ramsunder; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen; K. Riles; B. Rivera; N. A. Robertson; C. Robinson; E. L. Robinson; S. Roddy; A. Rodriguez; A. M. Rogan; J. Rollins; J. D. Romano; J. Romie; R. Route; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Ruet; P. Russell; K. Ryan; S. Sakata; M. Samidi; L. Sancho de la Jordana; V. Sandberg; V. Sannibale; S. Saraf; P. Sarin; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Sato; P. R. Saulson; R. Savage; P. Savov; S. W. Schediwy; R. Schilling; R. Schnabel; R. Schofield; B. F. Schutz; P. Schwinberg; S. M. Scott; A. C. Searle; B. Sears; F. Seifert; D. Sellers; A. S. Sengupta; P. Shawhan; D. H. Shoemaker; A. Sibley; X. Siemens; D. Sigg; S. Sinha; A. M. Sintes; B. J. J. Slagmolen; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; M. R. Smith; N. D. Smith; K. Somiya; B. Sorazu; L. C. Stein; A. Stochino; R. Stone; K. A. Strain; D. M. Strom; A. Stuver; T. Z. Summerscales; K. -X. Sun; M. Sung; P. J. Sutton; H. Takahashi; D. B. Tanner; R. Taylor; R. Taylor; J. Thacker; K. A. Thorne; K. S. Thorne; A. Thüring; K. V. Tokmakov; C. Torres; C. Torrie; G. Traylor; M. Trias; W. Tyler

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

Wave Propagation at Oblique Shocks: How Did Tycho Get Its Stripes?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a new model for the "stripes" of synchrotron radiation seen in the remnant of Tycho's supernova. In our picture, cosmic rays streaming ahead of the forward shock generate parallel (with respect to the local magnetic field direction) circularly polarized Alfven waves that are almost free of dissipation, and due to being circularly polarized exhibit no spatial variation of magnetic field strength. Following interaction with the SNR shock with nonzero obliquity, these parallel waves become obliquely propagating, due the the wave refraction (different in principle for the different plane wave components), and dissipation sets in. The magnetosonic polarization decays faster, due to transit time damping, leaving only the Alfven mode. This surviving mode now exhibits a spatial variation of the magnetic field, leading to local maxima and minima in the synchrotron emission, i.e. the stripes. We attribute the initial wave generation to the Bell instability, which in contrast to the resonant generation of up...

Laming, J Martin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Numerical Analysis for Controlling the Eigenmode Formation of Alfven Waves in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The numerical analysis is performed with two dimensional wave code for controlling the eigenmode formation of fast Alfven waves in the GAMMA 10 central cell. The plasma production by fast waves depends on the wave excitation in the plasma. Eigenmodes are strongly formed when the boundary conditions in the axial and radial directions are satisfied. As the optimum density for the formation of eigenmode exists discretely, the density is clamped at the value where the eigenmode is strongly formed. For the higher density plasma production, the eigenmodes must be continuously excited as the density increases. It is found that the almost continuous excitation of eigenmodes can be realized by using two waves with different frequencies at the same time.

Yamaguchi, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ichimura, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higaki, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kakimoto, S. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ide, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Inoue, D. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nagai, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakagome, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fukuyama, A. [Kyoto University (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Geometric Phase Of The Faraday Rotation Of Electromagnetic Waves In Magnetized Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geometric phase of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase is investigated. The in uence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using Faraday rotation is also discussed as an application of the theory.

Jian Liu and Hong Qin

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Studies on the formation of large amplitude kinetic Alfven wave solitons and double layers in plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two fluid model has been employed to study the oblique propagation of solitary kinetic Alfven waves. Formation of solitary waves and double layers is observed. Amplitude, width (in the case of solitons), and thickness (in the case of double layers) of the nonlinear structures are studied in some detail. Wider solitary structures are found to exist for oblique propagation nearer to the magnetic field direction.

Devi, N.; Gogoi, R.; Das, G. C.; Roychoudhury, R. [Department of Mathematics, Cotton College, Guwahati-781001, Assam (India); Mathematical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Paschim Boragaon, Guwahati-781035, Assam (India); Physics and Applied Mathematical Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata 700108 (India)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences, 2002 ROSSBY WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVES Peter B. Rhines School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington Large` wave. These waves owe their existence to the rotation and spherical shape of the Earth. Weather reinforce this inequality. Waves then become possible, which are dominated by nearly horizontal wind

Bordoni, Simona

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

362

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Rogue Waves UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rogue Waves UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, Florida 33149 http://www.rsmas.miami.edu Taking the Surprise Out of the Freak Wave another to create monster waves that not even the bravest surfer could love. Big waves are big news

Miami, University of

364

Integrated campaign to study the stationary inertial Alfvn wave in the laboratory and space This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introduction The stationary inertial Alfv´en (StIA) wave [1 of StIA waves is magnetic-field-aligned (s-direction in figure 1) electron drift energy that overcomes of the effective phase velocity vector, as shown, and is approximately zero. The StIA wave vector is approximately

California at Berkeley, University of

365

Phase matching of four-wave interactions of SRS components in birefringent SRS-active crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method has been proposed for achieving wave vector matching in four-wave interactions of frequency components upon SRS in birefringent SRS-active crystals. The method ensures anti-Stokes wave generation and enables a substantial reduction in higher order Stokes SRS generation thresholds. Phase matching directions in BaWO{sub 4} SRS-active negative uniaxial crystals and SrWO{sub 4} SRS-active positive uniaxial crystals have been found in the wavelength range 0.4 - 0.7 {mu}m.

Smetanin, Sergei N; Basiev, Tasoltan T [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers in dense electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existence of ion acoustic solitary waves is studied in a magnetized dense electron-positron-ion plasma. The ions are described by the hydrodynamic equations, and the electron and positron are assumed to follow the Thomas-Fermi density distribution. The pseudopotential is derived directly from the basic equations including Poisson's equation without assuming the quasineutrality condition. The effect of ion temperature on the solitary waves is studied, and the ranges of parameters for which solitary waves and double layers exist are also studied in detail using Sagdeev's technique.

Chatterjee, Prasanta [Department of Physics, Plasma Research Laboratory, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Saha, Taraknath [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Department of Physics, Plasma Research Laboratory, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey Nazarenko,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey the first simultaneous space-time measurements for gravity wave turbulence in a large laboratory flume. We found that the slopes of k and ! wave spectra depend on wave intensity. This cannot be explained by any

Nazarenko, Sergey

368

Dances with waves Air-sea interaction The generation and growth of waves due to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dances with waves Air-sea interaction · The generation and growth of waves due to wind blowing over to the sea causes the waves to grow until equilibrium is reached between input and dissipation of energy. The most obvious manifestation of wave energy dissipation is breaking waves, often visible as whitecaps

Haak, Hein

369

Physica D 159 (2001) 3557 Wave group dynamics in weakly nonlinear long-wave models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physica D 159 (2001) 35­57 Wave group dynamics in weakly nonlinear long-wave models Roger Grimshawa Communicated by A.C. Newell Abstract The dynamics of wave groups is studied for long waves, using the framework reserved. Keywords: Wave group dynamics; Korteweg­de Vries equation; Nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation 1

Pelinovsky, Dmitry

370

DSRP, direct sulfur production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to demonstrate on a bench-scale the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for up to 99 percent or higher recovery of sulfur (as elemental sulfur) from regeneration off-gases and coal-gas produced in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generating systems. Fundamental kinetic and thermodynamic studies will also be conducted to enable development of a model to predict DSRP performance in large-scale reactors and to shed light on the mechanism of DSRP reactions. The ultimate goal of the project is to advance the DSRP technology to the point where industry is willing to support its further development.

McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.L.; Howe, G.B. [Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Extension of DOE Directives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The following directives are extended until 3-18-06: DOE N 205.8, Cyber Security Requirements for Wireless Devices and Information Systems, dated 2-11-04; DOE N 205.9, Certification and Accreditation Process for Information Systems Including National Security Systems, dated 02-19-04; DOE N 205.10, Cyber Security Requirements for Risk Management, dated 02-19-04; DOE N 205.11, Security Requirements for Remote Access to DOE and Applicable Contractor Information Technology Systems, dated 2-19-04. DOE N 205.12, Clearing, Sanitizing, and Destroying Information System Storage Media, Memory Devices, and Other Related Hardware, dated 2-19-04.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Directions to Berkeley Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel pricesDirections & Parking

373

Directions - 88-Inch Cyclotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. The DesertDirections The Laboratory is on the hillside

374

Directions | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. The DesertDirections The Laboratory is on theArea Map

375

Theory of Optical Leaky-Wave Antenna Integrated in a Ring Resonator for Radiation Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The integration of a leaky-wave antenna with a ring resonator is presented using analytical guided wave models. The device consists of a ring resonator fed by a directional coupler, where the ring resonator path includes a leaky-wave antenna segment. The resonator integration provides two main advantages: the high-quality factor ensures effective control of radiation intensity by controlling the resonance conditions and the efficient radiation from a leaky-wave antenna even when its length is much smaller than the propagation length of the leaky wave. We devise an analytical model of the guided wave propagation along a directional coupler and the ring resonator path including the antenna and non-radiating segments. The trade-offs regarding the quality factor of resonance and the antenna efficiency of such a design is reported in terms of the coupler parameters, leaky-wave constant and radiation length. Finally a CMOS-compatible OLWA design suitable for the ring resonator integration is designed where Silicon ...

Guclu, Caner; Capolino, Filippo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Propagation Plane waves -High order Modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes y x a One wave: p(x,y,t)=p0 cos(k y)e-jk x e j t vy(y,t)= 0 ; y=0,a xy } ky = n a Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes x n a p(x,y,t)=pn cos( y + - +- + + - +- + - + + +- - - (m,n) #12;4 Propagation · Circular duct ­ Helical waves (spiralling waves) kc=m/a kz k

Berlin,Technische Universität

377

Propagation Plane waves -High order Modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes y x a ky = n a One wave: p(x,y,t)=p0 cos(k y)e-jk x e j t vy(y,t)= 0 ; y=0,a xy } Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes x n a p(x,y,t)=pn cos( y;4 Propagation · Circular duct ­ Helical waves (spiralling waves) kc=m/a kz kH Projection: Propagation #12

Berlin,Technische Universität

378

Impulsive waves in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter space-times generated by null particles with an arbitrary multipole structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a class of impulsive gravitational waves which propagate either in a de Sitter or an anti-de Sitter background. They are conformal to impulsive waves of Kundt's class. In a background with positive cosmological constant they are spherical (but non-expanding) waves generated by pairs of particles with arbitrary multipole structure propagating in opposite directions. When the cosmological constant is negative, they are hyperboloidal waves generated by a null particle of the same type. In this case, they are included in the impulsive limit of a class of solutions described by Siklos that are conformal to pp-waves.

J Podolsky; J B Griffiths

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

379

Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

Mccomiskey, Allison

380

Remote direct memory access  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, parallel computers, and computer program products are disclosed for remote direct memory access. Embodiments include transmitting, from an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node to a plurality target DMA engines on target compute nodes, a request to send message, the request to send message specifying a data to be transferred from the origin DMA engine to data storage on each target compute node; receiving, by each target DMA engine on each target compute node, the request to send message; preparing, by each target DMA engine, to store data according to the data storage reference and the data length, including assigning a base storage address for the data storage reference; sending, by one or more of the target DMA engines, an acknowledgment message acknowledging that all the target DMA engines are prepared to receive a data transmission from the origin DMA engine; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, the acknowledgement message from the one or more of the target DMA engines; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine, data to data storage on each of the target compute nodes according to the data storage reference using a single direct put operation.

Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Projected Constraints on Lorentz-Violating Gravity with Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves are excellent tools to probe the foundations of General Relativity in the strongly dynamical and non-linear regime. One such foundation is Lorentz symmetry, which can be broken in the gravitational sector by the existence of a preferred time direction, and thus, a preferred frame at each spacetime point. This leads to a modification in the orbital decay rate of binary systems, and also in the generation and chirping of their associated gravitational waves. We here study whether waves emitted in the late, quasi-circular inspiral of non-spinning, neutron star binaries can place competitive constraints on two proxies of gravitational Lorentz-violation: Einstein-\\AE{}ther theory and khronometric gravity. We model the waves in the small-coupling (or decoupling) limit and in the post-Newtonian approximation, by perturbatively solving the field equations in small deformations from General Relativity and in the small-velocity/weak-gravity approximation. We assume a gravitational wave consistent with General Relativity has been detected with second- and third-generation, ground-based detectors, and with the proposed space-based mission, DECIGO, with and without coincident electromagnetic counterparts. Without a counterpart, a detection consistent with General Relativity of neutron star binaries can only place competitive constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation when using future, third-generation or space-based instruments. On the other hand, a single counterpart is enough to place constraints that are 10 orders of magnitude more stringent than current binary pulsar bounds, even when using second-generation detectors. This is because Lorentz violation forces the group velocity of gravitational waves to be different from that of light, and this difference can be very accurately constrained with coincident observations.

Devin Hansen; Nicolas Yunes; Kent Yagi

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy-momentum relation for solitary waves of relativistic wave equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solitary waves of relativistic invariant nonlinear wave equation with symmetry group U(1) are considered. We prove that the energy-momentum relation for spherically symmetric solitary waves coincides with the Einstein energy-momentum relation for point particles.

T. V. Dudnikova; A. I. Komech; H. Spohn

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price, Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and saltacoustics, South Pole, sound speed, pressure waves,shear waves PACS: 47.35.De, 47.35.Rs, 62.65. +k, 92.40.Vq,

Klein, Spencer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Width dependent transition of quantized spin-wave modes in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} square nanorings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated optically induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics in square shaped Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanorings with varying ring width. Rich spin-wave spectra are observed whose frequencies showed a strong dependence on the ring width. Micromagnetic simulations showed different types of spin-wave modes, which are quantized upto very high quantization number. In the case of widest ring, the spin-wave mode spectrum shows quantized modes along the applied field direction, which is similar to the mode spectrum of an antidot array. As the ring width decreases, additional quantization in the azimuthal direction appears causing mixed modes. In the narrowest ring, the spin-waves exhibit quantization solely in azimuthal direction. The different quantization is attributed to the variation in the internal field distribution for different ring width as obtained from micromagnetic analysis and supported by magnetic force microscopy.

Banerjee, Chandrima; Saha, Susmita; Barman, Saswati; Barman, Anjan, E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Rousseau, Olivier [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Otani, YoshiChika [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Conclusions and Policy Directions,  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter briefly revisits the constraints and opportunities of mitigation and adaptation, and highlights and the multiple linkages, synergies and trade-offs between mitigation, adaptation and urban development. The chapter then presents future policy directions, focusing on local, national and international principles and policies for supporting and enhancing urban responses to climate change. In summary, policy directions for linking climate change responses with urban development offer abundant opportunities; but they call for new philosophies about how to think about the future and how to connect different roles of different levels of government and different parts of the urban community. In many cases, this implies changes in how urban areas operate - fostering closer coordination between local governments and local economic institutions, and building new connections between central power structures and parts of the population who have often been kept outside of the circle of consultation and discourse. The difficulties involved in changing deeply set patterns of interaction and decision-making in urban areas should not be underestimated. Because it is so difficult, successful experiences need to be identified, described and widely publicized as models for others. However, where this challenge is met, it is likely not only to increase opportunities and reduce threats to urban development in profoundly important ways, but to make the urban area a more effective socio-political entity, in general - a better city in how it works day to day and how it solves a myriad of problems as they emerge - far beyond climate change connections alone. It is in this sense that climate change responses can be catalysts for socially inclusive, economically productive and environmentally friendly urban development, helping to pioneer new patterns of stakeholder communication and participation.

Wilbanks, Thomas J [ORNL; Romero-Lankao, Paty [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Gnatz, P [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Solution of the inverse problem in spherical gravitational wave detectors using a model with independent bars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct detection of gravitational waves will provide valuable astrophysical information about many celestial objects. The SCHENBERG has already undergone its first test run. It is expected to have its first scientific run soon. In this work a new data analysis approach is presented, called the method of independent bars, which can be used with SCHENBERG's data. We test this method through the simulation of the detection of gravitational waves. With this method we find the source's direction without the need to have all six transducers operational. Also, we show that the method is a generalization of another one, already described in the literature, known as the mode channels method.

Lenzi, Cesar H. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Campo Montenegro, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, 12228-900 (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, Coimbra, 3004-516 (Portugal); Magalhaes, Nadja S. [Centro Federal de Educacao de Tecnologica de Sao Paulo, R. Dr. Pedro Vicente 625, Sao Paulo, SP 01109-010 (Brazil); Marinho, Rubens M. Jr.; Araujo, Helmo A. B. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Campo Montenegro, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, 12228-900 (Brazil); Costa, Cesar A.; Aguiar, Odylio D. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Avenida dos Astronautas 1.758, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, 12227-010 (Brazil)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Global coherence of dust density waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Mach reflection of spherical detonation waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When two detonation waves collide, the shape of the wave front at their intersection can be used to categorize the flow as regular or irregular reflection. In the case of regular reflection, the intersection of the waves forms a cusp. In the case of irregular reflection, the cusp is replaced by a leading shock locus that bridges the incident waves. Many workers have studied irregular or Mach reflection of detonation waves, but most of the their experimental work has focused on the interaction of plane detonation waves. Reflection of spherical detonation waves has received less attention. This study also differs from previous work in that the focus is to measure the relationship between the detonation velocity and the local wave curvatue for irregular reflection of spherical detonation waves. Two explosives with different detonation properties, PBX 9501 and PBX 9502, are compared.

Hull, L.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Modulation and kinematics of mechanically-generated short gravity waves riding on long waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering MODULATION AND KINEMATICS OF MECHANICALLY- GENERATED SHORT GRAVITY WAVES RIDING ON LONG WAVES A Thesis by C~S ANTHONY SPELL Approved as to style and content by: Jun Zhang... fundamental nonlinear wave interaction occurring in an irregular wave field. The objectives of the present study are now stated: ~ Generate a dual-component wave formed from the interaction of two inde- pendently propagating monochromatic wave trains in a...

Spell, Charles Anthony

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Measurements of the Shear Alfven Wave Dispersion for Finite Perpendicular Wave Number C. A. Kletzing,* S. R. Bounds, and J. Martin-Hiner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This allows us to test theoretical predictions of the dispersion of these waves by direct comparison with data Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, Iowa 52245 W. Gekelman and C. Mitchell Department of Physics, University=!pe, is 0.42 cm and the ion acoustic gyroradius (the gyroradius of ions with energy equal

California at Los Angles, University of

392

Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

B8 Page 1 B8. Using CMS-Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B8 ­ Page 1 B8. Using CMS-Wave The most recent CMS-Wave code developed is Version 3.2. Several new capabilities and advanced features in this version include: · Full-plane wind-generation of waves · Automatic wave run-up calculation · Infra-gravity wave calculation · Nonlinear wave-wave interaction · Muddy

US Army Corps of Engineers

394

Rank and directional entropy Rank and directional entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rank and directional entropy Rank and directional entropy E. Arthur (Robbie) Robinson (Joint work with Ayse Sahin) The George Washington University Talk at KIAS, Seoul, Korea. September 27, 2010 #12;Rank and directional entropy Outline 1 Introduction 2 Finite rank, Z case 3 The formal definition 4 The Z2 case 5

Robinson Jr., E. Arthur (Robbie)

395

Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Reaction force control implementation of a linear generator in irregular waves for a wave power system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Most designs for wave energy converters include a hydraulic (or pneumatic) interface between the wave device and the generator to smooth electricity production, but a… (more)

Li, Bin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Excitation of intense acoustic waves in hexagonal crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resonant excitation of an intense elastic wave using reflection of a pump wave from a free surface of hexagonal crystal is described. A resonance arises in the case of specially chosen propagation geometry where the reflecting boundary slightly deviates from symmetric orientation and the propagation direction of an intense reflected wave is close to that of an exceptional bulk wave, which satisfies the free boundary condition in unperturbed symmetric orientation. It is shown that, in crystals with elastic moduli c{sub 44}>c{sub 66}, a resonance arises when the initial boundary is chosen parallel to the hexagonal axis 6, whereas in crystals characterized by the relation c{sub 44}

Alshits, V. I., E-mail: alshits@ns.crys.ras.ru; Bessonov, D. A.; Lyubimov, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established.

Coutant, Antonin, E-mail: antonin.coutant@aei.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany); Parentani, Renaud, E-mail: renaud.parentani@th.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Bâtiment 210, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Bâtiment 210, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy...

400

Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Identifying two steps in the internal wave energy cascade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1.1 The internal wave energy cascade . . . . . . .? ? , which contain only wave energy trav- eling upward anddistinction is made between wave energy propagating upward

Sun, Oliver Ming-Teh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable...

403

Langmuir Waves and Electron Acceleration at Heliospheric Shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results for S/WAVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . A.7 Rheometry2.4 MHD Wave Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Electron Acceleration, Plasma Waves, and Radio Emission 3.1

Pulupa, Marc Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

atmospheric gravity waves: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gravity waves (AGWs). Satellite imagery shows evidence the characteristics of these waves. The favorable wave propagation conditions in 12;this region are illustrated 5...

406

Bioenergy Technologies Office New Directions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New Directions and New Business Opportunities for BETO Valerie Reed, Acting Director, BETO, U.S. Department of Energy

407

Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

Yoo, S. J. Ben

408

Cofinal types of directed orders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ) directed partial orders #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P orders Tukey reducibility: (P, ) T (Q, ) if f : P Q X P unbounded = f [X] Q unbounded g : Q P Y Q cofinal = g[Y ] P cofinal #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P

Mátrai, Tamás

409

Direct and Inverse Cascades in the Wind-Driven Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We offer a new form for the S(nl) term in the Hasselmann kinetic equation for squared wave amplitudes of wind-driven gravity wave. This form of S(nl) makes possible to rewrite in differential form the conservation laws for energy, momentum, and wave action, and introduce their fluxes by a natural way. We show that the stationary kinetic equation has a family of exact Kolmogorov-type solutions governed by the fluxes of motion constants: wave action, energy, and momentum. The simple "local" model for S(nl) term that is equivalent to the "diffusion approximation" is studied in details. In this case, Kolmogorov spectra are found in the explicit form. We show that a general solution of the stationary kinetic equation behind the spectral peak is described by the Kolmogorov-type solution with frequency-dependent fluxes. The domains of "inverse cascade" and "direct cascade" can be separated by natural way. The spectrum in the universal domain is close to $\\omega^{-4}$.

Zakharov, Vladimir E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Wave Energy challenges and possibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a reservoir, with low head turbines as power take off. Articulating tubes with hydraulic power take off. Point or fixed coastal installation. Air based Wells turbines as power take off. Over topping waves absorber, with either water pumps, linear generators or hydraulic power take off systems. Multi point

411

Wave functions of linear systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complete analysis of quantum wave functions of linear systems in an arbitrary number of dimensions is given. It is shown how one can construct a complete set of stationary quantum states of an arbitrary linear system from purely classical arguments. This construction is possible because for linear systems classical dynamics carries the whole information about quantum dynamics.

Tomasz Sowinski

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

case, the electrons have negative wave energy for 2w ne w wave energy for 2w .w > 0 nl Hence, unstable waves with negative phase velocity,

Cary, John R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

On quantization of nondispersive wave packets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nondispersive wave packets are widely used in optics and acoustics. We found it interesting that such packets could be also a subject of quantum field theory. Canonical commutation relations for the nondispersive wave packets are constructed.

Altaisky, M. V. [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)] [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Kaputkina, N. E. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)] [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Wave Mechanics and General Relativity: A Rapprochement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using exact solutions, we show that it is in principle possible to regard waves and particles as representations of the same underlying geometry, thereby resolving the problem of wave-particle duality.

Paul S. Wesson

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Wind Wave Float | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(TRL 1 2 3 Component) Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale PowerBuoy Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...

416

Stratified Shear Flow: Instability and Wave Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratified Shear Flow: Instability and Wave Radiation B. R. Sutherland Dept. Mathematical of internal waves in the atmosphere and ocean, but the evolution of the shear layer itself is significantly

Sutherland, Bruce

417

Wave Patterns and Southern Hemisphere Convergence Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-rate days, a wave pattern is identified that is characteristic of high rain events. This wave pattern is then compared to the patterns of variability of brightness temperature using empirical orthogonal functions. A linear regression technique is used...

Ramotowski, Michelle R.

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

Analysis of optimum Lamb wave tuning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guided waves are of enormous interest in the nondestructive evaluation of thin-walled structures and layered media. Due to their dispersive and multi-modal nature, it is desirable to tune the waves by discriminating one ...

Shi, Yijun, 1970-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Strings in plane-fronted gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brinkmann's plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel rays --~shortly pp-waves~-- are shown to provide, under suitable conditions, exact string vacua at all orders of the sigma-model perturbation expansion.

C. Duval; Z. Horvath; P. A. Horvathy

2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

420

Symmetries and Interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We considered symmetry restriction on the interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves and demonstrated that linear in small wave vector asymptotic is not forbidden, as one can expect by naive reasoning.

Vladimir V. Lebedev; Victor S. L'vov

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

422

Nonlinear Saturation of Vertically Propagating Rossby Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interaction between vertical Rossby wave propagation and wave breaking is studied in the idealized context of a beta-plane channel model. Considering the problem of propagation through a uniform zonal flow in an ...

Giannitsis, Constantine

423

Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

Hughes, Scott A.

424

Non-expanding impulsive gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a class of impulsive gravitational waves which propagate either in Minkowski or in the (anti-)de Sitter background. These waves are constructed as impulsive members of the Kundt class $P(\\Lambda)$ of non-twisting, non-expanding type N solutions of vacuum Einstein equations with a cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. We show that the only non-trivial waves of this type in Minkowski spacetime are impulsive pp-waves. For $\\Lambda\

J. Podolsky

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the ? channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Electromagnetic wave scattering by Schwarzschild black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the scattering of a planar monochromatic electromagnetic wave incident upon a Schwarzschild black hole. We obtain accurate numerical results from the partial wave method for the electromagnetic scattering cross section, and show that they are in excellent agreement with analytical approximations. The scattering of electromagnetic waves is compared with the scattering of scalar, spinor and gravitational waves. We present a unified picture of the scattering of all massless fields for the first time.

Luís C. B. Crispino; Sam R. Dolan; Ednilton S. Oliveira

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic wave propagation through fractures and cracks is an important subject in exploration and production geophysics, earthquake seismology and mining.

428

Multi-reflective acoustic wave device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

Andle, Jeffrey C.

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

Wave guides: vacuum w/ tube of conductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave guides: vacuum w/ tube of conductor boundary conditions for conductor Properties: non-transverse waves except TEM mode in coaxial cable speed normal modes (from Liouville problem) TE or TM TEM for coaxial cable cuto frequency otherwise evanescent waves separation into and components with 1 #12;B

Hart, Gus

430

WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

Stewart, Sarah T.

431

Wave Packets and Turbulent Peter Jordan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Packets and Turbulent Jet Noise Peter Jordan1 and Tim Colonius2 1 D´epartement Fluides-control efforts is incomplete. Wave packets are intermittent, advecting disturbances that are correlated over review evidence of the existence, energetics, dynamics, and acous- tic efficiency of wave packets. We

Dabiri, John O.

432

Wave propagation Remco Hartkamp (University of Twente)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) waves Sound: 20 Hz ­ 20 kHz Gas: P Liquid: P Plasma: P Solid: P & S #12;Stretched string example 1D wave Dispersion: Waves with different wavelengths propagate at different speeds 6 k c k k Shallow water: c gh mJ K material parameter (related to the strain saturation of the material) det FJ bulk modulus

Entekhabi, Dara

433

CURRENTS DRIVEN BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURRENTS DRIVEN BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES C.F.F. KARNEY, NJ. FISCH Plasma Physics Laboratory of the generation of steady-state currents by electron cyclotron waves are explored. A numerical solution of electron cyclotron wave absorption appears to be one of the more promising schemes of providing a steady

Karney, Charles

434

SCATTERING BEHAVIOR OF TRANSITIONAL SHOCK WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCATTERING BEHAVIOR OF TRANSITIONAL SHOCK WAVES Kevin R. Zumbrun Bradley J. Plohr Dan Marchesin September, 1991 Abstract. We study the stability and asymptotic behavior of transitional shock waves as solutions of a parabolic system of conservation laws. In contrast to classical shock waves, transitional

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

435

Waves on unsteady currents Merrick C. Haller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves on unsteady currents Merrick C. Haller School of Civil and Construction Engineering, Oregon 2007; published online 3 December 2007 Models for surface gravity wave propagation in the presence of currents often assume the current field to be quasi-stationary, which implies that the absolute wave

Haller, Merrick

436

Bifurcation Theory of Meandering Spiral Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bifurcation Theory of Meandering Spiral Waves Claudia Wul Freie Universitat Berlin, Fachbereich Mathematik und Informatik, Arnimallee 2{6, 14195 Berlin, email: wul @math.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Spiral waves-Zhabotinsky reaction. We develop a mathematical theory for the Hopf bifurcation from rigidly rotating spiral waves

Wulff, Claudia

437

Autoresonance of coupled nonlinear waves L. Friedland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave train solutions of the decoupled problem. At the same time, the waves are globally phase locked, allowing the continuation of the phase locking between the waves despite the variation of system's param and sustaining this multidimensional autoresonance are the internal reso- nant excitation of one of the coupled

Friedland, Lazar

438

EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory X. 1 33 R A. RTT ir.':; WOODS instantaneously to sounds. It was con- were tested in an experimental tank and in eluded that sound waves were, Wash . sound studies conducted under the above contract are terminated. #12;EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES

439

Hybrid wave model and its applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nonlinear hybrid wave model (HWM) is developed. It uses the conventional mode-coupling method (MCM) and the phase modulation method (PMM) to address the nonlinear interactions between free-wave components in an ocean wave field. The PMM is a...

Yang, Jun

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation Kai Huang, Knut Solna and Hongkai Zhao #3; April simulation of wave propagation over long distances. The coupled parabolic equations are derived from a two algorithms are important in order to understand wave propagation in complex media. Resolving the wavelength

Zhao, Hongkai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Seminario de Matemtica Aplicada "Renowable wave energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Among the various renewable energy sources, ocean wave energy has been only recently investigaSeminario de Matemática Aplicada "Renowable wave energy: potencial and technical challenges will be at first to introduce the potential of wave energy, as a significant, and often neglected, contributor

Tradacete, Pedro

442

WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research a preliminary examination and analysis of a small suite of 4-D wave data to explore what new insight century. We feel it is timely to encourage further 4-D ocean wave measurement and thereby facilitate fresh

443

Wave Front Interaction Model of Stabilized Propagating Wave Segments Vladimir S. Zykov1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Front Interaction Model of Stabilized Propagating Wave Segments Vladimir S. Zykov1 and Kenneth; published 14 February 2005) A wave front interaction model is developed to describe the relationship between excitability and the size and shape of stabilized wave segments in a broad class of weakly excitable media

Showalter, Kenneth

444

Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

Fominov, Yakov

445

Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tams Bnsgi, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tamás Bánsági, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka Received 5 November 2007; accepted 26 December 2007; published online 6 March 2008 Scroll waves are three can be pinned to the wake of traveling wave pulses. This pinning is studied in experiments with the 1

Steinbock, Oliver

446

Lossless Tapers, Gaussian Beams, Free-Space Modes: Standing Waves Versus Through-Flowing Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lossless Tapers, Gaussian Beams, Free-Space Modes: Standing Waves Versus Through-Flowing Waves inconsistencies, in Marcatili's lossless tapers through-flowing waves must be drastically different from standing waves. First, we reconfirm this by means of numerical results based on an extended BPM algorithm. Next

Curtarolo, Stefano

447

Segmented Waves from a Spatiotemporal Transverse Wave Instability Lingfa Yang, Igal Berenstein, and Irving R. Epstein*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Segmented Waves from a Spatiotemporal Transverse Wave Instability Lingfa Yang, Igal Berenstein observe traveling waves emitted from Turing spots in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction. The newborn waves are continuous, but they break into segments as they propagate, and the propagation

Epstein, Irving R.

448

THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )}. In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Karpen, Judith T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. Richard, E-mail: pbu3@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: judy.karpen@nasa.gov, E-mail: devore@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

Beauty waves: an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we present a method for computing an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves. Wave forms are loosely based on procedural wave models and are designed to emulate those found in both art and nature. The wave forms...

Faulkner, Jay Allen

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

450

High amplitude wave propagation in collapsible tubes. II. Forerunners and high amplitude waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

773 High amplitude wave propagation in collapsible tubes. II. Forerunners and high amplitude waves that, under certain circumstances, a pressure wave of large amplitude which propagates in a fluid feature of such a shock wave propagation inside an initially collapsed tube is the presence ofwavelets

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation So far we have talked about wave propagation in one-dimension. For two or three spatial dimensions, we vectorize our ideas propagation. For surface waves, there is no vertical propagation, and we are only concerned with the two

Thompson, LuAnne

452

Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Paper: Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building John residential light- frame wood buildings and wave and surge loading be- cause often little is left residential structures and wave loading. To do this, one-sixth scale residen- tial building models typical

Cox, Dan

453

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms gradient technologies. This paper is focused on Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) and the need

Haller, Merrick

454

The Effects of Wave Energy Converters on a Monochromatic Wave Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Wave energy converters were converters as well as the availability of energy in the ocean. This study will examine the effects of a wave and mean wave period of wave energy fields. There is tremendous energy potential in the ocean. Solar energy

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

455

Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and idealized numerical modeling. The linear theory for ow without terrain shows that the solution depends on two parameters: a nondimensional coastal width L and a nondimensional wind speed U. For U 6= 0 the solution is composed of three distinct wave branches...

Qian, Tingting

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

456

Hydromagnetic waves and instabilities in kappa distribution plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stability properties of hydromagnetic waves (shear and compressional Alfven waves) in spatially homogeneous plasma are investigated when the equilibrium particle velocity distributions in both parallel and perpendicular directions (in reference to the ambient magnetic field) are modeled by kappa distributions. Analysis is presented for the limiting cases |{xi}{sub {alpha}}|<<1 and |{xi}{sub {alpha}}|>>1 for which solutions of the dispersion relations are analytically tractable. Here {xi}{sub {alpha}}({alpha}=e,i) is the ratio of the wave phase speed and the electron (ion) thermal speed. Both low and high {beta} (=plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) plasmas are considered. The distinguishing features of the hydromagnetic waves in kappa distribution plasma are (1) both Landau damping and transit-time damping rates are larger than those in Maxwellian plasma because of the enhanced high-energy tail of the kappa distribution and (2) density and temperature perturbations in response to the electromagnetic perturbations are different from those in Maxwellian plasma when |{xi}{sub {alpha}}|<<1. Moreover, frequency of the oscillatory stable modes (e.g., kinetic shear Alfven wave) and excitation condition of the nonoscillatory (zero frequency) unstable modes (e.g., mirror instability) in kappa distribution plasma are also different from those in Maxwellian plasma. Quantitative estimates of the differences depend on the specific choice of the kappa distribution. For simplicity of notations, same spectral indices {kappa}{sub ||} and {kappa}{sub perpendicular} have been assumed for both electron and ion population. However, the analysis can be easily generalized to allow for different values of the spectral indices for the two charged populations.

Basu, B. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 01731 (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

ITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Acknowledgment Surface waves are phenomena that are characterised by the dynamic interplay between linear.3 Linear Dispersive wave model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Wave groupsITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves Brenny van Groesen, Applied Analysis & Mathematical

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

458

Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectra for that given region from a selected deep-water calibration station. METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING THE AVAILABLE WAVE ENERGY RESOURCE This section will describe the methodology for estimating the naturally available and technically recoverable... resource in a given region. In a recent study done by the EPRI, data was gathered from U.S. coastal waters for a 51- month Wavewatch III hindcast database that was developed specifically for the EPRI by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental...

Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Traveling wave device for combining or splitting symmetric and asymmetric waves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A traveling wave device for the combining or splitting of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy includes a feed waveguide for traveling wave energy, the feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for coupling wave energy between the feed waveguide and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of wave energy to or from the reflector. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which includes a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which includes a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

Möbius, Arnold (Eggenstein, DE); Ives, Robert Lawrence (Saratoga, CA)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effective medium theory of elastic waves in random networks of rods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We formulate an effective medium (mean field) theory of a material consisting of randomly distributed nodes connected by straight slender rods, hinged at the nodes. Defining novel wavelength-dependent effective elastic moduli, we calculate both the static moduli and the dispersion relations of ultrasonic longitudinal and transverse elastic waves. At finite wave vector $k$ the waves are dispersive, with phase and group velocities decreasing with increasing wave vector. These results are directly applicable to networks with empty pore space. They also describe the solid matrix in two-component (Biot) theories of fluid-filled porous media. We suggest the possibility of low density materials with higher ratios of stiffness and strength to density than those of foams, aerogels or trabecular bone.

J. I. Katz; J. J. Hoffman; M. S. Conradi; J. G. Miller

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Breaking of relativistically intense longitudinal space charge waves: A description using Dawson sheet model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatio-temporal evolution of relativistically intense longitudinal space charge waves in a cold homogeneous plasma is studied analytically as well as numerically, as an initial value problem, using Dawson sheet model. It is found that, except for very special initial conditions which generates the well known longitudinal Akhiezer-Polovin mode, for all other initial conditions, the waves break through a novel mechanism called phase mixing at an amplitude well below the Akhiezer-Polovin limit. An immediate consequence of this is, that Akhiezer-Polovin waves break when subjected to arbitrarily small longitudinal perturbations. We demonstrate this by performing extensive numerical simulations. This result may be of direct relevance to ultrashort, ultraintense laser/beam pulse-plasma interaction experiments where relativistically intense waves are routinely excited.

Sengupta, Sudip, E-mail: sudip@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat , Gandhinagar - 382428 (India)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite Doppler velocimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves imprint apparent Doppler shifts on the frequency of photons propagating between an emitter and detector of light. This forms the basis of a method to detect gravitational waves using Doppler velocimetry between pairs of satellites. Such detectors, operating in the milli-hertz gravitational frequency band, could lead to the direct detection of gravitational waves. The crucial component in such a detector is the frequency standard on board the emitting and receiving satellites. We point out that recent developments in atomic frequency standards have led to devices that are approaching the sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting sources. The sensitivity of satellites equipped with optical frequency standards for Doppler velocimetry is examined, and a design for a robust, space-capable optical frequency standard is presented.

Vutha, Amar C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Coherent molecular transistor: Control through variation of the gate wave function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor.

Ernzerhof, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.Ernzerhof@UMontreal.ca [Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succursale A, Montréal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)] [Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succursale A, Montréal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

464

Partial Reflection and Trapping of a Fast-mode Wave in Solar Coronal Arcade Loops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first direct observation of a fast-mode wave propagating along and perpendicular to cool (171 {\\AA}) arcade loops observed by the SDO/AIA. The wave was associated with an impulsive/compact flare, near the edge of a sunspot. The EUV wavefront expanded radially outward from the flare center and decelerated in the corona from 1060-760 km/s within ~3-4 minute. Part of the EUV wave propagated along a large-scale arcade of cool loops and was partially reflected back to the flare site. The phase speed of the wave was about 1450 km/s, which is interpreted as a fast-mode wave. A second overlying loop arcade, orientated perpendicular to the cool arcade, is heated and becomes visible in the AIA hot channels. These hot loops sway in time with the EUV wave, as it propagated to and fro along the lower loop arcade. We suggest that an impulsive energy release at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops causes the onset of an EUV shock wave that propagates along and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

Kumar, Pankaj

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Efficient and Scalable All-to-All Personalized Exchange for InfiniBand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· High performance ­ Low latency of lesser than 5us ­ Over 840 Mega Byte/s uni-directional bandwidth? ­ Can we utilize the InfiniBand RDMA and Gather/Scatter capabilities? ­ How can we achieve better of pinning is high ­ Solution for small messages: copy into a pre-registered buffer [liuj-ics03] ­ Cost

Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

466

Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uni-directional wind turbine fiber-reinforced composite material with an epoxy resin were utilized of wind turbine blades have essentially dictated the use of low cost fiberglass composite materials. Even1 Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects Jared W. Nelson

467

Whistler waves observed near lunar crustal magnetic sources J. S. Halekas,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-standing whistler wakes formed by direct solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic fields. Citation such waves on about 6.6% of LP orbits in the solar wind, outside of the lunar wake. About a third of them-standing whistler wakes can be generated by solar wind interaction with electron- scale magnetic obstacles

California at Berkeley, University of

468

Radar Observations of MJO and Kelvin Wave Interactions During DYNAMO/AMIE/CINDY2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-stratiform classification of rain rate, rain area, and echo-top heights, as well as cloud boundaries. Sounding data includes profiles of wind speed and direction and relative humidity. Kelvin waves that occur during the suppressed MJO are convectively weaker than Kelvin...

DePasquale, Amanda Michele

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

469

Shack Hartmann wave-front measurement with a large F-number plastic microlens array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hartmann wave-front sensor, deformable mirror. r 1996 Optical Society of America 1. Introduction In direct The improvement in laser irradiation uniformity of a spherical target is necessary for higher efficiency in the fusion reaction. In the laser system used for this purpose, large optical devices of several tens

Yoon, Geunyoung

470

Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a more active development began only after the rapid increase of the prices of oil-dependent fuels Article history: Received 30 July 2013 Accepted 25 March 2014 Available online Keywords: Wave energy mitigation and adaptation, the shadow of the recent economic crisis that directly affected the oil- dependent

Georgiou, Georgios

471

Title of Document: STUDY OF LONGITUDINAL SPACE CHARGE WAVES IN SPACE-CHARGE DOMINATED BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAMS Jayakar Charles Tobin Thangaraj, Doctor of Philosophy, 2009 Directed By: Prof. Patrick O'Shea Prof current electron beam with very low emittance and energy spread. Any density fluctuation in an intense beam can launch space charge waves that lead to energy modulation. The energy modulations may cause

Anlage, Steven

472

Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated Granular Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated a mechanically free surface of an unconsolidated granular layer under gravity is solved analytically using of the acoustic experiments directed to the investigation of fundamental mechanical properties of unconsolidated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

Optoelectronic down-conversion by four-wave mixing in a highly nonlinear fiber for millimeter-wave and THz phase-locking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optoelectronic down-conversion of a THz optical beatnote to a RF intermediate frequency is performed with a standard Mach-Zehnder modulator followed by a zero dispersion-slope fiber. The two interleaved optical spectra obtained by four-wave mixing are shown to contain more than 75 harmonics enabling to conveniently recover the phase noise of a beatnote at 770 GHz at around 500 MHz. This four-wave mixing down-conversion technique is implemented in a two-frequency solid-state laser in order to directly phase-lock its 168 GHz beatnote to a 10 MHz local oscillator.

Rolland, Antoine; Brunel, Marc; Alouini, Mehdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Matter Wave Radiation Leading to Matter Teleportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of matter wave radiation is put forward, and its equation is established for the first time. The formalism solution shows that the probability density is a function of displacement and time. A free particle and a two-level system are reinvestigated considering the effect of matter wave radiation. Three feasible experimental designs, especially a modified Stern-Gerlach setup, are proposed to verify the existence of matter wave radiation. Matter wave radiation effect in relativity has been formulated in only a raw formulae, which offers another explanation of Lamb shift. A possible mechanics of matter teleportation is predicted due to the effect of matter wave radiation.

Yong-Yi Huang

2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

Ponderomotive Forces On Waves In Modulated Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear interactions of waves via instantaneous cross-phase modulation can be cast in the same way as ponderomotive wave-particle interactions in high-frequency electromagnetic fi eld. The ponderomotive effect arises when rays of a probe wave scatter off perturbations of the underlying medium produced by a second, modulation wave, much like charged particles scatter off a quasiperiodic field. Parallels with the point-particle dynamics, which itself is generalized by this theory, lead to new methods of wave manipulation, including asymmetric barriers for light.

Dodin, I.Y; Fisch, Nathaniel

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

476

Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations of magnetic energy emerge at some particular wave frequencies.

Wei, Xing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

478

Millimeter-wave active probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza (Sunnyvale, CA); Bloom, David M. (Portola Valley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Gravitational waves from perturbed stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

Valeria Ferrari

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

Magnonic band structure, complete bandgap, and collective spin wave excitation in nanoscale two-dimensional magnonic crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the observation of a complete bandgap and collective spin wave excitation in two-dimensional magnonic crystals comprised of arrays of nanoscale antidots and nanodots, respectively. Considering that the frequencies dealt with here fall in the microwave band, these findings can be used for the development of suitable magnonic metamaterials and spin wave based signal processing. We also present the application of a numerical procedure, to compute the dispersion relations of spin waves for any high symmetry direction in the first Brillouin zone. The results obtained from this procedure have been reproduced and verified by the well established plane wave method for an antidot lattice, when magnetization dynamics at antidot boundaries are pinned. The micromagnetic simulation based method can also be used to obtain iso–frequency contours of spin waves. Iso–frequency contours are analogous of the Fermi surfaces and hence, they have the potential to radicalize our understanding of spin wave dynamics. The physical origin of bands, partial and full magnonic bandgaps have been explained by plotting the spatial distribution of spin wave energy spectral density. Although, unfettered by rigid assumptions and approximations, which afflict most analytical methods used in the study of spin wave dynamics, micromagnetic simulations tend to be computationally demanding. Thus, the observation of collective spin wave excitation in the case of nanodot arrays, which can obviate the need to perform simulations, may also prove to be valuable.

Kumar, D.; Barman, A., E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); K?os, J. W.; Krawczyk, M. [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, Pozna? 61-614 (Poland)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

482

Progress towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I will review the most recent and interesting results from gravitational wave detection experiments, concentrating on recent results from the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). I will outline the methodologies utilized in the searches, explain what can be said in the case of a null result, what quantities may be constrained. I will compare these results with prior expectations and discuss their significance. As I go along I will outline the prospects for future improvements.

M. Alessandra Papa

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

483

Rabi Waves in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QED-model for the multichain qubit system with interactions of qubits and chains between themselves on the example of the system of $\\sigma$-polarons in carbon zigzag nanotubes, interacting with quantized EM-field, is considered analytically. The possibility of experimental detection of Rabi waves in conventional stationary optical experiments for any quasi-1D system with strong electron-photon interaction is predicted.

Alla Dovlatova; Dmitry Yearchuck

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

484

Corvino's construction using Brill waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For two-black-hole time-symmetric initial data we consider the Corvino construction of gluing an exact Schwarzschild end. We propose to do this by using Brill waves. We address the question of whether this method can be used to reduce the overall energy, which seems to relate to the question of whether it can reduce the amount of `spurious' gravitational radiation. We find a positive answer at first order in the inverse gluing radius.

Domenico Giulini; Gustav Holzegel

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

485

Freak waves in white dwarfs and magnetars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report properties of ion acoustic freak waves that propagate in a plasma composed of warm ions and ultrarelativistic electrons and positrons. The dynamics of the nonlinear freak waves is governed by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The possible region for the freak waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of white dwarfs and magnetars corona. It is found that for low wave number, the nonlinear ion-acoustic wave packets are structurally stable in magnetars corona than in white dwarfs. However, for large wave numbers the situation is opposite. The critical wave number threshold (k{sub c}), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, is defined for both applications. It is seen that near to k{sub c} the freak wave amplitude becomes high, but it decreases whenever we stepped away from k{sub c}. For the wave numbers close to k{sub c}, the increase of the unperturbed density ratio of positrons-to-electrons ({beta}) would lead to increase the freak wave amplitude, but for larger wave numbers the amplitude decreases with the increase of {beta}.

Sabry, R. [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Moslem, W. M. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Direct cooled power electronics substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN) [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

487

Idaho National Laboratory Driving Directions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

488

Policy Procedure Administrative Directive Title: _____________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy ­ Procedure ­ Administrative Directive Title: _____________________________________ Policy-President _____________ See also: Related Policies, Procedures and Agreements: Relevant Legislation and Regulations: ____________________________________________________________________________ Background and Purpose: ____________________________________________________________________________ Policy

Northern British Columbia, University of

489

Dimensional Reduction in 6D Standing Waves Braneworld  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We found cosmological solution of the 6D standing wave braneworld model generated by gravity coupled to a massless scalar phantom-like field. By obtaining a full exact solution of the model we found a novel dynamical mechanism in which the anisotropic nature of the primordial metric gives rise to expansion of three spatial brane dimensions and affectively reduction of other spatial directions. This dynamical mechanism can be relevant for dimensional reduction in string and other higher dimensional theories in the attempt of getting a 4D isotropic expanding space-time.

Otari Sakhelashvili

2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

490

Stochastic background of gravitational waves from cosmological sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves (GW) can constitute a unique probe of the primordial universe. In many cases, the characteristic frequency of the emitted GW is directly related to the energy scale at which the GW source is operating in the early universe. Consequently, different GW detectors can probe different energy scales in the evolution of the universe. After a general introduction on the properties of a GW stochastic background of primordial origin, some examples of cosmological sources are presented, which may lead to observable GW signals.

Caprini, Chiara

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Wave propagation in axion electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, the axion contribution to the electromagnetic wave propagation is studied. First we show how the axion electrodynamics model can be embedded into a premetric formalism of Maxwell electrodynamics. In this formalism, the axion field is not an arbitrary added Chern-Simon term of the Lagrangian, but emerges in a natural way as an irreducible part of a general constitutive tensor.We show that in order to represent the axion contribution to the wave propagation it is necessary to go beyond the geometric approximation, which is usually used in the premetric formalism. We derive a covariant dispersion relation for the axion modified electrodynamics. The wave propagation in this model is studied for an axion field with timelike, spacelike and null derivative covectors. The birefringence effect emerges in all these classes as a signal of Lorentz violation. This effect is however completely different from the ordinary birefringence appearing in classical optics and in premetric electrodynamics. The axion field does not simple double the ordinary light cone structure. In fact, it modifies the global topological structure of light cones surfaces. In CFJ-electrodynamics, such a modification results in violation of causality. In addition, the optical metrics in axion electrodynamics are not pseudo-Riemannian. In fact, for all types of the axion field, they are even non-Finslerian.

Yakov Itin

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

492

Topological Aspects of Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of wave propagation on a manifold X, the characteristic functions are real valued functions on cotangent bundle of X that specify the allowable phase velocities of the waves. For certain classes of differential operators (e.g Maxwell's Equations) the associated characteristic functions have singularities. These singularities account for phenomena like conical refraction and the transformation of longitudinal waves into transversal ones (or viceversa). For a specific class of differential operators on surface, we prove that the singularities of the characteristic functions can be accounted from purely topological considerations. We also prove that there is a natural way to desingularsize the characteristic functions, and observe that this fact and Morse Theory establishes a specific connection between singularities and critical points of these functions. The relation between characteristic functions and differential operators is obtained through what is known as the symbol of the operator. We establish a connection between these symbols and holomorphic vector fields, which will provide us with symbols whose characteristic functions have interesting singularity sets.

Carlos Valero

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

493

On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean waveOn the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry

Victoria, University of

494

A Wave Interpretation of the Compton Effect As a Further Demonstration of the Postulates of de Broglie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Compton effect is commonly cited as a demonstration of the particle feature of light, while the wave nature of matter has been proposed by de Broglie and demonstrated by Davisson and Germer with the Bragg diffraction of electron beams. In this investigation, we present an entirely different interpretation of the Compton effect based on the postulates of de Broglie and on an interaction between electromagnetic and matter waves. The speeds of interacting electrons in the Compton scattering are quite fast and its mechanism relies heavily on the mass variation. Thus, based on this wave interpretation, the Compton effect can be viewed as a further demonstration of the postulates of de Broglie for high-speed particles. In addition to the scattered wave, a direct radiation depending on the mass variation is predicted, which provides a means to test the wave interpretation.

Ching-Chuan Su

2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

495

Focusing of Rayleigh waves generated by high-speed trains under the condition of ground vibration boom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present paper, the effects of focusing of Rayleigh waves generated by high speed trains in the supporting ground under the condition of ground vibration boom are considered theoretically. These effects are similar to the effects of focusing of sound waves radiated by aircraft under the condition of sonic boom. In particular, if a railway track has a bend to provide the possibility of changing direction of train movement, the Rayleigh surface waves generated by high-speed trains under the condition of ground vibration boom may become focused. This results in concentration of their energy along a simple caustic line at one side of the track and in the corresponding increase in ground vibration amplitudes. The effect of focusing of Rayleigh waves may occur also if a train moves along a straight line with acceleration and its current speed is higher than Rayleigh wave velocity in the ground. The obtained results are illustrated by numerical calculations.

Krylov, Victor V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Wave propagation and shock formation in different magnetic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Velocity oscillations "measured" simultaneously at the photosphere and the chromosphere -from time series of spectropolarimetric data in the 10830 A region- of different solar magnetic features allow us to study the properties of wave propagation as a function of the magnetic flux of the structure (i.e. two different-sized sunspots, a tiny pore and a facular region). While photospheric oscillations have similar characteristics everywhere, oscillations measured at chromospheric heights show different amplitudes, frequencies and stages of shock development depending on the observed magnetic feature. The analysis of the power and the phase spectra, together with simple theoretical modeling, lead to a series of results concerning wave propagation within the range of heights of this study. We find that, while the atmospheric cut-off frequency and the propagation properties of the different oscillating modes depend on the magnetic feature, in all the cases the power that reaches the high chromosphere above the atmospheric cut-off comes directly from the photosphere by means of linear vertical wave propagation rather than from non-linear interaction of modes.

Rebecca Centeno; Manuel Collados; Javier Trujillo Bueno

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

497

Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Scattering of Sound Waves by a Canonical Acoustic Hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a study of a monochromatic planar perturbation impinging upon a canonical acoustic hole. We show that acoustic hole scattering shares key features with black hole scattering. The interference of wavefronts passing in opposite senses around the hole creates regular oscillations in the scattered intensity. We examine this effect by applying a partial wave method to compute the differential scattering cross section for a range of incident wavelengths. We demonstrate the existence of a scattering peak in the backward direction, known as the glory. We show that the glory created by the canonical acoustic hole is approximately 170 times less intense than the glory created by the Schwarzschild black hole, for equivalent horizon-to-wavelength ratios. We hope that direct experimental observations of such effects may be possible in the near future.

Sam R. Dolan; Ednilton S. Oliveira; Luís C. B. Crispino

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

499

Wave  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition3 WaterFebruary 18, 20141 Summer 2001

500

High-power and wavelength-tunable traveling-wave semiconductor ring laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Fig. 3, to direct the TM-mode light to a 50/50 beamsplitter, which deflects 50% of the light out of the ring cavity. With the combination of a Faraday rotator and a X/2-plate, we can operate the ring laser unidirectionally. The direction... of the traveling wave is as indicated in Fig. 1. Unidirectional propagation of light can be achieved as follows: The Faraday rotator is used to rotate the polarization of the light that comes from the k/2-plate by 45', say in the clockwise direction...

Peng, En Titus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z