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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Property:Wave Direction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direction Direction Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wave Direction Property Type String Pages using the property "Wave Direction" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alden Small Flume + Uni-Directional + Alden Wave Basin + Both + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + Both + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + Uni-Directional + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + Uni-Directional + Chase Tow Tank + Uni-Directional + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + Uni-Directional + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + Uni-Directional + Coastal Structures Modeling Complex + Both + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + Uni-Directional + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + Uni-Directional + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + Uni-Directional + H Haynes Wave Basin + Both +

2

Approximate Uni-directional Benders Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tention of visiting as many markets as is necessary to meet demand for a set of ... K. The markets may have lim- ited quantities of each product (capacity C).

C N Burt, N Lipovetzky, A R Pearce, P J Stuckey

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 104.0 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 4.6 Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 1.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 12' by 12' concrete slabs anchored to flume walls

4

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheets Wave Basin Sheets Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sheets Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Rhode Island Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 30.0 Beam(m) 3.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $750(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.0 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Pre-programmed for regular and irregular waves, but wavemaker is capable of any input motion. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

5

DeFrees Large Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Large Wave Basin Large Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Large Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 32.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 64 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled 4m hydraulic wave paddle stroke allows a series of solitary waves to be generated; arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes

6

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy  

SciTech Connect

The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

Directional Spectra of Wind-Generated Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...H. Hui From observations of wind and of water surface elevation...the directional spectrum of wind-generated waves on deep water...inversely proportional to the fourth power of the frequency , with the...clearly dependent on the ratio of wind speed to peak wave speed...

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DeFrees Small Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Small Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 15.0 Beam(m) 0.8 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 30 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled hydraulic paddle, arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 1:10 sloping glass with dissipative horsehair covering if needed

9

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 15.2 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Special Physical Features Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control sys

10

MHL 2D Wind/Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL 2D Wind/Wave MHL 2D Wind/Wave Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL 2D Wind/Wave Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 35.1 Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Removable beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 20.4

11

University of Iowa Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University of Iowa Wave Basin University of Iowa Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 40.0 Beam(m) 20.0 Depth(m) 3.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Towed 3DPIV; contactless motion tracking; free surface measurement mappingv Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Fully programmable for regular or irregular waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Trusses overlaid with lattice and matting Channel/Tunnel/Flume

12

Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy April 9, 2013 - 12:00am...

13

DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF INTERACTION OF DETONATION WAVE WITH HOMOGENEOUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF INTERACTION OF DETONATION WAVE WITH HOMOGENEOUS ISOTROPIC TURBULENCE SIMULATION OF INTERACTION OF DETONATION WAVE WITH HOMOGENEOUS ISOTROPIC TURBULENCE HARI NARAYANAN NAGARAJAN The propagation of a shock or detonation wave through a reactive mixture has been the subject of research for over

Texas at Arlington, University of

14

Direct Simulation of Internal Wave Energy Transfer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional nonhydrostatic numerical model is used to calculate nonlinear energy transfers within decaying Garrett–Munk internal wavefields. Inviscid wave interactions are calculated over horizontal scales from about 1 to 80 km and for ...

Kraig B. Winters; Eric A. D’Asaro

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print The electronic properties of a metal are determined by the dynamical behavior of its conduction electrons. Conventional band theory accounts for the interaction of the electrons with the static ion lattice. However, coupling to further microscopic degrees of freedom can alter the electron dynamics considerably. For example, "conventional" superconductivity emerges as a result of the electrons' interaction with lattice vibrations (phonons). In magnetic materials, coupling with spin waves (magnons) is also expected. Such interactions may contribute to high-temperature superconductivity in novel materials. Unfortunately, lattice vibrations and spin waves have similar energy scales, hindering detailed study. Researchers have taken a new approach in analyzing the electron bands of ferromagnetic iron. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) provides direct spectroscopic evidence of altered electron mass and energy (quasiparticle formation) in a magnetic solid due to coupling with spin waves.

16

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print The electronic properties of a metal are determined by the dynamical behavior of its conduction electrons. Conventional band theory accounts for the interaction of the electrons with the static ion lattice. However, coupling to further microscopic degrees of freedom can alter the electron dynamics considerably. For example, "conventional" superconductivity emerges as a result of the electrons' interaction with lattice vibrations (phonons). In magnetic materials, coupling with spin waves (magnons) is also expected. Such interactions may contribute to high-temperature superconductivity in novel materials. Unfortunately, lattice vibrations and spin waves have similar energy scales, hindering detailed study. Researchers have taken a new approach in analyzing the electron bands of ferromagnetic iron. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) provides direct spectroscopic evidence of altered electron mass and energy (quasiparticle formation) in a magnetic solid due to coupling with spin waves.

17

Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO ...

Aggarwal, Nancy

18

Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and consistent estimates of the energy spreading parameter and mean wave direction of directional seas based on a cosine-2s model. In this approach, a Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) is employed. Because it is more tolerant of errors in the estimated cross...

Zhang, Shaosong

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

19

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print Wednesday, 30 March 2005 00:00 The electronic properties of a metal are determined by the dynamical behavior of its conduction electrons. Conventional band theory accounts for the interaction of the electrons with the static ion lattice. However, coupling to further microscopic degrees of freedom can alter the electron dynamics considerably. For example, "conventional" superconductivity emerges as a result of the electrons' interaction with lattice vibrations (phonons). In magnetic materials, coupling with spin waves (magnons) is also expected. Such interactions may contribute to high-temperature superconductivity in novel materials. Unfortunately, lattice vibrations and spin waves have similar energy scales, hindering detailed study. Researchers have taken a new approach in analyzing the electron bands of ferromagnetic iron. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) provides direct spectroscopic evidence of altered electron mass and energy (quasiparticle formation) in a magnetic solid due to coupling with spin waves.

20

MHK Technologies/Wave Catcher | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Catcher.png Wave Catcher.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Offshore Islands Ltd Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Wave Catcher can be orientated to take advantage of the most numerous prevailing waves to generate power It is a long surface buoy cylinder that is lifted by each passing wave As the cylinder is lifted it pulls on its anchor lines which in turn pulls on a support pulley This support pulley turns the generator s rotor and flywheel The generator s flywheel keeps the rotor turning until the next wave lifts up the cylinder and the anchor line once again turns the pulley The cylinder will also be lifted by waves from all directions As a result the anchor cables at each end of the buoy may either pull together or at slightly different times The gears the pulleys the rotor and flywheel are turned when the anchor cable s tension is high The uni direction pulley s re coil spring re winds the anchor cable back around the pulley when the buoy moves down with the trough of the wave and the anchor cable tension is low The wave generator can be in a surface buoy or mounted sub

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Asymmetry in Directional Spreading Function of Random Waves due to Refraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for deep water conditions. Analytic directional spreading functions take the form cos2 - p Pierson et al. Introduction Water waves generated by the wind are multidirectional random waves. The wave energy increases, 1970 , the Joint North Sea Wave Project JONSWAP spectrum Hassel- mann et al. 1973 , and the TEXEL storm

Haller, Merrick

22

Numerical modeling of extreme rogue waves generated by directional energy focusing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of extreme rogue waves generated by directional energy focusing Christophe angle of directional energy focusing. We find that an over- turning rogue wave can have different are characterized by their brief occurrence in space and time, resulting from a local focusing of wave energy

Grilli, Stéphan T.

23

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

superconductivity in novel materials. Unfortunately, lattice vibrations and spin waves have similar energy scales, hindering detailed study. Researchers have taken a new...

24

Ultrahigh-intensity optical slow-wave structure for direct laser electron acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WAVEGUIDE Ultraintense laser­plasma interaction applications in- cluding x-ray lasers, coherentUltrahigh-intensity optical slow-wave structure for direct laser electron acceleration Andrew G of corrugated slow-wave plasma guiding structures with application to quasi- phase-matched direct laser

Milchberg, Howard

25

The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better tha...

Moldabayev, Daulet; Dutykh, Denys

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better than both the KdV and BBM equations.

Daulet Moldabayev; Henrik Kalisch; Denys Dutykh

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves Using LIGO S5 Science Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as stochastic backgrounds. We perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for ...

Barnum, Sam

28

Optimisation and comparison of integrated models of direct-drive linear machines for wave energy conversion   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined electrical and structural models of five types of permanent magnet linear electrical machines suitable for direct-drive power take-off on wave energy applications are presented. Electromagnetic models were ...

Crozier, Richard Carson

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Wave load computation in direct strength analysis of semi-submersible platform structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A wave load computation approach in direct strength analysis of semi-submersible platform structures was presented in this paper. Considering ... adopted for generating the wet surface mesh of platform. The hydro...

Hai-bin Zhang; Hui-long Ren; Yang-shan Dai…

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Generation and analysis of multi-directional waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1.3 Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) 6 1.1.4 Extended Maximum Likelihood Method (EMLM) 7 1.1.5 Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) 7 1.1.6 Variational fitting procedure 8 1.1.7 Extended Maximum Entropy Method (EMEM) 8 1.2 Present research study 10 2. M O D E L I... directionality are next discussed. They are the Direct Fourier Transform Method (DTMF), the Parametric Method (PM), the Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM), the Extended Maximum Likelihood Method (EMLM), the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM), the Variational fitting...

Liagre, Pierre-Yves Francois Bernard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Direct Detection of Resonant Electron Pitch Angle Scattering by Whistler Waves in a Laboratory Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Detection of Resonant Electron Pitch Angle Scattering by Whistler Waves in a Laboratory on the first laboratory experiment to directly detect resonant pitch angle scattering of energetic (ke or less, making it difficult to detect changes in electron pitch angle. A review of observations

California at Los Angles, University of

32

DIPOLE COLLAPSE AND DYNAMO WAVES IN GLOBAL DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic fields of low-mass stars and planets are thought to originate from self-excited dynamo action in their convective interiors. Observations reveal a variety of field topologies ranging from large-scale, axial dipoles to more structured magnetic fields. In this article, we investigate more than 70 three-dimensional, self-consistent dynamo models in the Boussinesq approximation obtained by direct numerical simulations. The control parameters, the aspect ratio, and the mechanical boundary conditions have been varied to build up this sample of models. Both strongly dipolar and multipolar models have been obtained. We show that these dynamo regimes in general can be distinguished by the ratio of a typical convective length scale to the Rossby radius. Models with a predominantly dipolar magnetic field were obtained, if the convective length scale is at least an order of magnitude larger than the Rossby radius. Moreover, we highlight the role of the strong shear associated with the geostrophic zonal flow for models with stress-free boundary conditions. In this case the above transition disappears and is replaced by a region of bistability for which dipolar and multipolar dynamos coexist. We interpret our results in terms of dynamo eigenmodes using the so-called test-field method. We can thus show that models in the dipolar regime are characterized by an isolated 'single mode'. Competing overtones become significant as the boundary to multipolar dynamos is approached. We discuss how these findings relate to previous models and to observations.

Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel [MAG (ENS/IPGP), LRA, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Petitdemange, Ludovic, E-mail: martin@schrinner.eu [Previously at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. (Germany)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

The sea surface directional wave spectrum and forward scattering from the sea surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An influence of the directional wave spectrum on acoustic forward scattering from the sea surface is difficult to measure. Here we present results of an experiment to measure vertical spatialcoherence from an acoustic path interacting once with the sea surface at two different angles with respect to the wave direction. The measurements were part of the Shallow-Water 2006 program that took place off the coast of New Jersey in August 2006. An acoustic source was deployed at depth 40 m and signals were recorded on a moored receiving system consisting of two 1.4 m long vertical line arrays centered at depths 25 and 50 m. Measurements were made over four source-receiver bearing angles separated by 90° during which sea surface conditions remained stable and characterized by an rms waveheight of 0.17 m and a mixed swell and wind-wave field originating from different directions. The measurements show a statistically significant difference depending on source-receiver bearing when the acoustic frequency is less than about 10 kHz; a result not observed at higher frequencies. This paper will present field observations along with modeling based on a rough surface parabolic wave equation utilizing synthetic sea surfaces. [Research supported by ONR Ocean Acoustics].

Peter H. Dahl; David R. Dall'Osto; William J. Plant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Coupled Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in two-electron temperature plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The nonlinear propagation of coupled Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in a two-electron temperature plasma is shown to be governed by a generalized Schroedinger{endash}Boussinesq system, which for uni-directional propagation reduces to the coupled Schroedinger{endash}Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) system. For stationary propagation of the coupled waves, the Schroedinger{endash}Boussinesq (or K-dV) system leads to a generic Hamiltonian which is shown to be integrable in the sub- as well as supersonic regimes of the Mach number. Different classes of exact analytical solutions of the stationary Schroedinger{endash}Boussinesq system are explicitly obtained. Two-electron temperature plasmas are shown to admit a new class of coupled Langmuir{endash}ion-acoustic solitons which propagate with supersonic speeds but are accompanied by density rarefactions. We also derive exact governing equations valid for large amplitude waves, and obtain their approximate solutions. Existence conditions for large amplitude localized solutions in the quasi-neutral limit are derived. A comparison between different types of governing equations and their analytical solutions is carried out. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Rao, N.N. [Theoretical Physics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad-380009 (India)] [Theoretical Physics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad-380009 (India); Shukla, P.K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik---IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780, Bochum (Germany)] [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik---IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780, Bochum (Germany)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Banks of templates for directed searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars  

SciTech Connect

We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for directed searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning neutron stars in our Galaxy in data being collected by currently operating interferometric detectors. We thus assume that the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky is known, but we do not assume that the wave's frequency and its derivatives are a priori known. In the construction we employ a simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a polynomial function of time. All our template banks enable usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood F-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank. We study and employ the dependence of the grid's construction on the choice of the position of the observational interval with respect to the origin of time axis. We also study the usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithms with nonstandard frequency resolutions achieved by zero padding or folding the data. In the case of the gravitational-wave signal with one spin-down parameter included we have found grids with covering thicknesses which are only 0.1-16% larger than the thickness of the optimal 2-dimensional hexagonal covering.

Pisarski, Andrzej; Jaranowski, Piotr; Pietka, Maciej [Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, 15-424 Bialystok (Poland)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Measuring surface ocean wave height and directional spectra using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler from an autonomous underwater vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) is a proven technology which is capable of measuring surface wave height and directional information, however it is generally limited to rigid, bottom mounted applications which ...

Haven, Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A simple and direct method for generating travelling wave solutions for nonlinear equations  

SciTech Connect

We propose a simple and direct method for generating travelling wave solutions for nonlinear integrable equations. We illustrate how nontrivial solutions for the KdV, the mKdV and the Boussinesq equations can be obtained from simple solutions of linear equations. We describe how using this method, a soliton solution of the KdV equation can yield soliton solutions for the mKdV as well as the Boussinesq equations. Similarly, starting with cnoidal solutions of the KdV equation, we can obtain the corresponding solutions for the mKdV as well as the Boussinesq equations. Simple solutions of linear equations can also lead to cnoidal solutions of nonlinear systems. Finally, we propose and solve some new families of KdV equations and show how soliton solutions are also obtained for the higher order equations of the KdV hierarchy using this method.

Bazeia, D. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)], E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br; Das, Ashok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700064 (India); Losano, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Silva, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual da Paraiba, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Direct measurement of density oscillation induced by a radio-frequency wave  

SciTech Connect

An O-mode reflectometer at a frequency of 25.85 GHz was applied to plasmas heated by the high harmonic fast wave (21 MHz) in the TST-2 spherical tokamak. An oscillation in the phase of the reflected microwave in the rf range was observed directly for the first time. In TST-2, the rf (250 kW) induced density oscillation depends mainly on the poloidal rf electric field, which is estimated to be about 0.2 kV/m rms by the reflectometer measurement. Sideband peaks separated in frequency by ion cyclotron harmonics from 21 MHz, and peaks at ion cyclotron harmonics which are suggested to be quasimodes generated by parametric decay, were detected.

Yamada, T.; Ejiri, A.; Shimada, Y.; Oosako, T.; Tsujimura, J.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Direct path from microscopic mechanics to Debye shielding, Landau damping, and wave-particle interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The derivation of Debye shielding and Landau damping from the $N$-body description of plasmas is performed directly by using Newton's second law for the $N$-body system. This is done in a few steps with elementary calculations using standard tools of calculus, and no probabilistic setting. Unexpectedly, Debye shielding is encountered together with Landau damping. This approach is shown to be justified in the one-dimensional case when the number of particles in a Debye sphere becomes large. The theory is extended to accommodate a correct description of trapping and chaos due to Langmuir waves. Shielding and collisional transport are found to be two related aspects of the repulsive deflections of electrons, in such a way that each particle is shielded by all other ones while keeping in uninterrupted motion.

Dominique F. Escande; Yves Elskens; Fabrice Doveil

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Quantum Monte Carlo: Direct calculation of corrections to trial wave functions and their energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The wave functions and energies for these systems are corrected to the fixed-node values desirable features of: good wave function in/better wave function out ... good energy in/better energy out wave function, and Eref is a reference energy. Making use of the difference 0 and defining another

Anderson, James B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. is working to advance their wave energy buoy to commercial readiness.

42

Improved performance of traveling wave directional coupler modulator based on electro-optic polymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer based electro-optic modulators have shown great potentials in high frequency analog optical links. Existing commercial LiNibO3 Mach-Zehnder modulators have intrinsic drawbacks in linearity to provide high fidelity communication. In this paper, we present the design, fabrication and characterization of a traveling wave directional coupler modulator based on electro-optic polymer, which is able to provide high linearity, high speed, and low optical insertion loss. A silver ground electrode is used to reduce waveguide sidewall roughness due to the scattering of UV light in photolithography process in addition to suppressing the RF loss. A 1-to-2 multi-mode interference 3dB-splitter, a photobleached refractive index taper and a quasi-vertical taper are used to reduce the optical insertion loss of the device. The symmetric waveguide structure of the MMI-fed directional coupler is intrinsically bias-free, and the modulation is obtained at the 3-dB point regardless of the ambient temperature. By achieving lo...

Zhang, Xingyu; Lin, Che-yun; Wang, Alan X; Hosseini, Amir; Lin, Xiaohui; Chen, Ray T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Quantification of the influence of directional sea state parameters over the performances of wave energy converters   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate predictions of the annual energy yield from wave energy converters are essential to the development of the wave industry. The current method based on power matrices uses only a small part of the data available ...

Pascal, Remy Claude Rene

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

A laboratory study of wave crest statistics and the role of directional spreading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...distributions. wave crest statistics|nonlinear waves...associated exceedance probabilities represents a key...result, the load statistics, describing the exceedance probability of a particular...crest-height statistics. Furthermore...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

ccsd-00022730,version2-20Apr2006 Direct observation of a "devil's staircase" in wave-particle interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ccsd-00022730,version2-20Apr2006 Direct observation of a "devil's staircase" in wave-J´er^ome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 We report the experimental observation of a "devil's staircase" in a time exhibits a "devil's staircase" behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

Direct numerical investigation of detonation waves using a Monte Carlo method.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A detonation wave describes a shock that propagates at supersonic velocity through a chemically unstable gas medium and is driven by the energy released by… (more)

O'Connor, Patrick

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Direct observation of a "devil's staircase'' in wave-particle interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the experimental observation of a "devil's staircase'' in a time dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large scale chaos in the universality class of hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a Travelling Wave Tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a "devil's staircase'' behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

Fabrice Doveil; Alessandro Macor; Yves Elskens

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

Direct observation of a 'devil's staircase' in wave-particle interaction  

SciTech Connect

We report the experimental observation of a 'devil's staircase' in a time-dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large-scale chaos in the universality class of Hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a traveling wave tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a 'devil's staircase' behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro; Elskens, Yves [Physique des interactions ioniques et moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe turbulence plasma, case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

Direct Simulations of Wind-Driven Breaking Ocean Waves with Data Assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A formulation is developed to assimilate ocean-wave data into the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. NFA is a Cartesian-based implicit Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) code with Volume of Fluid (VOF) interface capturing. The sequential assimilation of data into NFA permits detailed analysis of ocean-wave physics with higher bandwidths than is possible using either other formulations, such as High-Order Spectral (HOS) methods, or field measurements. A framework is provided for assimilating the wavy and vortical portions of the flow. Nudging is used to assimilate wave data at low wavenumbers, and the wave data at high wavenumbers form naturally through nonlinear interactions, wave breaking, and wind forcing. Similarly, the vertical profiles of the mean vortical flow in the wind and the wind drift are nudged, and the turbulent fluctuations are allowed to form naturally. As a demonstration, the results of a HOS of a JONSWAP wave spectrum are assimilated to study short-crested seas in equilibrium with the wind. Log pr...

Dommermuth, Douglas G; Tran, Vu H; Valenciano, Miguel A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Seismic experiments provide new clues to earthquake wave directionality and growth speed PASADENA, Calif.--In recent years, seismologists thought they were getting a handle on how an earthquake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic experiments provide new clues to earthquake wave directionality and growth speed PASADENA that direction. The phenomenon has to do with the basic ways rupture fronts (generating seismic waves

52

The Direct Breaking of Internal Waves at Steep1 Topography2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of internal tide generation, estimate how much22 energy they trap and turn into turbulence. This approach has approximately equally by internal waves forced by the wind and tides (Munk8 & Wunsch, 1998). Tracking the energy the energy balance11 of tides.12 generation generation Surface Tide Surface Tide low-mode propagation

Klymak, Jody M.

53

Bearing options, including design and testing, for direct drive linear generators in wave energy converters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The key focus of this research was to investigate the bearing options most suited to operation in a novel direct drive linear generator. This was… (more)

Caraher, Sarah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Direct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

interactions, and the pollutant emission is hence directly proportional to the bulk neutral density. Simultaneously monitoring the total emission at 1040 nm and the...

55

Vertical coherence and forward scattering from the sea surface and the relation to the directional wave spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of an experiment to measure vertical spatial coherence from acoustic paths interacting once with the sea surface but at perpendicular azimuth angles are presented. The measurements were part of the Shallow Water 2006 program that took place off the coast of New Jersey in August 2006. An acoustic source frequency range 6–20?kHz was deployed at depth 40?m and signals were recorded on a 1.4?m long vertical line array centered at depth 25?m and positioned at range 200?m. The vertical array consisted of four omni-directional hydrophones and vertical coherences were computed between pairs of these hydrophones. Measurements were made over four source–receiver bearing angles separated by 90 ° during which sea surface conditions remained stable and characterized by a root-mean-square wave height of 0.17?m and a mixture of swell and wind waves. Vertical coherences show a statistically significant difference depending on source–receiver bearing when the acoustic frequency is less than about 12?kHz with results tending to fade at higher frequencies. This paper presents field observations and comparisons of these observations with two modeling approaches one based on bistatic forward scattering and the other on a rough surface parabolic wave equation utilizing synthetic sea surfaces.

Peter H. Dahl; David R. Dall'Osto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Bearing options, including design and testing, for direct drive linear generators in wave energy converters   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key focus of this research was to investigate the bearing options most suited to operation in a novel direct drive linear generator. This was done through bearing comparisons, modelling and testing. It is fundamental ...

Caraher, Sarah

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

Study of directional ocean wavefield evolution and rogue wave occurrence using large-scale phase-resolved nonlinear simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is challenging to obtain accurate predictions of ocean surface wavefield evolutions due to several complex dynamic processes involved, including nonlinear wave interaction, wave breaking and wind forcing, and also wave ...

Xiao, Wenting, 1982-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Inbound waves in the solar corona: a direct indicator of Alfv\\'en Surface location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tenuous supersonic solar wind that streams from the top of the corona passes through a natural boundary -- the Alfv\\'en surface -- that marks the causal disconnection of individual packets of plasma and magnetic flux from the Sun itself. The Alfv\\'en surface is the locus where the radial motion of the accelerating solar wind passes the radial Alfv\\'en speed, and therefore any displacement of material cannot carry information back down into the corona. It is thus the natural outer boundary of the solar corona, and the inner boundary of interplanetary space. Using a new and unique motion analysis to separate inbound and outbound motions in synoptic visible-light image sequences from the COR2 coronagraph on board the STEREO-A spacecraft, we have identified inbound wave motion in the outer corona beyond 6 solar radii for the first time, and used it to determine that the Alfv\\'en surface is at least 12.5 solar radii from the Sun over the polar coronal holes and 17 solar radii in the streamer belt, well beyond ...

DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Effects of nonlinearity and wave directionality on the use of Morison equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;, 8j)(k; cos8; ? kj cos 81)(w; ? wj) g[k, ? kj[ ? (w; ? wj)' Je ? ~l'~ [(zr + h) ? ~I I lk, -s sg 1 (98) (b) transverse direction g: Substitute equation (13) & (18) into equation (92) M = f Fg ~ (h+ z)dz eq 22 C pV'(')(-) (k+. )d. ?D A(ai, a..., h) glk* ? kjI ? (~i ? ~j)' (18) and where: (19) (2) Convective term: finite water depth Applying the gradiant operator to the first-order potential function equation (4): c) -, c) - c) - " a, gcoshk;(z+ h) a;g coshk;(z+ k) [ ' k, (cos...

Chen, Weida

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ?2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Austin, M. E. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Torino (Italy); Porkolab, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Turco, F. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from binary systems: parameter-space metrics and optimal Scorpius X-1 sensitivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive simple analytic expressions for the (coherent and semi-coherent) phase metrics of continuous-wave sources in low-eccentricity binary systems, both for the long-segment and short- segment regimes (compared to the orbital period). The resulting expressions correct and extend previous results found in the literature. We present results of extensive Monte-Carlo studies comparing metric mismatch predictions against the measured loss of detection statistic for binary parameter offsets. The agreement is generally found to be within ~ 10%-30%. As an application of the metric template expressions, we estimate the optimal achievable sensitivity of an Einstein@Home directed search for Scorpius X-1, under the assumption of sufficiently small spin wandering. We find that such a search, using data from the upcoming advanced detectors, would be able to beat the torque- balance level [1,2] up to a frequency of ~ 500 - 600 Hz, if orbital eccentricity is well-constrained, and up to a frequency of ~ 160 - 200 Hz for m...

Leaci, Paola

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Self consistent radio-frequency wave propagation and peripheral direct current plasma biasing: Simplified three dimensional non-linear treatment in the 'wide sheath' asymptotic regime  

SciTech Connect

A minimal two-field fluid approach is followed to describe the radio-frequency (RF) wave propagation in the bounded scrape-off layer plasma of magnetic fusion devices self-consistently with direct current (DC) biasing of this plasma. The RF and DC parts are coupled by non-linear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions at both ends of open magnetic field lines. The physical model is studied within a simplified framework featuring slow wave (SW) only and lateral walls normal to the straight confinement magnetic field. The possibility is however kept to excite the system by any realistic 2D RF field map imposed at the outer boundary of the simulation domain. The self-consistent RF + DC system is solved explicitly in the asymptotic limit when the width of the sheaths gets very large, for several configurations of the RF excitation and of the target plasma. In the case of 3D parallelepipedic geometry, semi-analytical results are proposed in terms of asymptotic waveguide eigenmodes that can easily be implemented numerically. The validity of the asymptotic treatment is discussed and is illustrated by numerical tests against a quantitative criterion expressed from the simulation parameters. Iterative improvement of the solution from the asymptotic result is also outlined. Throughout the resolution, key physical properties of the solution are presented. The radial penetration of the RF sheath voltages along lateral walls at both ends of the open magnetic field lines can be far deeper than the skin depth characteristic of the SW evanescence. This is interpreted in terms of sheath-plasma wave excitation. Therefore, the proper choice of the inner boundary location is discussed as well as the appropriate boundary conditions to apply there. The asymptotic scaling of various quantities with the amplitude of the input RF excitation is established.

Colas, L.; Jacquot, J.; Hillairet, J.; Goniche, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Heuraux, S.; Faudot, E. [IJL-P2M UMR 7198 CNRS, F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Crombe, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Kyrytsya, V. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Euratom-'Belgian State', TEC Partner, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Development of African Easterly Waves in Late Summer, 2003-07  

SciTech Connect

Episodic events of both Saharan dust outbreaks and African easterly waves (AEWs) are observed to move westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between the warm, dry, and dusty Saharan air layer on the nearby storms has been the subject of considerable debate. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model is used to investigate the radiative effect of dust on the development of AEWs during August and September, the months of maximumtropical cyclone activity, in years 2003–07. The simulations show that dust radiative forcing enhances the convective instability of the environment. As a result, mostAEWsintensify in the presence of a dust layer. The Lorenz energy cycle analysis reveals that the dust radiative forcing enhances the condensational heating, which elevates the zonal and eddy available potential energy. In turn, available potential energy is effectively converted to eddy kinetic energy, in which local convective overturning plays the primary role. The magnitude of the intensification effect depends on the initial environmental conditions, including moisture, baroclinity, and the depth of the boundary layer. The authors conclude that dust radiative forcing, albeit small, serves as a catalyst to promote local convection that facilitates AEW development.

Ma, Po-Lun; Zhang, Kai; Shi, Jainn Jong; Matsui, Toshihisa; Arking, Albert

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Model study of waves generated by convection with direct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Model study of waves generated circulation, structure and stability on a global scale. Gravity waves can be generated by convection, the authors examine an event on January 12, 2003, when convective waves were clearly generated by a period

Alexander, M. Joan

65

Millimeter-wave InP/InGaAs HPT optoelectronic mixers and their application to 60GHz bi-directional radio-on-fiber systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Millimeter-wave InP/InGaAs HPT optoelectronic mixers and their application to 60GHz bi demonstrate the use of InP/InGaAs heterojunction phototransistors as optoelectronic mixers for bi are frequency up-converted to millimeter-wave band signals in InP HPT optoelectronic mixer with remotely

Choi, Woo-Young

66

Wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves receive their energy from the wind by means of a ... whose yield is not yet clearly understood. Energy in the wave is more concentrated than in the wind ... density. For this reason a motor utilizing wave p...

Ferruccio Mosetti

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-multiple of the wavelength: n 2 L ,n 1,2,... . A vibrating string is an example of a transverse wave: its oscillation2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand

Glashausser, Charles

68

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

69

A high-frequency gravitational-wave burst search with LIGO's Hanford site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of long-arm interferometers designed to directly measure gravitational-wave strain. Direct observation of gravitational waves would provide a test ...

Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A high-frequency gravitational-wave burst search with LIGO's Hanford site .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of long-arm interferometers designed to directly measure gravitational-wave strain. Direct observation of gravitational waves would provide… (more)

Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Wave Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:30pm Addthis Photo of a large wave. Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.) However, wave energy cannot be harnessed everywhere. Wave power-rich areas of the world include the western coasts of Scotland, northern Canada, southern Africa, and Australia as well as the northeastern and northwestern coasts of the United States. In the Pacific Northwest alone, it is feasible that wave energy could produce 40-70 kilowatts (kW) per 3.3 feet (1 meter) of western coastline. Wave Energy Technologies

72

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin 2 Wave Basin 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Length(m) 48.8 Beam(m) 26.5 Depth(m) 2.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Built to client specifications, currently rigid concrete over gravel fill

73

Nonlinear dissipation of circularly polarized Alfven waves due to the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, the dissipation processes of circularly polarized Alfven waves in solar wind plasmas including beam components are numerically discussed by using a 2-D hybrid simulation code. Numerical results suggest that the parent Alfven waves are rapidly dissipated due to the presence of the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves, such as kinetic Alfven waves. The nonlinear wave-wave coupling is directly evaluated by using the induction equation for the parent wave. It is also observed both in the 1-D and 2-D simulations that the presence of large amplitude Alfven waves strongly suppresses the beam instabilities.

Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Hada, T. [Department of Earth System Science and Technology, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga City, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Tsubouchi, K. [Department of Earth and Planetary Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Gravitational wave astronomy and cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first direct observation of gravitational waves' action upon matter has recently been reported by the BICEP2 experiment. Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are being installed. They will soon be commissioned, and then begin searches for high-frequency gravitational waves at a sensitivity level that is widely expected to reach events involving compact objects like stellar mass black holes and neutron stars. Pulsar timing arrays continue to improve the bounds on gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies, and may detect a signal on roughly the same timescale as ground-based detectors. The science case for space-based interferometers targeting millihertz sources is very strong. The decade of gravitational-wave discovery is poised to begin. In this writeup of a talk given at the 2013 TAUP conference, we will briefly review the physics of gravitational waves and gravitational-wave detectors, and then discuss the promise of these measurements for making cosmological measurements in the near future.

Scott A. Hughes

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 33.5 Beam(m) 21.3 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 1.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 1.8 Wave Period Range(s) 1.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sand/sediment

76

An Introduction to Wave-Current Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scale wave focusing across a storm can re-direct the wind-stress? #12;1. Adiabatic interaction StartAn Introduction to Wave-Current Interactions Jerry Smith, MPL-SIO-UCSD jasmith@ucsd.edu http just want to hold up your hand. #12;Some Questions in Wave-Current Interaction Physics 1. Adiabatic

Smith, Jerome A.

77

wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

wave energy ? Wellenenergie f [Die einer Schwerewelle innewohnende potentielle und kinetische Energie. Sie ist etwa proportional dem Quadrat der Wellenhöhe. Zeichen: E we ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplitude electrostatic wave Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 4 Computer simulations for direct conversion of the HF electromagnetic wave into the upper hybrid wave in ionospheric heating experiments...

79

Vacuum Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

Paul S. Wesson

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Estimating wave energy from a wave record  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This note is concerned with the calculation of wave energy from a time series record of wave heights. Various methods are used to estimate the wave energy. For wave records that contain a number of different ... ...

Sasithorn Aranuvachapun; John A. Johnson

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

SHOCK WAVES AND SOLITARY WAVES IN BCC CRYSTALS Institut fr Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, Universitt Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SHOCK WAVES AND SOLITARY WAVES IN BCC CRYSTALS J. Roth Institut für Theoretische und Angewandte waves in bcc crystals have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction]. Depending on the strength of the shock wave and the propagation direction different phase transition

Roth, Johannes

83

Coherence waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1955 Wolf noticed that the mutual coherence function ? obeys two wave equations [Proc. R. Soc. London230, 246 (1955)]. The physical optics of this finding is thoroughly presented in...

Lohmann, Adolf W; Mendlovic, David; Shabtay, Gal

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cluster Dynamics of Planetary Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of nonlinear atmospheric planetary waves is determined by a small number of independent wave clusters consisting of a few connected resonant triads. We classified the different types of connections between neighboring triads that determine the general dynamics of a cluster. Each connection type corresponds to substantially different scenarios of energy flux among the modes. The general approach can be applied directly to various mesoscopic systems with 3-mode interactions, encountered in hydrodynamics, astronomy, plasma physics, chemistry, medicine, etc.

Elena Kartashova; Victor S. L'vov

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

87

A parametric study of directional sea modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examines the effect due to wave loading described by the directional sea spectrum on the response of offshore structures. The use of directional seas in design is expected to provide a better representation of the ocean surface and associated kinematics... as compared to unidirectional theory. This in turn should provide a basis for minimizing the overdesign of offshore structures. Several of the more popular directional wave spreading functions are intro- duced. A parametric study is conducted in order...

Whatley, Christopher Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

89

Quadratic cost functional for wave-front reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A quadratic cost functional for reconstruction of a high-resolution wave front from a coarse wave front is presented. The functional uses as data the position and the direction of the...

Legarda-Sáenz, Ricardo; Rivera, Mariano; Rodríguez-Vera, Ramón

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Some Evidence of Colinear Wind Stress and Wave Breaking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data collected during the Surface Waves and Processes Program are employed to investigate a possible interrelation between wind stress and surface wave breaking. From comparison of data from 15 half-hour long time segments, the directions of the ...

Karl F. Rieder; Jerome A. Smith; Robert A. Weller

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Long Wave/Short Wave Resonance in Equatorial Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that resonant coupling between ultra long equatorial Rossby waves and packets of either short Rossby or short westward-traveling gravity waves is possible. Simple analytic formulas give the discrete value of the packet wave number k, ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Inhomogeneous High Frequency Expansion-Free Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a natural inhomogeneous generalization of high frequency plane gravitational waves. The waves are high frequency waves of the Kundt type whose null propagation direction in space-time has vanishing expansion, twist and shear but is not covariantly constant. The introduction of a cosmological constant is discussed in some detail and a comparison is made with high frequency gravity waves having wave fronts homeomorphic to 2-spheres.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves Hiu Ning Chan (1 waves; Long-short resonance PACS Classification: 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg #12;2 ABSTRACT A resonance between long and short waves will occur if the phase velocity of the long wave matches the group velocity

94

Vortices in Brain waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Vortices in Brain Waves 62. M. E. Raichle, ScienceVORTICES IN BRAIN WAVES WALTER J. FREEMAN Department ofthat is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG).

Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria Oleg A. Igoshin*, Roy Welch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria Oleg A. Igoshin*, Roy Welch , Dale Kaiser'' characterized by traveling linear, concentric, and spiral waves. These waves are different from the waves communicate by direct contact. The difference is most dramatic when waves collide: rather than annihilating

Igoshin, Oleg

96

Environmental Data Collection Using Autonomous Wave Gliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Data Collection Using Autonomous Wave Gliders LCDR Kate Hermsdorfer Qing Wang model ­AIRMAR PB200 weather station Pressure, Temperature, Wind Speed and Direction 10 min averaged sea conditions Bulk flux estimates 2-D wave spectra Water temperature profile Autonomous

97

Plasma Waves Near Venus: Initial Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...noise, damping of the waves by the ionospheric electrons can be an important interaction mecha-nism that transfers solar wind energy di-rectly to the ionosphere. The measurements of plasma wave ac-tivity near Venus are made by using a vee-type...

F. L. SCARF; W. W. L. TAYLOR; I. M. GREEN

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD FROM ANALYSES OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

99

Ohmsett Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohmsett Tow Tank Ohmsett Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Ohmsett Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Ohmsett Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 203.0 Beam(m) 19.8 Depth(m) 2.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 3.4 Length of Effective Tow(m) 155.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.1 Maximum Wave Length(m) 18 Wave Period Range(s) 4.1 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 3.4 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Programmable frequency Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Wave dampening at downstream end Channel/Tunnel/Flume

100

Direct observation of tetrahertz electromagnetic waves emitted from intrinsic Josephson junctions in single crystallie Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}.  

SciTech Connect

We have observed intense, coherent, continuous and monochromatic electromagnetic (EM) emission at terahertz frequencies generated from a single crystalline mesa structure of the high-T{sub c} superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} intrinsic Josephson junction system. The mesa is fabricated by the Argon-ion-milling and photolithography techniques on the cleaved surface of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} single crystal. The frequency, {nu}, of the EM radiation observed from the sample obeys simple relations: {nu} = c/n{lambda} = c/2nw and {nu} = 2eV/hN, where c is the light velocity in vacuum, n the refractive index of a superconductor, {lambda} the wave length of the EM emission in vacuum, w the shorter width of the mesa, V the voltage applied to the mesa, N the number of layers of intrinsic Josephson junctions, e and h are the elementary charge and the Planck constant, respectively. These two relations strongly imply that the mechanism of the emission is, firstly, due to the geometrical resonance of EM waves to the mesa like a cavity resonance occuring in the mesa structure, and forming standing waves as cavity resonance modes, and secondly, due to the ac-Josephson effect, which works coherently in all intrinsic Josephson junctions. The peculiar temperature dependence of the power intensity emitted form samples shows a broad maximum in a temperature region between 20 and 40 K, suggesting that the nonequilibrium effect plays an essential role for the emission of EM waves in this system. The estimated total power is significantly improved in comparison with the previous report [L. Ozyuzer et al., Science 318 (2007) 1291, K. Kadowaki, et al., Physica C 437-438 (2006) 111, I.E. Batov, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 262504], and reached as high as 5 {micro}W from single mesa with w = 60 {micro}m at 648 GHz, which enables us to use it for some of applications. So far, we succeeded in fabricating the mesa emitting EM waves up to 960 GHz in the fundamental mode in the w = 40 {micro}m mesa, whereas the higher harmonics up to the 4-th order were observed, resulting in a frequency exceeding 2.5 THz. In sharp contrast to the previous reports [K. Kadowaki, et al., Physica C 437-438 (2006) 111, M.-H. Bae, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, (2007) 027002], all the present measurements were done in zero magnetic field. Lastly, a plausible theoretical model for the mechanism of emission is discussed.

Kadowaki, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kawamata, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Minami, H.; Kakeya, I.; Welp, U.; Ozyuzer, L.; Koshelev, A.; Kurter, C.; Gray, K. E.; Kwok, W.-K.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Tsukuba; Izmir Inst. of Tech.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DNS of Detonation Wave and Isotropic Turbulence Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNS of Detonation Wave and Isotropic Turbulence Interaction Hari Narayanan Nagarajan , Luca Massa A direct numerical simulation of detonation wave with compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence is carried out with three different detonation Mach numbers to study the effect of detonation wave

Texas at Arlington, University of

102

Resonant Heating Due to Cyclotron Subharmonic Frequency Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A direct ion heating process which is resonant with the wave at the cyclotron subharmonic frequency, ?=32?i, is discovered through the particle-simulation investigation of the ion Bernstein-wave heating. The particle trapping in phase space due to the wave of an arbitrary cyclotron subharmonic frequency is studied theoretically and numerically confirmed.

H. Abe; H. Okada; R. Itatani; M. Ono; H. Okuda

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

103

One-Directional Perfect Cloak Created With Homogeneous Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A one-directional invisibility cloak is presented in this letter. Perfect invisibility can be achieved for TM waves along certain directions. The parameters are just homogeneously anisotropic and relatively easy for practical ...

Xi, Sheng

104

A Spar Buoy for High-Frequency Wave Measurements and Detection of Wave Breaking in the Open Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves and wave breaking play a significant role in the air–sea exchanges of momentum, sea spray aerosols, and trace gases such as CO2, but few direct measurements of wave breaking have been obtained in the open ocean (far from the coast). This ...

Robin W. Pascal; Margaret J. Yelland; Meric A. Srokosz; Bengamin I. Moat; Edward M. Waugh; Daniel H. Comben; Alex G. Cansdale; Mark C. Hartman; David G. H. Coles; Ping Chang Hsueh; Timothy G. Leighton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Directives Help  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

All DOE directives are available through this site. While it may seem overwhelming, given the number of documents, we have provided a number of ways in which you may get to the information you need.

106

Coastal Inlet Model Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inlet Model Facility Inlet Model Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Inlet Model Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 103.6 Beam(m) 48.8 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

107

Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Long Beach Harbors Model and Long Beach Harbors Model Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 67.1 Beam(m) 79.2 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.1 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.0 Wave Period Range(s) 2.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Point Fermin to Huntington Beach, CA Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities

108

MIT Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT Tow Tank MIT Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 36.6 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) $750 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 1.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.1 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 4.6 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Arbitrary spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition

109

Carderock Tow Tank 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 904.6 Beam(m) 6.4 Depth(m) 4.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Two operable carriages on this basin: Carriage 3 (max towing speed of 15.4 m/s); Carriage 5 (max towing speed of 25.8 m/s) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Length(m) 12.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Irregular waves with a spectrum resembling typical ocean wave patterns with appropriate scale reductions. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

110

Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laboratory Tow Tank Laboratory Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Stevens Institute of Technology Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 97.5 Beam(m) 4.9 Depth(m) 2.0 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 18.3 Length of Effective Tow(m) 30.5 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 15.2 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Menu driven selection of standard spectra or user specified Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes

111

Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Facility Modeling Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 121.9 Beam(m) 48.8 Depth(m) 0.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

112

Geodesic deviation and gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of gravitational waves based on the geodesic deviation equation is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the only non-vanishing components of the wave field in the conventional traceless-transverse gauge in linearized general relativity do not enter the geodesic deviation equation, and therefore, apparently, no effect is predicted by that equation in that specific gauge. The reason is traced back to the fact that the geodesic deviation equation is written in terms of a coordinate distance, which is not a directly measurable quantity. On the other hand, in the proper Lorentz frame of the detector, the conventional result described in standard textbooks holds.

M. Leclerc

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

113

Initial data for Einstein's equations with superposed gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method is presented to construct initial data for Einstein's equations as a superposition of a gravitational wave perturbation on an arbitrary stationary background spacetime. The method combines the conformal thin sandwich formalism with linear gravitational waves, and allows detailed control over characteristics of the superposed gravitational wave like shape, location and propagation direction. It is furthermore fully covariant with respect to spatial coordinate changes and allows for very large amplitude of the gravitational wave.

Harald P. Pfeiffer; Lawrence E. Kidder; Mark A. Scheel; Deirdre Shoemaker

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

114

Plane waves Lumped systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems S x y z Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · open tube #12;2 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · closed tube Impedance · Cylindrical waves z x y r #12;3 Impedance · Cylindrical waves ­ Circumferential part n=0 n=1 n=2 n=3 Impedance · Cylindrical

Berlin,Technische Universität

115

Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Standing Wave on a String as an Oscillator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the usual treatment of waves in introductory courses one begins with traveling waves and the frequency/wavelength relationship f??=?v where v is the wave velocity. One then makes the point about superposition and shows that two waves traveling in opposite directions can add up to a standing wave; Eq. (1) still applies. This approach is problematic in two ways: (1) The motion being described standing waves has no apparent “velocity ” and so it seems unnecessarily complex—perhaps unreasonably complex—to construct it out of moving waves; (2) It is not easy to derive the formula for the velocity of waves especially for an audience without calculus or without multi-variate calculus (the wave equation).

Michael Sobel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Degenerate weakly nonlinear elastic plane waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weakly nonlinear plane waves are considered in hyperelastic crystals. Evolution equations are derived at a quadratically nonlinear level for the amplitudes of quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse waves propagating in arbitrary anisotropic media. The form of the equations obtained depends upon the direction of propagation relative to the crystal axes. A single equation is found for all propagation directions for quasi-longitudinal waves, but a pair of coupled equations occurs for quasi-transverse waves propagating along directions of degeneracy, or acoustic axes. The coupled equations involve four material parameters but they simplify if the wave propagates along an axis of material symmetry. Thus, only two parameters arise for propagation along an axis of two-fold symmetry, and one for a three-fold axis. The transverse wave equations decouple if the axis is four-fold or higher. In the absence of a symmetry axis it is possible that the evolution equations of the quasi-transverse waves decouple if the third order elastic moduli satisfy a certain identity. The theoretical results are illustrated with explicit examples.

W?odzimierz Doma?ski; Andrew N. Norris

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

118

Waves in Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Quadratic corrections to the metaplectic formulation of mode conversions. In this work we showed how to systematically deal with quadratic corrections beyond the usual linearization of the dispersion matrix at a conversion. The linearization leads to parabolic cylinder functions as the local approximation to the full-wave behavior, but these do not include the variation in amplitude associated with ray refraction in the neighborhood of the conversion. Hence, the region over which they give a good fit to the incoming and outgoing WKB solutions is small. By including higher order corrections it is possible to provide a much more robust matching. We also showed that it was possible, in principle, to extend these methods to arbitrary order. A new normal form for mode conversion. This is based upon our earlier NSF-DOE-funded work on ray helicity. We have begun efforts to apply these new ideas in practical ray tracing algorithms. Group theoretical foundation of path integrals and phase space representations of wave problems. Using the symbol theory of N. Zobin, we developed a new understanding of path integrals on phase space. The initial goal was to find practical computational tools for dealing with non-standard mode conversions. Along the way we uncovered a new way to represent wave functions directly on phase space without the intermediary of a Wigner function. We are exploring the use of these ideas for numerical studies of conversion, with the goal of eventually incorporating kinetic effects. Wave packet studies of gyroresonance crossing. In earlier work, Huanchun Ye and Allan Kaufman -- building upon ideas due to Lazar Friedland -- had shown that gyroresonance crossings could be treated as a double conversion. This perspective is one we have used for many of our papers since then. We are now performing a detailed numerical comparison between full-wave and ray tracing approaches in the study of minority-ion gyroresonance crossing. In this study, a fast magnetosonic wave -- supported by a majority-ion species such as deuterium -- crosses the resonance layer associated with a minority species, such as hydrogen. By using wave packets instead of harmonic solutions, it becomes easy to see the evolution in k-space of the minority-ion disturbance, and the time delay for emission of the reflected fast-wave packet. Iterated conversion in a cavity. When mode conversion occurs in a cavity where rays are trapped, multiple conversions will occur and the resulting absorption profile will typically have a complicated spatial dependence due to overlapping interference patterns. The goal of this work is to develop fast and efficient ray-based methods for computing the cavity response to external driving, and to compute the spatial absorption profile. We have introduced a new approach that allows us to visualize in great detail the underlying iterated ray geometry, and should lead to simpler methods for identifying parameter values where global changes occur in the qualitative response (e.g. global bifurcations).

Tracy, Eugene R

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

119

MHK Technologies/WaveStar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WaveStar WaveStar < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WaveStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Star Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Wave Star machine does not form a barrier against the waves - with a view to harnessing all their energy - but instead cuts in at right angles to the direction of the wave. In this way, the waves run through the length of the machine and the energy is utilized in a continuous process, which produces a smooth output. On each side of the oblong Wave Star machine, there are a number of hemisphere-shaped floats, which are half submerged in the water. When a wave rolls in, the floats are pressed up - one after the other - until the wave subsides. Each float is positioned at the end of an arm and pumps energy by the vertical movement of the waves up and down. Every time a float is raised or lowered, a piston presses oil into the machine's common transmission system. The pressure drives a hydraulic motor, which drives a generator, which produces electricity. As the machine is several wave lengths long, the floats will work continuously to harness the energy and produce a smooth output.

120

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.  

SciTech Connect

The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wave propagation in anisotropic linear viscoelastic media: theory and simulated wavefields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......elastic waves in anisotropic inhomogeneous media...waves in Pierre shale, Geophysics, 23...1958) for Pierre shale (Qp= lo), and...direction) of the anisotropic material. The elasticities...elastic waves in anisotropic inhomogeneous media...waves in Pierre shale, Geophysics, 23......

J. M. Carcione

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Parametric instability of a monochromatic Alfven wave: Perpendicular decay in low beta plasma  

SciTech Connect

Two-dimensional hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the parametric decay of a monochromatic Alfven wave in low beta plasma. Both the linearly and left-hand polarized pump Alfven waves are considered in the paper. For the linearly polarized pump Alfven wave, either a parallel or obliquely propagating wave can lead to the decay along the perpendicular direction. Initially, the parametric decay takes place along the propagating direction of the pump wave, and then the decay occurs in the perpendicular direction. With the increase of the amplitude and the propagating angle of the pump wave (the angle between the propagating direction of the pump wave and the ambient magnetic field), the spectral range of the excited waves becomes broad in the perpendicular direction. But the effects of the plasma beta on the spectral range of the excited waves in perpendicular direction are negligible. However, for the left-hand polarized pump Alfven wave, when the pump wave propagates along the ambient magnetic field, the parametric decay occurs nearly along the ambient magnetic field, and there is no obvious decay in the perpendicular direction. Significant decay in the perpendicular direction can only be found when the pump wave propagates obliquely.

Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Shan, Lican; Wang, Shui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Li, Xing [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

SAFL Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SAFL Channel SAFL Channel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name SAFL Channel Overseeing Organization University of Minnesota Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 84.0 Beam(m) 2.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 6.1 Length of Effective Tow(m) 76.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Length(m) 6.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Wavemaking Description Programmable control of wave making is currently in development and will be available in fall of 2009. Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Channel is sufficiently adaptable to allow simulation of beach

124

Scripps Channel 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scripps Channel 1 Scripps Channel 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Scripps Channel 1 Overseeing Organization University of California, San Diego (Scripps) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 44.5 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 2.4 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Strategically placed windows, longest being 5.5m, allow optical access from side Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2 Length of Effective Tow(m) 7.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Function Generator or user provided Wave Direction Uni-Directional

125

Scripps Channel 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Channel 2 Channel 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Scripps Channel 2 Overseeing Organization University of California, San Diego (Scripps) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 33.0 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.5 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features All side walls and 11m of the tank bottom are glass to provide optical access. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.7 Length of Effective Tow(m) 20.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Function Generator or user provided Wave Direction Uni-Directional

126

Lakefront Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakefront Tow Tank Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Lakefront Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of New Orleans Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 36.6 Beam(m) 4.9 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $1200 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.7 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.9 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Length(m) 22 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular random and transient waves Spectra include ISSC, JONSWAP, Bretschneider, Pierson-Moskowitz and custom user-defined. Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Aluminum segmented arch

127

Direct costing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oau 5e reduced. Under the same oonOitions, even ~Me on a bread scale entails not mere1y the conduct of the direct oyeraticns cf yrccessing the materials into finished products, but also the performance of auxiliary functions. these may 'ba power y... purposes have been advanced as folkway le Most of a o03RyaxO' 8 products Grc usual13r sold at prices which oovex' full product costs y plus 861ling a%el administrative expenses, plus normal profit. The inventoi~ valuate. on should be consistent...

Browning, Donald Bullock

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Interaction for solitary waves in coasting charged particle beams  

SciTech Connect

By using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method, the collision of solitary waves in a coasting charged particle beams is studied. The results show that the system admits a solution with two solitary waves, which move in opposite directions and can be described by two Korteweg-deVries equation in small-amplitude limit. The collision of two solitary waves is elastic, and after the interaction they preserve their original properties. Then the weak phase shift in traveling direction of collision between two solitary waves is derived explicitly.

Liu, Shi-Wei; Hong, Xue-Ren; Shi, Yu-Ren; Duan, Wen-shan, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic an Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMPCAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)] [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic an Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMPCAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Han, Jiu-Ning [College of Physics and Electromechanical Engineering, Hexi University, Zhangye 734000 (China)] [College of Physics and Electromechanical Engineering, Hexi University, Zhangye 734000 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Generalized Darboux transformation and localized waves in coupled Hirota equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we construct a generalized Darboux transformation to the coupled Hirota equations with high-order nonlinear effects like the third dispersion, self-steepening and inelastic Raman scattering terms. As application, an Nth-order localized wave solution on the plane backgrounds with the same spectral parameter is derived through the direct iterative rule. In particular, some semi-rational, multi-parametric localized wave solutions are obtained: (1) Vector generalization of the first- and the second-order rogue wave solution; (2) Interactional solutions between a dark-bright soliton and a rogue wave, two dark-bright solitons and a second-order rogue wave; (3) Interactional solutions between a breather and a rogue wave, two breathers and a second-order rogue wave. The results further reveal the striking dynamic structures of localized waves in complex coupled systems.

Xin Wang; Yuqi Li; Yong Chen

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Propagation of MHD waves in a plasma in a sheared magnetic field with straight field lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The propagation of MHD plasma waves in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The problem is solved using ... is inhomogeneous in one direction, and the magnetic field lines are straight. The waves are assumed...

P. N. Mager; D. Yu. Klimushkin

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES  

SciTech Connect

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

Okamoto, Takenori J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

MHL Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tow Tank Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 109.7 Beam(m) 6.7 Depth(m) 3.7 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 6.7 Length of Effective Tow(m) 103.6 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Concrete beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

133

Alden Small Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flume Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Small Flume Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 17.1 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $2500/week Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Length(m) Variable Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) >0.9 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes

134

The various manifestations of collisionless dissipation in wave propagation  

SciTech Connect

The propagation of an electrostatic wave packet inside a collisionless and initially Maxwellian plasma is always dissipative because of the irreversible acceleration of the electrons by the wave. Then, in the linear regime, the wave packet is Landau damped, so that in the reference frame moving at the group velocity, the wave amplitude decays exponentially with time. In the nonlinear regime, once phase mixing has occurred and when the electron motion is nearly adiabatic, the damping rate is strongly reduced compared to the Landau one, so that the wave amplitude remains nearly constant along the characteristics. Yet, we show here that the electrons are still globally accelerated by the wave packet, and in one dimension, this leads to a non local amplitude dependence of the group velocity. As a result, a freely propagating wave packet would shrink, and therefore, so would its total energy. In more than one dimension, not only does the magnitude of the group velocity nonlinearly vary, but also its direction. In the weakly nonlinear regime, when the collisionless damping rate is still significant compared to its linear value, the group velocity is directed towards the outside of the wave packet and tends to increase its transverse extent, while the opposite is true once the wave is essentially undamped. The impact of the nonlinear variation of the group velocity on the transverse size of the wave packet is quantified, and compared to that induced by the self-focussing due to wave front bowing.

Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

MHK Technologies/Wave Rotor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rotor Rotor < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Rotor.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ecofys Subsidiary of Econcern Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/C Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Wave Rotor uses a combined Darrieus-Wells rotor, which is contained on the same vertical axis of rotation. These are respectively omni- and bi-directional rotors that can operate in currents of changing directions. The Wave Rotor is mounted on a platform to allow for the capture of wave energy from circulating water particles created by local currents. Since it uses two types of rotor on a single axis of rotation it is able to convert not only tidal currents, but also waves into electricity.

136

Assessment of wave energy variation in the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since wave energy has the highest marine energy density in the coastal areas, assessment of its potential is of great importance. Furthermore, long term variation of wave power must be studied to ensure the availability of stable wave energy. In this paper, wave energy potential is assessed along the southern coasts of Iran, the Persian Gulf. For this purpose, SWAN numerical model and ECMWF wind fields were used to produce the time series of wave characteristics over 25 years from 1984 till 2008. Moreover, three points in the western, central and eastern parts of the Persian Gulf were selected and the time series of energy extracted from the modeled waves were evaluated at these points. The results show that there are both seasonal and decadal variations in the wave energy trends in all considered points due to the climate variability. There was a reduction in wave power values from 1990 to 2000 in comparison with the previous and following years. Comparison of wind speed and corresponding wave power variations indicates that a small variation in the wind speed can cause a large variation in the wave power. The seasonal oscillations lead to variation of the wave power from the lowest value in summer to the highest value in winter in all considered stations. In addition, the seasonal trend of wave power changed during the decadal variation of wave power. Directional variations of wave power were also assessed during the decadal variations and the results showed that the dominant direction of wave propagation changed in the period of 1990 to 2000 especially in the western station.

B. Kamranzad; A. Etemad-shahidi; V. Chegini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.  

SciTech Connect

A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ferrimagnetic Spin Wave Resonance and Superconductivity in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomenon of ferrimagnetic spin wave resonance [uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin wave resonance] has been detected for the first time. It has been observed in carbon nanotubes, produced by high energy ion beam modification of diamond single crystals in $\\ $ direction. Peculiarities of spin wave resonance observed allow to insist on the formation in given nanotubes of $s^+$ superconductivity at room temperature, coexisting with uncompensated antiferromagnetic ordering.

Yerchuck, Dmitri; Stelmakh, Vyacheslav; Dovlatova, Alla; Alexandrov, Andrey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Kelvin Waves around Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean allows circumpolar structure and the Antarctic coastline plays a role as a waveguide for oceanic Kelvin waves. Under the cyclic conditions, the horizontal wavenumbers and frequencies for circumpolarly propagating waves are ...

Kazuya Kusahara; Kay I. Ohshima

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Standing waves in the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At first, a review of our knowledge on the distribution of galaxies at large-scale, leading to a foam-like large-scale structure of the Universe, is presented in the Introduction. Then, it is shown how, according to the present theory for the formation of superclusters, wave scalar perturbations of the same frequency traveling in opposite directions give rise to standing waves, which cause a motion of the cosmic material towards the nodes, resulting in the concentration of the cosmic material around the nodes. Generalizing this effect to two (three) dimensions, the cosmic material is concentrated around the node lines (node surfaces). It is proposed that the three-dimensional effect is responsible for the foam-like large-scale structure of the Universe.

Evangelos Chaliasos

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A Pragmatic Methodology for Testing Intrusion Prevention Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......traffic initiated within intranets allowing compromised internal...ultimately change the traffic characteristics as additional packets such...operations help shape the characteristics of the replayed traffic...in common the following characteristics: (a) uni-directional-feeding......

Zhongqiang Chen; Alex Delis; Peter Wei

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Solitary wave scattering by a vertical cylinder: Experimental study  

SciTech Connect

The nonlinear interaction of a solitary wave and a vertical circular cylinder is examined. The wave field was measured at various locations near the cylinder and the detailed process of wave reflection, diffraction and scattering is discussed. The formation of the first and second scattered wave is observed as the incident wave first encounters the cylinder and as it leaves the cylinder respectively. Comparisons are made to the generalized Boussinesq (gB) model which is found to give quite good results for the wave heights except very close to the cylinder surface and in the immediate wake region behind the cylinder. The net force on the cylinder in the direction of incident wave propagation was measured as a function of time, and good agreement with the gB model is obtained.

Yates, G.T. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wang, K.H. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Wave-climate assessment by satellite remote sensing  

SciTech Connect

Satellite remote sensing based on radar altimetry and the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be used for accurate ocean-wave climatology globally. The altimeter provides significant wave height and wind speed whereas SAR in principle gives the full wave spectrum. Over the next few years, altimeter-derived wave heights will become the basic data sources for open-ocean statistics and SAR, in combination with results from global wave models, will provide the corresponding directional statistics. In addition, SAR may be used for studying wave conditions in near coastal areas. In the Norwegian Sea and elsewhere, real-time SAT and altimeter data are now being used operationally for forecasting and assimilation into numerical wave models.

Barstow, S.; Krogstad, H.E. [SINTEF, Trodheim (Norway)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gravity perturbed Crapper waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waves are known to have multi-valued height. Using...gravity-capillary waves with multi-valued height. The...of single-valued and multi-valued travelling waves...absence of gravity, a family of exact solutions is...elliptic functions. Building upon the work by Tanveer...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Intensity modulation in SAR images of internal waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... indicate that although the presence of the internal-wave surface current does indeed produce enhanced roughening of the surface at X-band scales, this ... of the surface at X-band scales, this roughening is not due to direct modulation of X-band Bragg waves as described by equation ...

D. R. Thompson; R. F. Gasparovic

1986-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

Alfv'en Wave Solitons and Solar Intermediate Drift Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

propagate at velocities of the order of the Alfv'en veloc­ ity in a direction inclined to the magnetic field, the solar wind, and possibly accretion disks, and extra­ galactic jets. In such magnetized plasmas Alfv'en waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v

Guedel, Manuel

147

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

148

The Effect of Wave Breaking on the Wave Energy Spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of wave breaking on the wave energy spectral shape is examined. The Stokes wave-breaking criterion is first extended to random waves and a breaking wave model is established in which the elevation of breaking waves is expressed in ...

C. C. Tung; N. E. Huang

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

APPROXIMATE HARTREE TYPE WAVE FUNCTIONS AND MATRIX ELEMENTS FOR...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

APPROXIMATE HARTREE TYPE WAVE FUNCTIONS AND MATRIX ELEMENTS FOR THE K AND L SHELLS OF ATOMS AND IONS Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Meyerott, R.E. Temp Data Storage 3:...

150

FDI Waves, Waves of Neglect of Political Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Studies of the impact of local political risk on foreign direct investment inflows overlook that worldwide FDI comes in waves. Using a simple model we show that the impact of political risk on FDI inflows is likely to be weaker, the larger the worldwide amount of FDI, which may question standard estimates and their policy implications. Using a large sample of developing and developed economies, we estimate the sensitivity of the distribution of FDI inflows across countries, to the local political risk. We find that it is a decreasing function of the worldwide amount of FDI. This finding has been upheld after many robustness checks.

Pierre-Guillaume Méon; Khalid Sekkat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Direct Laser Cladding , Current Status and Future Scope of Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the last decades Direct Laser Cladding has become an established technique in many ... oil drilling components. Continuous wave (CW) lasers with a power up to 18 kW ... with three or more axes, enabling ...

A. Weisheit; A. Gasser; G. Backes; T. Jambor…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Streamers generation by small-scale drift-Alfvén waves  

SciTech Connect

Excitation of streamers by modulationally unstable small-scale drift-Alfvén wave (SSDAW) is investigated. It is found that the excitation depends strongly on the propagation direction of the SSDAW, and the ion and electron diamagnetic drift waves are both unstable due to the generation of streamers. It is also shown that zonal flows can be effectively excited by the SSDAW with the propagation direction different from that for streamer excitation.

Zhao, J. S. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China and Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Maine Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tow Tank Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Maine Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of Maine Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 30.5 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 3 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Simulated beach is framed with PVC/mesh. Has a 4:9 slope. Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition

154

Magnetohydrodynamic density waves in a composite disc system of interstellar medium and cosmic ray gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dispersion Relations of Spiral mhd density waves Parker first investigated...hydromagnetic waves using the MHD perturbation equations in a thermal...that there is a in the phase diagram for the fast mode in the direction...alone (Appendix B). For spiral MHD density waves in a thin self-gravitating......

Yu-Qing Lou; Zuhui Fan

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

A pistonless Stirling engine—The traveling wave heat engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The propagation of acoustical waves through a differentially heated regenerator results in gas in the regenerator undergoing a Stirling thermodynamic cycle. One direction of wave propagation results in amplification of the waves and conversion of thermal energy into acoustical energy. The opposite direction results in acoustical energy being used to pump heat. The ideal gain and maximum energy conversion rates are derived in this paper. Low power gain measurements were made which verify the derived gain equation. Practical engines and heat pumps using this principle are discussed.

Peter H. Ceperley

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

157

New directions for gravitational wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Millikan oil drops" are drops of superfluid helium coated with electrons, and levitated in a strong, inhomogeneous magnetic field. When the temperature of the system becomes very low compared to the cyclotron gap energy, the system remains in its quantum ground state. Two such levitated charged drops can have their charge-to-mass ratio critically adjusted so that the forces of gravity and electricity between the drops are in balance. Then it is predicted that the amount of scattered electromagnetic and gravitational radiation from the drops are equalized, along with these two kinds of forces. The cross sections for the scattering of the two kinds of radiation can become large, hard-sphere cross-sections at the first Mie resonance, due to the hard-wall boundary conditions on the surfaces of the spheres for both kinds of radiations. An efficient quantum transduction process between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation by such a pair of drops is predicted at microwave frequencies, and a Hertz-like experi...

Chiao, Raymond Y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wave height forecasting in Dayyer, the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forecasting of wave parameters is necessary for many marine and coastal operations. Different forecasting methodologies have been developed using the wind and wave characteristics. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) as a robust data learning method is used to forecast the wave height for the next 3, 6, 12 and 24 h in the Persian Gulf. To determine the effective parameters, different models with various combinations of input parameters were considered. Parameters such as wind speed, direction and wave height of the previous 3 h, were found to be the best inputs. Furthermore, using the difference between wave and wind directions showed better performance. The results also indicated that if only the wind parameters are used as model inputs the accuracy of the forecasting increases as the time horizon increases up to 6 h. This can be due to the lower influence of previous wave heights on larger lead time forecasting and the existing lag between the wind and wave growth. It was also found that in short lead times, the forecasted wave heights primarily depend on the previous wave heights, while in larger lead times there is a greater dependence on previous wind speeds.

B. Kamranzad; A. Etemad-Shahidi; M.H. Kazeminezhad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hysteresis of ionization waves  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H. [Institut fuer Physik, E.-M.-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Wilke, C. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung und Technologie, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer of the Subject II. Introduction­Historical Perspective III. Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations IV. Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics V. Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions VI

Hereman, Willy A.M.

162

Matter Waves and Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classical four-dimensional relativity gives a most natural and harmonious interpretation of the three basic phenomena of nature: gravity, electricity, and the wave structure of matter, provided that the basic assumptions of the Einsteinian theory are modified in two respects: (1) the fundamental invariant of the action principle is chosen as a quadratic instead of a linear function of the curvature components; (2) the static equilibrium of the world is replaced by a dynamic equilibrium. Electricity comes out as a second-order resonance effect of the matter waves. The matter waves are gravitational waves but superposed not on an empty Euclidean space but on a space of high average curvature.

Cornelius Lanczos

1942-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

kinetic wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

kinetic wave energy ? kinetische Wellenenergie f [Teil der Wellenlänge, die im Feld der Orbitalgeschwindigkeiten unter der Welle enthalten ist und als Orbitalbewegung am Ort verbleibt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

potential wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

potential wave energy ? potentielle Wellenenergie f [Der für die Auslenkung des Wasserspiegels zum Ruhewasserspiegel erforderliche Teil der Wellenenergie, die mit der Wellengeschwindigkeit fortbewegt...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

MHK Technologies/Green Cat Wave Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Turbine Wave Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Green Cat Wave Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Cat Renewables Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Green Cat Wave Turbine employs an extremely novel yet simple mechanical coupling to drive a multi pole Direct Drive generator Recent advances in permanent magnet materials and power electronic converters have opened up this extremely straightforward conversion route Unlike a number of devices currently being investigated this configuration enables maximum energy capture from both vertical and horizontal sea motions swell and surge respectively

166

MHK Technologies/WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Sea for Life Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The WEGA device is an articulated suspended body semi submerged attached to a mount structure that oscillates in an elliptical orbit with the passage of the waves The movement of the body drives an hydraulic cylinder which pushes high pressure fluid through an accumulator and an hydraulic motor driving the generator that produces energy The articulated body attaches to the mount structure through a rotary head which allows it to adapt to the direction wave propagation Multiple devices can be placed on a single mount structure according to the size and place of the structure

167

Observations on waveforms of capillary and gravity-capillary waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to extreme conditions in the field, there has not been any observational report on three-dimensional waveforms of short ocean surface waves. Three-dimensional waveforms of short wind waves can be found from integrating surface gradient image data (Zhang 1996a). Ocean surface gradient images are captured by an optical surface gradient detector mounted on a raft operating in the water offshore California (Cox and Zhang 1997). Waveforms and spatial structures of short wind waves are compared with early laboratory wind wave data (Zhang 1994, 1995). Although the large-scale wind and wave conditions are quite different, the waveforms are resoundingly similar at the small scale. It is very common, among steep short wind waves, that waves in the capillary range feature sharp troughs and flat crests. The observations show that most short waves are far less steep than the limiting waveform under weak wind conditions. Waveforms that resemble capillary-gravity solitons are observed with a close match to the form theoretically predicted for potential flows (Longuet-Higgins 1989, Vanden-Broeck and Dias 1992). Capillaries are mainly found as parasitic capillaries on the forward face of short gravity waves. The maximum wavelength in a parasitic wave train is less than a centimeter. The profiles of parasitic wave trains and longitudinal variations are shown. The phenomenon of capillary blockage (Phillips 1981) on dispersive freely traveling short waves is observed in the tank but not at sea. The short waves seen at sea propagate in all directions while waves in the tank are much more unidirectional.

Xin Zhang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.  

SciTech Connect

A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis...

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Free-Wave Energy Dissipation in Experimental Breaking Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several transient wave trains containing an isolated plunging or spilling breaker at a prescribed location were generated in a two-dimensional wave flume using an energy focusing technique. Surface elevation measurements of each transient wave ...

Eustorgio Meza; Jun Zhang; Richard J. Seymour

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

173

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

174

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

175

Klymak, J.M., S. Legg, M.H. Alford, M. Buijsman, R. Pinkel, and J.D. Nash. 2012. The direct breaking of internal waves at steep topography. Oceanography 25(2):150159, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of internal tide generation, computation of how much energy they trap and turn into turbulence. This approach waves forced by wind and by tides (Munk and Wunsch, 1998). Tracking the energy pathways of internal the energy balance of tides. Though simpler than wind-driven waves, the energy balance of internal tides

176

Wave energy: a Pacific perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...study by Cornett used wind/wave hindcasting to assess Canada's offshore wave energy resource...will probably attract offshore birds, possibly leading...related projects, such as offshore wind farms. If wave energy development...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Rainbow trapping of guided waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rainbow trapping of guided waves Javier Polanco and Rosa M.the propagation of a wave packet that is a superpositionof three s-polarized guided waves with different frequencies

Polanco, Javier; Fitzgerald, Rosa M; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus and efficiency of seismic processing algorithms, especially for application to regions of structural complexity

179

Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

Gravitational waves from cosmic bubble collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic bubbles are nucleated through the quantum tunneling process. After nucleation they would expand and undergo collisions with each other. In this paper, we focus in particular on collisions of two equal-sized bubbles and compute gravitational waves emitted from the collisions. First, we study the mechanism of the collisions by means of a real scalar field and a quartic potential of the field. Then, using this scalar field model, we compute gravitational waves from the collisions in a straightforward manner. In the quadrupole approximation, time-domain gravitational waveforms are directly obtained by integrating the energy-momentum tensors over the volume of the wave sources, where the energy-momentum tensors are expressed in terms of the scalar field, the local geometry and the potential; therefore, containing all information about the bubble collisions. We present gravitational waveforms emitted during (i) the initial-to-intermediate stage of strong collisions and (ii) the final stage of weak collisions...

Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yang, Jongmann; Yeom, Dong-han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Simulation of one-dimensional evolution of wind waves in a deep water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A direct wave model based on the one-dimensional nonlinear equations for potential waves is used for simulation of wave field development under the action of energy input dissipation and nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The equations are written in conformal surface-fitted nonstationary coordinate system. New schemes for calculating the input and dissipation of wave energy are implemented. The wind input is calculated on the basis of the parameterization developed through the coupled modeling of waves and turbulent boundary layer. The wave dissipation algorithm introduced to prevent wave breaking instability is based on highly selective smoothing of the wave surface and surface potential. The integration is performed in Fourier domain with the number of modes M = 2048 broad enough to reproduce the energy downshifting. As the initial conditions the wave field is assigned as train of Stokes waves with steepness ak = 0.15 at nondimensional wavenumber k = 512. Under the action of nonlinearity and energy input the spectrum starts to grow. This growth is followed by the downshifting. The total time of integration is equal to 7203 initial wave periods. During this time the energy increased by 1111 times. Peak of the spectrum gradually shifts from wavenumber nondimensional k = 512 down to k = 10. Significant wave height increases 33 times while the peak period increases 51 times. Rates of the peak downshift and wave energy evolution are in good agreement with the JONSWAP formulation.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD FROM ANALYSES OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD FROM ANALYSES OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This project aims to improve understanding of the subsurface fracture system in the Coso geothermal field, located in the east central California. We applied shear-wave splitting technique on a set of high quality, locally recorded microearthquake (MEQ) data. Four major fracture directions have been identified from the seismograms recorded by the permanent sixteen-station down-hole array: N10- 20W, NS, N20E, and N40-45E,

183

Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

List of Wave Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveEnergy&oldid267203" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

184

Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect

The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Experimental Measurements and Numerical Prediction of the Effect of Waves on Mooring Line Forces for a Container Ship Moored to Pile Supported and Solid Wall Docks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conditions of a moored container ship are examined by a physical model in a wave basin and by a numerical simulation. Each condition, wave period, significant wave height and wave direction, was isolated and tested for a 50:1 scale model of a...

Luai, Andres B

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

186

wave | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281559 Varnish cache server wave Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. Source Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Date Released December 05th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

187

Directives Quarterly Updates  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Listings of new Justification Memoranda and new or revised Directives that have been posted to the DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Portal. Updated quarterly.

188

Another face of DIRECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

authors, see for example, tree-Direct [5]. This paper ..... [4] J.M. Gablonsky, Modifications of the DIRECT Algorithm, Ph.D. Thesis, North Carolina State. University ...

chiter

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Density waves in a transverse electric field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a quasi-one-dimensional conductor with an open Fermi surface, a charge- or a spin-density-wave phase can be destroyed by an electric field perpendicular to the direction of high conductivity. This mechanism, due to the breakdown of electron-hole symmetry, is very similar to the orbital destruction of superconductivity by a magnetic field, due to time-reversal symmetry.

Gilles Montambaux

1996-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE  

SciTech Connect

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Wave Function and Quantum Reality  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the meaning of the wave function by analyzing the mass and charge density distributions of a quantum system. According to protective measurement, a charged quantum system has effective mass and charge density distributing in space, proportional to the square of the absolute value of its wave function. In a realistic interpretation, the wave function of a quantum system can be taken as a description of either a physical field or the ergodic motion of a particle. The essential difference between a field and the ergodic motion of a particle lies in the property of simultaneity; a field exists throughout space simultaneously, whereas the ergodic motion of a particle exists throughout space in a time-divided way. If the wave function is a physical field, then the mass and charge density will be distributed in space simultaneously for a charged quantum system, and thus there will exist gravitational and electrostatic self-interactions of its wave function. This not only violates the superposition principle of quantum mechanics but also contradicts experimental observations. Thus the wave function cannot be a description of a physical field but be a description of the ergodic motion of a particle. For the later there is only a localized particle with mass and charge at every instant, and thus there will not exist any self-interaction for the wave function. It is further argued that the classical ergodic models, which assume continuous motion of particles, cannot be consistent with quantum mechanics. Based on the negative result, we suggest that the wave function is a description of the quantum motion of particles, which is random and discontinuous in nature. On this interpretation, the square of the absolute value of the wave function not only gives the probability of the particle being found in certain locations, but also gives the probability of the particle being there. The suggested new interpretation of the wave function provides a natural realistic alternative to the orthodox interpretation, and it also implies that the de Broglie-Bohm theory and many-worlds interpretation are wrong and the dynamical collapse theories are in the right direction by admitting wavefunction collapse.

Gao Shan [Unit for History and Philosophy of Science and Centre for Time, SOPHI, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

193

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

194

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli MIT E .J. Porkolab Sherwood/Spring APS Denver May 2009 #12; 2 Participants in the Center for Simulation of Wave hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance

Wright, John C.

195

On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall  

SciTech Connect

By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

197

Doppler Effect of Nonlinear Waves and Superspirals in Oscillatory Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonlinear waves emitted from a moving source are studied. A meandering spiral in a reaction-diffusion medium provides an example in which waves originate from a source exhibiting a back-and-forth movement in a radial direction. The periodic motion of the source induces a Doppler effect that causes a modulation in wavelength and amplitude of the waves (“superspiral”). Using direct simulations as well as numerical nonlinear analysis within the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, we show that waves subject to a convective Eckhaus instability can exhibit monotonic growth or decay as well as saturation of these modulations depending on the perturbation frequency. Our findings elucidate recent experimental observations concerning superspirals and their decay to spatiotemporal chaos.

Lutz Brusch; Alessandro Torcini; Markus Bär

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

198

Traveling-wave photodetector  

SciTech Connect

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Shock waves on complex networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable...

Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Tamás; Herrmann, Hans J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

MHK Technologies/hyWave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hyWave hyWave < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage HyWave.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Wavegen subsidiary of Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Mutriku *MHK Projects/Wavegen Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The hyWave device rests directly on the seabed and is designed to operate in the near-shore environment in a nominal mean water depth of 15m. Optimum performance will be achieved when driven by a long ocean swell. The pneumatic power of the oscillating water column (OWC) is converted to electricity by a Wells generator and specially designed induction generators.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wave power absorption: Experiments in open sea and simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A full scale prototype of a wave power plant based on a direct drive linear generator driven by a point absorber has been installed at the west coast of Sweden. In this paper experimentally collected data of energy absorption for different electrical loads are used to verify a model of the wave power plant including the interactions of wave buoy generator and external load circuit. The wave-buoy interaction is modeled with linear potential wavetheory. The generator is modeled as a nonlinear mechanical damping function that is dependent on piston velocity and electric load. The results show good agreement between experiments and simulations. Potential wavetheory is well suited for the modeling of a point absorber in normal operation and for the design of future converters. Moreover the simulations are fast which opens up for simulations of wave farms.

M. Eriksson; R. Waters; O. Svensson; J. Isberg; M. Leijon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ultrasonic NDT of titanium diffusion bonding with guided waves  

SciTech Connect

An ultrasonic guided wave technique is developed for the NDT of diffusion bonded titanium-to-titanium structures. A three-layer model based on the normal beam experimental results has been proposed. Dispersion curves and wave structure are analyzed to direct the experimental study. Two features related to Lamb waves propagating in diffusion bonded titanium plates, the spectral peak to peak ratios and the wave mode frequency shift, are extracted from the guided wave experimental results for both 2 mm (0.08 in.) and 4 mm (0.16 in.) diffusion bond panels. It is found for some specific modes and frequencies that these two features are sensitive to the diffusion bonding states and, therefore, could be used to distinguish good bond panels from poor bond ones.

Rose, J.L.; Zhu, W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics; Zaidi, M. [Boeing Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave...

204

Smith-Purcell radiation on a surface wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the radiation from an electron in flight over a surface wave of an arbitrary profile excited in a plane interface. For an electron bunch the conditions are specified under which the overall radiation essentially exceeds the incoherent part. It is shown that the radiation from the bunch with asymmetric density distribution of electrons in the longitudinal direction is partially coherent for waves with wavelengths much shorter than the characteristic longitudinal size of the bunch.

A. A. Saharian

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

205

Smith-Purcell radiation on a surface wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the radiation from an electron in flight over a surface wave of an arbitrary profile excited in a plane interface. For an electron bunch the conditions are specified under which the overall radiation essentially exceeds the incoherent part. It is shown that the radiation from the bunch with asymmetric density distribution of electrons in the longitudinal direction is partially coherent for waves with wavelengths much shorter than the characteristic longitudinal size of the bunch.

Saharian, A A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Localized Wave Functions and the Interaction Potential between Electronic Groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the Schrödinger equation for electronic wave functions can be modified so that its solutions describe a molecule as a collection of interacting atoms or other units. The interaction potential between electrons localized in different units is the weakest one possible that is consistent with the constraint that the corresponding localized wave function yield upon symmetry projection one solution to the Schrödinger equation. The binding energy of the system can be calculated directly.

William H. Adams

1974-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Mathematical Caricature of Large Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kadomtsev-Petviiashvili equation is considered as a mathematical caricature of large and rogue waves.

Mikhail Kovalyov

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Clustering of floaters by waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study experimentally how waves affect distribution of particles that float on a water surface. We show that clustering of small particles in a standing wave is a nonlinear effect with the clustering time decreasing as the square of the wave amplitude. In a set of random waves, we show that small floaters concentrate on a multi-fractal set.

P. Denissenko; G. Falkovich; S. Lukaschuk

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES Tuning Wave Dispersion in Resonant Networks Eyal Feigenbaum with meta-atoms. Resonant guided wave networks (RGWNs) are a new class of artificial photonic material,5 distinct from photonic crystals and metamateri- als, in which localized waves resonate in closed paths

Atwater, Harry

210

Selection Rules for the Nonlinear Interactions of Internal Gravity Waves and Inertia-Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal Gravity Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.1 Twodimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . . . . .Three dimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . .

Jiang, Chung-Hsiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Various Boussinesq solitary wave solutions  

SciTech Connect

The generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations have been used to model nonlinear wave evolution over variable topography and wave interactions with structures. Like the KdV equation, the gB equations support a solitary wave solution which propagates without changing shape, and this solitary wave is often used as a primary test case for numerical studies of nonlinear waves using either the gB or other model equations. Nine different approximate solutions of the generalized Boussinesq equations are presented with simple closed form expressions for the wave elevation and wave speed. Each approximates the free propagation of a single solitary wave, and eight of these solutions are newly obtained. The author compares these solutions with the well known KdV solution, Rayleigh`s solution, Laitone`s higher order solution, and ``exact`` numerical integration of the gB equations. Existing experimental data on solitary wave shape and wave speed are compared with these models.

Yates, G.T. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Absorption of fast waves by electrons on the DIII-D tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efficient direct heating of electrons by fast waves has been observed on the DIII-D tokamak. The measured fast-wave heating efficiency was independent of magnetic field, in contrast to the strong inverse magnetic field scaling predicted by the theory of single-pass damping, indicating multiple-pass absorption. The central heating of electrons by the fast waves had a strong dependence on the target eelctron temperature. H-mode plasmas were obtained with fast-wave heating alone for the first time in the direct electron heating regime.

C. C. Petty; R. I. Pinsker; M. J. Mayberry; M. Porkolab; F. W. Baity; P. T. Bonoli; S. C. Chiu; J. C. M. de Haas; R. H. Goulding; D. J. Hoffman; T. C. Luce; R. Prater

1992-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium  

SciTech Connect

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; H.L. Rappaport

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

214

Foreign Direct Investment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investment Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 June 2001 ii iii Contents Foreign Affiliates' Role in U.S. Energy Industry Operations ..............................................................................1 Foreign Direct Investment: The International Transactions Accounts ..............................................................8 U.S. Companies' Direct Investment Abroad in Energy ......................................................................................14 Conclusion...............................................................................................................................................................19

215

TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general ...

Agathos, M.

216

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves P. Junga: a subexcitable photosensitive Belousov­Zhabotinsky reaction, hippocampal slices of rat brains, and astrocyte of such a behavior for calcium wave net- works in interconnected brain cells. I. INTRODUCTION Since the early days

Showalter, Kenneth

217

MHK Technologies/Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Generation Buoy Power Generation Buoy < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Columbia Power Technologies Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Direct drive point absorber In 2005 Oregon State University entered into an exclusive license agreement with Columbia Power Technologies to jointly develop a direct drive wave energy conversion device Designed to be anchored 2 5 miles off the Oregon coast in 130 feet of water it uses the rise and fall of ocean waves to generate electricity Mooring Configuration Anchored

218

Direct-current-like Phase Space Manipulation Using Chirped Alternating Current Fields  

SciTech Connect

Waves in plasmas can accelerate particles that are resonant with the wave. A dc electric field also accelerates particles, but without a resonance discrimination, which makes the acceleration mechanism profoundly different. Whereas wave-particle acceleration mechanisms have been widely discussed in the literature, this work discusses the direct analogy between wave acceleration and dc field acceleration in a particular parameter regime explored in previous works. Apart from the academic interest of this correspondence, there may be practical advantages in using waves to mimic dc electric fields, for example, in driving plasma current with high efficiency.

P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Explicit dispersion relations for elastic waves in extremely deformed soft matter with application to nearly incompressible and auxetic materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the propagation of elastic waves in soft materials subjected to finite deformations. We derive explicit dispersion relations, and apply these results to study elastic wave propagation in (i) nearly incompressible materials such as biological tissues and polymers, and (ii) negative Poisson's ratio or auxetic materials. We find that for nearly incompressible materials transverse wave velocities exhibit strong dependence on direction of propagation and initial strain state, whereas the longitudinal component is not affected significantly until extreme levels of deformations are attained. For highly compressible materials, we show that both pressure and shear wave velocities depend strongly on initial deformation and direction of propagation. When compression is applied, longitudinal wave velocity decreases in positive bulk modulus materials, and increases for negative bulk modulus materials; this is regardless the direction of wave prorogation. We demonstrate that finite deformations influence elastic wave propagation through combinations of induced effective compressibility and stiffness.

Pavel Galich; Stephan Rudykh

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves  

SciTech Connect

We carried out a series of particle simulations to study electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves generated by an electron ring distribution. The electron ring distribution leads to excitations of X-mode waves mainly in the perpendicular direction, Z-mode waves in the perpendicular and parallel directions, and whistler-mode waves mainly in the parallel direction. The parallel Z- and whistler-mode waves can lead to an effective acceleration of ring electrons. The electron acceleration is mainly determined by the wave amplitude and phase velocity, which in turn is affected by the ratio of electron plasma to cyclotron frequencies. For the initial kinetic energy ranging from 100 to 500 keV, the peak energy of the accelerated electrons is found to reach 2–8 times the initial kinetic energy. We further study the acceleration process by test-particle calculations in which electrons interact with one, two, or four waves. The electron trajectories in the one-wave case are simple diffusion curves. In the multi-wave cases, electrons are accelerated simultaneously by counter-propagating waves and can have a higher final energy.

Lee, K. H. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Omura, Y. [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)] [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Lee, L. C. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MHK Technologies/Syphon Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Syphon Wave Generator Syphon Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Syphon Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Syphon Wave Generator is composed of a horizontal pipe containing a propeller driven generator mounted above the highest normal wave at high tide and two or more vertical pipes at least one at each end of the horizontal pipe Each vertical pipe must extend below the water surface at all times and have openings below the surface All the air must be removed from the pipe thus filling the unit completely with water When the crest of a wave reaches the first vertical pipe the water level will be higher at that pipe than at the second vertical pipe This causes water to flow up the first pipe and through the horizontal pipe thus turning the propeller and generator to produce electricity and then down the second vertical pipe due to the siphon effect When the crest of the wave moves to the second vertical pipe the water level is higher there than at the first pipe This will cause the water to flow up the second pipe and through the system in the opposite direction again prod

222

MHK Technologies/OCEANTEC Wave Energy Converter | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Energy Converter Wave Energy Converter < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OCEANTEC Wave Energy Converter.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization OCEANTEC Energias Marinas S L Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description OCEANTEC Marine Energy Company Ltd owned by Iberdrola and TECNALIA is developing a sensor for wave energy technology type Spanish attenuator Floating body oscillates due to wave excitation in its main DOF pitch Mooring system allows the body to weathervane so that it is faced to the predominant wave propagation direction Main advantage capture system completely encapsulated free of contact with sea water A flywheel continuously spins under the action of an electric motor Z The pitching motion of the WEC caused by wave action is transformed into an alternating precession in the longitudinal hull axis X A coupling device transforms this precession into an unidirectional rotation of higher frequency that is used to feed a conventional electric generator

223

Gain and efficiency of a short traveling wave heat engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gain and efficiency equations are derived for a traveling wave heat engine which has a regenerator that is SHORT compared to an acoustic wavelength. A traveling wave heat engine is a modified Stirling engine in which acoustical waves replace the usual pistons and energy is transformed from thermal to acoustical forms and vice?versa depending on the wave direction. A previous paper examined the energy transformation process for isothermal wave propagation in an infinite regenerator having a temperature gradient [P. H. Ceperley J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 7 2 1688–1694 (1982)]. Similar to that paper the present paper assumes: small amplitude waves nonturbulent flow a constant heat exchange coefficient and no regenerator end effects. In contrast the present paper assumes that the wave impedance is NOT determined by the regenerators’s properties but is instead set by the acoustical circuit exterior to the regenerator. In this paper the normalized power gain and efficiency are calculated and graphed as functions of dimensionless variables. For acoustical impedances of freely propagating waves and a Prandtl number of 0.7 the efficiency is limited to 10% of Carnot efficiency due to viscous losses in the regenerator. Higher efficiencies are possible with higher impedances e.g. if the impedance is multiplied by 10 79% of Carnot efficiencies are possible. Methods of achieving such impedances are discussed. Traveling waveheat pumps are similarly modeled and have comparable potential efficiencies.

Peter H. Ceperley

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Measuring ocean waves from space; Proceedings of the Symposium, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD, Apr. 15-17, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Papers are presented on ocean-wave prediction; the quasi-universal form of the spectra of wind-generated gravity waves at different stages of their development; the limitations of the spectral measurements and observations of the group structure of surface waves; the effect of swell on the growth of wind wave; operational wave forecasting; ocean-wave models, and seakeeping using directional wave spectra. Consideration is given to microwave measurements of the ocean-wave directional spectra; SIR research; estimating wave energy spectra from SAR imagery, with the radar ocean-wave spectrometer, and SIR-B; the wave-measurement capabilities of the surface contour radar and the airborne oceanographic lidar; and SIR-B ocean-wave enhancement with fast-Fourier transform techniques. Topics discussed include wave-current interaction; the design and applicability of Spectrasat; the need for a global wave monitoring system; the age and source of ocean swell observed in Hurricane Josephine; and the use of satellite technology for insulin treatment.

Beal, R.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

MHK Technologies/Multi Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Multi Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Leancon Wave Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Leancon Real Sea Test Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description MAWEC is an OWC wave energy converter that works differently from other OWCs in that it concurrently utilizes pressure and suck. This gives the wanted effect that the vertical force on the WEC is zero when the WEC stretches over more than one wave length. The device is V-shaped and oriented perpendicular to wave direction. The device consists of a number of vertical air tubes, and when a wave passes, air is pushed into a pressure channel that sucks air out of the suck channel. During one wave period each tube (120 in total) goes through a sequence where air is first pushed into a pressure channel when the wave is rising and is later sucked from the pressure channel when the wave is falling. In this situation there is constant pressure in the pressure channel and the air flow through the turbines is constant.

226

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Observation of negative-frequency waves in a water tank: A classical analogue to the Hawking effect?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of positive-frequency waves into negative-frequency waves at the event horizon is the mechanism at the heart of the Hawking radiation of black holes. In black-hole analogues, horizons are formed for waves propagating in a medium against the current when and where the flow exceeds the wave velocity. We report on the first direct observation of negative-frequency waves converted from positive-frequency waves in a moving medium. The measured degree of mode conversion is significantly higher than expected from theory.

Germain Rousseaux; Christian Mathis; Philippe Maissa; Thomas G. Philbin; Ulf Leonhardt

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions  

SciTech Connect

A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

231

Direct/Indirect Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Directives System Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1A, Directives System, dated 1-30-98.

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Separation of gas mixtures by thermoacoustic waves.  

SciTech Connect

Imposing sound on a binary gas mixture in a duct separates the two gases along the acoustic-propagation axis. Mole-fraction differences as large as 10% and separation fluxes as high as 0.001 M-squared c, where M is Mach number and c is sound speed, are easily observed. We describe the accidental discovery of this phenomenon in a helium-xenon mixture, subsequent experiments with a helium-argon mixture, and theoretical developments. The phenomenon occurs because a thin layer of the gas adjacent to the wall is immobilized by viscosity while the rest of the gas moves back and forth with the wave, and the heat capacity of the wall holds this thin layer of the gas at constant temperature while the rest of the gas experiences temperature oscillations due to the wave's oscillating pressure. The oscillating temperature gradient causes the light and heavy atoms in the gas to take turns diffusing into and out of the immobilized layer, so that the oscillating motion of the wave outside the immobilized layer tends to carry light-enriched gas in one direction and heavy-enriched gas in the opposite direction. Experiment and theory are in very good agreement for the initial separation fluxes and the saturation mole-fraction differences.

Swift, G. W. (Gregory W.); Geller, D. A. (Drew A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Wave Loading on Floating Platforms by Internal Solitary Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morison’s equation is used for estimating internal solitary wave-induced forces exerted on SPAR and semi-submersible platforms. And the results we got have also ... estimate internal wave loading even for SPAR an...

H. Q. Zhang; J. C. Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

Yuksel, Cem

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. (2005) “Modeling guided wave propagation with applicationMultiple Guided Ultrasonic Wave Features,” ASME Journal ofto-spar joints using guided waves and macro fiber composite

Bartoli, Ivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Love wave surface acoustic wave sensor for ice detection on aircraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the design fabrication experimental results and theoretical validation of a Love wave surface acoustic wave sensor for detecting the phase change from liquid water to solid ice. The sensing of this phase transition is due to the shear horizontal nature of Love waves which couple to a solid (ice) but not to a liquid (water). An SiO2 film of thickness 3.2 ?m deposited on an ST cut quartz wafer via plasma?enhanced chemical?vapor deposition acts as the guiding layer for Love waves. Testing is carried out with the water or ice placed directly in the propagation path of Love waves. An oscillation frequency shift of 2 MHz is observed when water on the sensor is frozen and melted cyclically. The contribution to the frequency shift is explained in terms of the acousto?electric effect (high permittivity and conductivity of water relative to ice) mass loading and elastic film formation (solid ice). An arrangement for wireless interrogation of the sensor is proposed which is particularly attractive for aircraft and rotorcraft applications obviating the need for complex wiring and local power sources. t

Vasundara V. Varadan; Sunil Gangadharan; Vijay K. Varadan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

Walsh, Donald Eugene

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the Wave Hub experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of wave energy on biodiversity...accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent...in the form of wind, wave and tidal...Rajapandian2007A review of wind energy technologiesRenew...emergence and the challenges it facesRefocus...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

James, L. Allan

243

Plane wave solution for elastic wave scattering by a heterogeneous ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A plane-wave method for computing the three-dimensional scattering of propagating elastic waves ... boundary conditions also called linear slip interface conditions, and therefore, called the ... good agreement between measured waves and theoretical ..... tribution with a mean and a standard deviation of the com-.

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

MHK Technologies/Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oregon State University OSU Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/OSU Direct Drive Power Generation Buoys Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description When the coil experiences a changing magnetic field created by the heaving magnets voltage is generated Technology Dimensions

245

Resuspension of Clays Under Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Owing to their complex form, very small size and relatively low density, clays freshly deposited in a bay are vulnerable to resuspension when agitated by waves. The model of resuspension of clays under wave motio...

Prida Thimakorn

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

MHD Waves in Astrophysical Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the wave velocities on the angle ? between the undisturbed field B 0 and the wave vector k is clearly demonstrated in a polar diagram—the phase velocity diagram. In Fig.?15.2, th...

Boris V. Somov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Elgen Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elgen Wave Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elgen Wave Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:www.elgenwave.com This company is listed in the Marine...

248

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

California at Davis, University of

249

The Nonlinear Equatorial Kelvin Wave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the method of strained coordinates, a uniformly valid approximation to the nonlinear equatorial Kelvin wave is derived. It is shown that nonlinear effects are negligible for the Kelvin waves associated with the Gulf of Guinea upwelling. The ...

John P. Boyd

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Wave guide impedance matching method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for modifying the end portion of a wave guide, whether hollow or solid, carrying electromagnetic, acoustic or optical energy, to produce a gradual impedance change over the length of the end portion, comprising the cutting of longitudinal, V-shaped grooves that increase in width and depth from beginning of the end portion of the wave guide to the end of the guide so that, at the end of the guide, no guide material remains and no surfaces of the guide as modified are perpendicular to the direction of energy flow. For hollow guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the interior surface; for solid guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the exterior surface. One or more resistive, partially conductive or nonconductive sleeves can be placed over the exterior of the guide and through which the grooves are cut to smooth the transition to free space.

Kronberg, James W. (Beech Island, SC)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Spherical waves r Legendre polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Impedance · Spherical waves r er e e Impedance · Legendre polynomials P0(x) = 1 P1(x) = x P2(x · Spherical waves ­ Spherical Hankel functions hn (2)(kr)=jn(kr)-iyn(kr) Impedance · Spherical waves Order: 0 1 4 Circumferential And azimuthal: 0,0 1,1 3,2 #12;3 Impedance · Spherical waves ­ Arbitrary

Berlin,Technische Universität

252

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms at station 139. Keywords: wave energy, survivability, breaking waves, joint distribution, OWEC INTRODUCTION

Haller, Merrick

253

Experimental quiescent drifting dusty plasmas and temporal dust acoustic wave growth  

SciTech Connect

We report on dust acoustic wave growth rate measurements taken in a dc (anode glow) discharge plasma device. By introducing a mesh with a variable bias 12-17 cm from the anode, we developed a technique to produce a drifting dusty plasma. A secondary dust cloud, free of dust acoustic waves, was trapped adjacent to the anode side of the mesh. When the mesh was returned to its floating potential, the secondary cloud was released and streamed towards the anode and primary dust cloud, spontaneously exciting dust acoustic waves. The amplitude growth of the excited dust acoustic waves was measured directly along with the wavelength and Doppler shifted frequency. These measurements were compared to fluid and kinetic dust acoustic wave theories. As the wave growth saturated a transition from linear to nonlinear waves was observed. The merging of the secondary and primary dust clouds was also observed.

Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Analytical modeling of elastic-plastic wave behavior near grain boundaries in crystalline materials  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that changes in material properties across an interface will produce differences in the behavior of reflected and transmitted waves. This is seen frequently in planar impact experiments, and to a lesser extent, oblique impacts. In anisotropic elastic materials, wave behavior as a function of direction is usually accomplished with the aid of velocity surfaces, a graphical method for predicting wave scattering configurations. They have expanded this method to account for inelastic deformation due to crystal plasticity. The set of derived equations could not be put into a characteristic form, but instead led to an implicit problem. to overcome this difficulty an algorithm was developed to search the parameters space defined by a wave normal vector, particle velocity vector, and a wave speed. A solution was said to exist when a set from this parameter space satisfied the governing vector equation. Using this technique they can predict the anisotropic elastic-plastic velocity surfaces and grain boundary scattering configuration for crystalline materials undergoing deformation by slip. Specifically, they have calculated the configuration of scattered elastic-plastic waves in anisotropic NiAl for an incident compressional wave propagating along a <111> direction and contacting a 45 degree inclined grain boundary and found that large amplitude transmitted waves exist owing to the fact that the wave surface geometry forces it to propagate near the zero Schmid factor direction <100>.

Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Damian [LLNL; Peralta, Pedro [ASU

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker, meterstick, sound tube apparatus, thermometer, microphone INTRODUCTION traveling wave of sinusoidal shape

Glashausser, Charles

256

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

257

Energy Loss by Breaking waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of the frequency of wind wave breaking in deep water are combined with laboratory estimates of the rate of energy loss a from single breaking wave to infer the net rate of energy transfer to the mixed layer from breaking waves, as a ...

S. A. Thorpe

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

Ryu, Yong Uk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Laser Excitation of a Fracture Source for Elastic Waves Thomas E. Blum* and Kasper van Wijk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser Excitation of a Fracture Source for Elastic Waves Thomas E. Blum* and Kasper van Wijk a transparent sample by focusing laser light directly onto this fracture. The associated displacement field, measured by a laser interferometer, has pronounced waves that are diffracted at the fracture tips. We

Snieder, Roel

260

LASER-INDUCED SHOCK WAVES IN CONDENSED MATTER: SOME TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LASER-INDUCED SHOCK WAVES IN CONDENSED MATTER: SOME TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS S. N. LUOa,Ã? , D. C, NV 89154, USA; c GPS Division, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA Laser pressure physics. We briefly review some techniques in laser-induced shock waves, including direct laser

Asimow, Paul D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Universal properties of two-port scattering, impedance, and admittance matrices of wave-chaotic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universal properties of two-port scattering, impedance, and admittance matrices of wave matrices of two-port wave-chaotic systems are studied experimentally using a chaotic microwave cavity. We remove the direct processes introduced by the nonideally coupled driving ports through a matrix

Anlage, Steven

262

The chemical-gas dynamic mechanisms of pulsating detonation wave instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemical-gas dynamic mechanisms of pulsating detonation wave instability By Mark Short1- dimensional pulsating detonation wave driven by a three-step chain-branching reac- tion are revealed by direct involves regular oscillations of the detonation front, where the instability is driven by low

Kapila, Ashwani K.

263

Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Ralf Starzmann Fluid the water wave motion into a bi-directional air flow, which in turn drives an air turbine. The Wells turbine the environmental impact of an in situ Wells turbine in more detail requires an in depth understanding

Frandsen, Jannette B.

264

Mode conversion between Alfvn and slow waves observed in the magnetotail by THEMIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an essential role to its dynamics. They can act as an intermediate energy sink or as a carrier to takeMode conversion between Alfvén and slow waves observed in the magnetotail by THEMIS J. Du,1,2 T. L] We present the direct spacecraft observations of wave mode conversion in the magnetotail

California at Berkeley, University of

265

Waves and the equilibrium range at Ocean Weather Station P J. Thomson,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy spectra. Observations are consistent with a local balance between wind input and breaking is extended to a wider range of conditions using observations of wave energy spectra and wind speed during a 2 friction velocity u� (and thus wind stress) directly controls wave energy spectra levels at high fre

266

EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF A COUPLED BEM-NAVIER-STOKES MODEL FOR SOLITARY WAVE SHOALING AND BREAKING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications are considered. The first one is the case of the breaking of a solitary wave over a step, which). INTRODUCTION Breaking waves on beaches and over ocean bottom discontinuities, constitute one of the most. In particular, due to the increasing power of mod- ern computers, direct Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD

Grilli, Stéphan T.

267

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since radar involves the transmission, propagation and scattering of EM waves by various is the electrostatic force between two point charges. #12;Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves Electric fields

Rutledge, Steven

268

Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressible Turbulence Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material Interfaces Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material Interfaces Lele.jpg Alternate Title: High-fidelity simulations of supersonic turbulent mixing and combustion Key Challenges: Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of isotropic turbulence interacting with a normal shock wave and turbulent multi-material mixing in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) Why it Matters: Shock/turbulence interaction is a fundamental phenomenon in fluid mechanics that occurs in a wide range of interesting problems in various disciplines, including supernova explosions, inertial confinement fusion, hypersonic flight and propulsion, and shock wave lithotripsy. Accomplishments: A novel solution-adaptive algorithm that applies different

269

Dominant Imprint of Rossby Waves in the Climate Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The connectivity pattern of networks based on ground level temperature records shows a dense stripe of links in the extra tropics of the southern hemisphere. We show that statistical categorization of these links yields a clear association with the pattern of an atmospheric Rossby wave, one of the major mechanisms associated with the weather system and with planetary scale energy transport. It is shown that alternating densities of negative and positive links are arranged in half Rossby wave distances around 3500, 7000, and 10?000 km and are aligned with the expected direction of energy flow, distribution of time delays, and the seasonality of these waves. In addition, long distance links that are associated with Rossby waves are the most dominant in the climate network.

Yang Wang; Avi Gozolchiani; Yosef Ashkenazy; Yehiel Berezin; Oded Guez; Shlomo Havlin

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Intersections of S-branes with Waves and Monopoles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct intersections of S-branes with waves and Kaluza-Klein monopoles. There are several possible ways to add a monopole to an S-brane solution similar to p-branes. On the other hand, one may add a wave only to the transverse space of an S-brane unlike a p-brane where wave resides on its worldvolume. The metric function of the wave is a harmonic function of the remaining transverse directions and an extra condition on integration constants is needed. We also show that it is not possible to add an S-brane to p-brane intersections whose near horizon geometry has an AdS part.

Mert Besken; Nihat Sadik Deger

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Doppler Effect of Nonlinear Waves and Superspirals in Oscillatory Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear waves emitted from a moving source are studied. A meandering spiral in a reaction-diffusion medium provides an example, where waves originate from a source exhibiting a back-and-forth movement in radial direction. The periodic motion of the source induces a Doppler effect that causes a modulation in wavelength and amplitude of the waves (``superspiral''). Using the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, we show that waves subject to a convective Eckhaus instability can exhibit monotonous growth or decay as well as saturation of these modulations away from the source depending on the perturbation frequency. Our findings allow a consistent interpretation of recent experimental observations concerning superspirals and their decay to spatio-temporal chaos.

Lutz Brusch; Alessandro Torcini; Markus Baer

2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

Predicted giant magnetic moment on non-{n0m} surfaces of d-wave superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the [1 (1) over bar 0] direction. Observing these predictions in high-T(c) superconductors can provide a strong confirmation of the d-wave scenario for such materials. [S0163-1829(99)50942-9]....

Hu, Chia-Ren; Yan, XZ.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Impact of Finite-Amplitude Bottom Topography on Internal Wave Generation in the Southern Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct observations in the Southern Ocean report enhanced internal wave activity and turbulence in a kilometer-thick layer above rough bottom topography collocated with the deep-reaching fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Linear theory, ...

Maxim Nikurashin; Raffaele Ferrari; Nicolas Grisouard; Kurt Polzin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfven wave cascade Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics ; Plasma Physics and Fusion 79 Hot Solar-Wind Helium: Direct Evidence for Local Heating by Alfven-Cyclotron Dissipation J. C. Kasper* Summary: to the Alfven wave speed...

275

Direct evidence for local oscillatory current sources and intracortical phase gradients in turtle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct evidence for local oscillatory current sources and intracortical phase gradients in turtle of several species. In turtle, these oscillations take the form of linear and circular traveling waves the origin of wave propagation in turtle visual cortex, we performed simultaneous measurements of the local

Kleinfeld, David

276

Directional emission of stadium-shaped micro-lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The far-field emission of two dimensional (2D) stadium-shaped dielectric cavities is investigated. Micro-lasers with such shape present a highly directional emission. We provide experimental evidence of the dependance of the emission directionality on the shape of the stadium, in good agreement with ray numerical simulations. We develop a simple geometrical optics model which permits to explain analytically main observed features. Wave numerical calculations confirm the results.

M. Lebental; J. -S. Lauret; J. Zyss; C. Schmit; E. Bogomolny

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Waves and instabilities in dissipative rotating superfluid neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss wave propagation in rotating superfluid neutron star cores, taking into account the vortex mediated mutual friction force. For models where the two fluids co-rotate in the unperturbed state, our analysis clarifies the role of chemical coupling and entrainment for sound and inertial waves. We also investigate the mutual friction damping, providing results that demonstrate the well-known fact that sound waves propagating along a vortex array are undamped. We show that the same is not true for inertial waves, which are damped by the mutual friction regardless of the propagation direction. We then include the vortex tension, which arises due to local vortex curvature. Focussing on purely transverse inertial waves, we derive the small correction that the tension induces in the wave frequency. Finally, we allow for a relative linear flow in the background (along the rotation axis). In this case we show how the mutual friction coupling may induce a dynamical instability in the inertial waves. We discuss the critical flow required for the instability to be present, its physical interpretation and the possible relevance it may have for neutron star physics.

T. Sidery; N. Andersson; G. L. Comer

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: the same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analysed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a "chaotic diode", where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

Stefano Lepri; Arkady Pikovsky

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

A FAST DIRECT SOLVER FOR QUASI-PERIODIC SCATTERING A. GILLMAN, A. BARNETT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A FAST DIRECT SOLVER FOR QUASI-PERIODIC SCATTERING PROBLEMS A. GILLMAN, A. BARNETT Abstract. We-of-plane electric field [5]). We seek the scattered wave u which 1 #12;2 A. GILLMAN, A. BARNETT solves, ( + 2 )u

Barnett, Alex

280

A spectrally accurate direct solution technique for frequency-domain scattering problems with variable media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a direct solution technique for the scattering of time-harmonic waves from a bounded region of the plane in which the wavenumber varies smoothly in space. The method constructs the interior...

Adrianna Gillman; Alex H. Barnett; Per-Gunnar Martinsson

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Departmental Directives Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To define requirements and responsibilities for implementing the Department of Energy (DOE) Directives Program in support of the Secretary's memorandum of September 10, 2007, Principles Governing Departmental Directives. See also the current list of Directives Requiring Further Documentation, as required by Appendix D of this Order. Cancels DOE P 251.1A, DOE O 251.1B, DOE M 251.1-1B.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nonlinear wave evolution in the expanding solar wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report here on a numerical model allowing direct numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations advected by the expanding solar wind. We show that the expansion of the plasma delays and possibly freezes the turbulent evolution, but that it also triggers the nonlinear evolution of otherwise stable (Alfvén) waves, which can thus release their energy in the wind.

Roland Grappin; Marco Velli; André Mangeney

1993-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

DISSIPATIVE ENERGIZATION OF BAROCLINIC WAVES BY SURFACE EKMAN PUMPING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

result is zero wave amplitude with an altered mean flow. Nonlinear numerical model calculations also. A numerical model calculation shows that the EAPE growth occurs directly through the Ekman pumping increase the net production of total eddy energy. #12;1 Introduction In the context of the two-layer quasi

Lee, Sukyoung

284

Directives System Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1, which establishes requirements for the development, coordination, and sunset review of DOE directives.

1995-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

285

Departmental Directives Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish directives as the primary means to set, communicate, and institutionalize policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors.

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

287

Fractional Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Method of detecting the direction of arcing faults on power distribution feeders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of overcurrent relays, which Journal model is IEEE transactions on Power Delivery is required for distribution system reliability. The traveling wave directionality al- gorithms also require fairly substantial change in voltage for proper operation... is of significant magnitude to cause a current reversal in the case of a reverse fault [18]. 2. Traveling Wave Relaying The need for more accurate and fast detection of fault and direction of very high voltage transmission lines, was the base of invention...

Fernando, W. Anand Krisantha

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ripping Graphene: Preferred Directions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ripping Graphene: Preferred Directions ... Here we present experimental and theoretical studies on cracks or tears in suspended monolayer graphene membranes. ... Edges from mechanically induced ripping exhibit straight lines and are predominantly aligned in the armchair or zigzag directions of the graphene lattice. ...

Kwanpyo Kim; Vasilii I. Artyukhov; William Regan; Yuanyue Liu; M. F. Crommie; Boris I. Yakobson; A. Zettl

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Departmental Directives System  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes the directives system to be used for publishing permanent and temporary directives issued by DOE Headquarters and addressed to Headquarters and/or field elements. Chg 1 dated 3-14-85. Cancels DOE 1321.1A.

1983-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Su Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li Hui [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 6078471 (Japan)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

direct_deposit_111609  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: DO NOT complete this form until you are ready to submit it to the Payroll Department. DIRECT DEPOSIT REQUEST Directions: 1. Provide required information neatly, legibly; 2. If Checking Account Direct Deposit, include a voided check. a. DO NOT submit a deposit slip! 3. If Savings Account Direct Deposit, include a copy of savings card. 4. Sign this form; 5. Inter-office mail it to Craft Payroll at "P238." DIRECT DEPOSITION AUTHORIZATION I hereby authorize Los Alamos National Laboratory, hereinafter called The Laboratory, to initiate credit entries and, if necessary, debit entries and adjustments for any credit entries in error to my account listed on this form. If deposit is for:

293

Directions and Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directions & Maps Directions & Maps Plan Your Visit Visit About the Museum Museum Hours Directions & Maps When to Visit Arrange for a Visit Around Los Alamos Contact Us invisible utility element Directions and Maps Aerial View of Los Alamos Aerial approach to the Los Alamos airport Where we're located Los Alamos (elevation 7,355 feet) is perched high atop the Pajarito Plateau in the Jemez Mountains, 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe. The Bradbury Science Museum is located in downtown Los Alamos at the corner of Central Avenue and 15th Street. If you're driving here and using GPS navigation, our address is 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos, NM 87544. How to get here From Albuquerque take I-25 north to Santa Fe (take NM 599 for most direct route), then US 84/285 north to Pojoaque. At Pojoaque take the NM 502 exit

294

MHK Technologies/CETO Wave Energy Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Energy Technology Wave Energy Technology < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage CETO Wave Energy Technology.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/CETO La Reunion *MHK Projects/CETO3 Garden Island *MHK Projects/Perth Wave Energy Project PWEP Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing & Demonstration & Operation Technology Description The CETO system distinguishes itself from other wave energy devices by operating out of sight and being anchored to the ocean floor. Each CETO unit consists of a pump unit moored to the ocean floor and connected to a submerged Buoyant Actuator via a tether. The Buoyant Actuator moves in an orbital motion, in harmony with the wave, capturing the power of the passing waves. The Buoyant Actuator is connected to a tether (marine rope) that creates a vertical upward force which actuates the seabed mounted piston pump. This force pressurises fluid in the CETO system. The high pressure fluid is then sent ashore via a subsea pipeline. Onshore the fluid passes through a standard hydroelectric turbine to generate zero-emission electricity and/or through a reverse osmosis plant to directly create zero-emission desalinated water (replacing greenhouse gas emitting electrically driven pumps usually required for such plants). The fluid is then re-circulated at low-pressure to the CETO units offshore creating a closed-loop system. The generation capacity of CETO projects is scalable. To increase the project capacity additional units can be added offshore and connected back to a larger power house onshore.

295

Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave–short-wave resonance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave–short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics.

Shihua Chen; Jose M. Soto-Crespo; Philippe Grelu

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The properties of linear Alfvén slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics(MHD) are discussed augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3 + 1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field a graphical view of the relativistic aberrationeffects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions corresponding to a localized point perturbation their formulae and geometrical construction can serve to benchmark current high-resolution algorithms for numerical relativistic MHD.

R. Keppens; Z. Meliani

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of linear Alfv\\'en, slow, and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed, augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3+1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field, a graphical view of the relativistic aberration effects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover, it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way, even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions co...

Keppens, R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

The properties of linear Alfven, slow, and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed, augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3+1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field, a graphical view of the relativistic aberration effects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover, it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way, even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions corresponding to a localized point perturbation, their formulae and geometrical construction can serve to benchmark current high-resolution algorithms for numerical relativistic MHD.

Keppens, R. [Centre for Plasma-Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Centre, K.U. Leuven (Belgium); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands) and Astronomical Institute, Utrecht University (Netherlands); Meliani, Z. [Centre for Plasma-Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of linear Alfv\\'en, slow, and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed, augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3+1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field, a graphical view of the relativistic aberration effects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover, it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way, even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions corresponding to a localized point perturbation, their formulae and geometrical construction can serve to benchmark current high-resolution algorithms for numerical relativistic MHD.

R. Keppens; Z. Meliani

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

300

Acoustic radiation due to surface wave breaking.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While wave breaking is continually occurring at the sea surface its transient and sporadic nature makes it difficult to measure. Experimental results are presented that show how acoustic methods can be used as a remote sensor of this fundamental process. Sea surface?generated acoustic radiation (40 to 4000 Hz) is directly related to a quantitative measure of the boundary dynamics; i.e. the Toba variable. The frequency spectrum of the radiation remains remarkably unchanged over a wide range of environmental conditions but the correlation between the sound pressure level and the Toba variable undergoes an abrupt change when spilling breakers start to occur. Results support the use of acoustics to remotely measure the rate of energy being dissipated by wave breaking and the wavelength of the dominant gravity wave component. Theoretical studies have related the field measurements to analytical and laboratory results cited in the literature indicating that remote monitoring of the rate of occurrence and size distribution of ‘‘infant’’ (freshly entrained) bubbles may be possible if splashes on the surface do not radiate significant sound. Signal processing algorithms for the remote measurements discussed above are enhanced by eigenstructure analysis of the measured cross?spectral density matrix. [Work sponsored by ONR and NUSC.

Robert M. Kennedy; Stewart A. L. Glegg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wave Refraction Analyses at the Coast of Norway for Offshore Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The wave load on potential offshore wind farms off Norway is studied by the use of a numerical wave refraction model. The model estimates trajectories of wave energy (rays) for waves propagating in water with varying surface velocity. The calculations indicate that for southerly and southwesterly winds the majority of shoreward propagating waves will converge in the coastal area off southwestern Norway. For offshore wave propagation directions equal to 180o and 210o, respectively 88% and 72% of the shoreward propagating rays approaches land south of Ålesund on the western part of Norway. For westerly and northerly winds the distributions are approximately uniform. It is further found that in the case of southerly or southwesterly winds, waves approach- ing the southern part of Norway are frequently misaligned with the wind. This will result in an increased bending moment of the masts. For offshore wave propagation direction between 180o and 240o the calculations indicate that approximately 24% of the rays reaching the coast of Norway along its southwestern part deviates by more than 45o of offshore propagation direction.

Ole Henrik Segtnan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Millimeter wave interconnect and slow wave transmission lines in CMOS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When heading into the millimeter wave frequency band, even wires on CMOS exhibit transmission line effects, this thesis therefore presents models, simulation and measurements for… (more)

Bjørndal, Øystein

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spar Buoy Engine Spar Buoy Engine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Functional Design Engineering Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A long period spar buoy supports a subsurface flow augmentor The augmentor directs water from the wave s submarine flow field to a free prime mover piston The prime mover is decoupled from the machine s PTO during times in the wave s cycle when there is little power available for conversion Wave energy is stored in the device until the is enough flow magnetude that power take off can efficiently take place Power can be taken off as high pressure water crankshaft torque or directly as DC electricity

305

A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. ...

Courtney, Amy; 10.1016/j.mehy.2008.08.015

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Iterated multidimensional wave conversion  

SciTech Connect

Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

Brizard, A. J. [Dept. Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D. [Dept. Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Kaufman, A. N. [LBNL and Physics Dept., UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, A. S. [T-5, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zobin, N. [Dept. Mathematics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Gravity Waves in the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present numerical simulations of penetrative convection and gravity wave excitation in the Sun. Gravity waves are self-consistently generated by a convective zone overlying a radiative interior. We produce power spectra for gravity waves in the radiative region as well as estimates for the energy flux of gravity waves below the convection zone. We calculate a peak energy flux in waves below the convection zone to be three orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates for m=1. The simulations show that the linear dispersion relation is a good approximation only deep below the convective-radiative boundary. Both low frequency propagating gravity waves as well as higher frequency standing modes are generated; although we find that convection does not continually drive the standing g-mode frequencies.

Tamara M. Rogers; Gary A. Glatzmaier

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

MHK Technologies/Direct Energy Conversion Method DECM | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conversion Method DECM Conversion Method DECM < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Direct Energy Conversion Method DECM.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Trident Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/TE4 Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Description The Direct Energy Conversion Method DECM device has four major components 1 linear generators that convert straight line mechanical motion directly into electricity 2 floats placed in the sea to capture wave energy through a rising and falling action which drives linear generators resulting in the immediate generation of electricity 3 a sea platform used to support the floats and generators and 4 a conventional anchoring system to moor the rig

309

Direct Discharge Permit (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A direct discharge permit is required if a project involves the discharge of pollutants to state waters. For generation purposes, this involves the withdrawal of surface water for cooling purposes...

310

Directed transport in equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how a microscopic system, which can move only in one direction, comes to equilibrium with a heat-bath. To understand this problem, we investigate a symmetry broken dimer constrained to move in a particular direction when in contact with a uniform heat-bath at a constant temperature. The dimer is not driven by any external force. The system gains kinetic energy from the heat-bath and that the system can only use in directed transport. At the hard core collision limit between the particles of the dimer, we show by exact analytic calculations and complementary numerical results that the dimer undergoes steady directed transport by attaining a stationary distribution for a relevant degree of freedom. Our observation, being perfectly consistent with the {\\it second law of thermodynamics}, leads to a generalization of the existing {\\it Brownian ratchet} paradigm and points out some important limitations of {\\it Fokker-Planck} dynamics.

Bhattacharyay, A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Surface Wind Direction Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Common large shifts of wind direction in the weak-wind nocturnal boundary layer are poorly understood and are not adequately captured by numerical models and statistical parameterizations. The current study examines 15 datasets representing a ...

Larry Mahrt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Art Directable Tornadoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................................................... 25 2. Directional Force ........................................................... 26 3. Vortex Force .................................................................. 26 4. Lattice... ................................................................... 7 7 Tornado in its rope stage before disappearing ........................................... 9 8 Fire vortex and Waterspout ........................................................................ 10 9 Landspout and Gustnado...

Dwivedi, Ravindra

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials.

Ivan Fernandez-Corbaton; Mauro Cirio; Alexander Büse; Lucas Lamata; Enrique Solano; Gabriel Molina-Terriza

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

Proton heating by parallel Alfven wave cascade  

SciTech Connect

In a recent series of papers, the present authors developed a kinetic theory for low-frequency turbulence propagating parallel to the ambient magnetic field. Making use of this theory, it was shown that low-frequency Alfvenic turbulence may cascade to ion-cyclotron frequency range and beyond by nonlinear three-wave decay processes. The significance of such a finding is that it may lead to the proton heating by cyclotron resonance. However, the actual proton heating process was not demonstrated. The present paper complements the previous works by including the proton heating in the discussion. It is found that the left-hand circularly polarized Alfven-cyclotron turbulence leads to a moderate heating of the protons in the perpendicular direction and cooling in the parallel direction. It is also found that ion-acoustic turbulence is generated by the decay instability process. Finally, the heating rate is shown to increase in inverse proportion to the time scale of the wave source.

Yoon, P. H.; Fang, T.-M. [Massachusetts Technological Laboratory, Inc., 330 Pleasant Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 02478 (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

New Directions in Direct Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present the status of direct dark matter detection with specific attention to the experimental results and their phenomenological interpretation in terms of dark matter interactions. In particular I review a new and more general approach to study signals in this field based on non-relativistic operators which parametrize more efficiently the dark matter-nucleus interactions in terms of a very limited number of relevant degrees of freedom. Then I list the major experimental results, pointing out the main uncertainties that affect the theoretical interpretation of the data. Finally, since the underlying theory that describes both the dark matter and the standard model fields is unknown, I address the uncertainties coming from the nature of the interaction. In particular, the phenomenology of a class of models in which the interaction between dark matter particles and target nuclei is of a long-range type is discussed.

Paolo Panci

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advances and new directions in direct liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

With advance in single stage processes such as H-Coal, EDS and SRC, and refining and upgrading of coal liquids by Chevron and UOP, the direct liquefaction process has continuously evolved to the present two-stage catalytic configuration, which produces the highest liquid yield and product quality of any process worldwide. The Two Stage Liquefaction (TSL) process has been successfully applied to bituminous and subbituminous coals, overcoming problems associated with earlier processes. But, potential for additional improvement is recognized in several areas: cleaning coal prior to liquefaction; low temperature and pressure preconditioning of feed coal; novel catalysts development to arrest regressive reactions and improve hydrotreatment and cracking reactions; improvement in hydrocarbon value recovery and reduced energy rejection by alternate bottoms processing techniques. In this paper, after discussing briefly the history of liquefaction and development of the TSL process, present potential areas for research and development are presented.

Rao, S.N.; Schindler, H.D.; McGurl, G.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hydroelastic response of a floating runway to cnoidal waves  

SciTech Connect

The hydroelastic response of mat-type Very Large Floating Structures (VLFSs) to severe sea conditions, such as tsunamis and hurricanes, must be assessed for safety and survivability. An efficient and robust nonlinear hydroelastic model is required to predict accurately the motion of and the dynamic loads on a VLFS due to such large waves. We develop a nonlinear theory to predict the hydroelastic response of a VLFS in the presence of cnoidal waves and compare the predictions with the linear theory that is also developed here. This hydroelastic problem is formulated by directly coupling the structure with the fluid, by use of the Level I Green-Naghdi theory for the fluid motion and the Kirchhoff thin plate theory for the runway. The coupled fluid structure system, together with the appropriate jump conditions are solved in two-dimensions by the finite-difference method. The numerical model is used to study the nonlinear response of a VLFS to storm waves which are modeled by use of the cnoidal-wave theory. Parametric studies show that the nonlinearity of the waves is very important in accurately predicting the dynamic bending moment and wave run-up on a VLFS in high seas.

Ertekin, R. C., E-mail: ertekin@hawaii.edu [Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Xia, Dingwu [Engineering Services, British Petroleum GoM, Houston, Texas 77079 (United States)] [Engineering Services, British Petroleum GoM, Houston, Texas 77079 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Sound Waves in the Atmosphere at Infrasonic Frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various geophysical processes generate sound waves in the atmosphere. Some typical sources are auroral discharges in the upper atmosphere tornadoes and severe storms surface waves on the oceans volcanic explosions earthquakes and atmospheric oscillations arising from unstable wind flow at the tropopause. Man?made sources include powerful explosions and the shock waves from vehicles moving at supersonic speeds at altitudes below about 125 km. The components of sound?wave energy at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods >1.0 sec) are propagated for large distances (thousands of kilometers) over the earth's surface with very little loss of energy from absorption by viscosity and heat conduction. But the propagation depends strongly on (a) the horizontally stratified temperature structure of the atmosphere (b) the influence of gravity at oscillation periods greater than the atmospheric resonance period ?300 sec and (c) the nonuniform distribution of atmospheric winds. The microphones and electroacoustical apparatus at an infrasonics observation station e.g. the one at Washington D. C. measure (1) the amplitude and waveform of incident sound pressure (2) the direction of local propagation of the wave (3) the horizontal trace velocity and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various oscillation frequencies. Researches on propagation require observational data from a network of stations separated geographically by large distances coupled with theoretical analysis of sound propagation to arrive at useful results on the acoustics of the atmosphere.

Richard K. Cook

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Shear-wave crosswell reflection imaging in west Texas  

SciTech Connect

Crosswell reflection imaging was recently introduced as a method for high-resolution (of the order of a few feet) imaging of reservoirs. P-wave imaging was successfully tested on short and intermediate-offset crosswell profiles. Although shear-wave imaging was demonstrated with a short-offset (187 feet) data set, it was generally believed that high-frequency shear imaging at larger interwell distances might not be feasible, because the high-frequency shear waves will suffer large attenuation losses, resulting in poor signal-to-noise ratios for the shear-wave reflections. In this paper the authors present a real-data study, illustrating that shear-wave imaging was feasible at a west Texas carbonate reservoir for an interwell distance of 586 feet. Although the shear direct arrival and reflections are not always evident in the raw gathers processing and stacking enhances them enough to allow imaging of the interwell area for the whole depth range covered by the survey. The results clearly indicate that further work on shear-wave crosswell reflection imaging is warranted.

Lazaratos, S.K.; Marion, B.P. [TomoSeis Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Langan, R. [Chevron Petroleum Technology, La Habra, CA (United States); Harris, J.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Gain and efficiency of a short traveling wave heat engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gain and efficiency equations are derived and evaluated for a traveling wave heat engine having a regenerator of short length compared with an acoustic wavelength. A traveling wave heat engine is a modified Stirling engine in which acoustic waves replace the usual pistons and energy is transferred between thermal and acoustic forms depending on the wave direction [P. H. Ceperley J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66 1508–1513 (1979)]. This paper is similar to another paper on gain and efficiency [P. H. Ceperley J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 72 1688–1694 (1982)] except that the present paper assumes that the wave impedance is not determined by the regenerator's properties but instead by the acoustic circuit exterior to the regenerator. For acoustic impedance of freely propagating traveling waves in air the efficiency is limited to 11% of Carnot efficiency due to visious heating in the regenerator. This can be greatly increased by going to higher impedances; e.g. 79% is possible at ten times greater impedance.

Peter H. Ceperley

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

323

Carderock Tow Tank 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 574.9 Beam(m) 15.5 Depth(m) 6.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Carriage 2 is located on this basin Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 10.3 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Length(m) 12.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Irregular waves with a spectrum resembling typical ocean wave patterns with appropriate scale reductions Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach The wave absorber spans the full width of the basin at the end opposite the wavemaker dome, the absorbers are a discontinuous 12 degree slope type made up of 12 permeable layers of rectangular precast concrete bar panels resting on an impermeable concrete slab supported by a structural steel framework, the center section of the absorber is of wood construction & can be raised and lowered as a unit to provide model access to and from the fitting-out dry dock located at the end of the basin.

324

A Reconsideration of Matter Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matter waves were discovered in the early 20th century from their wavelength, predicted by DeBroglie, Planck's constant divided by the particle's momentum, that is, lmw = h/mv. But, the failure to obtain a reasonable theory for the matter wave frequency resulted somewhat in loss of further interest. It was expected that the frequency of the matter wave should correspond to the particle kinetic energy, that is, fmw = 1/2mv^2/h but the resulting velocity of the matter of the particle, v = fmw x lmw, is that the matter wave moves at one half the speed of the particle, obviously absurd as the particle and its wave must move together. If relativistic mass is used (as it should in any case) the problem remains, the same mass appearing in numerator and denominator and canceling. It is no help to hypothesize that the total energy, not just the kinetic energy, yields the matter wave. That attributes a matter wave to a particle at rest. It also gives the resulting velocity as c^2/v, the wave racing ahead of its particle. A reinterpretation of Einstein's derivation of relativistic kinetic energy (which produced his famous E = mc^2) leads to a valid matter wave frequency and a new understanding of particle kinetics and of the atom's stable orbits.

Roger Ellman

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evolution of the wave function in a dissipative system  

SciTech Connect

For a dissipative system with Ohmic friction, we obtain a simple and exact solution for the wave function of the system plus the bath. It is described by the direct product in two independent Hilbert spaces. One of them is described by an effective Hamiltonian, the other represents the effect of the bath, i.e., the Brownian motion, thus clarifying the structure of the wave function of the system whose energy is dissipated by its interaction with the bath. No path-integral technology is needed in this treatment. The derivation of the Weisskopf-Wigner linewidth theory follows easily.

Yu, L.H. (National Synchroton Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)); Sun, C. (Institute of Theoretical Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Metal-insulator Transition by Holographic Charge Density Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a gravity dual for charge density waves (CDW) in which the translational symmetry along one spatial direction is spontaneously broken. Our linear perturbation calculation on the gravity side produces the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity, which exhibits the two familiar features of charge density waves, namely the pinned collective mode and gapped single-particle excitation. These two features indicate that our gravity dual also provides a new mechanism to implement the metal to insulator phase transition by CDW, which is further supported by the fact that d.c. conductivity decreases with the decreased temperature below the critical temperature.

Yi Ling; Chao Niu; Jianpin Wu; Zhuoyu Xian; Hongbao Zhang

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

327

Detecting Beyond-Einstein Polarizations of Continuous Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct detection of gravitational waves with the next generation detectors, like Advanced LIGO, provides the opportunity to measure deviations from the predictions of General Relativity. One such departure would be the existence of alternative polarizations. To measure these, we study a single detector measurement of a continuous gravitational wave from a triaxial pulsar source. We develop methods to detect signals of any polarization content and distinguish between them in a model independent way. We present LIGO S5 sensitivity estimates for 115 pulsars.

Isi, Maximiliano; Mead, Carver; Pitkin, Matthew

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations  

SciTech Connect

Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

Chen, Yi-Chiuan, E-mail: YCChen@math.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shyan-Shiou, E-mail: sschen@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Juan-Ming, E-mail: jmyuan@pu.edu.tw [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Discrete wave turbulence of rotational capillary water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the discrete wave turbulent regime of capillary water waves with constant non-zero vorticity. The explicit Hamiltonian formulation and the corresponding coupling coefficient are obtained. We also present the construction and investigation of resonance clustering. Some physical implications of the obtained results are discussed.

Adrian Constantin; Elena Kartashova; Erik Wahlén

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

330

MHK Technologies/LUKAS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LUKAS LUKAS < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage LUKAS.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kneider Innovations Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The device according to the invention aims at supplying a means of Navigation appropriate clean easy to use it can be an additional means of navigation This invention allows navigation by converting the kinetic energy of movements the oscillations right left an or front back or high down to a uni directional one way horizontal push These energies are free renewable but still undeveloped yet in navigations Mooring Configuration Does not indicate

331

Single-wave-number representation of nonlinear energy spectrum in elastic-wave turbulence of the Föppl–von Kármán equation: Energy decomposition analysis and energy budget  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A single-wave-number representation of a nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., a stretching-energy spectrum, is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the Föppl–von Kármán (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wave-number space and analytical expressions of detailed energy budgets in the nonlinear interactions. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic energy and bending energy are comparable with each other at large wave numbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wave numbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode ak and its companion mode a?k is observed at the small wave numbers. The energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wave numbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wave numbers. Total-energy flux consistent with energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

Naoto Yokoyama and Masanori Takaoka

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

332

Laboratory Studies of Nonlinear and Breaking Surface Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Breaking-wave generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the wave tank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On steep gravity waves meeting a vertical wall: a triple

Drazen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

SHORELINE DEVELOPMENT, LONGSHORE TRANSPORT AND SURFACE WAVE DYNAMICS 1675 Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Earth Surf. Process. Landforms 29, 16751690 (2004)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wave energy and direction which in turn is the integrated result of wind direction, wind intensity). However, wave energy transport from the north had limited fetch (c. 100 km), implying that wind intensity and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA 3 Department of Geography, University of Utah

Johnson, Cari

334

Solar off-limb line widths: Alfven waves, ion-cyclotron waves, and preferential heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alfven waves and ion-cyclotron absorption of high-frequency waves are frequently brought into models devoted to coronal heating and fast solar-wind acceleration. Signatures of ion-cyclotron resonance have already been observed in situ in the solar wind (HELIOS spacecrafts) and, recently, in the upper corona (UVCS/SOHO remote-sensing results). We propose a method to constrain both the Alfven wave amplitude and the preferential heating induced by ion-cyclotron resonance, above a partially developed polar coronal hole observed with the SUMER/SOHO spectrometer. The instrumental stray light contribution is first substracted from the spectra. By supposing that the non-thermal velocity is related to the Alfven wave amplitude, it is constrained through a density diagnostic and the gradient of the width of the Mg X 625 A line. The temperatures of several coronal ions, as functions of the distance above the limb, are then determined by substracting the non-thermal component to the observed line widths. The effect of stray light explains the apparent decrease with height in the width of several spectral lines, this decrease usually starting about 0.1-0.2 Rs above the limb. This result rules out any direct evidence of damping of the Alfven waves, often suggested by other authors. We also find that the ions with the smallest charge-to-mass ratios are the hottest ones at a fixed altitude and that they are subject to a stronger heating, as compared to the others, between 57" and 102" above the limb. This constitutes a serious clue to ion-cyclotron preferential heating.

L. Dolla; J. Solomon

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Excitation of plasma waves in the ionosphere caused by atmospheric acoustic waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transformation of atmospheric acoustic waves into plasma waves in the ionosphere is investigated. The transformation mechanism is based on plasma wave exitation by growing acoustic waves, when ... is reached....

N. Ya. Kotsarenko; R. Pérez Enríquez; S. V. Koshevaya

336

Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computed by Wheeler Stretching and Linear Extrapolation modifications to Linear Random Wave Theory and the Hybrid Wave Model. Extreme wave acceleration fields arc compared with Hybrid Wave Model acceleration fields only. Comparisons between measurements...

Longridge, Jonathon Kent

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Approximate analytical method and its use for calculation of phase velocities of acoustic plane waves in crystals for example LiNbO3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of the offered analytical method the determinant relation for a phase velocities of elastic waves for an arbitrary propagation directions in a piezoelectric crystal are received. The phase velocities of three normal elastic waves for the crystal of LiNbO3 are calculated. Results of this calculation for each of waves are presented graphically in the form of the cards allowing easily to define phase velocities in any given direction in crystal.

A. A. Golubeva

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

HOMOLOGOUS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVES IN THE EMERGING FLUX REGION OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations, we present four homologous extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves within 3 hr on 2010 November 11. All EUV waves emanated from the same emerging flux region (EFR), propagated in the same direction, and were accompanied by surges, weak flares, and faint coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The waves had the basically same appearance in all EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO. The waves propagated at constant velocities in the range of 280-500 km s{sup -1}, with little angular dependence, which indicated that the homologous waves could be likely interpreted as fast-mode waves. The waves are supposed to likely involve more than one driving mechanism, and it was most probable that the waves were driven by the surges, due to their close timing and location relations. We also propose that the homologous waves were intimately associated with the continuous emergence and cancellation of magnetic flux in the EFR, which could supply sufficient energy and trigger the onsets of the waves.

Zheng Ruisheng; Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Hong Junchao; Yang, B.; Yang Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Waves Transmission and Generation in Turbine Stages in a Combustion-Noise Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the acoustic behavior of the turbine blade rows must be known to evaluate the noise due to combustionWaves Transmission and Generation in Turbine Stages in a Combustion-Noise Framework M. Leyko SNECMA-engines could have two different origins: (a) the well-known direct combustion noise,2 which is directly

Nicoud, Franck

340

Wave energy technology in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wave energy technology in China Yage...Energy and Gas Hydrate...wave energy technology, summarizing...of an air turbine rotating at...research, development and construction...variable-pitch air turbine for the Azores...Liu2000Research and development of Daguan...National Ocean Technology Center, Tianjin...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possibilities for strong localization of electromagnetic radiation in a dense and ultracold atomic gas sample an ultracold atomic rubidium gas sample, showing the coherent backscattering cone. The angular width of electrical excita- tion of condensed samples.3 Ongoing experimental and theoretical research directed toward

342

Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri approve the attached thesis Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri Principal

Wood, Stephen L.

343

Wave and Tide-Dominated Coasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between the wave- and tide-dominated coastal extremes is a broad spectrum of wave and tide-dominated coasts. These range from settings with high wave energy and perceptible tidal energy associated with a low tida...

Edward J. Anthony

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear ...

Zheng, Yingcai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Second Harmonic Resonance for Equatorial Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simple, exact analytical conditions for second harmonic resonance between equatorial waves are derived. Such resonance can occur only between two Rossby waves or two westward travelling gravity waves. It is shown that regardless of whether the ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Superstrings and D-branes in a plane wave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We carefully analyze the supersymmetry algebra of closed strings and open strings in a type IIB plane wave background. We use eight-component chiral spinors, SO(8) chiral spinors, in the light-cone gauge to provide a useful basis for string field theory calculations in a plane wave. We consider the two classes of D-branes, D±-branes, and give a worldsheet derivation of conserved supercurrents for all half Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) D-branes preserving 16 supersymmetries in the type IIB plane wave background. We exhaustively provide the supersymmetry algebra of the half BPS branes as well. We also point out that the supersymmetry algebra distinguishes the two SO(4) directions with different signs, which is consistent with the Z2 symmetry of the string action.

Jongwook Kim; Bum-Hoon Lee; Hyun Seok Yang

2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

LIGO: the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is to detect and study gravitational waves (GWs) of astrophysical origin. Direct detection of GWs holds the promise of testing general relativity in the strong-field regime, of providing a new probe of exotic objects such as black holes and neutron stars and of uncovering unanticipated new astrophysics. LIGO, a joint Caltech–MIT project supported by the National Science Foundation, operates three multi-kilometer interferometers at two widely separated sites in the United States. These detectors are the result of decades of worldwide technology development, design, construction and commissioning. They are now operating at their design sensitivity, and are sensitive to gravitational wave strains smaller than one part in 1021. With this unprecedented sensitivity, the data are being analyzed to detect or place limits on GWs from a variety of potential astrophysical sources.

B P Abbott; R Abbott; R Adhikari; P Ajith; B Allen; G Allen; R S Amin; S B Anderson; W G Anderson; M A Arain; M Araya; H Armandula; P Armor; Y Aso; S Aston; P Aufmuth; C Aulbert; S Babak; P Baker; S Ballmer; C Barker; D Barker; B Barr; P Barriga; L Barsotti; M A Barton; I Bartos; R Bassiri; M Bastarrika; B Behnke; M Benacquista; J Betzwieser; P T Beyersdorf; I A Bilenko; G Billingsley; R Biswas; E Black; J K Blackburn; L Blackburn; D Blair; B Bland; T P Bodiya; L Bogue; R Bork; V Boschi; S Bose; P R Brady; V B Braginsky; J E Brau; D O Bridges; M Brinkmann; A F Brooks; D A Brown; A Brummit; G Brunet; A Bullington; A Buonanno; O Burmeister; R L Byer; L Cadonati; J B Camp; J Cannizzo; K C Cannon; J Cao; L Cardenas; S Caride; G Castaldi; S Caudill; M Cavaglià; C Cepeda; T Chalermsongsak; E Chalkley; P Charlton; S Chatterji; S Chelkowski; Y Chen; N Christensen; C T Y Chung; D Clark; J Clark; J H Clayton; T Cokelaer; C N Colacino; R Conte; D Cook; T R C Corbitt; N Cornish; D Coward; D C Coyne; J D E Creighton; T D Creighton; A M Cruise; R M Culter; A Cumming; L Cunningham; S L Danilishin; K Danzmann; B Daudert; G Davies; E J Daw; D DeBra; J Degallaix; V Dergachev; S Desai; R DeSalvo; S Dhurandhar; M Díaz; A Dietz; F Donovan; K L Dooley; E E Doomes; R W P Drever; J Dueck; I Duke; J-C Dumas; J G Dwyer; C Echols; M Edgar; A Effler; P Ehrens; E Espinoza; T Etzel; M Evans; T Evans; S Fairhurst; Y Faltas; Y Fan; D Fazi; H Fehrmenn; L S Finn; K Flasch; S Foley; C Forrest; N Fotopoulos; A Franzen; M Frede; M Frei; Z Frei; A Freise; R Frey; T Fricke; P Fritschel; V V Frolov; M Fyffe; V Galdi; J A Garofoli; I Gholami; J A Giaime; S Giampanis; K D Giardina; K Goda; E Goetz; L M Goggin; G González; M L Gorodetsky; S Goßler; R Gouaty; A Grant; S Gras; C Gray; M Gray; R J S Greenhalgh; A M Gretarsson; F Grimaldi; R Grosso; H Grote; S Grunewald; M Guenther; E K Gustafson; R Gustafson; B Hage; J M Hallam; D Hammer; G D Hammond; C Hanna; J Hanson; J Harms; G M Harry; I W Harry; E D Harstad; K Haughian; K Hayama; J Heefner; I S Heng; A Heptonstall; M Hewitson; S Hild; E Hirose; D Hoak; K A Hodge; K Holt; D J Hosken; J Hough; D Hoyland; B Hughey; S H Huttner; D R Ingram; T Isogai; M Ito; A Ivanov; B Johnson; W W Johnson; D I Jones; G Jones; R Jones; L Ju; P Kalmus; V Kalogera; S Kandhasamy; J Kanner; D Kasprzyk; E Katsavounidis; K Kawabe; S Kawamura; F Kawazoe; W Kells; D G Keppel; A Khalaidovski; F Y Khalili; R Khan; E Khazanov; P King; J S Kissel; S Klimenko; K Kokeyama; V Kondrashov; R Kopparapu; S Koranda; D Kozak; B Krishnan; R Kumar; P Kwee; P K Lam; M Landry; B Lantz; A Lazzarini; H Lei; M Lei; N Leindecker; I Leonor; C Li; H Lin; P E Lindquist; T B Littenberg; N A Lockerbie; D Lodhia; M Longo; M Lormand; P Lu; M Lubinski; A Lucianetti; H Lück; B Machenschalk; M MacInnis; M Mageswaran; K Mailand; I Mandel; V Mandic; S Márka; Z Márka; A Markosyan; J Markowitz; E Maros; I W Martin; R M Martin; J N Marx; K Mason; F Matichard; L Matone; R A Matzner; N Mavalvala; R McCarthy; D E McClelland; S C McGuire; M McHugh; G McIntyre; D J A McKechan; K McKenzie; M Mehmet; A Melatos; A C Melissinos; D F Menéndez; G Mendell; R A Mercer; S Meshkov; C Messenger; M S Meyer; J Miller; J Minelli; Y Mino; V P Mitrofanov; G Mitselmakher; R Mittleman; O Miyakawa; B Moe; S D Mohanty; S R P Mohapatra; G Moreno; T Morioka; K Mors; K Mossavi; C MowLowry; G Mueller; H Müller-Ebhardt; D Muhammad; S Mukherjee; H Mukhopadhyay; A Mullavey; J Munch; P G Murray; E Myers; J Myers; T Nash; J Nelson; G Newton; A Nishizawa; K Numata; J O'Dell; B O'Reilly; R O'Shaughnessy; E Ochsner; G H Ogin; D J Ottaway; R S Ottens; H Overmier; B J Owen; Y Pan; C Pankow; M A Papa; V Parameshwaraiah; P Patel; M Pedraza; S Penn; A Perraca; V Pierro; I M Pinto; M Pitkin; H J Pletsch; M V Plissi; F Postiglione; M Principe; R Prix; L Prokhorov; O Punken; V Quetschke; F J Raab; D S Rabeling; H Radkins; P Raffai; Z Raics; N Rainer; M Rakhmanov; V Raymond; C M Reed; T Reed; H Rehbein; S Reid; D H Reitze; R Riesen; K Riles; B Rivera; P Roberts; N A Robertson; C Robinson; E L Robinson; S Roddy; C Röver; J Rollins; J D Romano; J H Romie; S Rowan; A Rüdiger; P Russell; K Ryan; S Sakata; L Sancho de la Jordana; V Sandberg; V Sannibale; L Santamaría; S Saraf; P Sarin; B S Sathyaprakash; S Sato; M Satterthwaite; P R Saulson; R Savage; P Savov; M Scanlan; R Schilling; R Schnabel; R Schofield; B Schulz; B F Schutz; P Schwinberg; J Scott; S M Scott; A C Searle; B Sears; F Seifert; D Sellers; A S Sengupta; A Sergeev; B Shapiro; P Shawhan; D H Shoemaker; A Sibley; X Siemens; D Sigg; S Sinha; A M Sintes; B J J Slagmolen; J Slutsky; J R Smith; M R Smith; N D Smith; K Somiya; B Sorazu; A Stein; L C Stein; S Steplewski; A Stochino; R Stone; K A Strain; S Strigin; A Stroeer; A L Stuver; T Z Summerscales; K-X Sun; M Sung; P J Sutton; G P Szokoly; D Talukder; L Tang; D B Tanner; S P Tarabrin; J R Taylor; R Taylor; J Thacker; K A Thorne; A Thüring; K V Tokmakov; C Torres

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Surface Acoustic Wave Devices for Harsh Environment Wireless Sensing  

SciTech Connect

Langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harshenvironment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.

Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Bandwidth broadening and asymmetric softening of collective spin waves in magnonic crystals  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the dependence on the applied field of the frequency/wavevector dispersion relations of collective spin waves in arrays of dots, close to a magnetic transition. In particular, we focus on the low frequency “soft” modes in three different cases: end modes in the transition between two different saturated states in ellipses, fundamental mode in the saturated-to-vortex transition in disks, and gyrotropic mode in the vortex-to-saturated transition in disks. Noteworthy, the spin waves with nonzero Bloch wavevector along the direction of the applied field happen to soften earlier than spin waves with a Bloch wavevector along different directions, and this feature is responsible for an asymmetric broadening of the bandwidth along the different lattice directions. This is particularly useful in magnonic/spin-logic device research, if different binary digits are associated to modes with the same cell function but different propagation directions.

Montoncello, F., E-mail: montoncello@fe.infn.it; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, CNISM-University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Emilia-Romagna I-44100 (Italy)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

351

Directional gamma detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Extension of DOE Directives  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Notice extends the following directives until 2/16/04: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99-7/1/00.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

A numerical scheme for ionizing shock waves  

SciTech Connect

A two-dimensional (2D) visual computer code to solve the steady state (SS) or transient shock problems including partially ionizing plasma is presented. Since the flows considered are hypersonic and the resulting temperatures are high, the plasma is partially ionized. Hence the plasma constituents are electrons, ions and neutral atoms. It is assumed that all the above species are in thermal equilibrium, namely, that they all have the same temperature. The ionization degree is calculated from Saha equation as a function of electron density and pressure by means of a nonlinear Newton type root finding algorithms. The code utilizes a wave model and numerical fluctuation distribution (FD) scheme that runs on structured or unstructured triangular meshes. This scheme is based on evaluating the mesh averaged fluctuations arising from a number of waves and distributing them to the nodes of these meshes in an upwind manner. The physical properties (directions, strengths, etc.) of these wave patterns are obtained by a new wave model: ION-A developed from the eigen-system of the flux Jacobian matrices. Since the equation of state (EOS) which is used to close up the conservation laws includes electronic effects, it is a nonlinear function and it must be inverted by iterations to determine the ionization degree as a function of density and temperature. For the time advancement, the scheme utilizes a multi-stage Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm with time steps carefully evaluated from the maximum possible propagation speed in the solution domain. The code runs interactively with the user and allows to create different meshes to use different initial and boundary conditions and to see changes of desired physical quantities in the form of color and vector graphics. The details of the visual properties of the code has been published before (see [N. Aslan, A visual fluctuation splitting scheme for magneto-hydrodynamics with a new sonic fix and Euler limit, J. Comput. Phys. 197 (2004) 1-27]). The two-dimensional nature of ION-A was presented by a planar shock wave propagating over a circular obstacle. It was demonstrated that including the effects of ionization in calculating complex flows is important, even when they appear initially negligible. This code can be used to accurately simulate the nonlinear time dependent evolution of neutral or ionized plasma flows from supersonic to hypersonic regimes.

Aslan, Necdet [Yeditepe University, Physics Department, Kayisda g-circumflex i, 34755 Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: naslan@yeditepe.edu.tr; Mond, Michael [Ben Gurion University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Beer Sheva (Israel)

2005-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

A dimension-breaking phenomenon for water waves with weak surface tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well known that the water-wave problem with weak surface tension has small-amplitude line solitary-wave solutions which to leading order are described by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The present paper contains an existence theory for three-dimensional periodically modulated solitary-wave solutions which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of propagation and are periodic in the transverse direction; they emanate from the line solitary waves in a dimension-breaking bifurcation. In addition, it is shown that the line solitary waves are linearly unstable to long-wavelength transverse perturbations. The key to these results is a formulation of the water wave problem as an evolutionary system in which the transverse horizontal variable plays the role of time, a careful study of the purely imaginary spectrum of the operator obtained by linearising the evolutionary system at a line solitary wave, and an application of an infinite-dimensional version of the classical Lyapunov centre theorem.

Mark D. Groves; Shu-Ming Sun; Erik Wahlén

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

New wave effects in nonstationary plasma  

SciTech Connect

Through particle-in-cell simulations and analytics, a host of interesting and novel wave effects in nonstationary plasma are examined. In particular, Langmuir waves serve as a model system to explore wave dynamics in plasmas undergoing compression, expansion, and charge recombination. The entire wave life-cycle is explored, including wave excitation, adiabatic evolution and action conservation, nonadiabatic evolution and resonant wave-particle effects, collisional dissipation, and potential laboratory applications of the aforementioned phenomenology.

Schmit, P. F. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States); Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Chase Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chase Tow Tank Chase Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Chase Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 36.6 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 2.4 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 20.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.1 Wave Period Range(s) 3.1 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView-based data acquistion software/components. Optical measurement system for observing kinematics of a model under test in the wave mode.

357

Are "EIT Waves" Fast-Mode MHD Waves?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the nature of large-scale, coronal, propagating wave fronts (``EIT waves'') and find they are incongruous with solutions using fast-mode MHD plane-wave theory. Specifically, we consider the following properties: non-dispersive single pulse manifestions, observed velocities below the local Alfven speed, and different pulses which travel at any number of constant velocities, rather than at the ``predicted'' fast-mode speed. We discuss the possibility of a soliton-like explanation for these phenomena, and show how it is consistent with the above-mentioned aspects.

M. J. Wills-Davey; C. E. DeForest; J. O. Stenflo

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape-off layer of NSTX and NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect

Full wave simulations of fusion plasmas show a direct correlation between the location of the fast-wave cut-off, radiofrequency (RF) field amplitude in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and the RF power losses in the SOL observed in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX). In particular, the RF power losses in the SOL increase significantly when the launched waves transition from evanescent to propagating in that region. Subsequently, a large amplitude electric field occurs in the SOL, driving RF power losses when a proxy collisional loss term is added. A 3D reconstruction of absorbed power in the SOL is presented showing agreement with the RF experiments in NSTX. Loss predictions for the future experiment NSTX-Upgrade (NSTX-U) are also obtained and discussed.

Bertelli, Nicola [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL; Hosea, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Phillips, C. K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Berry, Lee Alan [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge; Gerhardt, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Green, David L [ORNL; LeBlanc, B [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Perkins, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ryan, Philip Michael [ORNL; Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Valeo, E. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Dartmouth Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dartmouth Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dartmouth Wave Energy Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:www.dartmouthwaveenergy This...

360

Wind Waves and Sun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waves and Sun Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wind Waves and Sun Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:www.windwavesandsun.com This company is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Wave Wind LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Wind LLC Place: Sun Prairie, Wisconsin Zip: 53590 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Wisconsin-based wind developer and construction services provider. References: Wave...

362

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HW aves B. Heat-related

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Sandia National Laboratories: wave energy converter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wave energy converter Sandia Funded to Model Power Pods for Utility-Scale Wave-Energy Converter On September 16, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

364

Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for EMSSABs Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for EMSSABs From: Assistant Secretary, Jessie Hill Roberson (EM-11) To: Mr. Monte Wilson, Chair, INEEL Citizens Advisory Board This letter is in response to a November 21, 2003 letter regarding direction and guidance for implementing direct DOE relationship and funding for Environmental Management Site Specific Advisory Boards. Roberson Letter - December 12, 2003 More Documents & Publications Letter: Progress in Implementing a Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSABs Letter: Mission, Objectives & Scope of the Site Specific Advisory Board Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship

365

Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for EMSSABs Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for EMSSABs From: Assistant Secretary, Jessie Hill Roberson (EM-11) To: Mr. Monte Wilson, Chair, INEEL Citizens Advisory Board This letter is in response to a November 21, 2003 letter regarding direction and guidance for implementing direct DOE relationship and funding for Environmental Management Site Specific Advisory Boards. Roberson Letter - December 12, 2003 More Documents & Publications Letter: Progress in Implementing a Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSABs Letter: Mission, Objectives & Scope of the Site Specific Advisory Board Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship

366

Mirror force induced wave dispersion in Alfvén waves  

SciTech Connect

Recent hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulations of global scale standing shear Alfvén waves along the Earth's closed dipolar magnetic field lines show that the upward parallel current region within these waves saturates and broadens perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and that this broadening increases with the electron temperature. Using resistive MHD simulations, with a parallel Ohm's law derived from the linear Knight relation (which expresses the current-voltage relationship along an auroral field line), we explore the nature of this broadening in the context of the increased perpendicular Poynting flux resulting from the increased parallel electric field associated with mirror force effects. This increased Poynting flux facilitates wave energy dispersion across field lines which in-turn allows for electron acceleration to carry the field aligned current on adjacent field lines. This mirror force driven dispersion can dominate over that associated with electron inertial effects for global scale waves.

Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nondestructive testing using stress waves: wave propagation in layered media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of stress waves in several civil engineering applications such as nondestructive testing of soil deposits or pavement systems has become extremely popular over the last few years. In all cases, a dynamic impulse is applied to the surface...

Ortega, Jose Alberto

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Branes are Waves and Monopoles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent paper it was shown that fundamental strings are null waves in Double Field Theory. Similarly, membranes are waves in exceptional extended geometry. Here the story is continued by showing how various branes are Kaluza-Klein monopoles of these higher dimensional theories. Examining the specific case of the E7 exceptional extended geometry, we see that all branes are both waves and monopoles. Along the way we discuss the O(d; d) transformation of localized brane solutions not associated to an isometry and how true T-duality emerges in Double Field Theory when the background possesses isometries.

David S. Berman; Felix J. Rudolph

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

369

Recirculation in multiple wave conversions  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional multiple wave-conversion model is constructed that allows energy recirculation in ray phase space. Using a modular eikonal approach, the connection coefficients for this model are calculated by ray phase-space methods. Analytical results (confirmed numerically) show that all connection coefficients exhibit interference effects that depend on an interference phase, calculated from the coupling constants and the area enclosed by the intersecting rays. This conceptual model, which focuses on the topology of intersecting rays in phase space, is used to investigate how mode conversion between primary and secondary waves is modified by the presence of a tertiary wave.

Kaufman, A. N.; Brizard, A.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Tracy, E.R.

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive  

SciTech Connect

Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

371

Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption  

SciTech Connect

We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Internal energy relaxation in shock wave structure  

SciTech Connect

The Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck (WCU) equation is numerically integrated to characterize the internal structure of Mach 3 and Mach 5 shock waves in a gas with excitation in the internal energy states for the treatment of inelastic collisions. Elastic collisions are modeled with the hard sphere collision model and the transition rates for the inelastic collisions modified appropriately using probabilities based on relative velocities of the colliding particles. The collision integral is evaluated by the conservative discrete ordinate method [F. Tcheremissine, “Solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation for high-speed flows,” Comput. Math. Math. Phys. 46, 315–329 (2006); F. Cheremisin, “Solution of the Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck equation,” Dokl. Phys. 47, 487–490 (2002)] developed for the Boltzmann equation. For the treatment of the diatomic molecules, the internal energy modes in the Boltzmann equation are described quantum mechanically given by the WCU equation. As a first step in the treatment of the inelastic collisions by the WCU equation, a two- and three-quantum system is considered to study the effect of the varying of (1) the inelastic cross section and (2) the energy gap between the quantum energy states. An alternative method, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, is used for the Mach 3 shock wave to ensure the consistency of implementation in the two methods and there is an excellent agreement between the two methods. The results from the WCU implementation showed consistent trends for the Mach 3 and Mach5 standing shock waves simulations. Inelastic contributions change the downstream equilibrium state and allow the flow to transition to the equilibrium state further upstream.

Josyula, Eswar, E-mail: Eswar.Josyula@us.af.mil; Suchyta, Casimir J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Boyd, Iain D. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Vedula, Prakash [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)] [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Harmonic waves in a fluid-solid waveguide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's equations of motion, and the strain- displacement equations. These equations are combined to give three second-ordered coupled partial differential equations for the three displacement components. Considering a plane wave propagating in the xt...-direction under plane strain conditions, u& = 0 and 8( )/Bxz = 0, the particle motion is confined in the xt-x3 plane. Thus for plane strain conditions, the displacements and stresses of an isotropic solid can be expressed in terms of two potentials consistent...

Yapura, Carlos Ludwig

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wilks, Scott C. (Santa Monica, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Monopole gravitational waves from relativistic fireballs driving gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Einstein's general relativity predicts that pressure, in general stresses, play a similar role to energy density in generating gravity. The source of gravitational field, the active gravitational mass density, sometimes referred to as Whittaker's mass density, is not conserved, hence its changes can propagate as monopole gravitational waves. Such waves can be generated only by astrophysical sources with varying gravitational mass. Here we show that relativistic fireballs, considered in modelling gamma-ray burst phenomena, are likely to radiate monopole gravitational waves from high-pressure plasma with varying Whittaker's mass. Also, ejection of a significant amount of initial mass-energy of the progenitor contributes to the monopole gravitational radiation. We identify monopole waves with h^11+h^22 waves of Eddington's classification which propagate (in the z-direction) together with the energy carried by massless fields. We show that the monopole waves satisfy Einstein's equations, with a common stress-energy tensor for massless fields. The polarization mode of monopole waves is Phi_22, i.e. these are perpendicular waves which induce changes of the radius of a circle of test particles only (breathing mode). The astrophysical importance of monopole gravitational waves is discussed.

M. Kutschera

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Theory of steady-state plane tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves  

SciTech Connect

The effect of band-to-band and trap-assisted tunneling on the properties of steady-state plane ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} structures is theoretically analyzed. It is shown that such tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves do not differ in a qualitative sense from ordinary impact ionization waves propagating due to the avalanche multiplication of uniformly distributed seed electrons and holes. The quantitative differences of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves from impact ionization waves are reduced to a slightly different relation between the wave velocity u and the maximum field strength E{sub M} at the front. It is shown that disregarding impact ionization does not exclude the possibility of the existence of tunneling-assisted ionization waves; however, their structure radically changes, and their velocity strongly decreases for the same E{sub M}. A comparison of the dependences u(E{sub M}) for various ionization-wave types makes it possible to determine the conditions under which one of them is dominant. In conclusion, unresolved problems concerning the theory of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves are discussed and the directions of further studies are outlined.

Kyuregyan, A. S., E-mail: ask@vei.ru [Lenin All-Russian Electrical-Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Astrophysical model selection in gravitational wave astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space-based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve ?5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

Matthew R. Adams; Neil J. Cornish; Tyson B. Littenberg

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

378

Astrophysical Model Selection in Gravitational Wave Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a Hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve ~5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

Matthew Adams; Neil Cornish; Tyson Littenberg

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

wave energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

99 99 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281099 Varnish cache server wave energy Dataset Summary Description Source The Wave Energy Resource Assessment project is a joint venture between NREL, EPRI, and Virginia Tech. EPRI is the prime contractor, Virginia Tech is responsible for development of the models and estimating the wave resource, and NREL serves as an independent validator and also develops the final GIS-based display of the data. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released September 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated October 20th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords EPRI GIS NREL Puerto Rico shapefile United States Virginia Tech wave energy

380

Gravitational waves: a foundational review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard linear approach to the gravitational waves theory is critically reviewed. Contrary to the prevalent understanding, it is pointed out that this theory contains many conceptual and technical obscure issues that require further analysis.

J. G. Pereira

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Wave Energy Extraction from buoys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different types of Wave Energy Converters currently tested or under development are using the vertical movement of floating bodies to generate electricity. For commercial applications, arrays have to be considered in order ...

Garnaud, Xavier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Astrophysical Model Selection in Gravitational Wave Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a Hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries ...

Adams, Matthew; Littenberg, Tyson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nanogap Transducer for Broadband Gravitational Wave Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By changing from a resonant multimode paradigm to a free mass paradigm for transducers in resonant mass gravitational wave detection, an array of six spheres can achieve a sensitivity response curve competitive with interferometers, being as sensitive as GEO600 and TAMA300 in the 3 to 6 kHz band and more sensitive than LIGO for 50 percent of the 6 to 10 kHz band. We study how to assemble a klystron resonant cavity that has a 1 nm gap by understanding the stability of the forces applied at it (Casimir force, elastic force, weight). This approach has additional benefits. First, due to the relatively inexpensive nature of this technology (around US$ 1 million), it is accessible to a broader part of the world scientific community. Additionally, spherical resonant mass detectors have the ability to discern both the direction and polarization resolutions.

Guilherme L. Pimentel; Odylio D. Aguiar; Michael E. Tobar; Joaquim J. Barroso; Rubens de M. Marinho

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

The effect of ocean waves on offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Ocean has a varying surface roughness where the roughness length is determined by the characteristics of the waves. In this paper, a method is established where the roughness length of the ocean is calculated from the wind speed and the fetch length. The fetch length depends on the wind direction and a case study is performed for a wind turbine exposed to wind blowing in two opposite directions: from the shore and the sea. For each case, the vertical wind speed distribution is calculated in order to study the influence that the direction of the wind has on the annual energy production. The potential for using a site-specific offshore turbine design, dependent on the prevailing wind direction, is also explored.

T. Thorsen; H. Naeser

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Laser-Accelerated Protons with Energy-Dependent Beam Direction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spatial distribution of protons, accelerated by intense femtosecond laser pulses interacting with thin target foils under oblique irradiation are investigated. Under certain conditions, the proton beams are directed away from the target normal. This deviation is towards the laser forward direction, with an angle that increases with the level and duration of the amplified spontaneous emission pedestal before the main laser pulse. In addition, for a given laser pulse, this beam deviation increases with proton energy. The observations are discussed in terms of different electron acceleration mechanisms and target normal sheath acceleration, in combination with a laser-controllable shock wave locally deforming the target rear surface.

F. Lindau; O. Lundh; A. Persson; P. McKenna; K. Osvay; D. Batani; C.-G. Wahlström

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

386

Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ocean rogue wave, one of the mysteries of nature, has not yet been understood or modelled satisfactorily, in spite of being in the intense lime-light in recent years and the concept spreadin fast to other disciplines. Rogue waves are extraordinarily high and steep surface waves. However, most of their theoretical models and experimental observations, excluding a few are one-dimensional, admitting limited high intensity and steepness. We propose here a novel two-dimensional integrable nonlinear Schroedinger equation allowing an exact lump-soliton with special asymmetry and directional preference. The soliton can appear on surface waves making a hole just before surging up high, with adjustable height and steepness and disappear again followed by the hole. The dynamics, speed and the duration of the soliton is controlled by ocean currents. These desirable properties make our exact model promising for describing deep sea large rogue waves.

Kundu, Anjan; Naskar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A new inversion method for P wave anisotropy (Wu and Lees, 1999a) has been applied to high-precision, microseismic traveltime data collected at Coso geothermal region, California. Direction-dependent P wave velocity and thus its perturbation, are represented by a symmetric positive definite matrix A instead of a scalar. The resulting anisotropy distribution is used to estimate variations in crack density, stress distribution and permeability within the producing geothermal field. A circular dome-like

388

Geometric Phase Of The Faraday Rotation Of Electromagnetic Waves In Magnetized Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The geometric phase of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase is investigated. The in uence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using Faraday rotation is also discussed as an application of the theory.

Jian Liu and Hong Qin

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

Studies on the formation of large amplitude kinetic Alfven wave solitons and double layers in plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A two fluid model has been employed to study the oblique propagation of solitary kinetic Alfven waves. Formation of solitary waves and double layers is observed. Amplitude, width (in the case of solitons), and thickness (in the case of double layers) of the nonlinear structures are studied in some detail. Wider solitary structures are found to exist for oblique propagation nearer to the magnetic field direction.

Devi, N.; Gogoi, R.; Das, G. C.; Roychoudhury, R. [Department of Mathematics, Cotton College, Guwahati-781001, Assam (India); Mathematical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Paschim Boragaon, Guwahati-781035, Assam (India); Physics and Applied Mathematical Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata 700108 (India)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences, 2002 ROSSBY WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WAVES Peter B. Rhines School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington Large` wave. These waves owe their existence to the rotation and spherical shape of the Earth. Weather reinforce this inequality. Waves then become possible, which are dominated by nearly horizontal wind

Bordoni, Simona

391

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

392

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Rogue Waves UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rogue Waves UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, Florida 33149 http://www.rsmas.miami.edu Taking the Surprise Out of the Freak Wave another to create monster waves that not even the bravest surfer could love. Big waves are big news

Miami, University of

394

Wave energy devices with compressible volumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...author and source are credited. Wave energy devices with compressible volumes Adi...1BJ, UK We present an analysis of wave energy devices with air-filled compressible...wave period range of about-4s. wave energy|compressible volume|axisymmetric device...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Breakout Session -- TEC Direction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

III: TEC III: TEC Direction and Priorities Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group Presented by: Alex Thrower Office of Logistics Management February 7, 2008 San Antonio, Texas 2 Topics of Discussion * Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) charter and membership * Topic group functions * Meeting format 3 TEC Charter and Membership * Mission - TEC was formed in 1992 to improve coordination among the Department of Energy (DOE) and external groups interested in the Department's transportation activities The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) co-chairs TEC with DOE's Environmental Management Program Provides an opportunity for broad based input and information exchange from varied organizations - Members meet semi-annually to participate in

396

The effects of a Severn Barrage on wave conditions in the Bristol Channel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The study investigates the impact that construction of a Severn Barrage in the Severn Estuary, on the west coast of the UK, might have on local wave conditions. Implementation of a barrage will impact on tidal currents and water elevations in the wider region. There is strong tidal modulation of wave conditions under the natural regime and therefore barrage-induced changes to tidal conditions could affect wave modulation in the region. This paper uses Swan, an open source 3rd generation spectral wave model, to investigate the possible impacts of construction of a barrage on tidal modulation of the wave conditions. It is found that current variations, rather than water level variations, are the dominant factor in tidal modulation of wave conditions. Barrage implementation does not substantially change the modulation of the wave period or direction. However, barrage implementation does affect the tidal modulation of wave heights in the area of interest. The tidal modulation of the wave heights is generally reduced compared to the natural case; the peaks in the wave heights on an incoming tide are slightly lowered and there is lesser attenuation in wave heights on the outgoing tide. This modulation leads to net changes in the wave heights over one tidal cycle. For all of the tested wave conditions, this net change is small for the majority of the tested domain, namely to within ±5% of the no barrage case. There are some areas of greater change, most notably larger net increases in the wave heights near the North Somerset coast where the post-construction net wave height increase over a tidal cycle approach 20% of the pre-construction conditions. These changes do not impact coastal flooding because the wave height increase is not co-incident with high tide. Importantly, the maximum wave height is not increased and thus the likelihood of extreme events is not increased. The area of greatest reduction is between Swansea and Porthcawl. Changes over a neap tidal cycle show similar patterns of net change, but the modulation over the tidal cycle is different; primarily the magnitude of modulation is half that for the spring tide case and the shape is altered in some locations.

I. Fairley; R. Ahmadian; R.A. Falconer; M.R. Willis; I. Masters

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Home: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

content. | Skip to navigation content. | Skip to navigation Site Map Contact Us Current Documents Archived Documents Entire Site only in current section Advanced Search... U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Sections Home Directives Current Directives Draft Directives Archives Delegations Current Delegations Current Designations Rescinded Organizations' Assignment of Responsibility Development & Review RevCom Writers' Tools DPC Corner References News and Updates Help Personal tools You are here: Office of Management » Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Info Home Directives are the Department of Energy's primary means of establishing policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. Directive

398

Integrated campaign to study the stationary inertial Alfvn wave in the laboratory and space This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introduction The stationary inertial Alfv´en (StIA) wave [1 of StIA waves is magnetic-field-aligned (s-direction in figure 1) electron drift energy that overcomes of the effective phase velocity vector, as shown, and is approximately zero. The StIA wave vector is approximately

California at Berkeley, University of

399

Continuous gravitational waves from isolated Galactic neutron stars in the advanced detector era  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider a simulated population of isolated Galactic neutron stars. The rotational frequency of each neutron star evolves through a combination of electromagnetic and gravitational-wave emission. The magnetic field strength dictates the dipolar emission, and the ellipticity (a measure of a neutron star’s deformation) dictates the gravitational-wave emission. Through both analytic and numerical means, we assess the detectability of the Galactic neutron star population and bound the magnetic field strength and ellipticity parameter space of Galactic neutron stars with or without a direct gravitational-wave detection. While our simulated population is primitive, this work establishes a framework by which future efforts can be conducted.

Leslie Wade; Xavier Siemens; David L. Kaplan; Benjamin Knispel; Bruce Allen

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

Phase matching of four-wave interactions of SRS components in birefringent SRS-active crystals  

SciTech Connect

A new method has been proposed for achieving wave vector matching in four-wave interactions of frequency components upon SRS in birefringent SRS-active crystals. The method ensures anti-Stokes wave generation and enables a substantial reduction in higher order Stokes SRS generation thresholds. Phase matching directions in BaWO{sub 4} SRS-active negative uniaxial crystals and SrWO{sub 4} SRS-active positive uniaxial crystals have been found in the wavelength range 0.4 - 0.7 {mu}m.

Smetanin, Sergei N; Basiev, Tasoltan T [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

Mccomiskey, Allison

402

SOLITARY-WAVE AND MULTI-PULSED TRAVELING-WAVE SOLUTIONS OF BOUSSINESQ SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLITARY-WAVE AND MULTI-PULSED TRAVELING-WAVE SOLUTIONS OF BOUSSINESQ SYSTEMS MIN CHEN Department words: water wave, Boussinesq system, traveling wave, homoclinic orbit, multi-pulsed solution 1. Introduction This paper studies solitary-wave and multi-pulsed solutions of the Boussinesq systems t + ux + (u

Chen, Min

403

Rogue Waves and Explorations of Coastal Wave Characteristics Primary Investigator: Paul C. Liu -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rogue Waves and Explorations of Coastal Wave Characteristics Primary Investigator: Paul C. Liu engineering, University of Wisconsin Overview Freak waves are unusually large waves. They have been observed. As the cause of freak waves is still unknown, measurements and analysis of this phenomena are extremely rare

404

Wave–wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deep ocean acoustics in the absence of shipping and wildlife is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions the Longuet-Higgins mechanism which dominates from 0.1 to 10?Hz and may be significant for another octave. For this source the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual “standing wave approximation ” but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1?Hz less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind and presumably waves is indeed observed in the data.

Z. Guralnik; J. Bourdelais; X. Zabalgogeazcoa; W. E. Farrell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Foreign Direct Investment in U  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 November 2000 Energy Information Administration/Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, the Team Leader for Financial Analysis (202) 586-1383. Specific technical information concerning this

406

SRNL - Directions and Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map of SRS, with Georgia and South Carolina Map of SRS, with Georgia and South Carolina Directions and Maps The Savannah River National Laboratory is located at the Savannah River Site , a 310 square mile site located in the southeastern coastal area of the United States in the state of South Carolina. It is bordered to the west by the Savannah River and Georgia, and is close to several major cities, including Augusta and Savannah (Ga.), Columbia, Greenville, and Charleston (S.C.). It is in an area residents refer to as the Central Savannah River Area, or CSRA. The Aiken County Technology Laboratory (which houses SRNL's biotechnology laboratories and certain waste treatment technology laboratories) and the Center for Hydrogen Research are located at Aiken County's Savannah River Research Campus, located adjacent to SRS.

407

Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSAB Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSAB From: Designated Federal Officer, Sandra L. Waisley (EM-11) To: SSAB Members (G. Stegner, J. Reising, G. Bowman, T. Taylor, C. Gertz, B. Murphie, S. McCracken, M. Marvin, J. Rampe, A. Doswell, C. Anderson, B. Wethington, S. Brennan, K. Kozeliski, D. Dollins, P. Halsey, Y. Sherman, L. Bratcher, R. Warther, K. Klein, R. Schepens, F. Lockhart, J. Allison, R. Erickson, E. Sellers, K. Carlson, G. Boyd, R. Butler) The memorandum informs of Assistant Secrectary Roberson's direction and guidance for implementing a DOE direct relationship and funding approach for EM's Site-Specific Advisory Board (EMSSAB).

408

Energy in a String Wave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When one end of a taut horizontal elastic string is shaken repeatedly up and down a transverse wave (assume sine waveform) will be produced and travel along it.1 College students know this type of wave motion well. They know when the wave passes by each element of the string will perform an oscillating up?down motion which in mechanics is termed simple harmonic 2. They also know elements of the string at the highest and the lowest positions—the crests and the troughs—are momentarily at rest while those at the centerline (zero displacement) have the greatest speed as shown in Fig. 1. Irrespective of this they are less familiar with the energy associated with the wave. They may fail to answer a question such as “In a traveling string wave which elements have respectively the greatest kinetic energy (KE) and the greatest potential energy (PE)?” The answer to the former is not difficult; elements at zero position have the fastest speed and hence their KE being proportional to the square of speed is the greatest. To the PE what immediately comes to their mind may be the simple harmonic motion (SHM) in which the PE is the greatest and the KE is zero at the two turning points. It may thus lead them to think elements at crests or troughs have the greatest PE. Unfortunately this association is wrong. Thinking that the crests or troughs have the greatest PE is a misconception.3

Chiu?king Ng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

MHK Technologies/Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Wave pumps and turbins Wind Wave pumps and turbins < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description 2Wave1Wind The hybrid wave power rig uses two wave converting technologies in addition to wind mills The main system is a pneumatic float in the category of overtopping as Wave Dragon In addition the pneumatic float can house point absorbers The hybrid wave power rig is based on the patented wave energy converter from 2005

410

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price, Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and saltacoustics, South Pole, sound speed, pressure waves,shear waves PACS: 47.35.De, 47.35.Rs, 62.65. +k, 92.40.Vq,

Klein, Spencer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Studying fast wave propagation and absorption at any cyclotron harmonic using a 2D finite element area coordinates wave equation solver  

SciTech Connect

Fourier analysis in the poloidal direction is a standard ingredient in present-day 2D wave equation solvers describing radio frequency waves in hot tokamak plasmas. Although a powerful and elegant technique, Fourier analysis has the disadvantage that a large number of modes is needed to describe the field pattern on a magnetic surface if a short wavelength mode exists on any - even very small - subpart of the particle trajectory. The present paper examines the potential of a method that does not suffer from this drawback: a finite element technique relying on simple linear or cubic area base functions that are defined on irregular elementary surfaces of triangular shape. The wave equation is solved in its weak Galerkin variational form and for realistic 2D tokamak geometry, accounting for the toroidal curvature but assuming the toroidal angle is ignorable, allowing to study the wave pattern for each of the independent toroidal modes excited by the antenna individually.The locally uniform full hot plasma dielectric tensor to all orders in finite Larmor radius was adopted. As the main intended application is the study of fast wave behavior (heating and current drive) at arbitrary harmonics, the wave vector complex amplitude appearing in the dielectric tensor is determined through a local dispersion root evaluation. High frequency fast wave propagation and damping is provided as an illustration in view of possible application of this type of current drive in future high density reactor-like tokamaks.

Lerche, Ernesto; Van Eester, Dirk [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Euratom-'Belgian State', TEC Partner, Brussels (Belgium)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

412

Rank and directional entropy Rank and directional entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank and directional entropy Rank and directional entropy E. Arthur (Robbie) Robinson (Joint work with Ayse Sahin) The George Washington University Talk at KIAS, Seoul, Korea. September 27, 2010 #12;Rank and directional entropy Outline 1 Introduction 2 Finite rank, Z case 3 The formal definition 4 The Z2 case 5

Robinson Jr., E. Arthur (Robbie)

413

Global coherence of dust density waves  

SciTech Connect

The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Measurements of the Shear Alfven Wave Dispersion for Finite Perpendicular Wave Number C. A. Kletzing,* S. R. Bounds, and J. Martin-Hiner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This allows us to test theoretical predictions of the dispersion of these waves by direct comparison with data Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, Iowa 52245 W. Gekelman and C. Mitchell Department of Physics, University=!pe, is 0.42 cm and the ion acoustic gyroradius (the gyroradius of ions with energy equal

California at Los Angles, University of

415

Wave Power: Destroyer of Rocks; Creator of Clean Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E E PG&E Wave Energy Wave Energy Federal Utility Partnership Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Wave Energy Wave Energy Development Development Ontario, CA Ontario, CA November 18 November 18- -19, 200 19, 2009 9 Donald G. Price Donald G. Price Senior Consulting Scientist, PG&E Senior Consulting Scientist, PG&E Wave Power Overview Wave Power Overview * * What is Wave Power? What is Wave Power? o o Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean o o Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean waves that is converted into electricity by various means. waves that is converted into electricity by various means. o o It is a clean, renewable energy resource capable of being utilized

416

Wave | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Wave Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 18 April, 2013 - 13:41 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing claims of LCOE, DOE has developed-for its own use-a standardized cost and performance data reporting process to facilitate uniform calculation of LCOE from MHK device developers. This standardization framework is only the first version in what is anticipated to be an iterative process that involves industry and the broader DOE stakeholder community. Multiple files are attached here for review and comment.Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon device_performance_validation_data_request.docx application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon

417

Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse  

SciTech Connect

Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with an algebraic study of the equations of detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics taking into account the pressure and the energy of thermal radiation. A new approach to shock and detonation wavefronts is outlined. The fluid under consideration is assumed to be perfect (nonviscous and nonconducting) and to obey the following equation of state: p=(?-1)? where p, ?, and ? are the pressure, the total energy density, and the adiabatic index, respectively. The solutions of the equations of detonation waves are reduced to the problem of finding physically acceptable roots of a quadratic polynomial ?(X) where X is the ratio ?/?0 of dynamical volumes behind and ahead of the detonation wave. The existence and the locations of zeros of this polynomial allow it to be shown that if the equation of state of the burnt fluid is known then the variables characterizing the unburnt fluid obey well-defined physical relations.

Mahdy Cissoko

1992-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Reaction force control implementation of a linear generator in irregular waves for a wave power system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Most designs for wave energy converters include a hydraulic (or pneumatic) interface between the wave device and the generator to smooth electricity production, but a… (more)

Li, Bin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel  

SciTech Connect

Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Optical Wave Propagation Simulation, Wigner Phase-Space Diagrams, and Wave Energy Confinement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The number of samples required for efficient numerical simulation of wave propagation can be determined by a combination of Wigner phase-space techniques, wave energy confinement...

Rhodes, William T; Sheridan, John T; Hennelley, Bryan M

422

Bioenergy Technologies Office New Directions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New Directions and New Business Opportunities for BETO Valerie Reed, Acting Director, BETO, U.S. Department of Energy

423

Fast wave heating in the NSTX-Upgrade device  

SciTech Connect

NSTX-Upgrade will operate with toroidal magnetic fields (B T) up to 1 T, nearly twice the value used in the experiments on NSTX, and the available NBI power will be doubled. The doubling of B T while retaining the 30 MHz RF source frequency has moved the heating regime from the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime used in NSTX to the mid harmonic fast wave (MHFW) regime. By making use of the full wave code AORSA, this work shows that direct ion damping (mainly by thermal ions localized at the 5th harmonic resonance) might be significant in NSTX-Upgrade under TRANSP predicted full performance conditions and the electron and ion absorption is sensitive to the ratio of electron and ion temperature. Launching at high toroidal wave number appears to be one way to significantly reduce the ion damping. By using the extended AORSA code, which includes a detailed description of the scrape-off layer in the field solutions, we found a large electric field amplitude outside of the last closed flux surface as previously seen in NSTX from AORSA simulations (D. L. Green, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 145001 (2011)). Preliminary results by introducing a collision damping in the scrape-off layer in the AORSA code to represent a damping process are presented, showing for the first time absorbed power in the scrape-off layer.

Bertelli, Nicola [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL; Berry, Lee Alan [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge; Bonoli, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Fu, GuoYong [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Gerhardt, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Green, David L [ORNL; Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA; Hosea, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kramer, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); LeBlanc, B [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Perkins, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Phillips, C. K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ryan, Philip Michael [ORNL; Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Valeo, E. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wright, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Multiple direction vibration fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

Cericola, Fred (Albuquerque, NM); Doggett, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Ernest, Terry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Priddy, Tommy G. (Rockville, MD)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves  

SciTech Connect

We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established.

Coutant, Antonin, E-mail: antonin.coutant@aei.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany); Parentani, Renaud, E-mail: renaud.parentani@th.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Bâtiment 210, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Bâtiment 210, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cofinal types of directed orders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ) directed partial orders #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P orders Tukey reducibility: (P, ) T (Q, ) if f : P Q X P unbounded = f [X] Q unbounded g : Q P Y Q cofinal = g[Y ] P cofinal #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P

Mátrai, Tamás

427

Direct and Inverse Cascades in the Wind-Driven Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We offer a new form for the S(nl) term in the Hasselmann kinetic equation for squared wave amplitudes of wind-driven gravity wave. This form of S(nl) makes possible to rewrite in differential form the conservation laws for energy, momentum, and wave action, and introduce their fluxes by a natural way. We show that the stationary kinetic equation has a family of exact Kolmogorov-type solutions governed by the fluxes of motion constants: wave action, energy, and momentum. The simple "local" model for S(nl) term that is equivalent to the "diffusion approximation" is studied in details. In this case, Kolmogorov spectra are found in the explicit form. We show that a general solution of the stationary kinetic equation behind the spectral peak is described by the Kolmogorov-type solution with frequency-dependent fluxes. The domains of "inverse cascade" and "direct cascade" can be separated by natural way. The spectrum in the universal domain is close to $\\omega^{-4}$.

Zakharov, Vladimir E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy...

429

Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave...

430

Identifying two steps in the internal wave energy cascade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1.1 The internal wave energy cascade . . . . . . .? ? , which contain only wave energy trav- eling upward anddistinction is made between wave energy propagating upward

Sun, Oliver Ming-Teh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable...

432

Langmuir Waves and Electron Acceleration at Heliospheric Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results for S/WAVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . A.7 Rheometry2.4 MHD Wave Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Electron Acceleration, Plasma Waves, and Radio Emission 3.1

Pulupa, Marc Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Managed DirectX First Steps: Direct3D Basics and DirectX vs. GDI+  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DirectX refers to a collection of Microsoft-created APIs and technologies that help developers more directly access the hardware features of a computer. It was originally released in 1996 as a way fo...

David Weller; Alexandre Santos Lobão…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + C Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + 2.3 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 4.0 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 3.0 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 3.0 +

436

Tabular icebergs in ocean waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in ocean waves. Two field seasons have been carried out by SPRI in cooperation with Norsk Polarinstitutt, and Foldvik et a/.11 have reported some measurements which took place during ... officers and the crew of the ship for their patience and help. We thank the Norsk Polarinstitutt (NP) and the Radio Echo Group at SPRI for loan of equipment, ...

Monica Kristensen; Vernon A. Squire; Stuart C. Moore

1982-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

437

Dispersion of discontinuous periodic waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Benjamin-Bona-Mahony (BBM) model's is asymptotically...standard bidirectional Boussinesq systems is asymptotically...waves |k|1/2k Boussinesq system, regularized Boussinesq equation signk Boussinesq...Korteweg-de Vries k 3 RLW/BBM k 1 Figure 2. RLW...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Spiral Waves of Chemical Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is tethered by an unwinding string (Fig. 1B). At p > l...minute. In its spontaneously oscillating form and its merely excitable...mentions spiral waves in the oscillating reagent on page 29 of "Investiga-tion...homogeneous chemical auto-oscillating systems" (in Russian...

Arthur T. Winfree

1972-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

439

On the use of computational models for wave climate assessment in support of the wave energy industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean wave environment. Unfortunately, wave data is typically un- available in… (more)

Hiles, Clayton E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Wave Star Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Star Energy Star Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Wave Star Energy Place Denmark Zip DK-2920 Product Denmark-based private wave device developer. References Wave Star Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: C5 WaveStar This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Wave Star Energy is a company located in Denmark . References ↑ "Wave Star Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wave_Star_Energy&oldid=678928" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

First Plasma Wave Observations at Uranus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electrons. Various other plasma waves were also observed...plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive...BRIDGE, H.S., PLASMA OBSERVATIONS NEAR URANUS...FROM URANUS AT 0.5 MHZ, ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL...

D. A. GURNETT; W. S. KURTH; F. L. SCARF; R. L. POYNTER

1986-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Sandia National Laboratories: Wave Energy Resource Characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Ivanpah Solar Power Site Sandia Funded to Model Power Pods for Utility-Scale Wave-Energy Converter Wave Energy Resource Characterization at US Test Sites On September...

443

Wave Patterns and Southern Hemisphere Convergence Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-rate days, a wave pattern is identified that is characteristic of high rain events. This wave pattern is then compared to the patterns of variability of brightness temperature using empirical orthogonal functions. A linear regression technique is used...

Ramotowski, Michelle R.

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

444

Wave Energy Centre | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Energy Centre Address: Wave Energy Centre Av Manuela da Maia 36 R C Dto Place: Lisboa Zip: 1000-201 Region: Portugal Sector: Marine...

445

Wind Wave Float | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(TRL 1 2 3 Component) Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale PowerBuoy Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...

446

Rene Wave Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rene Wave Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rene Wave Ltd Address: 85 Emmett Ave Suite 2508 Place: Toronto Zip: M6M 5A2 Region: Canada Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

447

Arnold Schwarzenegger DEVELOPING WAVE ENERGY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor DEVELOPING WAVE ENERGY IN COASTAL CALIFORNIA: POTENTIAL SOCIO. Developing Wave Energy In Coastal California: Potential Socio-Economic And Environmental Effects. California-ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program

448

On quantization of nondispersive wave packets  

SciTech Connect

Nondispersive wave packets are widely used in optics and acoustics. We found it interesting that such packets could be also a subject of quantum field theory. Canonical commutation relations for the nondispersive wave packets are constructed.

Altaisky, M. V. [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)] [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Kaputkina, N. E. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)] [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Motor Wave Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies: MotorWave This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMotorWaveGroup&oldid769272...

450

Strings in plane-fronted gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brinkmann's plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel rays --~shortly pp-waves~-- are shown to provide, under suitable conditions, exact string vacua at all orders of the sigma-model perturbation expansion.

C. Duval; Z. Horvath; P. A. Horvathy

2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

Symmetries and Interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We considered symmetry restriction on the interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves and demonstrated that linear in small wave vector asymptotic is not forbidden, as one can expect by naive reasoning.

Vladimir V. Lebedev; Victor S. L'vov

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nonlinear Saturation of Vertically Propagating Rossby Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction between vertical Rossby wave propagation and wave breaking is studied in the idealized context of a beta-plane channel model. Considering the problem of propagation through a uniform zonal flow in an ...

Giannitsis, Constantine

453

Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

454

On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean K. E. Bullen University College, Auckland, N. Z. ON RAYLEIGH WAVES ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN K. E. Bullen (Received 1939November 9) The Bering......

K. E. Bullen

1939-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Wave Breaking Dissipation Observed with “SWIFT” Drifters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy dissipation rates during ocean wave breaking are estimated from high-resolution profiles of turbulent velocities collected within 1 m of the surface. The velocity profiles are obtained from a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler sonar on a wave-...

Jim Thomson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Air Piston This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGreenOceanWaveEnergy&oldid769161...

457

Equatorial Solitary Waves. Part 2: Envelope Solitons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Via the method of multiple scales, it is shown that the time and space evolution of the envelope of wave packets of weakly nonlinear, strongly dispersive equatorial waves is governed by the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The diverse phenomena of ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Converter OWEC Converter OWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wave Energy Company Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Neutrally suspended and positively buoyant modules are quick connected into open frame networks Submerged portions are stabilized by variable ballast buoyancy chambers and optional damper sheets situated at a relatively calm depth Frame members carry shaft components of linear rotary converters associated with large point absorber buoys Both directions of reciprocal wave motion i e vertical and horizontal motion directly drive components of counter rotating electrical generators Compared to standard generators wherein one is associated with upstroke and another of smaller proportion with downstroke this configuration increases relative speed with fewer parts Electromechanical loads are real time adjustable with respect to wave sensor web resulting in optimal energy conversion from near fully submerged wave following buoys Electrical conductors are series connected and further quick connected with those of other modules via upper frame members Through implementation of rep

459

Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across the Tropical Pacific Ocean as a Component of the TOGA-TAO Buoy Array R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction The purpose of this document is to bring together pertinent information concerning the NOAA TOGA-TAO buoy array so that a decision can be made for the following questions: 1. Are the scientific gains from an array of short-wave radiation sensors in the equatorial Pacific Ocean sufficiently impelling that DOE/ARM should provide financial and material support to NOAA/PMEL to install and operate this array? 2. What scientists and/or scientific studies would directly benefit from such a data set? 3. What should that array look like? That is, what sub-set of buoys should be so implemented given the per-buoy

460

Periodic wave solutions of the Boussinesq equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boussinesq equation usually arises in a physical problem as a long wave equation. The present work extends the search of periodic wave solutions for it. The Hirota bilinear method and Riemann theta function are employed in the process. We also analyse the asymptotic property of periodic waves in detail. Furthermore, it is of interest to note that well-known soliton solutions can be reduced from the periodic wave solutions.

Yi Zhang; Ling-ya Ye; Yi-neng Lv; Hai-qiong Zhao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Numerical study on active wave devouring propulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of extracting energy from gravity waves for marine propulsion was numerically studied by a two-dimensional...

Liyanarachchi Waruna Arampath De Silva…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Electromagnetic wave scattering by Schwarzschild black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the scattering of a planar monochromatic electromagnetic wave incident upon a Schwarzschild black hole. We obtain accurate numerical results from the partial wave method for the electromagnetic scattering cross section, and show that they are in excellent agreement with analytical approximations. The scattering of electromagnetic waves is compared with the scattering of scalar, spinor and gravitational waves. We present a unified picture of the scattering of all massless fields for the first time.

Luís C. B. Crispino; Sam R. Dolan; Ednilton S. Oliveira

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nonlinear Mixing of Electromagnetic Waves in Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coupling (32, 33). Plasma instabilities with multiple...experiment (34) with 430-MHz incoher-ent backscatter...probing of ionospheric plasma with beat waves appears...four-wave mixing in a plasma opens up the possibility...important in future upper atmospheric research. Beat waves...

V. STEFAN; B. I. COHEN; C. JOSHI

1989-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

464

Airbreathing Rotating Detonation Wave Engine Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airbreathing Rotating Detonation Wave Engine Cycle Analysis Eric M. Braun, Frank K. Lu, Donald R analysis of an airbreathing, rotating detonation wave engine (RDWE) is developed. The engine consists of a steady inlet system with an isolator which delivers air into the detonation annulus. A single wave

Texas at Arlington, University of

465

Slow magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waves and oscillations in the solar plasma organized by Robert Erdelyi...waves at a magnetic interface. Solar Phys. 69, 1981a 27-38...Cram1981bpp. 369-383. Eds. New Mexico:Sunspot, Sacramento Peak...Magnetohydrodynamic waves. In Solar system magnetic fields E.R...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Seminario de Matemtica Aplicada "Renowable wave energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seminario de Matemática Aplicada "Renowable wave energy: potencial and technical challenges Abstract: Among the various renewable energy sources, ocean wave energy has been only recently investiga will be at first to introduce the potential of wave energy, as a significant, and often neglected, contributor

Tradacete, Pedro

467

Discrete control of resonant wave energy devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Society 28 January 2012 research-article Articles 1006...peaks and troughs of wave energy: the dreams and the...control of deep water wave energy devices using an active...www.iwwwfb.org/Abstracts/iwwwfb20/iwwwfb20...latching control of a wave energy device in regular and...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hydrodynamic principles of wave power extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Based on statistical data, Thorpe [12] has estimated the wave power potential along various...and K. Budal1982Wave-power absorption by parallel...de2008Phase control through load control of oscillating-body...and C. C. Mei2009Wave power extraction by a compact...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

CURRENTS DRIVEN BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CURRENTS DRIVEN BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES C.F.F. KARNEY, NJ. FISCH Plasma Physics Laboratory of the generation of steady-state currents by electron cyclotron waves are explored. A numerical solution of electron cyclotron wave absorption appears to be one of the more promising schemes of providing a steady

Karney, Charles

470

SCATTERING BEHAVIOR OF TRANSITIONAL SHOCK WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCATTERING BEHAVIOR OF TRANSITIONAL SHOCK WAVES Kevin R. Zumbrun Bradley J. Plohr Dan Marchesin September, 1991 Abstract. We study the stability and asymptotic behavior of transitional shock waves as solutions of a parabolic system of conservation laws. In contrast to classical shock waves, transitional

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

471

Waves on unsteady currents Merrick C. Haller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves on unsteady currents Merrick C. Haller School of Civil and Construction Engineering, Oregon 2007; published online 3 December 2007 Models for surface gravity wave propagation in the presence of currents often assume the current field to be quasi-stationary, which implies that the absolute wave

Haller, Merrick

472

Bifurcation Theory of Meandering Spiral Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bifurcation Theory of Meandering Spiral Waves Claudia Wul Freie Universitat Berlin, Fachbereich Mathematik und Informatik, Arnimallee 2{6, 14195 Berlin, email: wul @math.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Spiral waves-Zhabotinsky reaction. We develop a mathematical theory for the Hopf bifurcation from rigidly rotating spiral waves

Wulff, Claudia

473

Energy and Energy Flux in Planetary Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Energy and Energy Flux in Planetary Waves V. T. Buchwald The propagation...a thorough study of the energy of these waves in the plane approximation...case of divergent planetary waves, the total energy density being E = T + U...

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A Positive-Energy Relativistic Wave Equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article A Positive-Energy Relativistic Wave Equation P. A. M...positive and negative energies. A new relativistic wave equation for particles...positive values for the energy. There is great formal...usual relativistic wave equation for the electron...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Some Common Wave Phenomena Applied to an M.H.D. Anisotropic Surface Wave System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......10xf. 4. The Kelvin Ship Wave Problem The effect of a local disturbance...anisotropy relative to its effect on the ship wave pattern. It is...demonstrate clearly the effect of the anisotropy of...surface waves in the ship wave problem. However......

I. S. ROBINSON

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

Fominov, Yakov

477

Beauty waves: an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we present a method for computing an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves. Wave forms are loosely based on procedural wave models and are designed to emulate those found in both art and nature. The wave forms...

Faulkner, Jay Allen

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

478

Lossless Tapers, Gaussian Beams, Free-Space Modes: Standing Waves Versus Through-Flowing Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lossless Tapers, Gaussian Beams, Free-Space Modes: Standing Waves Versus Through-Flowing Waves inconsistencies, in Marcatili's lossless tapers through-flowing waves must be drastically different from standing waves. First, we reconfirm this by means of numerical results based on an extended BPM algorithm. Next

Curtarolo, Stefano

479

Segmented Waves from a Spatiotemporal Transverse Wave Instability Lingfa Yang, Igal Berenstein, and Irving R. Epstein*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmented Waves from a Spatiotemporal Transverse Wave Instability Lingfa Yang, Igal Berenstein observe traveling waves emitted from Turing spots in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction. The newborn waves are continuous, but they break into segments as they propagate, and the propagation

Epstein, Irving R.

480

THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )}. In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Karpen, Judith T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. Richard, E-mail: pbu3@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: judy.karpen@nasa.gov, E-mail: devore@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A numerical investigation of long waves in the atmosphere produced by flow over various mountain profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vector in the y direction unit vector in the vertical direction wavelength periodic length of model residual error distance from center of paraboloid mountain horizontal distance t ime U, u average zonal wind V west wind component of V..., However, Rossby did not at that time associate mountains with these waves. Constructing 5-day, mean, pressure charts for the 3-km level, he noted the existence of the major semi-permanent features of the low- level circulation which he termed "centers...

Collins, Ralph Warren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

482

Category:Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared page? For detailed information on Long-Wave Infrared as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Long-Wave Infrared Add.png Add a new Long-Wave Infrared...

483

Traveling wave device for combining or splitting symmetric and asymmetric waves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A traveling wave device for the combining or splitting of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy includes a feed waveguide for traveling wave energy, the feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for coupling wave energy between the feed waveguide and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of wave energy to or from the reflector. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which includes a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which includes a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

Möbius, Arnold (Eggenstein, DE); Ives, Robert Lawrence (Saratoga, CA)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

484

MHK Technologies/Uppsala Seabased AB Wave Energy Converter | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AB Wave Energy Converter AB Wave Energy Converter < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uppsala Seabased AB Wave Energy Converter.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Uppsala University Division for Electricity Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The system consists of a linear permanent magnet synchronous generator located on the sea floor The generator is connected directly via a line to a buoy on the surface There are no intermediate energy conversion steps thus the generator motion is the same as the buoy motion Several generators 3 today are connected to a marine substation where the voltage is converted to grid frequency transformed to higher voltage and transmitted to shore All electrical cables throughout the system are fixed i e there are no motions that subject the cables to bending moments

485

Breaking of relativistically intense longitudinal space charge waves: A description using Dawson sheet model  

SciTech Connect

Spatio-temporal evolution of relativistically intense longitudinal space charge waves in a cold homogeneous plasma is studied analytically as well as numerically, as an initial value problem, using Dawson sheet model. It is found that, except for very special initial conditions which generates the well known longitudinal Akhiezer-Polovin mode, for all other initial conditions, the waves break through a novel mechanism called phase mixing at an amplitude well below the Akhiezer-Polovin limit. An immediate consequence of this is, that Akhiezer-Polovin waves break when subjected to arbitrarily small longitudinal perturbations. We demonstrate this by performing extensive numerical simulations. This result may be of direct relevance to ultrashort, ultraintense laser/beam pulse-plasma interaction experiments where relativistically intense waves are routinely excited.

Sengupta, Sudip, E-mail: sudip@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat , Gandhinagar - 382428 (India)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

486

Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite Doppler velocimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational waves imprint apparent Doppler shifts on the frequency of photons propagating between an emitter and detector of light. This forms the basis of a method to detect gravitational waves using Doppler velocimetry between pairs of satellites. Such detectors, operating in the milli-hertz gravitational frequency band, could lead to the direct detection of gravitational waves. The crucial component in such a detector is the frequency standard on board the emitting and receiving satellites. We point out that recent developments in atomic frequency standards have led to devices that are approaching the sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting sources. The sensitivity of satellites equipped with optical frequency standards for Doppler velocimetry is examined, and a design for a robust, space-capable optical frequency standard is presented.

Vutha, Amar C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Linear stability analysis and the speed of gravitational waves in dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity  

SciTech Connect

We perform a linear stability analysis of dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity in the geometric optics approximation and find that it is linearly stable on the backgrounds considered. Our analysis also reveals that gravitational waves in the modified theory travel at the speed of light in Minkowski spacetime. However, on a Schwarzschild background the characteristic speed of propagation along a given direction splits into two modes, one subluminal and one superluminal. The width of the splitting depends on the azimuthal components of the propagation vector, is linearly proportional to the mass of the black hole, and decreases with the third inverse power of the distance from the black hole. Radial propagation is unaffected, implying that as probed by gravitational waves the location of the event horizon of the spacetime is unaltered. The analysis further reveals that when a high frequency, pure gravitational wave is scattered from a black hole, a scalar wave of comparable amplitude is excited, and vice versa.

Garfinkle, David [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States) and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 (United States); Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Efficient and Scalable All-to-All Personalized Exchange for InfiniBand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· High performance ­ Low latency of lesser than 5us ­ Over 840 Mega Byte/s uni-directional bandwidth? ­ Can we utilize the InfiniBand RDMA and Gather/Scatter capabilities? ­ How can we achieve better of pinning is high ­ Solution for small messages: copy into a pre-registered buffer [liuj-ics03] ­ Cost

Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

489

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Direct Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Use Direct Use Photo of alligators on a farm. Geothermally heated waters allow alligators to thrive on a farm in Colorado, where temperatures can drop below freezing. Geothermal reservoirs of hot water, which are found a few miles or more beneath the Earth's surface, can be used to provide heat directly. This is called the direct use of geothermal energy. Geothermal direct use has a long history, going back to when people began using hot springs for bathing, cooking food, and loosening feathers and skin from game. Today, hot springs are still used as spas. But there are now more sophisticated ways of using this geothermal resource. In modern direct-use systems, a well is drilled into a geothermal reservoir to provide a steady stream of hot water. The water is brought up through

490

Coherent molecular transistor: Control through variation of the gate wave function  

SciTech Connect

In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor.

Ernzerhof, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.Ernzerhof@UMontreal.ca [Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succursale A, Montréal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)] [Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succursale A, Montréal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

491

ICRF Mode Conversion Studies with Phase Contrast Imaging and Comparisons with Full-Wave Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat toka-mak plasmas. In a multi-ion-species plasma, the FW converts to ion cyclotron waves (ICW) and ion Bernstein waves (IBW) around the ion-ion hybrid resonance (mode conversion). The mode converted wave is of interest as an actuator to optimise plasma performance through flow drive and current drive. Numerical simulations are essential to describe these processes accurately, and it is important that these simulation codes be validated. On Alcator C-Mod, direct measurements of the mode converted waves have been performed using Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI), which measures the line-integrated electron density fluctuations. The results were compared to full-wave simulations AORSA and TORIC. AORSA is coupled to a Fokker-Planck code CQL3D for self-consistent simulation of the wave electric field and the minority distribution function. The simulation results are compared to PCI measurements using synthetic diagnostic. The experiments were performed in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas over a wide range of ion species concentrations. The simulations agreed well with the measurements in the strong absorption regime. However, the measured fluctuation intensity was smaller by 1-2 orders of magnitudes in the weakly abosorbing regime, and a realistic description of the plasma edge including dissipation and antenna geometry may be required in these cases.

Tsujii, N.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Porkolab, M.; Jaeger, E. F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oadk Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

492

Source-wave angular-momentum effects on electron-diffraction patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use a simple model to predict when electron-emission diffraction patterns from surfaces will have peaks or dips along internuclear axes. A high angular-momentum electron wave emitted from an atom acts like an s wave (l=0) in an extra centrifugal potential. This extra potential changes the electron’s effective wave number and phase shift, altering the conditions for constructive interference when this wave scatters from nearby atoms. We demonstrate that the difference in source-wave angular momentum between Cu M2,3M4,5M4,5 Auger and Cu 3p photoelectrons explains the difference between their emission angular distributions from surfaces: the Auger-electron emission has a predominantly f-like source wave (l=3) and destructive interference in the forward electron-scattering direction (‘‘silhouette’’) while the photoelectron has lower angular momentum and constructive interference (‘‘peak’’). As long as this effect is considered, Auger-electron emission patterns can be used to determine surface structures. The unusual Auger-electron emission patterns observed by Frank et al. [Science 247, 182 (1990)] can be explained as due to high source-wave angular momentum and low electron energy.

John J. Barton and Louis J. Terminello

1992-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

von Neumann-Landau equation for wave functions, wave-particle duality and collapses of wave functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that von Neumann-Landau equation for wave functions can present a mathematical formalism of motion of quantum mechanics. The wave functions of von Neumann-Landau equation for a single particle are `bipartite', in which the associated Schr\\"{o}dinger's wave functions correspond to those `bipartite' wave functions of product forms. This formalism establishes a mathematical expression of wave-particle duality and that von Neumann's entropy is a quantitative measure of complementarity between wave-like and particle-like behaviors. Furthermore, this extension of Schr\\"{o}dinger's form suggests that collapses of Schr\\"{o}dinger's wave functions can be regarded as the simultaneous transition of the particle from many levels to one.

Zeqian Chen

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

494

Policy Procedure Administrative Directive Title: _____________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy ­ Procedure ­ Administrative Directive Title: _____________________________________ Policy-President _____________ See also: Related Policies, Procedures and Agreements: Relevant Legislation and Regulations: ____________________________________________________________________________ Background and Purpose: ____________________________________________________________________________ Policy

Northern British Columbia, University of

495

Direct cooled power electronics substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN) [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

496

Radar Observations of MJO and Kelvin Wave Interactions During DYNAMO/AMIE/CINDY2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-stratiform classification of rain rate, rain area, and echo-top heights, as well as cloud boundaries. Sounding data includes profiles of wind speed and direction and relative humidity. Kelvin waves that occur during the suppressed MJO are convectively weaker than Kelvin...

DePasquale, Amanda Michele

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

497

Whistler waves observed near lunar crustal magnetic sources J. S. Halekas,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-standing whistler wakes formed by direct solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic fields. Citation such waves on about 6.6% of LP orbits in the solar wind, outside of the lunar wake. About a third of them-standing whistler wakes can be generated by solar wind interaction with electron- scale magnetic obstacles

California at Berkeley, University of

498

Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a more active development began only after the rapid increase of the prices of oil-dependent fuels Article history: Received 30 July 2013 Accepted 25 March 2014 Available online Keywords: Wave energy mitigation and adaptation, the shadow of the recent economic crisis that directly affected the oil- dependent

Georgiou, Georgios

499

Title of Document: STUDY OF LONGITUDINAL SPACE CHARGE WAVES IN SPACE-CHARGE DOMINATED BEAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEAMS Jayakar Charles Tobin Thangaraj, Doctor of Philosophy, 2009 Directed By: Prof. Patrick O'Shea Prof current electron beam with very low emittance and energy spread. Any density fluctuation in an intense beam can launch space charge waves that lead to energy modulation. The energy modulations may cause

Anlage, Steven

500

Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated Granular Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated a mechanically free surface of an unconsolidated granular layer under gravity is solved analytically using of the acoustic experiments directed to the investigation of fundamental mechanical properties of unconsolidated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de