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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Property:Wave Direction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direction Direction Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wave Direction Property Type String Pages using the property "Wave Direction" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alden Small Flume + Uni-Directional + Alden Wave Basin + Both + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + Both + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + Uni-Directional + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + Uni-Directional + Chase Tow Tank + Uni-Directional + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + Uni-Directional + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + Uni-Directional + Coastal Structures Modeling Complex + Both + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + Uni-Directional + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + Uni-Directional + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + Uni-Directional + H Haynes Wave Basin + Both +

2

Parameter assignment for improved connectivity and security in randomly deployed wireless sensor networks via hybrid omni/uni-directional antennas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conguring a network system to operate at optimal levels of performance re-quires a comprehensive understanding of the eects of a variety of system parameterson crucial metrics like connectivity and resilience to network attacks. Traditionally,omni-directional antennas have been used for communication in wireless sensor net-works. In this thesis, a hybrid communication model is presented where-in, nodes ina network are capable of both omni-directional and uni-directional communication.The eect of such a model on performance in randomly deployed wireless sensor net-works is studied, specically looking at the eect of a variety of network parameterson network performance.The work in this thesis demonstrates that, when the hybrid communication modelis employed, the probability of 100% connectivity improves by almost 90% and thatof k-connectivity improves by almost 80% even at low node densities when comparedto the traditional omni-directional model. In terms of network security, it was foundthat the hybrid approach improves network resilience to the collision attack by almost85% and the cost of launching a successful network partition attack was increased byas high as 600%. The gains in connectivity and resilience were found to improve withincreasing node densities and decreasing antenna beamwidths.

Shankar, Sonu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Directional Validation of Wave Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology for quantitative, directional validation of a long-term wave model hindcast is described and applied. Buoy observations are used as ground truth and the method does not require the application of a parametric model or data-adaptive ...

W. Erick Rogers; David W. C. Wang

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Directional Response of Ocean Waves to Changing Wind Direction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When analysing wave measurements in turning winds, one usually assumes that the rate of change of mean wave direction is determined by the angle between ?w, the wind direction, and ?o, the mean wave direction; however, it is well known that this ...

Gao Quanduo; Gerbrand Komen

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 104.0 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 4.6 Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 1.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 12' by 12' concrete slabs anchored to flume walls

6

Evolution of a Random Directional Wave and Freak Wave Occurrence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of a random directional wave in deep water was studied in a laboratory wave tank (50 m long, 10 m wide, 5 m deep) utilizing a directional wave generator. A number of experiments were conducted, changing the various spectral ...

Takuji Waseda; Takeshi Kinoshita; Hitoshi Tamura

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheets Wave Basin Sheets Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sheets Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Rhode Island Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 30.0 Beam(m) 3.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $750(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.0 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Pre-programmed for regular and irregular waves, but wavemaker is capable of any input motion. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

8

Worldwide Measurements of Directional Wave Spreading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The directional spreading of waves is important for both theoretical and practical reasons. Enough measurements have now been made to draw conclusions about the behavior of wave spreading at sites in different climatic regimes. The measurements ...

George Z. Forristall; Kevin C. Ewans

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Response of Wave Directions to Changing Wind Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the premise that the net growth of wave energy induced by wind is centered around the wind direction, a relaxation model for the response of the main wave direction to changes in the wind direction for young sea states is derived. The time ...

L. H. Holthuijsen; A. J. Kuik; E. Mosselman

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DeFrees Large Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Large Wave Basin Large Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Large Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 32.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 64 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled 4m hydraulic wave paddle stroke allows a series of solitary waves to be generated; arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes

11

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy  

SciTech Connect

The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

DeFrees Small Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Small Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 15.0 Beam(m) 0.8 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 30 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled hydraulic paddle, arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 1:10 sloping glass with dissipative horsehair covering if needed

13

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 15.2 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Special Physical Features Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control sys

14

MHL 2D Wind/Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL 2D Wind/Wave MHL 2D Wind/Wave Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL 2D Wind/Wave Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 35.1 Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Removable beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 20.4

15

University of Iowa Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University of Iowa Wave Basin University of Iowa Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 40.0 Beam(m) 20.0 Depth(m) 3.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Towed 3DPIV; contactless motion tracking; free surface measurement mappingv Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Fully programmable for regular or irregular waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Trusses overlaid with lattice and matting Channel/Tunnel/Flume

16

Evolution of the Bimodal Directional Distribution of Ocean Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent results of numerical wave models have shown that the presence of a bimodal directional spreading is a robust feature at wavenumbers above the spectral peak. This directional bimodality is controlled mainly by directional transfer of energy ...

David W. Wang; Paul A. Hwang

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Measurement of Directional Wave Spectra Using Aircraft Laser Altimeters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A remote sensing method to measure directional oceanic surface waves by three laser altimeters on the NOAA LongEZ aircraft is investigated. To examine feasibility and sensitivity of the wavelet analysis method to various waves, aircraft motions, ...

J. Sun; S. P. Burns; D. Vandemark; M. A. Donelan; L. Mahrt; Timothy L. Crawford; T. H. C. Herbers; G. H. Crescenti; J. R. French

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the analysis of measured directional seas using a nonlinear model, named Directional Hybrid Wave Model (DHWM). The model has the capability of decomposing the directional wave field into its free wave components with different frequency, amplitude, direction and initial phase based on three or more time series of measured wave properties. With the information of free waves, the DHWM can predict wave properties accurately up to the second order in wave steepness. In this study, the DHWM is applied to the analyses of the data of Wave Crest Sensor Inter-comparison Study (WACSIS). The consistency between the measurements collected by different sensors in the WACSIS project was examined to ensure the data quality. The wave characteristics at the locations of selected sensors were predicted in time domain and were compared with those recorded at the same location. The degree of agreement between the predictions and the related measurements is an indicator of the consistency among different sensors. To analyze the directional seas in the presence of strong current, the original DHWM was extended to consider the Doppler effects of steady and uniform currents on the directional wave field. The advantage of extended DHWM originates from the use of the intrinsic frequency instead of the apparent frequency to determine the corresponding wavenumber and transfer functions relating wave pressure and velocities to elevation. Furthermore, a new approach is proposed to render the accurate and consistent estimates of the energy spreading parameter and mean wave direction of directional seas based on a cosine-2s model. In this approach, a Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) is employed. Because it is more tolerant of errors in the estimated cross spectrum than a Directional Fourier Transfer (DFT) used in the conventional approach, the proposed approach is able to estimate the directional spreading parameters more accurately and consistently, which is confirmed by applying the proposed and conventional approach, respectively, to the time series generated by numerical simulation and recorded during the WACSIS project.

Zhang, Shaosong

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Directional Wave Spectra from a Swath Ship at Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE), the swath ship Frederick G. Creed was equipped with an array of wave staffs for the estimation of wave directional spectra. This paper reports on the first such estimates taken from a ship at ...

W. M. Drennan; M. A. Donelan; N. Madsen; K. B. Katsaros; E. A. Terray; C. N. Flagg

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Direct Observations of Coherent Backscatter of Radar Waves in Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous work, it was argued that a source of radar coherent scatter occurs in the direction perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation because of the presence of grids of enhanced particle concentrations with spatial periodicities in ...

A. R. Jameson; A. B. Kostinski

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Directional Response of Wind Waves to a Large Wind Shift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The directional response of a fully arisen sea to a 90° wind shift is studied using a combination of airborne radar and in situ directional wave observations. The observations were made in February 1991 as a part of the Surface Wave Dynamics ...

Frederick C. Jackson; Robert E. Jensen

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Direct Simulation of Internal Wave Energy Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional nonhydrostatic numerical model is used to calculate nonlinear energy transfers within decaying Garrett–Munk internal wavefields. Inviscid wave interactions are calculated over horizontal scales from about 1 to 80 km and for ...

Kraig B. Winters; Eric A. D’Asaro

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print The electronic properties of a metal are determined by the dynamical behavior of its conduction electrons. Conventional band theory accounts for the interaction of the electrons with the static ion lattice. However, coupling to further microscopic degrees of freedom can alter the electron dynamics considerably. For example, "conventional" superconductivity emerges as a result of the electrons' interaction with lattice vibrations (phonons). In magnetic materials, coupling with spin waves (magnons) is also expected. Such interactions may contribute to high-temperature superconductivity in novel materials. Unfortunately, lattice vibrations and spin waves have similar energy scales, hindering detailed study. Researchers have taken a new approach in analyzing the electron bands of ferromagnetic iron. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) provides direct spectroscopic evidence of altered electron mass and energy (quasiparticle formation) in a magnetic solid due to coupling with spin waves.

24

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print The electronic properties of a metal are determined by the dynamical behavior of its conduction electrons. Conventional band theory accounts for the interaction of the electrons with the static ion lattice. However, coupling to further microscopic degrees of freedom can alter the electron dynamics considerably. For example, "conventional" superconductivity emerges as a result of the electrons' interaction with lattice vibrations (phonons). In magnetic materials, coupling with spin waves (magnons) is also expected. Such interactions may contribute to high-temperature superconductivity in novel materials. Unfortunately, lattice vibrations and spin waves have similar energy scales, hindering detailed study. Researchers have taken a new approach in analyzing the electron bands of ferromagnetic iron. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) provides direct spectroscopic evidence of altered electron mass and energy (quasiparticle formation) in a magnetic solid due to coupling with spin waves.

25

Observations of the Directional Spectrum of Fetch-Limited Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the wave directional spectrum of fetch-limited sea states are made from measurements made with a heave–pitch–roll buoy at the Maui location off the west coast of New Zealand. The fetch-limited sea states have significant wave heights ...

Kevin C. Ewans

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation at Landfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA Scanning Radar Altimeter (SRA) flew aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane research aircraft to document the sea surface directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, South Carolina, and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, as ...

E. J. Walsh; C. W. Wright; D. Vandemark; W. B. Krabill; A. W. Garcia; S. H. Houston; S. T. Murillo; M. D. Powell; P. G. Black; F. D. Marks Jr.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Normalized Maximum-Likelihood Estimators of the Directional Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of data-adaptative directional wave spectrum estimators is proposed. These estimators may be considered as an improvement over the well-known extended maximum-likelihood method (EMLM). The normalization is based on the idea of ...

M. A. Arribas; J. J. Egozcue

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling Print Wednesday, 30 March 2005 00:00 The electronic properties of a metal are determined by the dynamical behavior of its conduction electrons. Conventional band theory accounts for the interaction of the electrons with the static ion lattice. However, coupling to further microscopic degrees of freedom can alter the electron dynamics considerably. For example, "conventional" superconductivity emerges as a result of the electrons' interaction with lattice vibrations (phonons). In magnetic materials, coupling with spin waves (magnons) is also expected. Such interactions may contribute to high-temperature superconductivity in novel materials. Unfortunately, lattice vibrations and spin waves have similar energy scales, hindering detailed study. Researchers have taken a new approach in analyzing the electron bands of ferromagnetic iron. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) provides direct spectroscopic evidence of altered electron mass and energy (quasiparticle formation) in a magnetic solid due to coupling with spin waves.

29

Nonstationary Analysis of the Directional Properties of Propagating Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is proposed that the sea surface be studied in a way that takes into account the observed groupiness of wind-generated waves. A new method of analysis to study the directional properties of the surface is developed. It is demonstrated that ...

M. A. Donelan; W. M. Drennan; A. K. Magnusson

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation in the Open Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sea surface directional wave spectrum was measured for the first time in all quadrants of a hurricane's inner core over open water. The NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane research ...

C. W. Wright; E. J. Walsh; D. Vandemark; W. B. Krabill; A. W. Garcia; S. H. Houston; M. D. Powell; P. G. Black; F. D. Marks

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

MHK Technologies/Wave Catcher | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Catcher.png Wave Catcher.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Offshore Islands Ltd Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Wave Catcher can be orientated to take advantage of the most numerous prevailing waves to generate power It is a long surface buoy cylinder that is lifted by each passing wave As the cylinder is lifted it pulls on its anchor lines which in turn pulls on a support pulley This support pulley turns the generator s rotor and flywheel The generator s flywheel keeps the rotor turning until the next wave lifts up the cylinder and the anchor line once again turns the pulley The cylinder will also be lifted by waves from all directions As a result the anchor cables at each end of the buoy may either pull together or at slightly different times The gears the pulleys the rotor and flywheel are turned when the anchor cable s tension is high The uni direction pulley s re coil spring re winds the anchor cable back around the pulley when the buoy moves down with the trough of the wave and the anchor cable tension is low The wave generator can be in a surface buoy or mounted sub

32

Interplay of Resonant and Quasi-Resonant Interaction of the Directional Ocean Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experimental study of the evolution of random directional gravity waves in deep water provides new insight into the nature of the spectral evolution of the ocean waves and the relative significance of resonant and quasi-resonant wave ...

Takuji Waseda; Takeshi Kinoshita; Hitoshi Tamura

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Model Study of Waves Generated by Convection with Direct Validation via Satellite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric gravity waves have a major effect on atmospheric circulation, structure, and stability on a global scale. Gravity waves can be generated by convection, but in many cases it is difficult to link convection directly to a specific wave ...

Alison W. Grimsdell; M. Joan Alexander; Peter T. May; Lars Hoffmann

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Higher Fourier Harmonics of the Directional Distribution of an Equilibrium Wave Field under Steady Wind Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, directional wave spectra have been obtained by applying the two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D FFT) to the three-dimensional spatial topography of ocean surface waves collected by an airborne scanning laser ranging system during ...

David W. Wang; Paul A. Hwang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Directionality and Crest Length Statistics of Steep Waves in Open Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wavelet analysis methodology is applied to open ocean wave height data from the Southern Ocean Waves Experiment (1992) and from a field experiment conducted at Duck, North Carolina, in 1997 with the aim of estimating the directionality and ...

Nicholas Scott; Tetsu Hara; Paul A. Hwang; Edward J. Walsh

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Direct Estimation of Near-Bottom Turbulent Fluxes in the Presence of Energetic Wave Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocities produced by energetic waves can contaminate direct covariance estimates of near-bottom turbulent shear stress and turbulent heat flux. A new adaptive filtering technique is introduced to minimize the contribution of wave-induced ...

W. J. Shaw; J. H. Trowbridge

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Directional Calibration of Wave Reanalysis Databases Using Instrumental Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave reanalysis databases (WRDBs) offer important advantages for the statistical characterization of wave climate (continuous time series, good spatial coverage, constant time span, homogeneous forcing, and more than a 40-yr-long time series) and ...

R. Mínguez; A. Espejo; A. Tomás; F. J. Méndez; I. J. Losada

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

ARPES Provides Direct Evidence of Spin-Wave Coupling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

band corresponding to the noninteracting case (no spin-wave coupling) was obtained by parabolic interpolation between the lowest data points and the Fermi-level crossing, making...

39

Observations of the Directional Distribution of Ocean-Wave Energy in Fetch-Limited Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directional energy distributions of wind-generated waves were observed with a relatively high directional resolution in fairly homogeneous and stationary wind fields in fetch-limited conditions using stereophotography of the sea surface. In a ...

L. H. Holthuijsen

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

New directions for gravity-wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pairs of Planck-mass--scale drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e., "Millikan oil drops"), when levitated in the presence of strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. A Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves back into EM waves, should be practical to perform. This would open up observations of the gravity-wave analog of the CMB from the extremely early Big Bang, and also communications directly through the interior of the Earth.

Raymond Y. Chiao

2006-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fifth ASTROD Symposium and Outlook of Direct Gravitational-Wave Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From July 11 to July 13, 2012, Raman Research Institute (Bangalore, India) hosted the Fifth International ASTROD Symposium on Laser Astrodynamics, Space Test of Relativity and Gravitational-Wave Astronomy. This is a report on the symposium with an exposition of the outlook of direct gravitational-wave detection.

Arun, K G; Ni, Wei-Tou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fifth ASTROD Symposium and Outlook of Direct Gravitational-Wave Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From July 11 to July 13, 2012, Raman Research Institute (Bangalore, India) hosted the Fifth International ASTROD Symposium on Laser Astrodynamics, Space Test of Relativity and Gravitational-Wave Astronomy. This is a report on the symposium with an exposition of the outlook of direct gravitational-wave detection.

K. G. Arun; Bala R. Iyer; Wei-Tou Ni

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves Using LIGO S5 Science Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as stochastic backgrounds. We perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for ...

Barnum, Sam

44

High-Resolution Directional Wave Spectra from Horizontally Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses the estimation of directional wave spectra by the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method. The performance of the estimate is illustrated using data obtained by an Acoustic Doppler Current Meter in the CUrrent Measurement ...

Harald E. Krogstad; R. Lee Gordon; Martin C. Miller

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Lagrangian Drifter Dispersion in the Surf Zone: Directionally Spread, Normally Incident Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian drifter statistics in a surf zone wave and circulation model are examined and compared to single- and two-particle dispersion statistics observed on an alongshore uniform natural beach with small, normally incident, directionally ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Effect of Fetch on the Directional Spectrum of Celtic Sea Storm Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes measurements of the directional spectrum of storm waves obtained using the PISCES high-frequency radar. The storm occurred during the Netherlands UK Radar Wavebuoy Experimental Comparison 2 experiment in March 1987. Wind ...

Lucy R. Wyatt

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Direct Calculation of Low-Frequency Coastally Trapped Waves and Their Scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new, direct numerical method is proposed for finding the phase speeds and pressure fields of low-frequency nondispersive coastally trapped waves in a continuously stratified flow. The usual two-dimensional problem is reduced to a one-...

G. A. Schmidt; E. R. Johnson

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Direct and Indirect Effects of Latent Heat Release on a Synoptic-Scale Wave System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this paper is to diagnose, the “direct” and “indirect” effects of latent heat release on a synoptic-scale wave system containing an extratropical cyclone that developed over the eastern United States. To achieve this goal, ...

Patricia M. Pauley; Phillip J. Smith

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Airborne Measurements of the Wavenumber Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves. Part II: Directional Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne scanning lidar system acquires three-dimensional (3D) spatial topography of ocean surface waves. From the spatial data, wavenumber spectra are computed directly. The spectral properties in terms of the spectral slope and dimensionless ...

Paul A. Hwang; David W. Wang; Edward J. Walsh; William B. Krabill; Robert N. Swift

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – Intermediate scale experiment  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Power Technologies deployed a scaled prototype wave energy converter (WEC) in the Puget Sound in February 2011. Other than a brief period (10 days) in which the WEC was removed for repair, it was in the water from Feb. 15, 2011 until Mar. 21, 2012. The SeaRay, as this WEC is known, consists of three rigid bodies which are constrained to move in a total of eight degrees of freedom (DOF). The SeaRay is kept on station with a spread, three-point mooring system. This prototype WEC is heavily instrumented, including but not limited to torque transducers and encoders reporting generator torque applied to and relative pitch of the floats, an inertial measurement unit (IMU) reporting translational acceleration and rotational position of the spar/nacelle, a GPS sensor reporting position, load cells reporting mooring loads at the WEC connection points and a number of strain gauges embedded in the fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) hull. Additionally, wave and current data are collected using an Acoustic Wave And Current Profiler (AWAC), allowing performance and design data to be correlated to environmental input conditions. This data – quality controlled, processed and analyzed – is used to characterize the metocean conditions (i.e. sea states). The WEC response will be correlated to the metocean conditions. These results will primarily be used to validate numerical models. The validated numerical models will be used optimize the commercial scale WEC and inform the design process. This document details the SeaRay experiment, including the quality control, processing and subsequent analysis of the data. Furthermore, the methodology and the results of numerical model validation will be described.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

51

Directional Surface Wave Estimates from Doppler Sonar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quick analysis for deriving directional-frequency spectra from surface grazing Doppler sonar data is presented. Here, “quick” refers to both the short time span of data required and computational ease. The technique employs time and space ...

Jerome A. Smith; Gregory T. Bullard

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Reaching ~3.35 x 10^-25 at ~150 Hz, those upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliá, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Obtaining Credit for Guided Wave as a Buried Pipe Direct Examination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundCurrently, guided wave examinations of buried and underground pipe are considered indirect examinations in Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) initiative 09-14, Guideline for the Management of Underground Piping and Tank Integrity, Revision 3, and in Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation 1801, Generic Aging and Lessons Learned (GALL) Report, Revision 2. Indirect examinations receive significantly less credit than direct examinations. Although a guided wave ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Momentum Flux and Flux Divergence of Gravity Waves in Directional Shear Flows over Three-Dimensional Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear mountain wave theory is used to derive the general formulas of the gravity wave momentum flux (WMF) and its vertical divergence that develop in directionally sheared flows with constant vertical shear. Height variations of the WMF and its ...

Xin Xu; Yuan Wang; Ming Xue

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

New directions for gravity-wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pairs of Planck-mass--scale drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e., "Millikan oil drops"), when levitated in a superconducting magnetic trap in the presence of strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. A Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves back into EM waves, should be practical to perform. As a step in this direction, an experiment to measure the quadrupolar electromagnetic scattering cross-section of a pair of "Millikan oil drops" will be performed first.

Chiao, R Y

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

An Observation of the Directional Wave Spectrum Evolution from Shoreline to Fully Developed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Surface Contour Radar (SCR) is a 36-GHz computer-controlled airborne system, which produces ocean directional wave spectra with much higher angular resolution than pitch-and-roll buoys. SCR observations of the evolution of the fetch-limited ...

Edward J. Walsh; David W. Hancock III; Donald E. Hines; Robert N. Swift; John F. Scott

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Measurement of Ocean Wave Directional Spectra Using Doppler Side-Scan Sonar Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is presented for extraction of ocean wave directional spectra using Doppler side-scan sonars. Two 103-kHz steerable side-scan beams from a freely drifting subsurface platform are used to estimate horizontal water surface velocity due ...

Mark V. Trevorrow

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Placing 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center, we reach ~3.35x10^-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliá; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; S. Deléglise; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endröczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

Role of plasma edge in the direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave experiment in TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of direct IBW launching, EPW{R_arrow}IBW and CESICW{R_arrow}IBW are investigated using two numerical codes, Full Hot Plasma Ray-Tracing Code and SEMAL Full Wave Slab Code, for the TFTR direct launch IBW experimental parameters. The measured density profiles (by microwave reflectometry) in TFTR appear to be satisfactory for IBW launching while the observed stored energy rise compared to the expected value (ray tracing+TRANSP) indicates only up to 50{percent} of launched power is reaching the plasma core. Possible causes of IBW inefficiency are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Ono, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, New Jersey (United States); Bush, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Cesario, R. [C.R.E., Association EUR-ENEA, Frascati (Italy); Hanson, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Hosea, J.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, New Jersey (United States); Paoletti, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Columbia University, New York (United States); Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, New Jersey (United States); Sauter, O. [Association EURATOM-SUISSE, EPFL Lausanne (Switzerland); Schilling, G.; Wilson, J.R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, New Jersey (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Role of plasma edge in the direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave experiment in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

Two types of direct IBW launching, EPW {R_arrow} IBW and CESICW {R_arrow} IBW are investigated using two numerical codes, Full Hot Plasma Ray-Tracing Code and SEMAL Full Wave Slab Code, for the TFTR direct launch IBW experimental parameters. The measured density profiles (by microwave reflectometry) in TFTR appear to be satisfactory for IBW launching while the observed stored energy rise compared to the expected value (ray tracing + TRANSP) indicates only up to 50% of launched power is reaching the plasma core. Possible causes of IBW inefficiency are also discussed.

Ono, M.; Cesario, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bush, C.E. [Association EUR-ENEA, Frascati (Italy)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Banks of templates for directed searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for directed searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning neutron stars in our Galaxy in data being collected by currently operating interferometric detectors. We thus assume that the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky is known, but we do not assume that the wave's frequency and its derivatives are a priori known. In the construction we employ a simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a polynomial function of time. All our template banks enable usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood F-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank. We study and employ the dependence of the grid's construction on the choice of the position of the observational interval with respect to the origin of time axis. We also study the usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithms with nonstandard frequency resolutions achieved by zero padding or folding the data. In the case of the gravitational-wave signal with one spin-down parameter included we have found grids with covering thicknesses which are only 0.1-16% larger than the thickness of the optimal 2-dimensional hexagonal covering.

Pisarski, Andrzej; Jaranowski, Piotr; Pietka, Maciej [Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, 15-424 Bialystok (Poland)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Forecast Constraints on Inflation from Combined CMB and Gravitational Wave Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, BBO (Big Bang Observer), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parameterization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Christopher Gordon; Joseph Silk; Naoshi Sugiyama

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Measurements of the Directional Spectra of Shallow Water Waves Using the Maximum Entropy Principle and a Single Ocean Bottom Seismometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for measurement of the directional spectra of surface gravity (water) waves is presented here. Measurements are made at a single point by orthogonally mounted seismometers buried 0.5 meters below the seabed surface and a pressure ...

Tom Nye; Tokuo Yamamoto; Mark Trevorrow

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nexus between directionality of terahertz waves and structural parameters in groove patterned InAs  

SciTech Connect

We performed terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy in various geometries, for characterizing the directivity of THz waves emitted from groove patterned InAs structures. We first identified two transient transport processes as underlying THz emission mechanisms in InAs epilayers with different thicknesses. Carrier drift around the surface depletion region was predominant for the THz wave generation in the thin sample group (10-70 nm), whereas electronic diffusion overrode the drift currents in the thick sample group (370-900 nm) as revealed by the amplitude change and phase reversal. Through a combination of electron-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching in 1 {mu}m-thick InAs epilayers, we could further periodically fabricate either asymmetric V-groove patterns or symmetric parabolic apertures. The THz amplitude was enhanced, particularly along the line-of-sight transmissive direction when the periodic groove patterns act as microscale reflective mirrors separated by a scale of the diffusion length.

Yim, Jong-Hyuk; Min, Kyunggu; Jeong, Hoonil; Jho, Young-Dahl [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Hye; Song, Jin-Dong [Center for Opto-Electronics Convergence Systems, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

Forecast constraints on cosmic string parameters from gravitational wave direct detection experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational waves (GWs) are one of the key signatures of cosmic strings. If GWs from cosmic strings are detected in future experiments, not only their existence can be confirmed but also their properties might be probed. In this paper, we study the determination of cosmic string parameters through direct detection of GW signatures in future ground-based GW experiments. We consider two types of GWs, bursts and the stochastic GW background, which provide us with different information about cosmic string properties. Performing the Fisher matrix calculation on the cosmic string parameters, such as parameters governing the string tension $G\\mu$ and initial loop size $\\alpha$ and the reconnection probability $p$, we find that the two different types of GW can break degeneracies in some of these parameters and provide better constraints than those from each measurement.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Koichi Miyamoto; Toyokazu Sekiguchi; Keitaro Takahashi; Joseph Silk

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

66

Directional Wind-Wave Coupling in Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models: Results from CBLAST-Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (...

Shuyi S. Chen; Wei Zhao; Mark A. Donelan; Hendrik L. Tolman

67

Directional Wind–Wave Coupling in Fully Coupled Atmosphere–Wave–Ocean Models: Results from CBLAST-Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (...

Shuyi S. Chen; Wei Zhao; Mark A. Donelan; Hendrik L. Tolman

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Directional Wavelet Analysis of Inhomogeneity in the Surface Wave Field from Aerial Laser Scanning Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern measurement techniques such as aerial laser scanning allow for rapid determination of the spatial variation of sea surface elevation. Wave fields obtained from such data show spatial inhomogeneity associated with the presence of wave ...

Richard M. Gorman; D. Murray Hicks

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Estimation of Directional Surface Wave Spectra from a Towed Research Catamaran*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the High-Resolution Remote Sensing Main Experiment (1993), wave height was estimated from a moving catamaran using pitch-rate and roll-rate sensors, a three-axis accelerometer, and a capacitive wave wire. The wave spectrum in the frequency ...

Kurt A. Hanson; Tetsu Hara; Erik J. Bock; Andrey B. Karachintsev

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Forecast constraints on cosmic strings from future CMB, pulsar timing and gravitational wave direct detection experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study future observational constraints on cosmic string parameters from various types of next-generation experiments: direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs), pulsar timing array, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We consider both GW burst and stochastic GW background searches by ground- and space-based interferometers as well as GW background detection in pulsar timing experiments. We also consider cosmic string contributions to the CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies. These different types of observations offer independent probes of cosmic strings and may enable us to investigate cosmic string properties if the signature is detected. In this paper, we evaluate the power of future experiments to constrain cosmic string parameters, such as the string tension Gmu, the initial loop size alpha, and the reconnection probability p, by performing Fisher information matrix calculations. We find that combining the information from the different types of observations breaks parameter degeneracies and provides more stringent constraints on the parameters. We also find future space-borne interferometers independently provide a highly precise determination of the parameters.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Koichi Miyamoto; Toyokazu Sekiguchi; Keitaro Takahashi; Joseph Silk

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Inertia–Gravity Wave and Neutral Eady Wave Trains Forced by Directionally Sheared Flow over Isolated Hills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical solutions are obtained to the linearized equations describing a particular class of directionally sheared flow over isolated hills or ridges. The flows are characterized by constant buoyancy frequency and vertical wind shear, though ...

Glenn Shutts

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Role of Nonlinear Momentum Fluxes on the Evolution of Directional Wind-Wave Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has long been known that nonlinear wave–wave interactions produce stationary solutions related to constant energy flux through the equilibrium range when a deep-water spectrum follows an f?4 form, as has been verified in numerical studies in ...

Donald T. Resio; Charles E. Long; William Perrie

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

X-Ray Preheating of Window Materials in Direct-Drive Shock-Wave Timing Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of x-ray preheated planar-window materials relevant for shock-wave timing experiments were studied on the OMEGA Laser System. The behavior of diamond windows exposed to x rays is consistent with a simple model based on the generation of free charge carriers. Polystyrene windows showed indications of optical transitions due to molecular states that are created by the ionizing radiation.

Theobald, W.; Miller, J. E.; Boehly, T.R.; Vianello, E, Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Eggert, J.; Celliers, P.M.

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

Computations of the Response of a Wave Spectrum to a Sudden Change in Wind Direction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of a wind-sea spectrum to a step function change in wind direction is investigated theoretically for a sequence of direction changes ranging from 30° to 180°, in increments of 30°. Two spectral energy balance models are used: the ...

I. R. Young; S. Hasselmann; K. Hasselmann

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

X-ray preheating of window materials in direct-drive shock-wave timing experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of x-ray preheated planar-window materials relevant for shock-wave timing experiments were studied on the OMEGA Laser System. The x-ray radiation was generated by 100 ps, 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses incident on planar plastic targets, instantaneously affecting samples located {approx}0.7 mm away. An abrupt onset of strong absorption of an optical probe beam ({lambda}=532 nm) and a temporally varying refractive index were measured in polystyrene and diamond windows. The behavior of diamond windows exposed to x rays is consistent with a simple model based on the generation of free charge carriers. Polystyrene windows showed indications of optical transitions due to molecular states that are created by the ionizing radiation.

Theobald, W.; Miller, J. E.; Boehly, T. R.; Vianello, E.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Eggert, J.; Celliers, P. M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

UNDERSTANDING SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS OF THE 2010 JUNE 13 EUV WAVE EVENT: DIRECT INSIGHT FROM A GLOBAL THERMODYNAMIC MHD SIMULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present a comprehensive observation and modeling analysis of the 2010 June 13 extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Due to extreme advances in cadence, resolution, and bandpass coverage in the EUV regime, the AIA instrument offers an unprecedented ability to observe the dynamics of large-scale coronal wave-like transients known as EUV waves. To provide a physical analysis and further complement observational insight, we conduct a three-dimensional, time-dependent thermodynamic MHD simulation of the eruption and associated EUV wave, and employ forward modeling of EUV observables to compare the results directly observations. We focus on two main aspects: (1) the interpretation of the stark thermodynamic signatures in the multi-filter AIA data within the propagating EUV wave front, and (2) an in-depth analysis of the simulation results and their implication with respect to EUV wave theories. Multiple aspects, including the relative phases of perturbed variables, suggest that the outer, propagating component of the EUV transient exhibits the behavior of a fast-mode wave. We also find that this component becomes decoupled from the evolving structures associated with the coronal mass ejection that are also visible, providing a clear distinction between wave and non-wave mechanisms at play.

Downs, Cooper; Roussev, Ilia I.; Lugaz, Noe [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Van der Holst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V., E-mail: cdowns@ifa.hawaii.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

SWIMSAT: A Real-Aperture Radar to Measure Directional Spectra of Ocean Waves from Space—Main Characteristics and Performance Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project SWIMSAT aims to measure the directional spectra of waves from space using a real-aperture radar with a low-incidence, conical-scanning beam. This system’s design is based on airborne versions developed in France and the United States. ...

Danièle Hauser; Elbatoul Soussi; Eric Thouvenot; Laurent Rey

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Wave Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.)

79

Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Development of African Easterly Waves in Late Summer, 2003–07  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Episodic events of both Saharan dust outbreaks and African easterly waves (AEWs) are observed to move westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between the warm, dry, and dusty Saharan air layer on the nearby storms has ...

Po-Lun Ma; Kai Zhang; Jainn Jong Shi; Toshihisa Matsui; Albert Arking

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Direct observation of dynamic surface acoustic wave controlled carrier injection into single quantum posts using phase-resolved optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A versatile stroboscopic technique based on active phase-locking of a surface acoustic wave to picosecond laser pulses is used to monitor dynamic acoustoelectric effects. Time-integrated multi-channel detection is applied to probe the modulation of the emission of a quantum well for different frequencies of the surface acoustic wave. For quantum posts we resolve dynamically controlled generation of neutral and charged excitons and preferential injection of holes into localized states within the nanostructure.

Völk, S; Schülein, F J R; Truong, T A; Kim, H; Petroff, P M; Wixforth, A; Krenner, H J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Direct observation of dynamic surface acoustic wave controlled carrier injection into single quantum posts using phase-resolved optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A versatile stroboscopic technique based on active phase-locking of a surface acoustic wave to picosecond laser pulses is used to monitor dynamic acoustoelectric effects. Time-integrated multi-channel detection is applied to probe the modulation of the emission of a quantum well for different frequencies of the surface acoustic wave. For quantum posts we resolve dynamically controlled generation of neutral and charged excitons and preferential injection of holes into localized states within the nanostructure.

S. Völk; F. Knall; F. J. R. Schülein; T. A. Truong; H. Kim; P. M. Petroff; A. Wixforth; H. J. Krenner

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Detecting Free-Mass Common-Mode Motion Induced by Incident Gravitational Waves: Testing General Relativity and Source Direction via Fox-Smith and Michelson Interferometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show that information on both the differential and common mode free-mass response to a gravitational wave can provide important information on discriminating the direction of the gravitational wave source and between different theories of gravitation. The conventional Michelson interferometer scheme only measures the differential free-mass response. By changing the orientation of the beam splitter, it is possible to configure the detector so it is sensitive to the common-mode of the free-mass motion. The proposed interferometer is an adaptation of the Fox-Smith interferometer. A major limitation to the new scheme is its enhanced sensitivity to laser frequency fluctuations over the conventional, and we propose a method of canceling these fluctuations. The configuration could be used in parallel to the conventional differential detection scheme with a significant sensitivity and bandwidth.

Michael Edmund Tobar; Toshikazu Suzuki; Kazuaki Kuroda

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

An omni-directional design tool for series hybrid electric vehicle design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System level parametric design of hybrid electric vehicles involves estimation of the power ratings as well as the values of certain parameters of the components, given the values of the performance parameters. The design is based on certain mathematical equations or ?design rules?, which relate the component parameters and the performance parameters. The flow of the design algorithm is uni-directional and fixed, and cannot be altered. This thesis proposes a new method for such parametric design, called omni- directional design, which does not have a fixed sequence like the conventional design, but can start with any parameters of the designer?s choice. The designer is also able to specify the input parameters over a range, instead of a point (one, fixed value) input. Scenarios having a point input, but values of an output which can vary over a range for the point input, can also be studied.

Shidore, Neeraj Shripad

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Selective Excitation of Tropical Atmospheric Waves in Wave-CISK: The Effect of Vertical Wind Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of waves and the generation of potential energy in wave-CISK require unstable waves to tilt with height oppositely to their direction of propagation. This makes the structures and instability properties of these waves very sensitive to ...

Minghua Zhang; Marvin A. Geller

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Numerical Dispersion of Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When atmospheric gravity waves are simulated in numerical models, they are not only dispersive for physical but also for numerical reasons. Their wave properties (e.g., damping or propagation speed and direction) can depend on grid spacing as ...

Guido Schroeder; K. Heinke Schlünzen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wave Dragon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overtopping Wave Devices Wave Dragon ApSLtd HWETTEI - Workshop October 26-28, 2005, Washington, DC Hydrokinetic Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop the Wave...

88

Improved Connectivity using Hybrid Uni/Omni-Directional Antennas in Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connectivity in sensor networks is an important metric that describes the capability of networks to be able to report sensed information. The ability of member nodes to communicate with each other and collectively report data largely depends on connectivity. Density of node deployment, the transmission radius of the antenna and the communication paradigm employed has a significant effect on connectivity. A network deployment is said to be connected when every node within the network is capable of communicating, either via multi-hops or direct links to every other node in the network. This is a very strict connectivity requirement called 100% connectivity. This work deals with analyzing connectivity in various randomly deployed sensor network deployments and comparing metrics between omni and hybrid uni/omni-directional sensor networks. Specific results will be presented with varying node deployment densities and transmission radii and the levels of connectivity they guarantee. These results have significant impact on secure routing protocol design for wireless sensor networks and planning network deployments. I also present results on k-connectivity, which is a metric that represents network availability, along with the dependence on transmission radii, node densities and uni-directional antenna beam width.

Kwon, Ji Heon

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nonintrusive Measurement of Ocean Waves: Lidar Wave Gauge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1999, a nonintrusive directional lidar wave gauge (LWG) was field tested at the Field Research Facility (FRF) in North Carolina. The LWG uses proven lidar technology to directly measure water surface elevation from above the water’s ...

Jennifer L. Irish; Jennifer M. Wozencraft; A. Grant Cunningham; Claudine Giroud

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Photoionization of hydrogen atom by coherent intense high-frequency short laser pulses: Direct propagation of electron wave packets on enormous spatial grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for the hydrogen atom and its interaction with coherent intense high-frequency short laser pulses is solved numerically exactly by employing the code implemented for the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method. Thereby, the wavefunction is followed in space and time for times longer than the pulse duration. Results are explicitly shown for 3 and 10 fs pulses. Particular attention is paid to identifying the effect of dynamic interference of photoelectrons emitted with the same kinetic energy at different times during the rising and falling sides of the pulse predicted in [\\emph{Ph.V. Demekhin and L.S. Cederbaum}, Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{108}, 253001 (2012)]. In order to be able to see the dynamic interference pattern in the computed electron spectra, the photoelectron wave packet has to be propagated over long distances. Clearly, complex absorption potentials often employed to compute spectra of emitted particles cannot be used to detect dy...

Demekhin, Philipp V; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

93

Wave Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:30pm Addthis Photo of a large wave. Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.) However, wave energy cannot be harnessed everywhere. Wave power-rich areas of the world include the western coasts of Scotland, northern Canada, southern Africa, and Australia as well as the northeastern and northwestern coasts of the United States. In the Pacific Northwest alone, it is feasible that wave energy could produce 40-70 kilowatts (kW) per 3.3 feet (1 meter) of western coastline. Wave Energy Technologies

94

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin 2 Wave Basin 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Length(m) 48.8 Beam(m) 26.5 Depth(m) 2.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Built to client specifications, currently rigid concrete over gravel fill

95

Nonlinear dissipation of circularly polarized Alfven waves due to the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, the dissipation processes of circularly polarized Alfven waves in solar wind plasmas including beam components are numerically discussed by using a 2-D hybrid simulation code. Numerical results suggest that the parent Alfven waves are rapidly dissipated due to the presence of the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves, such as kinetic Alfven waves. The nonlinear wave-wave coupling is directly evaluated by using the induction equation for the parent wave. It is also observed both in the 1-D and 2-D simulations that the presence of large amplitude Alfven waves strongly suppresses the beam instabilities.

Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Hada, T. [Department of Earth System Science and Technology, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga City, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Tsubouchi, K. [Department of Earth and Planetary Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ship Waves and Lee Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional internal trapped lee wave modes produced by an isolated obstacle in a stratified fluid are shown to have dynamics analogous to surface ship waves on water of finite depth. Two models which allow for vertical trapping of wave ...

R. D. Sharman; M. G. Wurtele

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A high-frequency gravitational-wave burst search with LIGO's Hanford site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of long-arm interferometers designed to directly measure gravitational-wave strain. Direct observation of gravitational waves would provide a test ...

Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A high-frequency gravitational-wave burst search with LIGO's Hanford site.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of long-arm interferometers designed to directly measure gravitational-wave strain. Direct observation of gravitational waves would provide… (more)

Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Mixing in Symmetric Holmboe Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct simulations are used to study turbulence and mixing in Holmboe waves. Previous results showing that mixing in Holmboe waves is comparable to that found in the better-known Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) billows are extended to cover a range of ...

W. D. Smyth; J. R. Carpenter; G. A. Lawrence

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Momentum Transport by Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The momentum flux by orographic gravity waves and the turbulent heat flux in wave-breaking regions are estimated from aircraft data from ALPEX. The fluxes on 6 March 1982 are controlled by low-level directional shear of the mean flow and ...

Jinwon Kim; L. Mahrt

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee' s Summit, MO)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee' s Summit, MO)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 33.5 Beam(m) 21.3 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 1.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 1.8 Wave Period Range(s) 1.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sand/sediment

104

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

107

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

JGI - Directions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map to JGI Directions from Directions from key local start points, public transit Home > About Us > Map to JGI UC logo DOE logo Contact Us Credits Disclaimer Access...

109

Ohmsett Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohmsett Tow Tank Ohmsett Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Ohmsett Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Ohmsett Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 203.0 Beam(m) 19.8 Depth(m) 2.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 3.4 Length of Effective Tow(m) 155.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.1 Maximum Wave Length(m) 18 Wave Period Range(s) 4.1 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 3.4 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Programmable frequency Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Wave dampening at downstream end Channel/Tunnel/Flume

110

Long Period Swell Wave Events on the Norwegian Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave records obtained by Waverider and heave/pitch/roll data buoys on the Norwegian continental shelf have been analysed in order to gain information on spectral characteristics (bandwidth, peak frequency, significant wave height and direction) ...

B. Gjevik; O. Rygg; H. E. Krogstad; A. Lygre

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

On the Equilibrium Spectrum of Gravity – Capillary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium spectra of unidirectional gravity – capillary waves are derived from the wave-action balance equation. The calculations include nonlinear triad interactions, direct energy input from the wind, and viscous dissipation. Known ...

Michael Stiassnie

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Oceanic Internal Waves Are Not Weak Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the oceanic internal wave field is too energetic by roughly two orders of magnitude to be treated theoretically as an assemblage of weakly interacting waves. This may be seen both from recent weak wave theoretical calculations ...

Greg Holloway

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

MIT Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT Tow Tank MIT Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 36.6 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) $750 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 1.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.1 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 4.6 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Arbitrary spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition

114

Carderock Tow Tank 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 904.6 Beam(m) 6.4 Depth(m) 4.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Two operable carriages on this basin: Carriage 3 (max towing speed of 15.4 m/s); Carriage 5 (max towing speed of 25.8 m/s) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Length(m) 12.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Irregular waves with a spectrum resembling typical ocean wave patterns with appropriate scale reductions. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

115

Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laboratory Tow Tank Laboratory Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Stevens Institute of Technology Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 97.5 Beam(m) 4.9 Depth(m) 2.0 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 18.3 Length of Effective Tow(m) 30.5 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 15.2 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Menu driven selection of standard spectra or user specified Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes

116

Coastal Inlet Model Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inlet Model Facility Inlet Model Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Inlet Model Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 103.6 Beam(m) 48.8 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

117

Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Long Beach Harbors Model and Long Beach Harbors Model Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 67.1 Beam(m) 79.2 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.1 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.0 Wave Period Range(s) 2.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Point Fermin to Huntington Beach, CA Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities

118

Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Facility Modeling Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 121.9 Beam(m) 48.8 Depth(m) 0.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

119

Wind Effects on Shoaling Wave Shape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near the shore, cross-shore winds strongly affect the location of the break point and the breaking-wave height. From casual observation from the beach, wind direction (onshore or offshore) and speed also appear to affect wave shape (i.e., ...

Falk Feddersen; Fabrice Veron

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Gravitational Waves from Supersymmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In theories of supersymmetry breaking, it is often the case that there is more than one metastable vacuum. First-order phase transitions among such metastable vacua may generate a stochastic background of gravitational waves, the observation of which would provide a direct window into the supersymmetry-breaking sector.

Craig, Nathaniel J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

JGI - Directions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directions Address DOE Joint Genome Institute 2800 Mitchell Drive Walnut Creek, CA 94598 From Oakland Airport Follow Airport exit signs onto AIRPORT DR. Turn RIGHT onto HEGENBERGER...

122

Wave–Wave Interaction of Unstable Baroclinic Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two slightly unstable baroclinic waves in the two-layer Phillips model are allowed to interact with each other as well as the mean flow. A theory for small dissipation rates is developed to examine the role of wave–wave interaction in the ...

Joseph Pedlosky; Lorenzo M. Polvani

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Effect of Current Shear on Topographic Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topographic Rossby waves are long-period waves which occur on continental slopes. In this paper we examine the effect of a mean current on these waves, when the current is directed along the isobaths and has a linear shear in the transverse ...

I. L. Collings; R. Grimshaw

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Wave-Induced Drift Force in the Marginal Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind waves are commonly ignored when modeling the ice motion in the marginal ice zone. In order to estimate the importance of the wave forcing, an expression for the second-order wave-induced drift force on a floe exposed to a full directional ...

Diane Masson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

DIELECTRIC-LOADED WAVE-GUIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent presents a particular arrangement for delectric loading of a wave-guide carrying an electromagnetic wave in the E or TM mode of at least the second order, to reduce the power dissipated as the result of conduction loss in the wave-guide walls. To achieve this desirabie result, the effective dielectric constants in the radial direction of adjacent coaxial tubular regions bounded approximateiy by successive nodai surfaces within the electromagnetic field are of two different values alternating in the radial direction, the intermost and outermost regions being of the lower value, and the dielectric constants between nodes are uniform.

Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Mullett, L.B.

1957-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

Lakefront Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakefront Tow Tank Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Lakefront Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of New Orleans Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 36.6 Beam(m) 4.9 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $1200 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.7 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.9 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Length(m) 22 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular random and transient waves Spectra include ISSC, JONSWAP, Bretschneider, Pierson-Moskowitz and custom user-defined. Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Aluminum segmented arch

127

SAFL Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SAFL Channel SAFL Channel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name SAFL Channel Overseeing Organization University of Minnesota Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 84.0 Beam(m) 2.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 6.1 Length of Effective Tow(m) 76.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Length(m) 6.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Wavemaking Description Programmable control of wave making is currently in development and will be available in fall of 2009. Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Channel is sufficiently adaptable to allow simulation of beach

128

Scripps Channel 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scripps Channel 1 Scripps Channel 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Scripps Channel 1 Overseeing Organization University of California, San Diego (Scripps) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 44.5 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 2.4 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Strategically placed windows, longest being 5.5m, allow optical access from side Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2 Length of Effective Tow(m) 7.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Function Generator or user provided Wave Direction Uni-Directional

129

Scripps Channel 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Channel 2 Channel 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Scripps Channel 2 Overseeing Organization University of California, San Diego (Scripps) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 33.0 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.5 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features All side walls and 11m of the tank bottom are glass to provide optical access. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.7 Length of Effective Tow(m) 20.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Function Generator or user provided Wave Direction Uni-Directional

130

A Spar Buoy for High-Frequency Wave Measurements and Detection of Wave Breaking in the Open Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waves and wave breaking play a significant role in the air–sea exchanges of momentum, sea spray aerosols, and trace gases such as CO2, but few direct measurements of wave breaking have been obtained in the open ocean (far from the coast). This ...

Robin W. Pascal; Margaret J. Yelland; Meric A. Srokosz; Bengamin I. Moat; Edward M. Waugh; Daniel H. Comben; Alex G. Cansdale; Mark C. Hartman; David G. H. Coles; Ping Chang Hsueh; Timothy G. Leighton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A New Approach to Estimate Directional Spreading Parameters of a Cosine-2s Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For accurate and consistent estimates of the directional spreading parameter and mean wave direction of directional seas based on a cosine-2s directional spreading model, a new approach is proposed, employing a maximum likelihood method (MLM) to ...

Shaosong Zhang; Jun Zhang

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Thunderstorm Bow Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thunderstorm solitary gust or bow wave, observed by Doviak and Ge, is examined from the viewpoint of boundary layer wave theory. It is concluded that all its well defined characteristics are consistently modeled as a bow wave of ducted ...

G. Chimonas; Carmen J. Nappo

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Sandia Wave Reflector  

The Sandia wave reflector is a magnetic conductor for wireless transmissions near 433 MHz. The device reflects perpendicular electromagnetic waves in-phase and suppresses surface waves resulting in improved gain performance and effective operation ...

134

Geostrophic Shock Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organized depth discontinuities involving a balance between steepening and dissipation are usually referred to as shock waves. An analytical “educed gravity” model is used to examine a special kind of shock wave. The wave under study is a depth ...

Doron Nof

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

MHK Technologies/WaveStar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WaveStar WaveStar < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WaveStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Star Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Wave Star machine does not form a barrier against the waves - with a view to harnessing all their energy - but instead cuts in at right angles to the direction of the wave. In this way, the waves run through the length of the machine and the energy is utilized in a continuous process, which produces a smooth output. On each side of the oblong Wave Star machine, there are a number of hemisphere-shaped floats, which are half submerged in the water. When a wave rolls in, the floats are pressed up - one after the other - until the wave subsides. Each float is positioned at the end of an arm and pumps energy by the vertical movement of the waves up and down. Every time a float is raised or lowered, a piston presses oil into the machine's common transmission system. The pressure drives a hydraulic motor, which drives a generator, which produces electricity. As the machine is several wave lengths long, the floats will work continuously to harness the energy and produce a smooth output.

136

Wave-Follower Field Measurements of the Wind-Input Spectral Function. Part II: Parameterization of the Wind Input  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nearly all of the momentum transferred from wind to waves comes about through wave-induced pressure acting on the slopes of waves: known as form drag. Direct field measurements of the wave-induced pressure in airflow over water waves are ...

Mark A. Donelan; Alexander V. Babanin; Ian R. Young; Michael L. Banner

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

MHL Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tow Tank Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 109.7 Beam(m) 6.7 Depth(m) 3.7 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 6.7 Length of Effective Tow(m) 103.6 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Concrete beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

138

Alden Small Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flume Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Small Flume Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 17.1 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $2500/week Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Length(m) Variable Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) >0.9 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes

139

Fundamental Guided Wave Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental Guided Wave Metrology. Summary: ... The program is focused on fundamental measurement research for microwave parameters. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

140

Watching Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the vicinity of merging neutron strar binaries or supernova remnants, gravitational waves can interact with the prevailing strong magnetic fields. The resulting partial conversion of gravitational waves into electromagnetic (radio) waves might prove to be an indirect way of detecting gravitational waves from such sources. Another interesting interaction considered in this article is the excitation of magnetosonic plasma waves by a gravitational wave passing through the surrounding plasma. The transfer of gravitational wave energy into the plasma might help to fuel the `fireball' of electromagnetic radiation observed in gamma ray bursts. In the last section of the article, a dispersion relation is derived for such magnetosonic plasma waves driven by a gravitational wave.

Joachim Moortgat

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fetch Relations for Wind-Generated Waves as a Function of Wind-Stress Scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the variation that results when fetch relations for wind-generated wave spectra are sealed by the friction velocity component in the dominant wave direction rather than the magnitude of the friction velocity, using the data collected ...

Will Perrie; Bechara Toulany

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Second-Order Theory and Setup in Surface Gravity Waves: A Comparison with Experimental Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second-order, three-dimensional, finite-depth wave theory is here used to investigate the statistical properties of the surface elevation and wave crests of field data from Lake George, Australia. A direct comparison of experimental and ...

A. Toffoli; J. Monbaliu; M. Onorato; A. R. Osborne; A. V. Babanin; E. Bitner-Gregersen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The search for gravitational wave bursts in data from the second LIGO science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The network of detectors comprising the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are among a new generation of detectors that seek to make the first direct observation of gravitational waves. While providing ...

Chatterji, Shourov Keith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New parameterizations for the spectral dissipation of wind-generated waves are proposed. The rates of dissipation have no predetermined spectral shapes and are functions of the wave spectrum and wind speed and direction, in a way consistent with ...

Fabrice Ardhuin; Erick Rogers; Alexander V. Babanin; Jean-François Filipot; Rudy Magne; Aaron Roland; Andre van der Westhuysen; Pierre Queffeulou; Jean-Michel Lefevre; Lotfi Aouf; Fabrice Collard

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Toward a waveform receiver on a chip dedicated to plasma wave instrument onboard scientific spacecraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma wave observation is very important in the study of space plasma physics because space plasma is collisionless. Plasma wave instruments require large-scale analog circuits. Therefore, the miniaturization of analog circuits leads directly to the ...

H. Fukuhara; H. Kojima; S. Okada; H. Ikeda; H. Yamakawa

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Seasonal Variations in the Formation of Internal Gravity Waves at a Coastal Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric internal gravity waves that formed over a coastal and an inland site were identified from analog records of wind speed and direction. Internal gravity waves occurred at all hours at the coastal site but only during nights inland. More ...

S. SethuRaman; C. Nagle; G. S. Raynor

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Gravity Waves from Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravity waves generated by severe thunderstorms in the eastern Ohio-Pennsylvania area were recorded by an array of microbarovariographs at Palisades, New York and by standard microbarographs across northeastern United States. The waves were ...

Nambath K. Balachandran

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Maine Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tow Tank Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Maine Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of Maine Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 30.5 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 3 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Simulated beach is framed with PVC/mesh. Has a 4:9 slope. Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition

149

The Effect of Wave Breaking on the Wave Energy Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of wave breaking on the wave energy spectral shape is examined. The Stokes wave-breaking criterion is first extended to random waves and a breaking wave model is established in which the elevation of breaking waves is expressed in ...

C. C. Tung; N. E. Huang

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

MHK Technologies/Wave Rotor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rotor Rotor < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Rotor.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ecofys Subsidiary of Econcern Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/C Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Wave Rotor uses a combined Darrieus-Wells rotor, which is contained on the same vertical axis of rotation. These are respectively omni- and bi-directional rotors that can operate in currents of changing directions. The Wave Rotor is mounted on a platform to allow for the capture of wave energy from circulating water particles created by local currents. Since it uses two types of rotor on a single axis of rotation it is able to convert not only tidal currents, but also waves into electricity.

151

Ferrimagnetic Spin Wave Resonance and Superconductivity in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomenon of ferrimagnetic spin wave resonance [uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin wave resonance] has been detected for the first time. It has been observed in carbon nanotubes, produced by high energy ion beam modification of diamond single crystals in $\\ $ direction. Peculiarities of spin wave resonance observed allow to insist on the formation in given nanotubes of $s^+$ superconductivity at room temperature, coexisting with uncompensated antiferromagnetic ordering.

Dmitri Yerchuck; Yauhen Yerchak; Vyacheslav Stelmakh; Alla Dovlatova; Andrey Alexandrov

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Cold Plasma Wave Analysis in Magneto-Rotational Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to investigate the cold plasma wave properties. The analysis has been restricted to the neighborhood of the pair production region of the Kerr magnetosphere. The Fourier analyzed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations are dealt under special circumstances and dispersion relations are obtained. We find the $x$-component of the complex wave vector numerically. The corresponding components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. The direction and dispersion of waves are investigated.

M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Finite volume methods for unidirectional dispersive wave models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the framework of the finite volume method to dispersive unidirectional water wave propagation in one space dimension. In particular we consider a KdV-BBM type equation. Explicit and IMEX Runge-Kutta type methods are used for time discretizations. The fully discrete schemes are validated by direct comparisons to analytic solutions. Invariants conservation properties are also studied. Main applications include important nonlinear phenomena such as dispersive shock wave formation, solitary waves and their various interactions.

Dutykh, Denys; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Detectability of gravitational waves from phase transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravitational waves potentially represent our only direct probe of the universe when it was less than one second old. In particular, first-order phase transitions in the early universe can generate a stochastic background of gravitational waves which may be detectable today. We briefly summarize the physical sources of gravitational radiation from phase transitions and present semianalytic expressions for the resulting gravitational wave spectra from three distinct realistic sources: bubble collisions, turbulent plasma motions, and inverse-cascade helical magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Using phenomenological parameters to describe phase transition properties, we determine the region of parameter space for which gravitational waves can be detected by the proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The electroweak phase transition is detectable for a wide range of parameters.

Kahniashvili, Tina [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); CCPP, New York University, 4 Washington Plaza, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6 (Canada); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Kosowsky, Arthur [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Gogoberidze, Grigol [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Maravin, Yurii [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Giant waves in weakly crossing sea states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of rogue waves in sea states with two close spectral maxima near the wave vectors k{sub 0} {+-} {Delta}k/2 in the Fourier plane is studied through numerical simulations using a completely nonlinear model for long-crested surface waves [24]. Depending on the angle {theta} between the vectors k{sub 0} and {Delta}k, which specifies a typical orientation of the interference stripes in the physical plane, the emerging extreme waves have a different spatial structure. If {theta} {<=} arctan(1/{radical}2), then typical giant waves are relatively long fragments of essentially two-dimensional ridges separated by wide valleys and composed of alternating oblique crests and troughs. For nearly perpendicular vectors k{sub 0} and {Delta}k, the interference minima develop into coherent structures similar to the dark solitons of the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation and a two-dimensional killer wave looks much like a one-dimensional giant wave bounded in the transverse direction by two such dark solitons.

Ruban, V. P., E-mail: ruban@itp.ac.r [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

On Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by a Wormhole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a wormhole. It is found that the scattered wave is partially depolarized and has a specific interference picture depending on parameters of the wormhole and the distance to the observer. It is proposed that such features can be important in the direct search of wormholes.

A. A. Kirillov; E. P. Savelova

2011-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

157

On Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by a Wormhole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a wormhole. It is found that the scattered wave is partially depolarized and has a specific interference picture depending on parameters of the wormhole and the distance to the observer. It is proposed that such features can be important in the direct search of wormholes.

Kirillov, A A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Model of Strongly Forced Wind Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of surface waves generated on deep water by strong winds is proposed. A two-layer approximation is adopted, in which a shallow turbulent layer overlies the lower, infinitely deep layer. The dynamics of the upper layer, which is directly ...

Alexey V. Fedorov; W. Kendall Melville

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Internal Wave Overturns Produced by Salt Fingers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salt finger fluxes obtained in small-domain direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are used to parameterize the fluxes in a larger domain that resolves internal gravity waves. For the case in which the molecular diffusivity ratio ? = KS/KT < 1 ...

Melvin E. Stern; Julian A. Simeonov

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Barotropic Stability Study of Free and Forced Planetary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of free and forced planetary waves in a ? plane channel is investigated with a barotropic model. The equilibrium flows that are considered have the gravest possible scale in the meridional direction and a zonal wavenumber of either ...

John Fyfe; Jacques Derome

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Doppler Sonar and Surface Waves: Range and Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance limitations of an acoustic Doppler sonar system are explored and compared with anticipated requirements for the measurement of surface wave directional/frequency spectra. To obtain measurements to a range D requires a delay ?t ...

Jerome A. Smith

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Semidiurnal Baroclinic Wave Momentum Fluxes at Kaena Ridge, Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kaena Ridge, Hawaii, is a site of energetic conversion of the semidiurnal barotropic tide. Diffuse baroclinic wave beams emanate from the critical-slope regions near the ridge crest, directed upward and southward from the north flank of the ridge ...

Robert Pinkel; Luc Rainville; Jody Klymak

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ship Waves in the Lee of Isolated Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, linear steady-state model, which has been designed for the purpose of simulating the internal wave field which is forced by stratified flow over topography, is described in the present paper. The model directly assimilates ...

Angele Simard; W. R. Peltier

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ocean Wave Slope Observations Using Radar Backscatter and Laser Altimeters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combination of laser and radar aboard an aircraft is used to directly measure long gravity wave surface tilting simultaneously with nadir-viewing microwave backscatter from the sea surface. The presented dataset is extensive, encompassing varied ...

D. Vandemark; B. Chapron; J. Sun; G. H. Crescenti; H. C. Graber

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Current Shear–Inertial Wave Interaction in the Sargasso Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic Doppler profiler measurements of inertial waves embedded within the high shell region of a cold core ring in the Sargasso Sea are described. By repeatedly traversing the same point from different directions, a sampling pattern resembling ...

Richard P. Mied; Colin Y. Shen; Matthew J. Kidd

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Observations of the Response of Sea Waves to Veering Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data-adaptive technique, the iterative maximum likelihood method, is used to estimate directional wave spectra from data collected by three pitch-and-roll buoys, during two turning wind events of the CASP 86 experiment. A relaxation coefficient ...

Diane Masson

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Spume Drops Produced by the Wind Tearing of Wave Crests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind tearing of breaking wave crests produces spume drops. The authors report preliminary laboratory data from direct and unambiguous observation of this process under various wind conditions using a video imaging technique. Results include ...

Magdalena Anguelova; Richard P. Barber Jr.; Jin Wu

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Measurement of Wind Waves and Wave-Coherent Air Pressures on the Open Sea from a Moving SWATH Vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and implementation on a Small Waterline Area Twin Hull (SWATH) vessel of a complete system for measuring the directional distribution of wind waves and the concomitant fluctuations of air pressure and wind speed immediately above them ...

Mark A. Donelan; Fred W. Dobson; Hans C. Graber; Niels Madsen; Cyril McCormick

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

New directions for gravitational wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Millikan oil drops" are drops of superfluid helium coated with electrons, and levitated in a strong, inhomogeneous magnetic field. When the temperature of the system becomes very low compared to the cyclotron gap energy, the system remains in its quantum ground state. Two such levitated charged drops can have their charge-to-mass ratio critically adjusted so that the forces of gravity and electricity between the drops are in balance. Then it is predicted that the amount of scattered electromagnetic and gravitational radiation from the drops are equalized, along with these two kinds of forces. The cross sections for the scattering of the two kinds of radiation can become large, hard-sphere cross-sections at the first Mie resonance, due to the hard-wall boundary conditions on the surfaces of the spheres for both kinds of radiations. An efficient quantum transduction process between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation by such a pair of drops is predicted at microwave frequencies, and a Hertz-like experiment is proposed. A more practical implementation of these ideas to use pairs of levitated, charged superconducting spheres is briefly discussed.

Raymond Y. Chiao

2009-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

171

WAVE REFLE TOR  

owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. SAND # 2013-8893 P WAVE REFLE TOR

172

Energy Basics: Wave Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

173

WAVE REFLE TOR  

electromagnetic wave travels through the rods along their axes it receives a 1/4 period of phase delay be- ... delay, creating positive interference that effectively

174

Trimodal steady water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

RFI Comments - Wave Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These attacks, such as those planted by rootkits ... PwC leveraged the power of TPMs to ... Wave EMBASSY® Remote Administration Server (ERAS) has ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

Collapse of Alfven waves  

SciTech Connect

The growth rates are calculated for the collapse of Alfven waves in a low-..beta.. plasma. The relationship to rf heating is discussed.(AIP)

Erokhin, N.S.; Moiseev, S.S.; Mukhin, V.V.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Control of energetic ion confinement by ion cyclotron range of frequency waves  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that ICRF waves can induce fast convective radial transport of energetic ions in a tokamak geometry without affecting the background ion transport. Spatially inhomogeneous ICRF waves with directional parallel wave vectors are needed; otherwise, a net parallel flow of the energetic ions has to be present. 8 refs.

Chang, C.S. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences)

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

179

Free-Wave Energy Dissipation in Experimental Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several transient wave trains containing an isolated plunging or spilling breaker at a prescribed location were generated in a two-dimensional wave flume using an energy focusing technique. Surface elevation measurements of each transient wave ...

Eustorgio Meza; Jun Zhang; Richard J. Seymour

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Airborne Measurements of the Wavenumber Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves. Part I: Spectral Slope and Dimensionless Spectral Coefficient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne scanning lidar system acquires 3D spatial topography of ocean surface waves. From the spatial data, wavenumber spectra are computed directly. The spectral analyses of two distinctively different wave fields are presented. The first ...

Paul A. Hwang; David W. Wang; Edward J. Walsh; William B. Krabill; Robert N. Swift

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Resonantly Forced Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow, rotating layer of fluid that supports Rossby waves is subjected to turbulent friction through an Ekman layer at the bottom and is driven by a wave that exerts a shear stress on the upper boundary and for which the phase approximate ...

John Miles

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

MHK Technologies/Green Cat Wave Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Turbine Wave Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Green Cat Wave Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Cat Renewables Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Green Cat Wave Turbine employs an extremely novel yet simple mechanical coupling to drive a multi pole Direct Drive generator Recent advances in permanent magnet materials and power electronic converters have opened up this extremely straightforward conversion route Unlike a number of devices currently being investigated this configuration enables maximum energy capture from both vertical and horizontal sea motions swell and surge respectively

183

MHK Technologies/WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Sea for Life Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The WEGA device is an articulated suspended body semi submerged attached to a mount structure that oscillates in an elliptical orbit with the passage of the waves The movement of the body drives an hydraulic cylinder which pushes high pressure fluid through an accumulator and an hydraulic motor driving the generator that produces energy The articulated body attaches to the mount structure through a rotary head which allows it to adapt to the direction wave propagation Multiple devices can be placed on a single mount structure according to the size and place of the structure

184

The road to gravitational-wave astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational-wave astronomy is an area of great promise, yet to be realized. While we are waiting for the first (undisputed!) direct detection of these elusive waves it is useful to take stock and consider the challenges that need to be met if we want this field to reach its full potential. This write-up provides a brief introduction to some of the key ideas and the current state-of-play, and lists a range of modelling questions that need to be considered in the future.

Andersson, N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

186

Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand  

SciTech Connect

There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Simultaneous Measurement of Ocean Winds and Waves with an Airborne Coherent Real Aperture Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coherent, X-band airborne radar has been developed to measure wind speed and direction simultaneously with directional wave spectra on the ocean. The coherent real aperture radar (CORAR) measures received power, mean Doppler shifts, and mean ...

William J. Plant; William C. Keller; Kenneth Hayes

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Wave Mechanics without Probability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of monochromatic electromagnetic waves in stationary media is shown to be ruled by a frequency dependent function, which we call Wave Potential, encoded in the structure of the Helmholtz equation. Contrary to the common belief that the very concept of "ray trajectory" is reserved to the eikonal approximation, a general and exact ray-based Hamiltonian treatment, reducing to the eikonal approximation in the absence of Wave Potential, shows that its presence induces a mutual, perpendicular ray-coupling, which is the one and only cause of any typically wave-like phenomenon, such as diffraction and interference. Recalling, then, that the time-independent Schroedinger and Klein-Gordon equations (associating stationary "matter waves" to mono-energetic particles) are themselves Helmholtz-like equations, the exact, ray-based treatment developed for classical electromagnetic waves is extended - without resorting to statistical concepts - to the exact, trajectory-based Hamiltonian dynamics of mono-energetic point-like particles, both in the non-relativistic and in the relativistic case. The trajectories turn out to be perpendicularly coupled, once more, by an exact, stationary, energy-dependent Wave Potential, coinciding in the form, but not in the physical meaning, with the statistical, time-varying, energy-independent "Quantum Potential" of Bohm's theory, which views particles, just like the standard Copenhagen interpretation, as traveling wave-packets. These results, together with the connection which is shown to exist between Wave Potential and Uncertainty Principle, suggest a novel, non-probabilistic interpretation of Wave Mechanics.

Adriano Orefice; Raffaele Giovanelli; Domenico Ditto

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

EU Metric Directive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... View EU Metric Directive Commission Services Working Document PDF ... of European Union (EU) Meeting on Metric Directives (2005); Packaging ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

190

Comparison of P-wave and S-wave data processed by DIP moveout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the major goals of seismic data processing is to produce an accurate image of the subsurface of the earth. Unfortunately, when dipping events or diffractions are present, or when velocities vary laterally, the normal-moveout (NMO) correction applied in common midpoint (CMP) stacking fails to convert even primary events on non-zero offset traces to true zero offset. Dip moveout (DMO) is a process that converts non-zerooffset data to true zero offset after NMO has been applied. Direct comparison of compressional (P) and shear (S) wave data in a fractured reservoir can show whether amplitude anomalies on the P-wave section are associated with the presence of gas or change of lithology. The P-wave and S-wave data selected for this study were shot in Burleson County, Texas. After processing, the P-wave and S-wave sections were interpreted. No gas-related DHf (direct hydrocarbon indicator) was seen in both sections. Comparison of both sections before and after DMO shows that DMO has helped imaging the fractures in the Austin Chalk and provided a clear image of the subsurface after migrating the DMO data. Major reflectors such as the Pecan Gap, "Top-of-the-Austin-Chalk", "Bottom-of-theAustin-Chalk", and Buda correlate well with seismic events on the synthetic seismogram which was generated from the sonic log of the Lancier Brinckman #1 well. The difference in depth between the sonic log and the P-wave seismic section is small. The sonic log depths are deeper than the P-wave seismic section depths. The top and bottom of the Austin Chalk reflectors on both sections display laterally varying amplitudes (surface locations 55 to 68). This region coincides with the high-oil production zone (fractured zone).

Al-Misnid, Abdulaziz Mugbel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Comparison of Directional Buoy and Fixed Platform Measurements Of Pacific Swell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the Datawell Directional Waverider and the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) 3-m discus buoy, widely used to measure the directional properties of surface gravity waves, are evaluated through comparisons to an array of six ...

W. C. O'Reilly; T. H. C. Herbers; R. J. Seymour; R. T. Guza

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wave Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

turn, rotates a turbine. Specially built seagoing vessels can also capture the energy of offshore waves. These floating platforms create electricity by funneling waves through...

193

Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Add description List of Wave Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveEnergy&oldid267203" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

194

Evaluation of a Wind-Wave System for Ensemble Tropical Cyclone Wave Forecasting. Part II: Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wind-wave forecast system, designed with the intention of generating unbiased ensemble wave forecasts for extreme wind events, is assessed. Wave hindcasts for 12 tropical cyclones (TCs) are forced using a wind analysis produced from a ...

Steven M. Lazarus; Samuel T. Wilson; Michael E. Splitt; Gary A. Zarillo

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

196

Magnetoacoustic shock waves in dissipative degenerate plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Quantum magnetoacoustic shock waves are studied in homogenous, magnetized, dissipative dense electron-ion plasma by using two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic (QMHD) model. The weak dissipation effects in the system are taken into account through kinematic viscosity of the ions. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation for magnetoacoustic wave propagating in the perpendicular direction to the external magnetic field in dense plasmas. The strength of magnetoacoustic shock is investigated with the variations in plasma density, magnetic field intensity, and ion kinematic viscosity of dense plasma system. The necessary condition for the existence of monotonic and oscillatory shock waves is also discussed. The numerical results are presented for illustration by using the data of astrophysical dense plasma situations such as neutron stars exist in the literature.

Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics (DPAM) PIEAS, P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

wave | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281559 Varnish cache server wave Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. Source Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Date Released December 05th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

198

Forced Trench Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general theory for forced barotropic long trench waves in the presence of linear bottom friction is presented. Two specific forcing mechanisms are considered: (i) transverse fluctuations in a western boundary current as it flows across a trench,...

Lawrence A. Mysak; Andrew J. Willmott

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

200

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Diffraction of surface wave on conducting rectangular wedge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffraction of a surface wave on a rectangular wedge with impedance faces is studied using the Sommerfeld-Malyuzhinets technique. An analog of Landau's bypass rule in the theory of plasma waves is introduced for selection of a correct branch of the Sommerfeld integral, and the exact solution is given in terms of imaginary error function. The formula derived is valid both in the near-field and far-wave zones. It is shown that a diffracted surface wave is completely scattered into freely propagating electromagnetic waves and neither reflected nor transmitted surface waves are generated in case of bare metals which have positive real part of surface impedance. The scattered waves propagate predominantly at a grazing angle along the direction of propagation of the incident surface wave and mainly in the upper hemisphere regarding the wedge face. The profile of radiated intensity is nonmonotonic and does not resemble the surface wave profile which exponentially evanesces with the distance from the wedge face. Comparison with experiments carried out in the terahertz spectral range at Novosibirsk free electron laser has shown a good agreement of the theory and the experiments.

Igor A. Kotelnikov; Vasily V. Gerasimov; Boris A. Knyazev

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Active Reflection Absorption for a Three Dimensional Multidirectional Wave Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to implement an accurate system that allows for absorption of reflected waves impinging to a wave maker (Active Reflection Absorption), it was required to apply a method to estimate properly the direction of arrival of the waves that does it in the fastest way possible. Our wavemaker control system has been prepared to handle an algorithm provided by Bosch-Rexroth where the wave angle estimation is practically locked to a very narrow frequency band (spatial gain-mixer). The system was evaluated with physical tests in a 3D wave basin for different conditions of reflected waves arriving with an angle to the wavemaker front, and acceptable performance has been found for the 3D ARA mode. However, for certain conditions over-compensation or sub-compensation can develop resulting in a poor absorption. This is mainly related to not being able to determine accurately the direction from which the reflected waves travel towards the wavemaker. The present work employed concepts found in the areas of antenna array signal processing and signal propagation, which were applied to this problem. This approach coupled naturally with our wavemaker system since it was prepared with 48 gages that can be employed in an array antenna fashion. A program was codified from an algorithm found in literature to calculate the Direction of Arrival (DOA) of the reflected waves. The focus for the testing of this program was with regular waves. The tests were conducted to validate the program with different angles of incidence and show that for regular waves the program was able to detect accurately the DOA of these in as few as 5 snapshots, with a minimum of 7 gages used as the antenna input. With data obtained directly from the control system of our wavemaker using regular waves, the program was able to determine the DOA. The computational burden of the algorithm is not significant in the case of regular waves. A modification of the program is required to analyze the DOA of reflected irregular waves, which could increase the computational burden. Actual implementation of this program to our control system depends on cooperation with Bosch-Rexroth.

Cruz Castro, Oscar

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD FROM ANALYSES OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD FROM ANALYSES OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This project aims to improve understanding of the subsurface fracture system in the Coso geothermal field, located in the east central California. We applied shear-wave splitting technique on a set of high quality, locally recorded microearthquake (MEQ) data. Four major fracture directions have been identified from the seismograms recorded by the permanent sixteen-station down-hole array: N10- 20W, NS, N20E, and N40-45E,

205

MHK Technologies/hyWave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hyWave hyWave < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage HyWave.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Wavegen subsidiary of Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Mutriku *MHK Projects/Wavegen Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The hyWave device rests directly on the seabed and is designed to operate in the near-shore environment in a nominal mean water depth of 15m. Optimum performance will be achieved when driven by a long ocean swell. The pneumatic power of the oscillating water column (OWC) is converted to electricity by a Wells generator and specially designed induction generators.

206

Principles Governing Departmental Directives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELEMENTS FROM: SAMUEL W. BODMA 4 SUBJECT: Principles Governing Departmental Directives The Department of Energy uses directives as its primary means to establish,...

207

directed acyclic word graph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and R. Verin, Direct Construction of Compact Directed Acyclic Word Graphs, 8th Annual Symposium, CPM 97, Aarhus, Denmark, 116-129, 1997. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

Tuck, J.L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Direct process for explosives  

SciTech Connect

A direct process of making ethylenediamine dinitrate through the reaction of ethylenediamine and ammonium nitrate.

Akst, Irving B. (1032 Duncan St., Pampa, TX 79065); Stinecipher, Mary M. (324 Connie St., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Expanding impulsive gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explicitly demonstrate that the known solutions for expanding impulsive spherical gravitational waves that have been obtained by a "cut and paste" method may be considered to be impulsive limits of the Robinson-Trautman vacuum type N solutions. We extend these results to all the generically distinct subclasses of these solutions in Minkowski, de Sitter and anti-de Sitter backgrounds. For these we express the solutions in terms of a continuous metric. Finally, we also extend the class of spherical shock gravitational waves to include a non-zero cosmological constant.

J. Podolsky; J. B. Griffiths

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ultrasonic shear wave couplant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL); Lanham, Ronald N. (Lockport, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ultrasonic shear wave couplant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

24 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 30, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2002 Diocotron Wave Echoes in a Pure Electron Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A second 4 tickler wave is then excited 500 s later [Fig. 1(d)] by applying a 20 V kick to four wall sectors separated azimuthally by 90 . The second pulse of Fig. 2 shows the time at which the 4 tickler wave is excited. This signal is not the 4 wave oscillation but rather a direct coupling of the tickler

California at San Diego, University of

214

Foreign Direct Investment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investment Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 June 2001 ii iii Contents Foreign Affiliates' Role in U.S. Energy Industry Operations ..............................................................................1 Foreign Direct Investment: The International Transactions Accounts ..............................................................8 U.S. Companies' Direct Investment Abroad in Energy ......................................................................................14 Conclusion...............................................................................................................................................................19

215

Wave–Turbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain wave are considered through an ensemble of high-resolution (essentially large-eddy simulation) wave-breaking calculations. Of particular interest are the turbulent heat and momentum fluxes ...

Craig C. Epifanio; Tingting Qian

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effects of Long Waves on Wind-Generated Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed to explain the observation made in several laboratory experiments that short wind-generated waves are suppressed by a train of long, mechanically generated waves. A sheltering mechanism is responsible for generation of the ...

Gang Chen; Stephen E. Belcher

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

MHK Technologies/Syphon Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Syphon Wave Generator Syphon Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Syphon Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Syphon Wave Generator is composed of a horizontal pipe containing a propeller driven generator mounted above the highest normal wave at high tide and two or more vertical pipes at least one at each end of the horizontal pipe Each vertical pipe must extend below the water surface at all times and have openings below the surface All the air must be removed from the pipe thus filling the unit completely with water When the crest of a wave reaches the first vertical pipe the water level will be higher at that pipe than at the second vertical pipe This causes water to flow up the first pipe and through the horizontal pipe thus turning the propeller and generator to produce electricity and then down the second vertical pipe due to the siphon effect When the crest of the wave moves to the second vertical pipe the water level is higher there than at the first pipe This will cause the water to flow up the second pipe and through the system in the opposite direction again prod

218

MHK Technologies/OCEANTEC Wave Energy Converter | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Energy Converter Wave Energy Converter < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OCEANTEC Wave Energy Converter.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization OCEANTEC Energias Marinas S L Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description OCEANTEC Marine Energy Company Ltd owned by Iberdrola and TECNALIA is developing a sensor for wave energy technology type Spanish attenuator Floating body oscillates due to wave excitation in its main DOF pitch Mooring system allows the body to weathervane so that it is faced to the predominant wave propagation direction Main advantage capture system completely encapsulated free of contact with sea water A flywheel continuously spins under the action of an electric motor Z The pitching motion of the WEC caused by wave action is transformed into an alternating precession in the longitudinal hull axis X A coupling device transforms this precession into an unidirectional rotation of higher frequency that is used to feed a conventional electric generator

219

Six Impossible Things: Fractional Charge From Laughlin's Wave Function  

SciTech Connect

The Laughlin's wave function is found to be the zero-energy ground state of a {delta}-function Hamiltonian. The finite negative value of the ground state energy which is 91 per cent of Wigner value, can be obtained only when Coulomb correlations are introduced. The Laughlin's wave function is of short range and it overlaps with that of the exact wave functions of small (number of electrons 2 or 5) systems. (i) It is impossible to obtain fractional charge from Laughlin's wave function. (ii) It is impossible to prove that the Laughlin's wave function gives the ground state of the Coulomb Hamiltonian. (iii) It is impossible to have particle-hole symmetry in the Laughlin's wave function. (iv) It is impossible to derive the value of m in the Laughlin's wave function. The value of m in {psi}{sub m} can not be proved to be 3 or 5. (v) It is impossible to prove that the Laughlin's state is incompressible because the compressible states are also likely. (vi) It is impossible for the Laughlin's wave function to have spin. This effort is directed to explain the experimental data of quantum Hall effect in GaAs/AlGaAs.

Shrivastava, Keshav N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

MHK Technologies/Multi Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Multi Absorbing Wave Energy Converter MAWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Leancon Wave Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Leancon Real Sea Test Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description MAWEC is an OWC wave energy converter that works differently from other OWCs in that it concurrently utilizes pressure and suck. This gives the wanted effect that the vertical force on the WEC is zero when the WEC stretches over more than one wave length. The device is V-shaped and oriented perpendicular to wave direction. The device consists of a number of vertical air tubes, and when a wave passes, air is pushed into a pressure channel that sucks air out of the suck channel. During one wave period each tube (120 in total) goes through a sequence where air is first pushed into a pressure channel when the wave is rising and is later sucked from the pressure channel when the wave is falling. In this situation there is constant pressure in the pressure channel and the air flow through the turbines is constant.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Pulsed wave interconnect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulsed wave interconnect is proposed for global interconnect applications. Signals are represented by localized wavepackets that propagate along the interconnect lines at the local speed of light to trigger the receivers. Energy consumption is reduced ... Keywords: CMOS, VLSI, high-speed interconnect, nonlinear transmission line, pulse compression, soliton, wafer-scale-integration

Pingshan Wang; Gen Pei; Edwin Chih-Chuan Kan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Deflagration Wave Profiles  

SciTech Connect

Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Distinguishing Propagating Waves and Standing Modes: An Internal Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines high-frequency (0.1-0.5 cph) internal waves, waves previously characterized by the Garrett and Munk spectral fits (GM72, GM75, GM79) as being vertically symmetric propagating waves (or equivalently “smeared” standing modes—...

M. Benno Blumenthal; Melbourne G. Briscoe

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Wave Activity Diagnostics Applied to Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave activity diagnostics are calculated for four different baroclinic wave life cycles, including the LC1 and LC2 cases studied by Thorncroft, Hoskins, and McIntyre. The wave activity is a measure of the disturbance relative to some zonally ...

Gudrun Magnusdottir; Peter H. Haynes

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Wave Breaking Dissipation in the Wave-Driven Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If wave breaking modifies the Lagrangian fluid paths by inducing an uncertainty in the orbit itself and this uncertainty on wave motion time scales is observable as additive noise, it is shown that within the context of a wave–current interaction ...

Juan M. Restrepo

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

MHK Technologies/Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Generation Buoy Power Generation Buoy < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Columbia Power Technologies Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Direct drive point absorber In 2005 Oregon State University entered into an exclusive license agreement with Columbia Power Technologies to jointly develop a direct drive wave energy conversion device Designed to be anchored 2 5 miles off the Oregon coast in 130 feet of water it uses the rise and fall of ocean waves to generate electricity Mooring Configuration Anchored

229

Sodium Nightglow and Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oscillations in intensity of NaD nightglow attributed to mesospheric gravity waves have bean studied. Fractional atmospheric density perturbations have been obtained by means of the linear gravity waves theory of Hines. Values of other parameters ...

A. Molina

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Diffusive Transport by Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple conceptual model of the relationship between advective transport by breaking waves and diffusive transport is derived. line model postulates that the displacement of fluid parcels by a breaking wave is analogous to molecular diffusion (...

Kenneth P. Bowman

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Spectral Wave–Turbulence Decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of wave–turbulence decomposition is introduced, for which the only instrument required is one high-frequency pointwise velocity sensor. This is a spectral method that assumes equilibrium turbulence and no wave–turbulence interaction. ...

Jeremy D. Bricker; Stephen G. Monismith

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Non-spectral methods of analysis of the internal gravity waves measurements in ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to the presentation of the non-spectral methods of analysis of the natural measurements of the internal gravity waves in the ocean with the purpose to determine characteristics of the wave-trains composing the measured field, the forms and parameters of the ocean along the pass of these wave-trains propagation. The problem of the analysis of the data of the natural measurements of the internal waves with the purpose to separate the single wave-trains from the measured field, and on this basis to determine the characteristics of these wave-trains, to receive the information on the sources of excitation of the waves, and the information on the properties of the ocean along the pass of the waves propagation, is directly connected with the problems of the wave dynamics. The basis of the offered algorithms of the analysis is the supposition, that the measured wave field represents the sum of the plane wave-trains having the certain speed and directions of propagation. Transformation of the pac...

Bulatov, Vitaly A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Wave Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

D. Van Eester; E. Lerche

234

Gravitational waves and fundamental physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give an overview of the motivations for gravitational-wave research, concentrating on the aspects related to ``fundamental'' physics.

Michele Maggiore

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Gravitational Wave Sources: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With full?sensitivity operation of the first generation of gravitational wave detectors now just around the corner

Bernard F. Schutz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy Loss by Breaking waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the frequency of wind wave breaking in deep water are combined with laboratory estimates of the rate of energy loss a from single breaking wave to infer the net rate of energy transfer to the mixed layer from breaking waves, as a ...

S. A. Thorpe

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Direct Photons at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The PHENIX experiment has measured direct photons in ? sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions and p+p collisions. The fraction of photons due to direct

Saskia Mioduszewski; Phenix Collaboration

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Direct Loan Program (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Connecticut Development Authority’s Direct Loan Program provides direct senior and subordinated loans and mezzanine investments to companies creating or maintaining jobs. Up to $20,000 per job...

239

Direct process for explosives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A direct process of making ethylenediamine dinitrate through the reaction of ethylenediamine and ammonium nitrate is described.

Akst, I.B.; Stinecipher, M.M.

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays  

SciTech Connect

This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys������� that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate high-resolution (fine scale, very near-field) fluid/structure interaction simulations of buoy motions, as well as array-scale, phase-resolving wave scattering simulations. These modeling efforts will utilize state-of-the-art research quality models, which have not yet been brought to bear on this complex problem of large array wave/structure interaction problem.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Haller, Merrick C.; Ozkan-Haller, H. Tuba

2013-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Long-Wave Trapping by Oceanic Ridges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long waves are affected by bottom topography and under certain conditions may be trapped along topographical contours which then act as wave guides transmitting wave energy for great distances with little loss. This study examines waves trapped ...

Richard Paul Shaw; Wayne Neu

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Wave guide impedance matching method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for modifying the end portion of a wave guide, whether hollow or solid, carrying electromagnetic, acoustic or optical energy, to produce a gradual impedance change over the length of the end portion, comprising the cutting of longitudinal, V-shaped grooves that increase in width and depth from beginning of the end portion of the wave guide to the end of the guide so that, at the end of the guide, no guide material remains and no surfaces of the guide as modified are perpendicular to the direction of energy flow. For hollow guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the interior surface; for solid guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the exterior surface. One or more resistive, partially conductive or nonconductive sleeves can be placed over the exterior of the guide and through which the grooves are cut to smooth the transition to free space.

Kronberg, James W. (Beech Island, SC)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Wave guide impedance matching method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for modifying the end portion of a wave guide, whether hollow and solid, carrying electromagnetic, acoustic or optical energy, to produce a gradual impedance change over the length of the end portion, comprising the cutting of longitudinal, V-shaped grooves that increase in width and depth from beginning of the end portion of the wave guide to the end of the guide so that, at the end of the guide, no guide material remains and no surfaces of the guide as modified are perpendicular to the direction of energy flow. For hollow guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the interior surface; for solid guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the exterior surface. One or more resistive, partially conductive or nonconductive sleeves can be placed over the exterior of the guide and through which the grooves are cut to smooth the transition to free space.

Kronberg, J.W.

1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

245

DNA waves and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

The influence of waves . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing interest in offshore wind resources, it has become increasingly important to establish and refine models for the interaction between wind and waves in order to obtain accurate models for the sea surface roughness. The simple Charnock relation that has been applied for open sea conditions does not work well in the shallow water near-coastal areas that are important for offshore wind energy. A model for the surface roughness of the sea has been developed based on this concept, using an expression for the Charnock constant as a function of wave age [1], and then relating the wave `age' to the distance to the nearest upwind coastline. The data used in developing these models originated partly from analysis of data from the Vindeby site, partly from previously published results. The scatter in the data material was considerable and consequently there is a need to test these models further by analysing data from sites exhibiting varying distances to the coast. Results from such analysis of recent data are presented for sites with distances to the coast varying from 10km to several hundreds of km. The model shows a good agreement also with this data.

Bernhard Lange; Jørgen Højstrup

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Modulational instability, wave breaking and formation of large scale dipoles in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present Letter we use the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equation for a two-phase flow (water and air) to study the dynamics of the modulational instability of free surface waves and its contribution to the interaction between ocean and atmosphere. If the steepness of the initial wave is large enough, we observe a wave breaking and the formation of large scale dipole structures in the air. Because of the multiple steepening and breaking of the waves under unstable wave packets, a train of dipoles is released and propagate in the atmosphere at a height comparable with the wave length. The amount of energy dissipated by the breaker in water and air is considered and, contrary to expectations, we observe that the energy dissipation in air is larger than the one in the water. Possible consequences on the wave modelling and on the exchange of aerosols and gases between air and water are discussed.

Iafrati, A; Onorato, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Modulational instability, wave breaking and formation of large scale dipoles in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present Letter we use the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equation for a two-phase flow (water and air) to study the dynamics of the modulational instability of free surface waves and its contribution to the interaction between ocean and atmosphere. If the steepness of the initial wave is large enough, we observe a wave breaking and the formation of large scale dipole structures in the air. Because of the multiple steepening and breaking of the waves under unstable wave packets, a train of dipoles is released and propagate in the atmosphere at a height comparable with the wave length. The amount of energy dissipated by the breaker in water and air is considered and, contrary to expectations, we observe that the energy dissipation in air is larger than the one in the water. Possible consequences on the wave modelling and on the exchange of aerosols and gases between air and water are discussed.

A. Iafrati; A. Babanin; M. Onorato

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressible Turbulence Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material Interfaces Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and Material Interfaces Lele.jpg Alternate Title: High-fidelity simulations of supersonic turbulent mixing and combustion Key Challenges: Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of isotropic turbulence interacting with a normal shock wave and turbulent multi-material mixing in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) Why it Matters: Shock/turbulence interaction is a fundamental phenomenon in fluid mechanics that occurs in a wide range of interesting problems in various disciplines, including supernova explosions, inertial confinement fusion, hypersonic flight and propulsion, and shock wave lithotripsy. Accomplishments: A novel solution-adaptive algorithm that applies different

250

Sensitivity Studies for Third-Generation Gravitational Wave Observatories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced gravitational wave detectors, currently under construction, are expected to directly observe gravitational wave signals of astrophysical origin. The Einstein Telescope, a third-generation gravitational wave detector, has been proposed in order to fully open up the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy. In this article we describe sensitivity models for the Einstein Telescope and investigate potential limits imposed by fundamental noise sources. A special focus is set on evaluating the frequency band below 10Hz where a complex mixture of seismic, gravity gradient, suspension thermal and radiation pressure noise dominates. We develop the most accurate sensitivity model, referred to as ET-D, for a third-generation detector so far, including the most relevant fundamental noise contributions.

S. Hild; M. Abernathy; F. Acernese; P. Amaro-Seoane; N. Andersson; K. Arun; F. Barone; B. Barr; M. Barsuglia; M. Beker; N. Beveridge; S. Birindelli; S. Bose; L. Bosi; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; T. Bulik; E. Calloni; G. Cella; E. Chassande Mottin; S. Chelkowski; A. Chincarini; J. Clark; E. Coccia; C. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; S. Danilishin; K. Danzmann; R. De Salvo; T. Dent; R. De Rosa; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Virgilio; M. Doets; V. Fafone; P. Falferi; R. Flaminio; J. Franc; F. Frasconi; A. Freise; D. Friedrich; P. Fulda; J. Gair; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; K. Glampedakis; C. Gräf; M. Granata; H. Grote; G. Guidi; A. Gurkovsky; G. Hammond; M. Hannam; J. Harms; D. Heinert; M. Hendry; I. Heng; E. Hennes; J. Hough; S. Husa; S. Huttner; G. Jones; F. Khalili; K. Kokeyama; K. Kokkotas; B. Krishnan; T. G. F. Li; M. Lorenzini; H. Lück; E. Majorana; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; M. Mantovani; I. Martin; C. Michel; Y. Minenkov; N. Morgado; S. Mosca; B Mours; H. Müller-Ebhardt; P. Murray; R. Nawrodt; J. Nelson; R. Oshaughnessy; C. D. Ott; C. Palomba; A. Paoli; G. Parguez; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; L. Pinard; W. Plastino; R. Poggiani1; P. Popolizio; M. Prato; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. Rabeling; P. Rapagnani; J. Read; T. Regimbau; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; F. Ricci; F. Richard; A. Rocchi; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Santamaría; B. Sassolas; B. Sathyaprakash; R. Schnabel; C. Schwarz; P. Seidel; A. Sintes; K. Somiya; F. Speirits; K. Strain; S Strigin; P. Sutton; S. Tarabrin; A. Thüring; J. van den Brand; M. van Veggel; C. van den Broeck; A. Vecchio; J. Veitch; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; S. Vyatchanin; B. Willke; G. Woan; K. Yamamoto

2010-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Non-principal surface waves in deformed incompressible materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Stroh formalism is applied to the analysis of infinitesimal surface wave propagation in a statically, finitely and homogeneously deformed isotropic half-space. The free surface is assumed to coincide with one of the principal planes of the primary strain, but a propagating surface wave is not restricted to a principal direction. A variant of Taziev's technique [Sov. Phys. Acoust. 35 (1989) 535] is used to obtain an explicit expression of the secular equation for the surface wave speed, which possesses no restrictions on the form of the strain energy function. Albeit powerful, this method does not produce a unique solution and additional checks are necessary. However, a class of materials is presented for which an exact secular equation for the surface wave speed can be formulated. This class includes the well-known Mooney-Rivlin model. The main results are illustrated with several numerical examples.

Michel Destrade; Melanie Ottenio; Alexey V. Pichugin; Graham A. Rogerson

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

252

MHK Technologies/LUKAS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LUKAS LUKAS < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage LUKAS.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kneider Innovations Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The device according to the invention aims at supplying a means of Navigation appropriate clean easy to use it can be an additional means of navigation This invention allows navigation by converting the kinetic energy of movements the oscillations right left an or front back or high down to a uni directional one way horizontal push These energies are free renewable but still undeveloped yet in navigations Mooring Configuration Does not indicate

253

Carderock Tow Tank 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 574.9 Beam(m) 15.5 Depth(m) 6.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Carriage 2 is located on this basin Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 10.3 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Length(m) 12.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Irregular waves with a spectrum resembling typical ocean wave patterns with appropriate scale reductions Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach The wave absorber spans the full width of the basin at the end opposite the wavemaker dome, the absorbers are a discontinuous 12 degree slope type made up of 12 permeable layers of rectangular precast concrete bar panels resting on an impermeable concrete slab supported by a structural steel framework, the center section of the absorber is of wood construction & can be raised and lowered as a unit to provide model access to and from the fitting-out dry dock located at the end of the basin.

254

The Estimation of Wind-Wave Generation in a Discrete Spectral Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of wind-wave generation using a new discrete spectral model is compared to Hasselmann et al.'s (1976) parametric model and to models driven primarily by direct transfer of energy from the atmosphere into the surface waves. The main ...

Donald T. Resio

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

MHK Technologies/Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oregon State University OSU Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/OSU Direct Drive Power Generation Buoys Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description When the coil experiences a changing magnetic field created by the heaving magnets voltage is generated Technology Dimensions

256

WAVE DELAYING STRUCTURE FOR RECTANGULAR WAVE-GUIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to wave-guides and in particular describes wave delaying structure located within a wave-guide. The disclosed wave-guide has an elongated fiat metal sheet arranged in a central plane of the guide and formed with a series of transverse inductive slots such that each face presents an inductive impedance to the guide. The sheet is thickened in the area between slots to increase the self capacity of the slots. Experimental results indicate that in a wave-guide loaded in accordance with the invention the guided wavelength changes more slowly as the air wavelength is changed than the guided wavelength does in wave-guides loaded by means of corrugations.

Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Dain, J.

1956-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

CHRISTOPHNIEMANN A new wave of start-ups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHRISTOPHNIEMANN 20 INNOVATION A new wave of start-ups wants to install rooftop solar panels. Installing a rooftop ar- ray of solar panels large enough to produce all of the energy required by a building a pool of cash to pay for the solar panels. Directly or indirectly, homeowners buy the electricity

Kammen, Daniel M.

258

Direct Photons at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PHENIX experiment has measured direct photons in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV Au+Au collisions and p+p collisions. The fraction of photons due to direct production in Au+Au collisions is shown as a function of $p_T$ and centrality. This measurement is compared with expectation from pQCD calculations. Other possible sources of direct photons are discussed.

S. Mioduszewski; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

A survey of current issues in inverse problem theory as applied to thermal wave imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recovery of optical and thermal property depth profiles using thermal waves relies directly on the application of inverse problem theory to the photothermal data. A general strategy for assessing and interrelating existing works in the field is presented.

J. F. Power

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Primary Nonlinear Dynamics of Modal and Nonmodal Perturbations of Monochromatic Inertia–Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The breaking of an inertia–gravity wave (IGW), initiated by its leading normal modes (NMs) or singular vectors (SVs), and the resulting small-scale eddies are investigated by means of direct numerical simulations of a Boussinesq fluid ...

Ulrich Achatz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Gravity Wave – Fine Structure Interactions, Part 2: Energy Dissipation Evolutions, Statistics, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fritts et al. (2013) employ four direct numerical simulations (DNS) to examine the dynamics and energetics of idealized gravity wave – fine structure (GW-FS) interactions. That study, and this companion paper, were motivated by the ubiquity of ...

David C. Fritts; Ling Wang

262

A Study of the Wavenumber Spectra of Short Water Waves in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial measurements of capillary-gravity waves in the ocean were obtained using a scanning slope sensor mounted on a free-drifting buoy intended to minimize the flow disturbance. The data provide direct calculation of the wavenumber spectra of ...

Paul A. Hwang; Serhad Atakturk; A. Sletten; Dennis B. Trizna

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modal and Nonmodal Perturbations of Monochromatic High-Frequency Gravity Waves: Primary Nonlinear Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary nonlinear dynamics of high-frequency gravity waves (HGWs) perturbed by their most prominent normal modes (NMs) or singular vectors (SVs) in a rotating Boussinesq fluid have been studied by direct numerical simulations (DNSs), with ...

Ulrich Achatz

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Critical Level Reflection and the Resonant Growth of Nonlinear Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the evolution of a field of internal waves launched by stratified flow over symmetric topography in mean flows which reverse direction at some height above the surface. With the gradient Richardson number at this “critical level” in ...

T. L. Clark; W. R. Peltier

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Wave-Driven Wind Jets in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between ocean surface waves and the overlying wind leads to a transfer of momentum across the air–sea interface. Atmospheric and oceanic models typically allow for momentum transfer to be directed only downward, from the ...

Kirsty E. Hanley; Stephen E. Belcher

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors Performances for Lamb Waves based Structural Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the through-thickness displacements and the electrical field as a continuous assembly of linear layerwise; hence, current interest is directed to the usage of lamb waves for revealing the damage in composite, such as the upper and lower

Giurgiutiu, Victor

267

Wave- and Wind-Driven Flow in Water of Finite Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors first derive both Coriolis-induced and viscosity-induced stresses for arbitrary water depth and arbitrary wave direction. Opportunity is taken here to succinctly and rigorously derive the Longuet-Higgins virtual tangential stress due ...

Zhigang Xu; A. J. Bowen

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Analysis of Gravity Waves during the POLINAT Experiment and Some Consequences for Stratosphere–Troposphere Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of horizontal wind speed and direction obtained during the Pollution from Aircraft Emissions in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor experiment are used to identify some waves propagating near the tropopause level. The variation ...

M. Moustaoui; H. Teitelbaum; P. F. J. van Velthoven; H. Kelder

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gravimagnetic shock waves and gravitational-wave experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Causes of the unsatisfactory condition of the gravitational-wave experiments are discussed and a new outlook at the detection of gravitational waves of astrophysical origin is proposed. It is shown that there are strong grounds for identifying the so-called giant pulses in the pulsar NP 0532 radiation with gravimagnetic shock waves (GMSW) excited in the neutron star magnetosphere by sporadic gravitational radiation of this pulsar.

Yu. G. Ignatyev

2011-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

Direct Photons at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief overview of direct-photon measurements in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is given. Direct-photon yields for pT > 4 GeV/c and photon-hadron azimuthal correlations were determined with the aid of an electromagnetic calorimeter. By detecting e+e- pairs from the internal conversion of virtual photons direct-photon yields were measured between 1 direct-photon yield in this range.

Klaus Reygers; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Direct energy conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

The potential importance of direct energy conversion to the long-term development of fusion power is discussed with stress on the possibility of alleviating waste heat problems. This is envisioned to be crucial for any central power station in the 21st century. Two approaches to direct conversion, i.e., direct collection and magnetic expansion, are reviewed. While other techniques may be possible, none have received sufficient study to allow evaluation. It is stressed that, due to the intimate connection between the type of fusion fuel, the confinement scheme, direct conversion, and the coupling technique, all four element must be optimized simultaneously for high overall efficiency.

Miley, G.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Riding the Waves: Harnessing Ocean Wave Energy through ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The opportunities for ocean wave power to become a new, reliable and clean source of renewable energy will be discussed, as well as activities of ...

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

273

MHK Technologies/CETO Wave Energy Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Energy Technology Wave Energy Technology < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage CETO Wave Energy Technology.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/CETO La Reunion *MHK Projects/CETO3 Garden Island *MHK Projects/Perth Wave Energy Project PWEP Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing & Demonstration & Operation Technology Description The CETO system distinguishes itself from other wave energy devices by operating out of sight and being anchored to the ocean floor. Each CETO unit consists of a pump unit moored to the ocean floor and connected to a submerged Buoyant Actuator via a tether. The Buoyant Actuator moves in an orbital motion, in harmony with the wave, capturing the power of the passing waves. The Buoyant Actuator is connected to a tether (marine rope) that creates a vertical upward force which actuates the seabed mounted piston pump. This force pressurises fluid in the CETO system. The high pressure fluid is then sent ashore via a subsea pipeline. Onshore the fluid passes through a standard hydroelectric turbine to generate zero-emission electricity and/or through a reverse osmosis plant to directly create zero-emission desalinated water (replacing greenhouse gas emitting electrically driven pumps usually required for such plants). The fluid is then re-circulated at low-pressure to the CETO units offshore creating a closed-loop system. The generation capacity of CETO projects is scalable. To increase the project capacity additional units can be added offshore and connected back to a larger power house onshore.

274

Iterated multidimensional wave conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

Brizard, A. J. [Dept. Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D. [Dept. Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Kaufman, A. N. [LBNL and Physics Dept., UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, A. S. [T-5, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zobin, N. [Dept. Mathematics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Gravity Waves in the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present numerical simulations of penetrative convection and gravity wave excitation in the Sun. Gravity waves are self-consistently generated by a convective zone overlying a radiative interior. We produce power spectra for gravity waves in the radiative region as well as estimates for the energy flux of gravity waves below the convection zone. We calculate a peak energy flux in waves below the convection zone to be three orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates for m=1. The simulations show that the linear dispersion relation is a good approximation only deep below the convective-radiative boundary. Both low frequency propagating gravity waves as well as higher frequency standing modes are generated; although we find that convection does not continually drive the standing g-mode frequencies.

Tamara M. Rogers; Gary A. Glatzmaier

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

Wind Direction Meander at a Coastal Site during Onshore Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 700 cases of wind direction meander occurred in a three-year period during onshore flow at a Long Island coastal site. Most appeared to be caused by internal gravity waves but some by roll vortices. Each case was documented with respect to ...

Gilbert S. Raynor; Janet V. Hayes

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

direct_deposit_111609  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: DO NOT complete this form until you are ready to submit it to the Payroll Department. DIRECT DEPOSIT REQUEST Directions: 1. Provide required information neatly, legibly; 2. If Checking Account Direct Deposit, include a voided check. a. DO NOT submit a deposit slip! 3. If Savings Account Direct Deposit, include a copy of savings card. 4. Sign this form; 5. Inter-office mail it to Craft Payroll at "P238." DIRECT DEPOSITION AUTHORIZATION I hereby authorize Los Alamos National Laboratory, hereinafter called The Laboratory, to initiate credit entries and, if necessary, debit entries and adjustments for any credit entries in error to my account listed on this form. If deposit is for:

278

Directions and Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directions & Maps Directions & Maps Plan Your Visit Visit About the Museum Museum Hours Directions & Maps When to Visit Arrange for a Visit Around Los Alamos Contact Us invisible utility element Directions and Maps Aerial View of Los Alamos Aerial approach to the Los Alamos airport Where we're located Los Alamos (elevation 7,355 feet) is perched high atop the Pajarito Plateau in the Jemez Mountains, 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe. The Bradbury Science Museum is located in downtown Los Alamos at the corner of Central Avenue and 15th Street. If you're driving here and using GPS navigation, our address is 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos, NM 87544. How to get here From Albuquerque take I-25 north to Santa Fe (take NM 599 for most direct route), then US 84/285 north to Pojoaque. At Pojoaque take the NM 502 exit

279

Method for effecting directional nuclear fracturing  

SciTech Connect

A method for localizing and directing energy from an underground nuclear explosion includes the steps of providing an acoustical blocking zone on at least one side of the contemplated explosion situs to limit transmission of elastic waves to the earth on the opposite sides of the acoustical blocking zone, then detonating the nuclear explosive at the situs. The acoustical blocking zone is a zone of material which is at variance in its acoustical characteristics with respect to the adjacent earth in which it is located. (5 claims)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1972-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

280

Shock waves in thermal lensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review experimental investigation on spatial shock waves formed by the self-defocusing action of a laser beam propagation in a disordered thermal nonlinear media.

Gentilini, S; DeRe, E; Conti, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gravitational Wave Sources from New Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forthcoming advances in direct gravitational wave detection from kilohertz to nanohertz frequencies have unique capabilities to detect signatures from or set meaningful constraints on a wide range of new cosmological phenomena and new fundamental physics. A brief survey is presented of the post-inflationary gravitational radiation backgrounds predicted in cosmologies that include intense new classical sources such as first-order phase transitions, late-ending inflation, and dynamically active mesoscopic extra dimensions. LISA will provide the most sensitive direct probes of such phenomena near TeV energies or Terascale. LISA will also deeply probe the broadband background, and possibly bursts, from loops of cosmic superstrings predicted to form in current models of brane inflation.

Craig J. Hogan

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wave-coherent airflow and critical layers over ocean waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of coherent measurements of winds and waves from data collected during the ONR HiRes program from R/P FLIP off the coast of northern California in June 2010 is presented. A suite of wind and wave measuring systems was deployed to ...

Laurent Grare; Luc Lenain; W. Kendall Melville

283

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accurate prediction of wave runup on deepwater offshore platform columns is of great importance for design engineers. Although linear predictive models are commonly used in the design and analysis process, many of the important effects are of higher order, and thus can only be accounted for by complex nonlinear models that better reflect the physics of the problem. This study presents a two-parameter Weibull distribution function that utilizes empirical coefficients to model the surface wave runup. Laboratory measurements of irregular waves interfering with vertical platform cylinders were used to obtain the Weibull coefficients necessary for the analytical model. Six data sets with different configurations where the wave elevation was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis and spectral analysis were utilized to characterize and interpret the time series data. The analysis focused on interpreting the tails of the probability distributions by carefully fitting the analytical model to the measured model data. The main conclusion of this study is that the two-parameter Weibull model can be used to accurately model the wave runup on platform cylinders for the experimental data investigated in this study.

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chase Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chase Tow Tank Chase Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Chase Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 36.6 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 2.4 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 20.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.1 Wave Period Range(s) 3.1 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView-based data acquistion software/components. Optical measurement system for observing kinematics of a model under test in the wave mode.

285

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

286

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spar Buoy Engine Spar Buoy Engine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Functional Design Engineering Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A long period spar buoy supports a subsurface flow augmentor The augmentor directs water from the wave s submarine flow field to a free prime mover piston The prime mover is decoupled from the machine s PTO during times in the wave s cycle when there is little power available for conversion Wave energy is stored in the device until the is enough flow magnetude that power take off can efficiently take place Power can be taken off as high pressure water crankshaft torque or directly as DC electricity

287

Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electromagnetic wave method for mapping subterranean earth formations  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a method for remotely mapping subterranean coal beds prior to and during in situ gasification operations. This method is achieved by emplacing highly directional electromagnetic wave transmitters and receivers in bore holes penetrating the coal beds and then mapping the anomalies surrounding each bore hole by selectively rotating and vertically displacing the directional transmitter in a transmitting mode within the bore hole, and thereafter, initiating the gasification of the coal at bore holes separate from those containing the transmitters and receivers and then utilizing the latter for monitoring the burn front as it progresses toward the transmitters and receivers.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV); Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Balanis, Constantine A. (Morgantown, WV)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Surface Wind Direction Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Common large shifts of wind direction in the weak-wind nocturnal boundary layer are poorly understood and are not adequately captured by numerical models and statistical parameterizations. The current study examines 15 datasets representing a ...

Larry Mahrt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

2013 FCMN Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... $100 (one way). Driving directions: Take I-95S to Exit 4B towards Washington.Merge onto I-495 to Exit 27 towards Silver Spring.Slight right onto ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

Direct nuclear pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

Miley, George H. (Champagne, IL); Wells, William E. (Urbana, IL); DeYoung, Russell J. (Hampton, VA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Maps & Directions | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maps & Directions ORNL is located in Roane County, Tennessee, about 7 miles from the center of the city of Oak Ridge and about 25 miles from the McGhee Tyson Airport near...

293

Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12 Relativity? · What are some of the consequences of GR? · What are Black Holes like and do they exist? · What? · What are Black Holes like and do they exist? · What can we learn from Gravity Waves? · To do all

Cook, Greg

295

Ocean Tidal and Wave Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First published in 2000, the annual Renewable Energy Technical Assessment Guide (TAG-RE) provides a consistent basis for evaluating the economic feasibility of renewable generation technologies. This excerpt from the 2005 TAG-RE addresses ocean tidal and wave energy conversion technologies, which offer promise for converting the significant energy potential available in ocean tidal currents and waves to electricity in the future.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Evolution of Persistent Wave Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the near-field leg of the Hawaiian Ocean-Mixing Experiment (HOME-NF), short, steep surface wave groups were observed that elicited strong group-forced responses in the wave-filtered surface current field, as reported by Smith. Some of ...

Jerome A. Smith; Coralie Brulefert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear power plants. However, an evi- dent lack of knowledge in the field had demanded for a detaileds & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number

298

Gravitational Waves II: Emitting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the basic equations that predict the emission of gravitational waves according to the Einstein gravitation theory to calculate the luminosities and the amplitudes of the waves generated by binary stars, pulsations of neutron stars, wobbling of deformed neutron stars, oscillating quadrupoles, rotating bars and collapsing and bouncing cores of supernovas. This paper was written to graduate and postgraduate students of Physics.

M. Cattani

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Outline Development of Direct PCR Benefits of Direct PCR ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 Direct PCR Amplification of STR Loci: Protocols and Performance ... Benefits of direct PCR • Collection media: FTA and 903 paper ...

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Nonlinear Landau Damping Rate of a Driven Plasma Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this Letter, we discuss the concept of the nonlinear Landau damping rate, {nu}, of a driven electron plasma wave, and provide a very simple, practical, analytic formula for {nu} which agrees very well with results inferred from Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering. {nu} actually is more complicated an operator than a plain damping rate, and it may only be seen as such because it assumes almost constant values before abruptly dropping to 0. The decrease of {nu} to 0 is moreover shown to occur later when the wave amplitude varies in the direction transverse to its propagation.

Benisti, D; Strozzi, D J; Gremillet, L; Morice, O

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

Williams, Jeremiah D. [Physics Department, Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio 45504 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Solar off-limb line widths: Alfven waves, ion-cyclotron waves, and preferential heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alfven waves and ion-cyclotron absorption of high-frequency waves are frequently brought into models devoted to coronal heating and fast solar-wind acceleration. Signatures of ion-cyclotron resonance have already been observed in situ in the solar wind (HELIOS spacecrafts) and, recently, in the upper corona (UVCS/SOHO remote-sensing results). We propose a method to constrain both the Alfven wave amplitude and the preferential heating induced by ion-cyclotron resonance, above a partially developed polar coronal hole observed with the SUMER/SOHO spectrometer. The instrumental stray light contribution is first substracted from the spectra. By supposing that the non-thermal velocity is related to the Alfven wave amplitude, it is constrained through a density diagnostic and the gradient of the width of the Mg X 625 A line. The temperatures of several coronal ions, as functions of the distance above the limb, are then determined by substracting the non-thermal component to the observed line widths. The effect of stray light explains the apparent decrease with height in the width of several spectral lines, this decrease usually starting about 0.1-0.2 Rs above the limb. This result rules out any direct evidence of damping of the Alfven waves, often suggested by other authors. We also find that the ions with the smallest charge-to-mass ratios are the hottest ones at a fixed altitude and that they are subject to a stronger heating, as compared to the others, between 57" and 102" above the limb. This constitutes a serious clue to ion-cyclotron preferential heating.

L. Dolla; J. Solomon

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

303

MHK Technologies/Direct Energy Conversion Method DECM | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conversion Method DECM Conversion Method DECM < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Direct Energy Conversion Method DECM.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Trident Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/TE4 Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Description The Direct Energy Conversion Method DECM device has four major components 1 linear generators that convert straight line mechanical motion directly into electricity 2 floats placed in the sea to capture wave energy through a rising and falling action which drives linear generators resulting in the immediate generation of electricity 3 a sea platform used to support the floats and generators and 4 a conventional anchoring system to moor the rig

304

Second Harmonic Resonance for Equatorial Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple, exact analytical conditions for second harmonic resonance between equatorial waves are derived. Such resonance can occur only between two Rossby waves or two westward travelling gravity waves. It is shown that regardless of whether the ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

On the Diurnal Variation of Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal variation of mountain waves and wave drag associated with flow past mesoscale ridges has been examined using the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) and an analytical boundary layer (BL) model. The wave drag ...

Qingfang Jiang; James D. Doyle

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effect of Nonlinearity on Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear limit of two-dimensional gravity waves in an incompressible, inviscid and stably stratified atmosphere is studied. The three-wave resonant interaction theory indicates an energy cascade from a vertically propagating wave (...

Mostafa M. Ibrahim

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Wind Wave Growth at Short Fetch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave wire data from the large wind wave tank of the Ocean Engineering Laboratory at the University of California, Santa Barbara, are analyzed, and comparisons are made with published data collected in four other wave tanks. The behavior of wind ...

T. Lamont-Smith; T. Waseda

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nonlinear Wave Statistics in a Focal Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the combined effects of refraction and nonlinearity on the evolution of ocean surface wave statistics are considered and possible implications for the likelihood of extreme waves, also known as freak or rogue waves, are examined. A ...

T. T. Janssen; T. H. C. Herbers

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Observations of Breaking Surface Wave Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breaking surface waves were observed during the Surface Wave Process Program with a novel acoustical instrument that makes use of underwater ambient sound to track individual breaking events. The spatial and temporal statistics of braking waves ...

Li Ding; David M. Farmer

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Topographic Waves Generated by a Transient Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of linear mountain waves is generally equated with steady-state stationary waves. This essentially means that the absolute horizontal phase velocity of mountain waves is zero and that their momentum flux profile is independent of ...

François Lott; Hector Teitelbaum

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Interpreting Stationary Wave Nonlinearity in Barotropic Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stationary wave nonlinearity describes the self-interaction of stationary waves and is important in maintaining the zonally asymmetric atmospheric general circulation. However, the dynamics of stationary wave nonlinearity, which is often ...

Lei Wang; Paul J. Kushner

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Direct observation of a magnetic Bose glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bose glass is a novel state of matter that emerges in systems of interacting bosons in the presence of quenched disorder. At sufficiently low temperatures, disorder-free bosons are subject to so-called Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). BEC can involve atoms in liquid 4He, laser-cooled ions in magnetic traps,2 Cooper pairs in superconductors, or magnons in magnetic systems. Due to peculiarities of Bose statistics, particles lose their individuality and occupy a unique quantum-mechanical state. The wave function of this condensate establishes long-range quantum phase coherence across a macroscopic sample. This, in turn, spawns unique quantum phenomena such as superfluity,5 Josephson effect6 and vortex matter. For repulsive bosons, quenched disorder disrupts the condensate and interferes with phase coherence. The result is a peculiar glassy state with only short-range phase correlations. While some experimental evidence of this was found in ultracold atoms,9 novel high-temperature superconductors,10 and quantum magnets,11, 12 none of the studies were direct. The key characteristic, namely the wave function of the condensate disrupted by disorder on the microscopic scale, remained inaccessible. Hereby we report a direct neutron diffraction observation of short range correlations of the BEC order parameter in a magnetic Bose glass. This phase is realized in the quantum spin ladder compound IPA-Cu(Cl0.96Br0.04)3, where disorder is induced by random chemical substitution.

Hong, Tao [ORNL; Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Manaka, H. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima JAPAN; Regnault, L.-P. [CEA, Grenoble, France

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nonlinear wave loads on a three-column TLP in real seas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear wave loads are essential in design of offshore structures. In this study an analysis model for nonlinear wave loads was improved by introducing a quasi-linear transfer function which incorporates both linear- and quadratic- transfer functions. The analysis model is first demonstrated by computing wave loads on a truncated column in experimental regular wave and irregular waves. The general trend of the quasi-linear transfer function LTF* is investigated. Time series of wave forces are computed and compared with experimental results. The model was confirmed through good agreement between experiment and prediction results. The analysis model is then applied to a three-column TLP. A real field wave, which is quite non-Gaussian, is used as input. Linear and second-order force time series in surge, pitch and heave directions are predicted. Time series of nonlinear force is obtained, and statistics of the wave loads are investigated. Second order wave loads in higher and lower frequency are highlighted. Finally, the nonlinear wave loads are applied to the TLP finite element analysis model to simulate the nonlinear motion and tendon tensions. The time domain simulations are transformed to the frequency amplitude spectra, from which high-frequency resonance and slowly-varying motion are investigated.

Wang, Zhongmin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Direct Photons at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum ($p_T$) range. The $p$ + $p$ measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high $p_T$ direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring "almost real" virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass $e^+e^-$ pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

G. David; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

315

Dynamics of Wave Breaking at a Coastal Sea Wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural designs barely consider the dynamic scenario of a well-developed impinging wave hitting the structure. The usual area of focus is on static and stability factors (e.g. drag, inertia, resistive forces related to weight, buoyancy, sliding etc). Even the "Factor of Safety" which is regularly used in designs to account for unknown and/or unforeseen situations which might occur implies a degree of uncertainty about the dynamic scenario of breaking waves in the coastal environment. In the present study the hydrodynamics of a coastal structure-turbulent bore interaction was studied by examination (two-dimensional) of the singular case of a plunging breaking wave forming a well developed turbulent bore which impacted on a model sea wall structure. The turbulent bore impact event was found to display similar characteristics to the impact event of other wave shapes, in particular that of a plunging breaker. Examination of the impact event confirmed the conversion of nearly all horizontal velocity to vertical velocity during the "flip through" event. In accordance with theoretical expectations the location of maximum pressure was found to occur just below the still water level (SWL). Resulting pressure data in the present study consisted of two blunt spikes as opposed to the "church-roof" (high spike) shape seen in other results. The shape of the pressure data was attributed to the following: firstly, to the initial impact of the protruding jet of the breaking wave which causes the first maxima, secondly, to the sensor encountering the bulk of the entrapped air hence causing the drop in pressure between the blunt spikes and lastly, to the inherent hydrostatic pressure combined with the compression of the entrapped air bubbles, by the subsequent forward motion of the water within the wave, which causes the second maxima. The point of maximum pressure was found to always be within the second maxima. Observation of the turbulent bore-structure interaction showed that the consequential maximum pressure was a direct result of the compression of entrapped air by the weight of the water in the wave as it continued forward onto the structure combined with the inherent hydrostatic pressure of the wave. The project was conducted in an attempt to contribute to the vast knowledge of coastal structure-wave interactions and to add to the understanding of the physics and characteristics of breaking waves. Whilst numerous studies and experiments have been carried out on the phenomenon of breaking waves by previous researchers the current project highlights the advent of new equipment and technological advances in existing methods.

Antoine, Arthur L.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ocean Wave Energy Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenoceanwa Region United States LinkedIn...

317

Wave Wind LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Wind LLC Place Sun Prairie, Wisconsin Zip 53590 Sector Services, Wind energy Product Wisconsin-based wind developer and construction services provider. References Wave Wind...

318

Direct conversion technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Direct Conversion Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. Initially, two systems were selected for exploratory research and advanced development. These are Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and Two-Phase Liquid Metal MD Generator (LMMHD). This report describes progress that has been made during the first six months of 1992 on research activities associated with these two systems. (GHH)

Back, L.H.; Fabris, G.; Ryan, M.A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Equatorial Wave-Mean Flow Interaction: The Long Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of long equatorial Rossby waves with mean zonal currents in the ocean is investigated in a continuously stratified finite difference numerical model. The model allows for realistic specification of the mean state including both ...

Jeffrey A. Proehl

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wave Attenuation and Wave Drift in the Marginal Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface gravity waves in a viscous rotating ocean are studied theoretically when they penetrate an area covered by highly concentrated brashlike ice. The motion is described by a Lagrangian formulation, and the brash is modeled by a viscous ...

Jan Erik Weber

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS: ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT  

SciTech Connect

We present numerical simulations of internal gravity waves (IGW) in a star with a convective core and extended radiative envelope. We report on amplitudes, spectra, dissipation, and consequent angular momentum transport by such waves. We find that these waves are generated efficiently and transport angular momentum on short timescales over large distances. We show that, as in Earth's atmosphere, IGW drive equatorial flows which change magnitude and direction on short timescales. These results have profound consequences for the observational inferences of massive stars, as well as their long term angular momentum evolution. We suggest IGW angular momentum transport may explain many observational mysteries, such as: the misalignment of hot Jupiters around hot stars, the Be class of stars, Ni enrichment anomalies in massive stars, and the non-synchronous orbits of interacting binaries.

Rogers, T. M. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Lin, D. N. C. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); McElwaine, J. N. [Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research, 11 Fluelastrasse, Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Lau, H. H. B., E-mail: tami@lpl.arizona.edu, E-mail: lin@ucolick.org, E-mail: james.mcelwaine@slf.ch, E-mail: hblau@astro.uni-bonn.de [Argelander-Institut for Astronomie, Universit Bonn Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

Direct Card. SPECIAL SITUATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be deducted. Rental cars Your Direct Card can be used to pay your final balance. Some companies may require cash at ATMs and banks No checks. No lines. No hassles. 24/7 Customer Support Get Account Information number or your date of birth (mm/dd). By activating your card, you accept the Terms and Conditions

Reynolds, Albert C.

324

Direct fired heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Directional gamma detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Applications of high power millimeter waves in the DIII-D fusion program  

SciTech Connect

First operation of a new generation of MW level, 110 GHz generator (gyrotron) on the DIII-D fusion experimental device has been achieved. The desire for high power, cw millimeter (mm) wave sources to support fusion research and development is just now beginning to be realized. Plasma heating and current drive with directed mm waves rely on the strong absorption achieved when the wave frequency matches the natural ``cyclotron`` frequency of electrons in a magnetic field, or its harmonics. Recent progress in fusion experiments highlights the need for control of the interior details of the hot plasma, and nun wave systems are ideally suited for this role. A brief status of fusion research is given, and the importance of mm waves in the future directions for fusion research is described. The vacuum transmission components necessary for transmitting, monitoring, and launching high power 1 10 GHz waves into a plasma have been developed at General Atomics (GA) and will be described. High power mm waves have a number of attractive technological features for fusion applications compared with other candidate plasma heating and current drive technologies. Millimeter waves can be transmitted with high power density over large distances with low losses by utilizing corrugated waveguides, so the generators can be sited remotely, facilitating maintenance and saving valuable space near the fusion device.

Freeman, R.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves  

SciTech Connect

The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Crescent Model School Shadman, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Waves in the chromosphere: observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the literature on observational aspects of waves in the solar chromosphere in the first part of this contribution. High-frequency waves are invoked to build elaborate cool-star chromosphere heating theories but have not been detected decisively so far, neither as magnetic modes in network elements nor as acoustic modes in below-the-canopy internetwork regions. Three-minute upward-propagating acoustic shocks are thoroughly established through numerical simulation as the cause of intermittent bright internetwork grains, but their pistoning and their role in the low-chromosphere energy budget remain in debate. Three-minute wave interaction with magnetic canopies is a newer interest, presently progressing through numerical simulation. Three-minute umbral flashes and running penumbral waves seem a similar acoustic-shock phenomenon awaiting numerical simulation. The low-frequency network Doppler modulation remains enigmatic. In the second part, I address low-frequency ultraviolet brightness variations of t...

Rutten, R J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

wave energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

99 99 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281099 Varnish cache server wave energy Dataset Summary Description Source The Wave Energy Resource Assessment project is a joint venture between NREL, EPRI, and Virginia Tech. EPRI is the prime contractor, Virginia Tech is responsible for development of the models and estimating the wave resource, and NREL serves as an independent validator and also develops the final GIS-based display of the data. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released September 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated October 20th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords EPRI GIS NREL Puerto Rico shapefile United States Virginia Tech wave energy

330

Gravitational waves with distinct wavefronts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exact solutions of Einstein's vacuum equations are considered which describe gravitational waves with distinct wavefronts. A family of such solutions presented recently in which the wavefronts have various geometries and which propagate into a number of physically significant backgrounds is here related to an integral representation which is a generalisation of the Rosen pulse solution for cylindrical waves. A nondiagonal solution is also constructed which is a generalisation of the Rosen pulse, being a cylindrical pulse wave with two states of polarization propagating into a Minkowski background. The solution is given in a complete and explicit form. A further generalisation to include electromagnetic waves with a distinct wavefront of the same type is also discussed.

G A Alekseev; J B Griffiths

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wave Energy Extraction from buoys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different types of Wave Energy Converters currently tested or under development are using the vertical movement of floating bodies to generate electricity. For commercial applications, arrays have to be considered in order ...

Garnaud, Xavier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Orographically Induced Rossby Wave Instabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, the effects of nonlinearity on waves forced by sinusoidal orography in severely truncated barotropic and baroclinic models have been explored. Multiple equilibria were found for fixed forcing and these have been associated with zonal ...

Michael J. Revell; Brian J. Hoskins

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermal Equilibration of Planetary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibration of planetary waves toward free-mode forms, steady solutions of the unforced, undamped equations of motion, is studied in a three-level quasi-geostrophic model on the hemisphere. A thermal mechanism is invoked, parameterized as a ...

John Marshall; Damon W. K. So

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A Planetary-Wave Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultralong and long planetary waves are analyzed at the 500 mb level in terms of their amplitudes, phases and stationarity characteristics, the latter described in terms of a stationarity index SIn. This index consists of the ratio between ...

Elmar R. Reiter; Daniel Westhoff

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Accelerations in Steep Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface accelerations can be measured in at least two ways: 1) by a fixed vertical wave guage, 2) by a free-floating buoy. This gives rise to two different vertical accelerations, called respectively “apparent” and “real”, or Langrangian. This ...

M. S. Longuet-Higgins

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

On Offshore Propagating Diurnal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics and dynamics of offshore diurnal waves induced by land–sea differential heating are examined using linear theory. Two types of heating profiles are investigated, namely a shallow heating source confined within an atmospheric ...

Qingfang Jiang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Explosive Instability of Vorticity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear dynamics of “vorticity waves” (VW), specific wavelike motions occurring nearshore in the presence of an alongshore shear current is examined. By means of a standard asymptotic technique starting with the shallow-water ...

V. I. Shrira; V. V. Voronovich; N. G. Kozhelupova

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Three-Dimensional Edge Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exact solutions are found to the linearized three-dimensional equations for free surface-gravity waves trapped against a straight coastline with a topography varying perpendicular to the coastline. Three families of topographies are found, one ...

Richard Paul Shaw; David Paskausky

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Scattering of superpositions of localized waves from spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized wave (LW) solutions of the homogeneous wave equation can represent either focused or extended pulses

Des Power; Rod Donnelly

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Planetary waves in rotating ionosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of propagation of ultralong planetary waves in the Earth's upper atmosphere is considered. A new exact solution to the MHD equations for the ionosphere is obtained in spherical coordinates with allowance for the geomagnetic field and Earth's rotation. A general dispersion relation is derived for planetary waves in the ionospheric E and F regions, and the characteristic features of their propagation in a weakly ionized ionospheric plasma are discussed.

Khantadze, A. G.; Jandieri, V. G. [Tbilisi State University (Georgia); Jandieri, G. V. [Georgian Technical University (Georgia)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Spinor wave equation of photon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we give the spinor wave equations of free and unfree photon, which are the differential equation of space-time one order. For the free photon, the spinor wave equations are covariant, and the spinors $\\psi$ are corresponding to the the reducibility representations $D^{10}+D^{01}$ and $D^{10}+D^{01}+D^{1/2 1/2}$ of the proper Lorentz group.

Xiang-Yao Wu; Bo-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Si-Qi Zhang; Jing Wang; Hong Li; Xi-Hui Fan; Jing-Wu Li

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ultrasonic Plate Wave Evaluation Of Natural Fiber Composite Panels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two key shortcomings of current ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for plywood, medium density fiberboard (MDF), and oriented strandboard are the reliance on empirical correlations and the neglect of valuable waveform information. The research reported herein examined the feasibility of using fundamental mechanics, wave propagation, and laminated, shear deformable plate theories to nondestructively evaluate material properties in natural fiber-based composite panels. Dispersion curves were constructed exhibiting the variation of flexural plate wave phase velocity with frequency. Based on shear deformable laminated plate wave theory, flexural and transverse shear rigidity values for solid transversely isotropic, laminated transversely isotropic, and solid orthotropic natural fiber-based composite panels were obtained from the dispersion curves. Axial rigidity values were obtained directly from extensional plate wave phase velocity. Excellent agreement (within 3%) of flexural rigidity values was obtained between NDE and mechanical testing for most panels. Transverse shear modulus values obtained from plate wave tests were within 4% of values obtained from through-thickness ultrasonic shear wave speed. Tensile and compressive axial rigidity values obtained from NDE were 22% to 41% higher than mechanical tension and compression test results. These differences between NDE and axial mechanical testing results are likely due to load-rate effects; however, these large differences were not apparent in the flexural and transverse shear comparisons. This fundamental research advances the state-of-the-art of NDE of wood-based composites by replacing empirical approaches with a technique based on fundamental mechanics, shear deformation laminated plate theory, and plate wave propagation theory.

Tucker, Brian J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bender, Donald A. (Washington State University); Pollock, David G. (Washington State University); Wolcott, Michael P. (Washington State University)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fast wave current drive on DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as {gamma} = 0.4 {times} 10{sup 18} T{sub eo} (keV) [A/m{sup 2}W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with dear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. There is some experimental evidence for fast wave absorption by energetic beam ions at high cyclotron harmonic resonances.

deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

TRAVELING WAVE PYROTRON  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pyrotron, i.e., magnetic mirror device, designed for continuous operation in producing a high-temperature fusion reaction plasma and for directly converting the plasma energy into electrical power. The device utilizes a system in which an axially symmetric magnetic field is produced and transports plasma through a first zone of progressively rising field intensity, a second reaction zone of slowly increasing intensity, and thenceforth through a third zone of progressively decreasing intensity wherein the plasma expands against the magnetic field thereby producing electrical current in magnetic field generating solenoids associated with said third zone. (AEC)

Post, R.F.

1963-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

345

Multibaseline gravitational wave radiometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistic for the detection of stochastic gravitational wave backgrounds (SGWBs) using radiometry with a network of multiple baselines. We also quantitatively compare the sensitivities of existing baselines and their network to SGWBs. We assess how the measurement accuracy of signal parameters, e.g., the sky position of a localized source, can improve when using a network of baselines, as compared to any of the single participating baselines. The search statistic itself is derived from the likelihood ratio of the cross correlation of the data across all possible baselines in a detector network and is optimal in Gaussian noise. Specifically, it is the likelihood ratio maximized over the strength of the SGWB, and is called the maximized-likelihood ratio (MLR). One of the main advantages of using the MLR over past search strategies for inferring the presence or absence of a signal is that the former does not require the deconvolution of the cross correlation statistic. Therefore, it does not suffer from errors inherent to the deconvolution procedure and is especially useful for detecting weak sources. In the limit of a single baseline, it reduces to the detection statistic studied by Ballmer [Class. Quant. Grav. 23, S179 (2006)] and Mitra et al. [Phys. Rev. D 77, 042002 (2008)]. Unlike past studies, here the MLR statistic enables us to compare quantitatively the performances of a variety of baselines searching for a SGWB signal in (simulated) data. Although we use simulated noise and SGWB signals for making these comparisons, our method can be straightforwardly applied on real data.

Dipongkar Talukder; Sanjit Mitra; Sukanta Bose

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive  

SciTech Connect

Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Direct insolation models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several recently published models of the direct component of the broadband insolation are compared for clear sky conditions. The comparison includes seven simple models and one rigorous model that is used as a basis for determining accuracy. Where possible, the comparison is made between the results of each model for each atmospheric constituent (H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, O/sub 2/, aerosol and molecular scattering) separately as well as for the combined effect of all of the constituents. Two optimum simple models of varying degrees of complexity are developed as a result of this comparison. The study indicates: aerosols dominate the attenuation of the direct beam for reasonable atmospheric conditions; molecular scattering is next in importance; water vapor is an important absorber; and carbon dioxide and oxygen are relatively unimportant as attenuators of the broadband solar energy.

Bird, R.; Hulstrom, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

Shock waves in trombones A. Hirschberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock waves in trombones A. Hirschberg Eindhoven University of Technology, W&S, P.O. Box 513, 5600 of the wave propagation in the pipe. At fortissimo levels this leads to shock wave formation observed in our and the band- width necessary in order to observe shock waves. Our ex- perimental results, shown in Figs. 2

Luo, Xiaoyu

351

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION STEPHEN SCHECTER Abstract solutions that include only shock waves. Shock waves are required to satisfy the viscous profile criterion for a given viscosity (B(u)u x ) x . Undercompressive shock waves are allowed. We also show that all

352

Monopole gravitational waves from relativistic fireballs driving gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Einstein's general relativity predicts that pressure, in general stresses, play a similar role to energy density in generating gravity. The source of gravitational field, the active gravitational mass density, sometimes referred to as Whittaker's mass density, is not conserved, hence its changes can propagate as monopole gravitational waves. Such waves can be generated only by astrophysical sources with varying gravitational mass. Here we show that relativistic fireballs, considered in modelling gamma-ray burst phenomena, are likely to radiate monopole gravitational waves from high-pressure plasma with varying Whittaker's mass. Also, ejection of a significant amount of initial mass-energy of the progenitor contributes to the monopole gravitational radiation. We identify monopole waves with h^11+h^22 waves of Eddington's classification which propagate (in the z-direction) together with the energy carried by massless fields. We show that the monopole waves satisfy Einstein's equations, with a common stress-energy tensor for massless fields. The polarization mode of monopole waves is Phi_22, i.e. these are perpendicular waves which induce changes of the radius of a circle of test particles only (breathing mode). The astrophysical importance of monopole gravitational waves is discussed.

M. Kutschera

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

Method for exciting inductive-resistive loads with high and controllable direct current  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for transmitting dc power to a load circuit by applying a dc voltage from a standard waveform synthesizer to duration modulate a bipolar rectangular wave generator. As the amplitude of the dc voltage increases, the widths of the rectangular wave generator output pulses increase, and as the amplitude of the dc voltage decreases, the widths of the rectangular wave generator output pulses decrease. Thus, the waveform synthesizer selectively changes the durations of the rectangular wave generator bipolar output pulses so as to produce a rectangular wave ac carrier that is duration modulated in accordance with and in direct proportion to the voltage amplitude from the synthesizer. Thereupon, by transferring the carrier to the load circuit through an amplifier and a rectifier, the load current also corresponds directly to the voltage amplitude from the synthesizer. To this end, the rectified wave at less than 100% duty factor, amounts to a doubled frequency direct voltage pulse train for applying a direct current to the load, while the current ripple is minimized by a high L/R in the load circuit. In one embodiment, a power transmitting power amplifier means having a dc power supply is matched to the load circuit through a transformer for current magnification without sacrificing load current duration capability, while negative voltage and current feedback are provided in order to insure good output fidelity.

Hill, Jr., Homer M. (Princeton Junction, NJ)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wilks, Scott C. (Santa Monica, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Constraints on primordial density perturbations from induced gravitational waves  

SciTech Connect

We consider the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced during the radiation-dominated hot big bang as a constraint on the primordial density perturbation on comoving length scales much smaller than those directly probed by the cosmic microwave background or large-scale structure. We place weak upper bounds on the primordial density perturbation from current data. Future detectors such as BBO and DECIGO will place much stronger constraints on the primordial density perturbation on small scales.

Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Capillary Wave Dynamics of Thin Polymer Films over Submerged Nanostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface dynamics of thin molten polystyrene films supported by nanoscale periodic silicon line-space gratings were investigated with x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Surface dynamics over these nanostructures exhibit high directional anisotropy above certain length scales, as compared to surface dynamics over flat substrates. A cutoff length scale in the dynamics perpendicular to the grooves is observed. This marks a transition from standard over-damped capillary wave behavior to suppressed dynamics due to substrate interactions.

Alvine, Kyle J.; Dai, Yeling; Ro, Hyun W.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec; Soles, Christopher L.; Shpyrko, Oleg G.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Gravity Wave – Fine Structure Interactions, Part 1: Influences of Fine-Structure Form and Orientation on Flow Evolution and Instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four idealized direct numerical simulations are performed to examine the dynamics arising from the superposition of a monochromatic gravity wave and sinusoidal linear and rotary fine structure in the velocity field. These simulations are motivated ...

David C. Fritts; Ling Wang; Joseph A. Werne

358

Remote Synoptic Surface Current Measurements by Gravity Waves; A Method and its Test in a Small Body of Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synoptic surface current data in a lagoon have been obtained utilizing a new approach that evolved from the kinematics of wave-current interaction. Surface current at a position was determined from wavelength and direction of two monochromatic ...

David Sheres

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Statistical Parameters of the Air Turbulent Boundary Layer over Steep Water Waves Measured by the PIV Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbulent airflow with a centerline velocity of 4 m s?1 above 2.5-Hz mechanically generated gravity waves of different amplitudes has been studied in experiments using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Direct measurements of the ...

Yu. Troitskaya; D. Sergeev; O. Ermakova; G. Balandina

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for EMSSABs Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for EMSSABs From: Assistant Secretary, Jessie Hill Roberson (EM-11) To: Mr. Monte Wilson, Chair, INEEL Citizens Advisory Board This letter is in response to a November 21, 2003 letter regarding direction and guidance for implementing direct DOE relationship and funding for Environmental Management Site Specific Advisory Boards. Roberson Letter - December 12, 2003 More Documents & Publications Letter: Progress in Implementing a Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSABs Letter: Mission, Objectives & Scope of the Site Specific Advisory Board Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for EMSSABs Letter: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for EMSSABs From: Assistant Secretary, Jessie Hill Roberson (EM-11) To: Mr. Monte Wilson, Chair, INEEL Citizens Advisory Board This letter is in response to a November 21, 2003 letter regarding direction and guidance for implementing direct DOE relationship and funding for Environmental Management Site Specific Advisory Boards. Roberson Letter - December 12, 2003 More Documents & Publications Letter: Progress in Implementing a Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSABs Letter: Mission, Objectives & Scope of the Site Specific Advisory Board Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship

362

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part IV Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy #12;#12;Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in the fundamentals of shock wave generation and delivery. That is, lithotriptors have changed in form and mode, an acoustic shock wave. This pressure pulse, or shock wave, is responsible for breaking stones. However

Cleveland, Robin

363

Wave propagation through soils in centrifuge testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave propagation phenomena in soils can be experimentally simulated using centrifuge scale models. An original excitation device (drop-ball arrangement) is proposed to generate short wave trains. Wave reflections on model boundaries are taken into account and removed by homomorphic filtering. Propagation is investigated through dispersion laws. For drop-ball experiments, spherical wave field analysis assuming linear viscoelasticity leads to a complete analytical description of wave propagation. Damping phenomena are examined and evaluated using this description.

Semblat, J F; 10.1142/S1363246998000071

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Asymptotic scattering wave function for three charged particles and astrophysical capture processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The asymptotic behavior of the wave functions of three charged particles has been investigated. There are two different types of three-body scattering wave functions. The first type of scattering wave function evolves from the incident three-body wave of three charged particles in the continuum. The second type of scattering wave function evolves from the initial two-body incident wave. In this work the asymptotic three-body incident wave has been derived in the asymptotic regions where two particles are close to each other and far away from the third particle. This wave function satisfies the Schrodinger equation up to terms O(1/3pa), where pa is the distance between the center of mass of two particles and the third particle. The derived asymptotic three-body incident wave transforms smoothly into RedmondÂ?s asymptotic incident wave in the asymptotic region where all three particles are well separated. For the scattering wave function of the second type the asymptotic threebody scattered wave has been derived in all the asymptotic regions. In the asymptotic region where all three particles well separated, the derived asymptotic scattered wave coincides with the Peterkop asymptotic wave. In the asymptotic regions where two particles are close to each other and far away from the third one, this is a new expression which is free of the logarithmically diverging phase factors that appeared in the Peterkop approach. The derived asymptotic scattered wave resolves a long-standing phase-amplitude ambiguity. Based on these results the expressions for the exact prior and post breakup amplitudes have been obtained. The post breakup amplitude for charged particles has not been known and has been derived for the first time directly from the prior form. It turns out that the post form of the breakup amplitude is given by a surface integral in the six dimensional hyperspace, rather than a volume integral, with the transition operator expressed in terms of the interaction potentials. We also show how to derive a generalized distorted-wave-Born approximation amplitude (DWBA) from the exact prior form of the breakup amplitude. It is impossible to derive the DWBA amplitude from the post form. The three-body Coulomb incident wave is used to calculate the reaction rates of 7Be(ep, e)8B and 7Be(pp, p)8B nonradiative triple collisions in stellar environments.

Pirlepesov, Fakhriddin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; R. Abbott; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; R. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; S. Ballmer; H. Bantilan; B. C. Barish; C. Barker; D. Barker; B. Barr; P. Barriga; M. A. Barton; M. Bastarrika; K. Bayer; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; R. Biswas; E. Black; K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; M. Brinkmann; A. Brooks; D. A. Brown; G. Brunet; A. Bullington; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. B. Camp; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; J. Cao; L. Cardenas; T. Casebolt; G. Castaldi; C. Cepeda; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; D. Clark; J. Clark; T. Cokelaer; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. Corbitt; D. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; R. M. Cutler; J. Dalrymple; K. Danzmann; G. Davies; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. Degree; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; J. Dickson; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; R. W. P. Drever; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; R. J. Dupuis; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; L. S. Finn; K. Flasch; N. Fotopoulos; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; J. Garofoli; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. Goggin; G. González; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. Harry; E. Harstad; K. Hayama; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; M. Hennessy; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; D. Hosken; J. Hough; S. H. Huttner; D. Ingram; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kamat; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; F. Ya. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; C. Kim; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. K. Kopparapu; D. Kozak; I. Kozhevatov; B. Krishnan; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; M. M. Lang; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; V. Leonhardt; I. Leonor; K. Libbrecht; H. Lin; P. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lück; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; V. Mandic; S. Márka; Z. Márka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; I. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. McKechan; K. McKenzie; T. Meier; A. Melissinos; G. Mendell; R. A. Mercer; S. Meshkov; C. J. Messenger; D. Meyers; J. Miller; J. Minelli; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; O. Miyakawa; B. Moe; S. Mohanty; G. Moreno; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; H. Mukhopadhyay; H. Müller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. Murray; E. Myers; J. Myers; T. Nash; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; K. Numata; J. O'Dell; G. Ogin; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; V. Parameshwaraiah; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; S. Penn; A. Perreca; T. Petrie; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; M. Principe; R. Prix; V. Quetschke; F. Raab; D. S. Rabeling; H. Radkins; N. Rainer; M. Rakhmanov; M. Ramsunder; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen; K. Riles; B. Rivera; N. A. Robertson; C. Robinson; E. L. Robinson; S. Roddy; A. Rodriguez; A. M. Rogan; J. Rollins; J. D. Romano; J. Romie; R. Route; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Ruet; P. Russell; K. Ryan; S. Sakata; M. Samidi; L. Sancho de la Jordana; V. Sandberg; V. Sannibale; S. Saraf; P. Sarin; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Sato; P. R. Saulson; R. Savage; P. Savov; S. W. Schediwy; R. Schilling; R. Schnabel; R. Schofield; B. F. Schutz; P. Schwinberg; S. M. Scott; A. C. Searle; B. Sears; F. Seifert; D. Sellers; A. S. Sengupta; P. Shawhan; D. H. Shoemaker; A. Sibley; X. Siemens; D. Sigg; S. Sinha; A. M. Sintes; B. J. J. Slagmolen; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; M. R. Smith; N. D. Smith; K. Somiya; B. Sorazu; L. C. Stein; A. Stochino; R. Stone; K. A. Strain; D. M. Strom; A. Stuver; T. Z. Summerscales; K. -X. Sun; M. Sung; P. J. Sutton; H. Takahashi; D. B. Tanner; R. Taylor; R. Taylor; J. Thacker; K. A. Thorne; K. S. Thorne; A. Thüring; K. V. Tokmakov; C. Torres; C. Torrie; G. Traylor; M. Trias; W. Tyler

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cylindrical ion-acoustic solitary waves in electronegative plasmas with superthermal electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using the standard reductive perturbation technique, a three-dimensional cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation (CKPE), which governs the dynamics of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs), is derived for small but finite amplitude ion-acoustic waves in cylindrical geometry in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma with kappa distributed electrons, thermal positrons, and cold ions. The generalized expansion method is used to solve analytically the CKPE. The existence regions of localized pulses are investigated. It is found that the solution of the CKPE supports only compressive solitary waves. Furthermore, the effects of superthermal electrons, the ratio of the electron temperature to positron temperature, the ratio of the positron density to electron density and direction cosine of the wave propagation on the profiles of the amplitudes, and widths of the solitary structures are examined numerically. It is shown these parameters play a vital role in the formation of ion acoustic solitary waves.

Eslami, Parvin [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mottaghizadeh, Marzieh [Department of Physics, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Local helioseismic and spectroscopic analyses of interactions between acoustic waves and a sunspot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a high cadence imaging spectropolarimetric observation of a sunspot and its surroundings in magnetically sensitive (FeI 6173 A) and insensitive (FeI 7090 A) upper photospheric absorption lines, we map the instantaneous wave phases and helioseismic travel times as a function of observation height and inclination of magnetic field to the vertical. We confirm the magnetic inclination angle dependent transmission of incident acoustic waves into upward propagating waves, and derive (1) proof that helioseismic travel times receive direction dependent contributions from such waves and hence cause errors in conventional flow inferences, (2) evidences for acoustic wave sources beneath the umbral photosphere, and (3) significant differences in travel times measured from the chosen magnetically sensitive and insensitive spectral lines.

Rajaguru, S P; Sankarasubramanian, K; Couvidat, S; 10.1088/2041-8205/721/2/L86

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Numerical Analysis for Controlling the Eigenmode Formation of Alfven Waves in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical analysis is performed with two dimensional wave code for controlling the eigenmode formation of fast Alfven waves in the GAMMA 10 central cell. The plasma production by fast waves depends on the wave excitation in the plasma. Eigenmodes are strongly formed when the boundary conditions in the axial and radial directions are satisfied. As the optimum density for the formation of eigenmode exists discretely, the density is clamped at the value where the eigenmode is strongly formed. For the higher density plasma production, the eigenmodes must be continuously excited as the density increases. It is found that the almost continuous excitation of eigenmodes can be realized by using two waves with different frequencies at the same time.

Yamaguchi, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ichimura, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higaki, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kakimoto, S. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ide, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Inoue, D. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nagai, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakagome, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fukuyama, A. [Kyoto University (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A new inversion method for P wave anisotropy (Wu and Lees, 1999a) has been applied to high-precision, microseismic traveltime data collected at Coso geothermal region, California. Direction-dependent P wave velocity and thus its perturbation, are represented by a symmetric positive definite matrix A instead of a scalar. The resulting anisotropy distribution is used to estimate variations in crack density, stress distribution and permeability within the producing geothermal field. A circular dome-like

370

Experimental Study on Wave Transformation and Nearshore Circulation on a Variable Bathymetry in Wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hurricanes are one of the primary threats to the Texas coastal environment and economy. They generate large wave and storm surges that have caused much damage on the Texas coast in the past. Understanding both the hydrodynamic processes that damage coastal habitats and hurricane hazard and risk are critical to preserve coastal vegetation and quantify its benefits to coastal storm protection. The goal of this project is to quantify the impact of wave attenuation and wave refraction as well as the development of coherent structures in marsh fringes and the formation of a rip current system over wetlands on storm protection. The 3D Shallow Water Wave Basin at Texas A&M University hosted a series of large-scale experiments considering an idealized wetland model to pursue this goal. Study of the marsh geometry of the Texas coast was done in order to scale the experiments to the size of the Haynes Laboratory 3D-Water Wave Basin using a Froude and a Reynolds scalings. Particularly, averaged size and idealized shape of marsh segments in the area of Dalehite Cove in Galveston Bay were considered. Three sets of different wave conditions and water levels were tested to approximate different intensities of storm surge. Identical tests with both vegetated and non-vegetated marshes were run to compare the influence of the vegetation in storm conditions, and three different spacings between marsh segments were tested. In the basin, normally incident regular waves were generated at three water circulation structures. Data analysis allows the determination of the impact of discontinuous marsh segments on wave attenuation and wave refraction. Coherent structures such as rip current and the circulation pattern were analyzed to study the change in the flow field during passage of the waves. The experimental measurements were able to describe the wave transformations over the marsh segments. The influence of coastal wetlands was identified to affect the hydrodynamic process and reduce the total wave energy which is dissipated and redistributed by vegetation. The presence of the mounds induced an important decrease in the wave height, in addition to the damping of the waves by the vegetation stems. The variation in spatial coverage of the wetland model has been shown to highly affect the flow dynamics by generating offshore directed flow in the channel and onshore directed flow on the marsh mounds. This experimental approach provides a further understanding of flow dynamics by waves and surge in wetlands, at a large scale.

Truong, Melanie Khanh Phuong

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Our purpose and direction Our purpose and direction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Our purpose and direction #12;Our purpose and direction Contents MINISTERS' FOREWORD 3 organisation 8 Our People 8 Our finances 8 Business sustainability ­ `Greenerways' 9 OUR DIRECTION 10 Our: Financial resources 56 2 #12;Our purpose and direction Ministers' Foreword I am very pleased to be providing

372

Introduction Direct seeding, also known as direct sowing, is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Direct seeding, also known as direct sowing, is an ancient method of woodland that control of competing vegetation is essential for successful tree establishment using direct sowing. Hand, Willoughby (2002) suggests total overall herbicide inputs may be lower in direct seeded woodland due

373

Our purpose and direction Our purpose and direction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Our purpose and direction #12;Our purpose and direction Contents MINISTERS' FOREWORD 3 8 Our People 8 Our finances 8 Business sustainability ­ `Greenerways' 9 OUR DIRECTION 10 Our Appendix 2: Business measures 55 Appendix 3: Financial resources 56 2 #12;3 Our purpose and direction

374

Breakout Session -- TEC Direction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

III: TEC III: TEC Direction and Priorities Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group Presented by: Alex Thrower Office of Logistics Management February 7, 2008 San Antonio, Texas 2 Topics of Discussion * Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) charter and membership * Topic group functions * Meeting format 3 TEC Charter and Membership * Mission - TEC was formed in 1992 to improve coordination among the Department of Energy (DOE) and external groups interested in the Department's transportation activities The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) co-chairs TEC with DOE's Environmental Management Program Provides an opportunity for broad based input and information exchange from varied organizations - Members meet semi-annually to participate in

375

Omni-directional railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for electromagetically accelerating projectiles. The invention features two parallel conducting circular plates, a plurality of electrode connections to both upper and lower plates, a support base, and a projectile magazine. A projectile is spring-loaded into a firing position concentrically located between the parallel plates. A voltage source is applied to the plates to cause current to flow in directions defined by selectable, discrete electrode connections on both upper and lower plates. Repulsive Lorentz forces are generated to eject the projectile in a 360 degree range of fire.

Shahinpoor, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hawaii Ocean Current Resources and Tidal Turbine Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in converting the kinetic energy of ocean current and tidal flow into electrical power has increased in recent years. This report focuses on the ocean current resource in Hawaii, which includes tidal flows as well as uni-directional oceanic current flows around the main Hawaiian Islands, with the exception of Kauai, from the shoreline to approximately the 2000-m depth contour.

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

377

Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects Jared W. Nelson The Blade Reliability Collaborative has been formed to perform comprehensive studies to improve wind turbine uni-directional wind turbine fiber-reinforced composite material with an epoxy resin were utilized

378

Ion Bernstein wave heating research  

SciTech Connect

Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW`s low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much_lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW`s that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW`s can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

Ono, Masayuki

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ion Bernstein wave heating research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

Ono, Masayuki.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Geometric phases of the Faraday rotation of electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geometric phases of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase are investigated. The influence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using the Faraday rotation is discussed as an application of the theory.

Liu Jian [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Qin Hong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

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381

MHK Technologies/Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Wave pumps and turbins Wind Wave pumps and turbins < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description 2Wave1Wind The hybrid wave power rig uses two wave converting technologies in addition to wind mills The main system is a pneumatic float in the category of overtopping as Wave Dragon In addition the pneumatic float can house point absorbers The hybrid wave power rig is based on the patented wave energy converter from 2005

382

Internal Wave–Wave Interactions. Part II: Spectral Energy Transfer and Turbulence Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral transfer of internal wave energy toward high vertical wavenumber kz and turbulence production ? is examined by ray tracing small-scale test waves in a canonical Garrett and Munk background wave field. Unlike previous ray-tracing ...

Haili Sun; Eric Kunze

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Influence of Wave Propagation on the Doppler Spreading of Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The “Doppler spread” theory of atmospheric gravity waves has developed rapidly in recent years, from an initial theory of wave spectra into a general parameterization of gravity wave effects for use in global models of the middle atmosphere. Yet ...

Stephen D. Eckermann

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Implicit–Explicit Multistep Methods for Fast-Wave–Slow-Wave Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implicit–explicit (IMEX) linear multistep methods are examined with respect to their suitability for the integration of fast-wave–slow-wave problems in which the fast wave has relatively low amplitude and need not be accurately simulated. The ...

Dale R. Durran; Peter N. Blossey

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy-momentum relation for solitary waves of relativistic wave equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solitary waves of relativistic invariant nonlinear wave equation with symmetry group U(1) are considered. We prove that the energy-momentum relation for spherically symmetric solitary waves coincides with the Einstein energy-momentum relation for point particles.

T. V. Dudnikova; A. I. Komech; H. Spohn

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers in dense electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of ion acoustic solitary waves is studied in a magnetized dense electron-positron-ion plasma. The ions are described by the hydrodynamic equations, and the electron and positron are assumed to follow the Thomas-Fermi density distribution. The pseudopotential is derived directly from the basic equations including Poisson's equation without assuming the quasineutrality condition. The effect of ion temperature on the solitary waves is studied, and the ranges of parameters for which solitary waves and double layers exist are also studied in detail using Sagdeev's technique.

Chatterjee, Prasanta [Department of Physics, Plasma Research Laboratory, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Saha, Taraknath [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Department of Physics, Plasma Research Laboratory, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Upper limits on the strength of periodic gravitational waves from PSR J1939+2134  

SciTech Connect

The first science run of the LIGO and GEO gravitational wave detectors presented the opportunity to test methods of searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars. Here we present new direct upper limits on the strength of waves from the pulsar PSR J1939+2134 using two independent analysis methods, one in the frequency domain using frequentist statistics and one in the time domain using Bayesian inference. Both methods show that the strain amplitude at Earth from this pulsar is less than a few times 10{sup -22}.

B. Allen et al.

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

Wave | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Wave Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 18 April, 2013 - 13:41 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing claims of LCOE, DOE has developed-for its own use-a standardized cost and performance data reporting process to facilitate uniform calculation of LCOE from MHK device developers. This standardization framework is only the first version in what is anticipated to be an iterative process that involves industry and the broader DOE stakeholder community. Multiple files are attached here for review and comment.Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon device_performance_validation_data_request.docx application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon

389

Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Home: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

content. | Skip to navigation content. | Skip to navigation Site Map Contact Us Current Documents Archived Documents Entire Site only in current section Advanced Search... U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Sections Home Directives Current Directives Draft Directives Archives Delegations Current Delegations Current Designations Rescinded Organizations' Assignment of Responsibility Development & Review RevCom Writers' Tools DPC Corner References News and Updates Help Personal tools You are here: Office of Management » Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Info Home Directives are the Department of Energy's primary means of establishing policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. Directive

391

Directional Entanglement of Quantum Fields with Quantum Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modification of quantum field theory on large scales is conjectured to result from effects of Planck scale limits on directional information. Transversely localized solutions of the relativistic wave equation are used to show that the path of a massless particle with wavelength $\\lambda$ that travels a distance $z$ has a wave function with indeterminacy in direction given by the diffraction scale, $\\langle \\Delta \\theta^2\\rangle > \\sqrt{2}\\lambda /\\pi z$. It is conjectured that the spatial structure of all quantum field states is influenced by a new kind of directional indeterminacy of quantum geometry set by the Planck length, $l_P$, that does not occur in the usual classical background geometry. Entanglement of field and geometry states is described in the small angle approximation. It is shown to have almost no effect on local measurements, microscopic particle interactions, or measurements of propagating states that depend only on longitudinal coordinates, but to significantly alter field states in systems larger than $\\approx \\lambda^2/l_P $ that depend on transverse coordinates or direction. It reduces the information content of fields in large systems, consistent with holographic bounds from gravitation theory, and may lead to quantum-geometrical directional fluctuations of massive bodies detectable with interferometers. Possible connections are discussed with field vacuum energy, black hole information, and inflationary fluctuations.

Craig J. Hogan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

(3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

Mirko Previsic

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

Wave Power: Destroyer of Rocks; Creator of Clean Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E E PG&E Wave Energy Wave Energy Federal Utility Partnership Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Wave Energy Wave Energy Development Development Ontario, CA Ontario, CA November 18 November 18- -19, 200 19, 2009 9 Donald G. Price Donald G. Price Senior Consulting Scientist, PG&E Senior Consulting Scientist, PG&E Wave Power Overview Wave Power Overview * * What is Wave Power? What is Wave Power? o o Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean o o Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean waves that is converted into electricity by various means. waves that is converted into electricity by various means. o o It is a clean, renewable energy resource capable of being utilized

394

Plasma beat-wave accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform an analytic study of some quantities relevant to the plasma beat-wave accelerator (PBWA) concept. We obtain analytic expressions for the plasma frequency, longitudinal electron velocity, plasma density and longitudinal plasma electric field of a nonlinear longitudinal electron plasma oscillation with amplitude less than the wave-breaking limit and phase velocity approaching the speed of light. We also estimate the luminosity of a single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear PBWA collider assuming the energy and collision beamstrahlung are fixed parameters.

Noble, R.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

SRNL - Directions and Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map of SRS, with Georgia and South Carolina Map of SRS, with Georgia and South Carolina Directions and Maps The Savannah River National Laboratory is located at the Savannah River Site , a 310 square mile site located in the southeastern coastal area of the United States in the state of South Carolina. It is bordered to the west by the Savannah River and Georgia, and is close to several major cities, including Augusta and Savannah (Ga.), Columbia, Greenville, and Charleston (S.C.). It is in an area residents refer to as the Central Savannah River Area, or CSRA. The Aiken County Technology Laboratory (which houses SRNL's biotechnology laboratories and certain waste treatment technology laboratories) and the Center for Hydrogen Research are located at Aiken County's Savannah River Research Campus, located adjacent to SRS.

396

Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel  

SciTech Connect

Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Conclusions and Policy Directions,  

SciTech Connect

This chapter briefly revisits the constraints and opportunities of mitigation and adaptation, and highlights and the multiple linkages, synergies and trade-offs between mitigation, adaptation and urban development. The chapter then presents future policy directions, focusing on local, national and international principles and policies for supporting and enhancing urban responses to climate change. In summary, policy directions for linking climate change responses with urban development offer abundant opportunities; but they call for new philosophies about how to think about the future and how to connect different roles of different levels of government and different parts of the urban community. In many cases, this implies changes in how urban areas operate - fostering closer coordination between local governments and local economic institutions, and building new connections between central power structures and parts of the population who have often been kept outside of the circle of consultation and discourse. The difficulties involved in changing deeply set patterns of interaction and decision-making in urban areas should not be underestimated. Because it is so difficult, successful experiences need to be identified, described and widely publicized as models for others. However, where this challenge is met, it is likely not only to increase opportunities and reduce threats to urban development in profoundly important ways, but to make the urban area a more effective socio-political entity, in general - a better city in how it works day to day and how it solves a myriad of problems as they emerge - far beyond climate change connections alone. It is in this sense that climate change responses can be catalysts for socially inclusive, economically productive and environmentally friendly urban development, helping to pioneer new patterns of stakeholder communication and participation.

Wilbanks, Thomas J [ORNL; Romero-Lankao, Paty [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Gnatz, P [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Impulsive waves in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter space-times generated by null particles with an arbitrary multipole structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a class of impulsive gravitational waves which propagate either in a de Sitter or an anti-de Sitter background. They are conformal to impulsive waves of Kundt's class. In a background with positive cosmological constant they are spherical (but non-expanding) waves generated by pairs of particles with arbitrary multipole structure propagating in opposite directions. When the cosmological constant is negative, they are hyperboloidal waves generated by a null particle of the same type. In this case, they are included in the impulsive limit of a class of solutions described by Siklos that are conformal to pp-waves.

J Podolsky; J B Griffiths

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Foreign Direct Investment in U  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 November 2000 Energy Information Administration/Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, the Team Leader for Financial Analysis (202) 586-1383. Specific technical information concerning this

400

Solitary waves and homoclinic orbits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion that fluid motion often organizes itself into coherent structures has increasingly permeated modern fluid dynamics. Such localized objects appear in laminar flows and persist in turbulent states; from the water on windows on rainy days, to the circulations in planetary atmospheres. This review concerns solitary waves in fluids. More specifically, it centres around the mathematical description of solitary waves in a single spatial dimension. Moreover, it concentrates on strongly dissipative dynamics, rather than integrable systems like the KdV equation. One-dimensional solitary waves, or pulses and fronts as they are also called, are the simplest kinds of coherent structure (at least from a geometrical point of view). Nevertheless, their dynamics can be rich and complicated. In some circumstances this leads to the formation of spatio-temporal chaos in the systems giving birth to the solitary waves, and understanding that phenomenon is one of the major goals in the theory outlined in this review. Unfortunately, such a goal is far from achieved to date, and the author assess its current status and incompleteness.

Balmforth, N.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Wave–Mean Flow Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relation between the statistics of large-scale waves and the mean flow is derived from the potential enstrophy equations integrated over an isobaric surface. The difference between time-averaged zonal-mean state and the radiative-dynamical ...

Mark R. Schoeberl

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Model for Shock Wave Chaos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the following model equation, u[subscript t]+1/2(u[superscript 2]-uu[subscript s])[subscript x]=f(x,u[subscript s]) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting ...

Kasimov, Aslan R.

403

Shallow Angle Wave Profiling Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lidar scanning system is described that is primarily designed to measure sea wave shape. The device is capable of measuring real-time spatial profiles over distances of hundreds of meters, and as the lidar must inevitably operate from modest ...

M. R. Belmont; J. M. K. Horwood; R. W. F. Thurley; J. Baker

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSAB Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSAB From: Designated Federal Officer, Sandra L. Waisley (EM-11) To: SSAB Members (G. Stegner, J. Reising, G. Bowman, T. Taylor, C. Gertz, B. Murphie, S. McCracken, M. Marvin, J. Rampe, A. Doswell, C. Anderson, B. Wethington, S. Brennan, K. Kozeliski, D. Dollins, P. Halsey, Y. Sherman, L. Bratcher, R. Warther, K. Klein, R. Schepens, F. Lockhart, J. Allison, R. Erickson, E. Sellers, K. Carlson, G. Boyd, R. Butler) The memorandum informs of Assistant Secrectary Roberson's direction and guidance for implementing a DOE direct relationship and funding approach for EM's Site-Specific Advisory Board (EMSSAB).

405

Spectral effects on fast wave core heating and current drive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L-mode and H-mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit radio frequency (rf) power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of HHFW CD were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

Phillips, Cynthia [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Berry, Lee [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jaeger, Erwin Frederick [ORNL; Ryan, Philip Michael [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Elastic Wave Radiation from a Line Source of Finite Length  

SciTech Connect

Straightforward algebraic expressions describing the elastic wavefield produced by a line source of finite length are derived in circular cylindrical coordinates. The surrounding elastic medium is assumed to be both homogeneous and isotropic, anc[ the source stress distribution is considered axisymmetic. The time- and space-domain formulae are accurate at all distances and directions from the source; no fa-field or long-wavelength assumptions are adopted for the derivation. The mathematics yield a unified treatment of three different types of sources: an axial torque, an axial force, and a radial pressure. The torque source radiates only azirnuthally polarized shear waves, whereas force and pressure sources generate simultaneous compressional and shear radiation polarized in planes containing the line source. The formulae reduce to more familiar expressions in the two limiting cases where the length of the line source approaches zero and infinity. Far-field approximations to the exact equations indicate that waves radiated parallel to the line source axI.s are attenuated relative to those radiated normal to the axis. The attenuation is more severe for higher I?equencies and for lower wavespeeds. Hence, shear waves are affected more than compressional waves. This fi-equency- and directiondependent attenuation is characterized by an extremely simple mathematical formula, and is readily apparent in example synthetic seismograms.

Aldridge, D.F.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

407

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + C Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + 2.3 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 4.0 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 3.0 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 3.0 +

408

Measuring Dark Matter Distribution in Directional Direct Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct detection of dark matter with directional sensitivity offers not only measurement of both recoil energy and direction of dark matter, but also a way to understand dark matter distribution in the Galaxy. Maxwell distribution is usually supposed as the distribution near the Earth, however, deviation from that, caused by tidal streams in the Galaxy, has been suggested. We explore the possibility of distinguishing the distribution by direct detection using nuclear emulsions.

Keiko I. Nagao

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

Observations of a Mesoscale Ducted Gravity Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports coordinated observations of a mesoscale gravity wave made during the FRONTS 84 field experiment conducted in southwestern France in the summer of 1984. The observations were unique in the sense that all relevant wave ...

F. M. Ralph; V. Venkateswaran; M. Crochet

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Motor Wave Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Motor Wave Group Place Hong Kong Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.motorwavegroup.com Region China LinkedIn Connections...

411

An Analysis of Wave-Turbulence Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of an analytical and numerical calculation of the interaction between an internal gravity wave and a wave-induced turbulence. The initial atmospheric state, assumed horizontally homogeneous, is statically and dynamically ...

D. Fua; G. Chimonas; F. Einaudi; O. Zeman

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Wave Star Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Star Energy Star Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Wave Star Energy Place Denmark Zip DK-2920 Product Denmark-based private wave device developer. References Wave Star Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: C5 WaveStar This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Wave Star Energy is a company located in Denmark . References ↑ "Wave Star Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wave_Star_Energy&oldid=678928" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

413

Generation of Turbulence by Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard current criterion for the generation of turbulence by atmospheric gravity waves and for the associated limitation on wave growth is based upon the standard criterion for static instability of the unperturbed atmosphere, namely, that ...

Colin O. Hines

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Interactions between Rain and Wind Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of rain on surface waves have been investigated in a circulating wind-wave tank. Surface displacement and slope spectra under different wind velocities were measured near the upwind and downwind edges of a region with simulated rains. ...

Ying-Keung Poon; Shih Tang; Jin Wu

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Equatorial Solitary Waves. Part 2: Envelope Solitons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Via the method of multiple scales, it is shown that the time and space evolution of the envelope of wave packets of weakly nonlinear, strongly dispersive equatorial waves is governed by the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The diverse phenomena of ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Generation of sand bars under surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Experiments were performed in a large wave flume to validate the theory and to study additional aspects of sand bar evolution. The wave envelope and bar profile were recorded for low and high beach reflection, ...

Hancock, Matthew James, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Wind effects on shoaling wave shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breaking in the presence of wind drift and swell. J. Fluidlin, 1995: Asymmetry of wind waves studied in a laboratorycoupling between swell and wind-waves. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,

Feddersen, F; Veron, F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Inertia–Gravity Waves in the Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The propagation and refraction of stationary inertia–gravity waves in the winter stratosphere is examined with ray tracing. Due to their smaller vertical group velocity these waves experience more lateral ray movement and horizontal refraction ...

Timothy J. Dunkerton

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Enhanced and Inhibited Gravity Wave Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balloon measurements were used to investigate gravity waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere above the Canadian high Arctic. The amount of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere was found to be related to particular ...

James A. Whiteway

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Transmission by Barotropic Rossby Waves Revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a semianalytic method to investigate the properties of energy transmission across bottom topography by barotropic Rossby waves. The method is first used to revisit the analytical estimates derived from wave-matching ...

R. P. Matano; E. D. Palma

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Wave Energy Centre | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Wave Energy Centre Address Wave Energy Centre Av Manuela da Maia 36 R C Dto Place Lisboa Zip 1000-201 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number (+351) 21...

422

Radiative Forcing of Stationary Planetary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stationary wave components of the planetary-scale circulation are maintained by topographic forcing and by latent and sensible heat transfers and radiation. These waves have a potential vorticity balance mainly due to vertically differential ...

Leo J. Donner; Hsiao-Lan Kuo

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Rossby Wave Propagation an Beta-Planes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical modeling of stratospheric, quasi-geostrophic Rossby wave propagation on a beta-plane channel is examined to determine how wave propagation is affected by the use of low horizontal (spectral) resolution. This study considers time ...

Donal O'Sullivan

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Kinetic Wave Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kinetic Wave Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Kinetic Wave Power Address 2861 N Tupelo St Place Midland Zip 48642 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 989-839-9757...

425

Solving general shallow wave equations on surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new framework for solving General Shallow Wave Equations (GSWE) in order to efficiently simulate water flows on solid surfaces under shallow wave assumptions. Within this framework, we develop implicit schemes for solving the external forces ...

Huamin Wang; Gavin Miller; Greg Turk

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Shock Waves in Currents and Outflows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock waves are discontinuities (in the physical properties of a fluid) which behave in an organized manner. The possibility that such waves may occur in oceanic boundary currents is examined with a nonlinear two-layer analytical model. Attention ...

Doron Nof

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Resonant Planetary Waves in a Spherical Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global model of planetary wave propagation in a spherical atmosphere is used to examine the spectrum of free or resonant planetary waves of the solstitial stratosphere. These free modes are located by forcing the model with a weak periodic ...

Mark R. Schoeberl; John H. E. Clark

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mesoscale Energy Spectra of Moist Baroclinic Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of moist processes in the development of the mesoscale kinetic energy spectrum is investigated with numerical simulations of idealized moist baroclinic waves. Dry baroclinic waves yield upper-tropospheric kinetic energy spectra that ...

Michael L. Waite; Chris Snyder

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Anelastic Internal Wave Packet Evolution and Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As upward-propagating anelastic internal gravity wave packets grow in amplitude, nonlinear effects develop as a result of interactions with the horizontal mean flow that they induce. This qualitatively alters the structure of the wave packet. The ...

Hayley V. Dosser; Bruce R. Sutherland

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Breaking of Wind-Generated Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breaking of wind-generated waves was studies in a laboratory tank. The critical surface slope and global wave steepness for inception of breaking were evaluated. Besides the frequency of occurrence, two other characteristic quantities, height and ...

Delun Xu; Paul A. Hwang; Jin Wu

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Dynamic Balance of Internal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For oceanic internal waves with vertical scales larger than 1 m the evolution of the spectrum is adequately described by weak-interaction theory. Based on simple physical arguments, a model for internal-wave energy dissipation predicts ...

C. Henry McComas; Peter Müller

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Wind Waves and Sun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waves and Sun Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Waves and Sun Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.windwavesandsun.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections...

433

How to excite a rogue wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose initial conditions that could facilitate the excitation of rogue waves. Understanding the initial conditions that foster rogue waves could be useful both in attempts to avoid them by seafarers and in generating highly energetic pulses in optical fibers.

Akhmediev, N.; Ankiewicz, A. [Optical Sciences Group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Soto-Crespo, J. M. [Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Wave Breaking Dissipation Observed with “SWIFT” Drifters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy dissipation rates during ocean wave breaking are estimated from high-resolution profiles of turbulent velocities collected within 1 m of the surface. The velocity profiles are obtained from a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler sonar on a wave-...

Jim Thomson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Eady Edge Waves and Rapid Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbations of the classical Eady model are treated in terms of the system's two intrinsic baroclinic edge waves. This provides a simple quantitative example of the wave coupling interpretation of quasigeostrophic instability and a compact ...

H. C. Davies; C. H. Bishop

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Events trigger generator for resonant spherical detectors of gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have set up and tested a pipeline for processing the data from a spherical gravitational wave detector with six transducers. The algorithm exploits the multichannel capability of the system and provides a list of candidate events with their arrival direction. The analysis starts with the conversion of the six detector outputs into the scalar and the five quadrupolar modes of the sphere, which are proportional to the corresponding gravitational wave spherical components. Event triggers are then generated by an adaptation of the WaveBurst algorithm. Event validation and direction reconstruction are made by cross-checking two methods of different inspiration: geometrical (lowest eigenvalue) and probabilistic (maximum likelihood). The combination of the two methods is able to keep substantially unaltered the efficiency and can reduce drastically the detections of fake events (to less than ten per cent). We show a quantitative test of these ideas by simulating the operation of the resonant spherical detector miniGRAIL, whose planned sensitivity in its frequency band (few hundred Hertz's around 3 kHz) is comparable with the present LIGO one.

Stefano Foffa; Riccardo Sturani

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

437

Applications Guide for Guided Wave Inspection Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, long-range ultrasonic guided wave technology has been emerging as a quick and economical method of obtaining a comprehensive view of the condition of piping systems, tubing, and other components (including areas that are difficult to access) by launching and detecting waves from a remote accessible location. This report describes how ultrasonic guided waves can be applied for various components and systems. Guidance on surface preparation, generation of various wave modes, and interpreta...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Quantum thermal waves in quantum corrals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the possibility of the generation of the thermal waves in 2D electron gas is investigated. In the frame of the quantum heat transport theory the 2D quantum hyperbolic heat transfer equation is formulated and numerically solved. The obtained solutions are the thermal waves in electron 2D gases. As an exapmle the thermal waves in quantum corrals are described. Key words: 2D electron gas, quantum corrals, thermal waves.

J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Kozlowski

2004-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge  

SciTech Connect

A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the ? channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Geothermal Technologies Program: Direct Use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This general publication describes geothermal direct use systems, and how they have been effectively used throughout the country. It also describes the DOE program R&D efforts in this area, and summarizes several projects using direct use technology.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave direction uni-directional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Superadiabatic Excess and Gravity Wave Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attention is called to a recent calculation of the superadiabatic excess—the ratio of wave amplitude at saturation to wave amplitude at convective instability threshold—caused by a saturated gravity wave. (This excess is also referred to as the ...

J. Weinstock

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Shock Waves in Quasicrystals JOHANNES ROTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock Waves in Quasicrystals JOHANNES ROTH Institut f�ur Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, Universit�at Stuttgart, D­70550 Stuttgart, Germany Abstract Shock waves in quasicrystals of the AlCuLi type: at low shock wave intensity the system reacts elastically, at high intensities it is turned amorphous

Roth, Johannes

443

Interaction of light with gravitational waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical properties of electromagnetic waves in the presence of a gravitational plane wave are analyzed. Formulas for the Stokes parameters describing the polarization of light are obtained in closed form. The particular case of a constant amplitude gravitational wave is worked out explicitly.

Shahen Hacyan

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Decay of a Near-Inertial Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decay of a downward propagating near-inertial wave was observed over four days. During this short period, the energy of the near-inertial wave decreased by 70%. The shear layers produced by the wave were regions of enhanced turbulent ...

Dave Hebert; J. N. Moum

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Large hazardous floods as translatory waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory for non-stationary flow in translatory waves is developed for an inclined plane in a prismatic channel and a funneling channel. The existence of translatory waves traveling over dry land or superimposed on constant flow is established, and ... Keywords: Flood hazard, Flow simulation, Jokulhlaup, Translatory waves

Jonas Elíasson; Snorri Pall Kjaran; Sigurdur Larus Holm; Magnus Tumi Gudmundsson; Gudrun Larsen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Robots on Waves By Cianna Beltran, Editor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The Wave Glider is about the size of a surfboard with a wave-based propulsion system and two solar panels that move across the ocean measuring weather and water quality. The goal is that these robot wave riders such as water quality and weather conditions. Photo courtesy of http://liquidr.com/ #12;Page 2Seawords, December

447

Suppression of Stationary Planetary Waves by Internal Gravity Waves in the Mesosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suppression of stationary planetary waves by internal gravity waves in the mesosphere is treated using a quasi-geostrophic model on a midlatitude beta-plane. The drag forces due to internal gravity waves are parameterized based on the wave ...

Saburo Miyahara

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )}. In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Karpen, Judith T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. Richard, E-mail: pbu3@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: judy.karpen@nasa.gov, E-mail: devore@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Effects of Wave Energy Converters on a Monochromatic Wave Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in wave energy converters as a possible means of providing renewable energy, the effects of a wave energy The interest in renewable energies is currently increasing due to the reported rise in global temperature is that of wave energy. The research is multifaceted and includes research on the efficiency of wave energy

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

450

To Wave Or Not To Wave? Order Release Policies for Warehouses with an Automated Sorter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave-based release policies are prevalent in warehouses with an automated sorter, and take different

Gallien, Jérémie

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

451

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi-phased and chaotic as a highly aerated region is formed in the flow in the vicinity of the structure while water runs up onto the structure. In this study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the velocity field of the water dominant region. For measurements of an aerated region that cannot be measured by PIV, a new measurement method called bubble image velocimetry (BIV) was developed. The principle and setup of the BIV method were introduced and validated. Mean and turbulence properties were obtained through ensemble averaging repeated tests measured by both methods. The dominant and maximum velocity of the breaking wave and associated green water are discussed for the three distinct phases of the impingement-runup-overtopping sequence. The distribution of the green water velocity along the top of the structure has a nonlinear profile and the maximum velocity occurs near the front of the fast moving water. Using the measured data and applying dimensional analysis, a similarity profile for the green water flow on top of the structure was obtained, and a prediction equation was formulated. The dam breaking solution used for the green water prediction was examined with determining initial water depth based on the experiment conditions. Comparison between measurements, the prediction equation, and the dam breaking flow was made. The prediction equation and the dam break flow with appropriate initial water depth may be used to predict the green water velocity caused by extreme waves in a hurricane. To demonstrate the aeration of the breaking wave and overtopping water, void fraction was also investigated. There is strong aeration in the region of overtopping water front generated by a plunging breaker. Void fraction of overtopping water was measured using a fiber optic reflectometer (FOR). The measured velocity and void fraction were also used to estimate flow rate and water volume of overtopping water.

Ryu, Yong Uk

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Two Types of Wave Breaking in an Aquaplanet GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of two distinct types of wave breaking in an aquaplanet general circulation model (GCM) are described. A systematic analysis of wave breaking is possible because when a baroclinic wave packet is present, the wave breaking ...

Sukyoung Lee; Steven Feldstein

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Effects of Wave—Wave and Wave-Mean Flow Interactions on the Growth and Maintenance of Transient Planetary Waves in the Presence of a Mean Thermal Restoring Force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to clarify the effects of wave—wave and wave-mean flow interactions on the growth and maintenance of extratropical tropospheric transient waves in the presence of a mean thermal restoring force, numerical experiments are conducted with ...

Y. Hayashi; D. G. Golder

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Interaction of Ocean Waves with a Soft Bottom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soft muddy bottoms have significant effects on properties of water waves which propagate over them. The wave dispersion equation is modified and wave energy is dissipated by the coupling between the waves in water and those induced in the mud ...

S. V. Hsiao; O. H. Shemdin

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Charge Management for Gravitational Wave Observatories using UV LEDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accumulation of electrical charge on the end mirrors of gravitational wave observatories, such as the space-based LISA mission and ground-based LIGO detectors, can become a source of noise limiting the sensitivity of such detectors through electronic couplings to nearby surfaces. Torsion balances provide an ideal means for testing gravitational wave technologies due to their high sensitivity to small forces. Our torsion pendulum apparatus consists of a movable Au-coated Cu plate brought near a Au-coated Si plate pendulum suspended from a non-conducting quartz fiber. A UV LED located near the pendulum photoejects electrons from the surface, and a UV LED driven electron gun directs photoelectrons towards the pendulum surface. We have demonstrated both charging and discharging of the pendulum with equivalent charging rates of $\\sim

Pollack, S E; Schlamminger, S; Hagedorn, C A; Gundlach, J H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across the Tropical Pacific Ocean as a Component of the TOGA-TAO Buoy Array R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction The purpose of this document is to bring together pertinent information concerning the NOAA TOGA-TAO buoy array so that a decision can be made for the following questions: 1. Are the scientific gains from an array of short-wave radiation sensors in the equatorial Pacific Ocean sufficiently impelling that DOE/ARM should provide financial and material support to NOAA/PMEL to install and operate this array? 2. What scientists and/or scientific studies would directly benefit from such a data set? 3. What should that array look like? That is, what sub-set of buoys should be so implemented given the per-buoy

457

Nonlinear Time-Reversal of Classical Waves: Experiment and Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider time-reversal of electromagnetic waves in a closed, wave-chaotic system containing a discrete, passive, harmonic-generating nonlinearity. An experimental system is constructed as a time-reversal mirror, in which excitations generated by the nonlinearity are gathered, time-reversed, transmitted, and directed exclusively to the location of the nonlinearity. Here we show that such nonlinear objects can be purely passive (as opposed to the active nonlinearities used in previous work), and develop a high-rate secure communication system based on nonlinear time-reversal. A model of the experimental system is developed, using a star-graph network of transmission lines, with one of the lines terminated by a model diode. The model simulates time-reversal of linear and nonlinear signals, demonstrates features seen in the experimental system, and supports our interpretation of the experimental results.

Matthew Frazier; Biniyam Taddese; Bo Xiao; Thomas Antonsen; Edward Ott; Steven M. Anlage

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Astrophysically Triggered Searches for Gravitational Waves: Status and Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In gravitational-wave detection, special emphasis is put onto searches that focus on cosmic events detected by other types of astrophysical observatories. The astrophysical triggers, e.g. from gamma-ray and X-ray satellites, optical telescopes and neutrino observatories, provide a trigger time for analyzing gravitational wave data coincident with the event. In certain cases the expected frequency range, source energetics, directional and progenitor information is also available. Beyond allowing the recognition of gravitational waveforms with amplitudes closer to the noise floor of the detector, these triggered searches should also lead to rich science results even before the onset of Advanced LIGO. In this paper we provide a broad review of LIGO's astrophysically triggered searches and the sources they target.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bastarrika, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Brunet, G; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casebolt, T; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Clark, D; Clark, J; Cokelaer, T; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cutler, R M; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Dietz, A; Donovan, iF; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Duke, I; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Echols, C; Eer, A; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Flasch, K; Fotopoulos, N; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, aC; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayama, K; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Kozhevatov, I; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leindecker, N; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lin, H; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandic, V; Mrka, S; Mrka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, aaE; Martin, I; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D; McKenzie, K; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Petrie, T; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Principe, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sanchodela Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S W; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, L C; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ulmen, J; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Van Den Broeck, C; vander Sluys, M; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Presidential Policy Directive / PPD-8 National Preparedness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Homeland Security Presidential Directives, National Security Presidential Directives, and national ... days from the date of this directive, the Secretary ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Converter OWEC Converter OWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wave Energy Company Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Neutrally suspended and positively buoyant modules are quick connected into open frame networks Submerged portions are stabilized by variable ballast buoyancy chambers and optional damper sheets situated at a relatively calm depth Frame members carry shaft components of linear rotary converters associated with large point absorber buoys Both directions of reciprocal wave motion i e vertical and horizontal motion directly drive components of counter rotating electrical generators Compared to standard generators wherein one is associated with upstroke and another of smaller proportion with downstroke this configuration increases relative speed with fewer parts Electromechanical loads are real time adjustable with respect to wave sensor web resulting in optimal energy conversion from near fully submerged wave following buoys Electrical conductors are series connected and further quick connected with those of other modules via upper frame members Through implementation of rep

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461

Coronal Seismology and the Propagation of Acoustic Waves Along Coronal Loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a combination of analytical theory, numerical simulation, and data analysis to study the propagation of acoustic waves along coronal loops. We show that the intensity perturbation of a wave depends on a number of factors, including dissipation of the wave energy, pressure and temperature gradients in the loop atmosphere, work action between the wave and a flow, and the sensitivity properties of the observing instrument. In particular, the scale length of the intensity perturbation varies directly with the dissipation scale length (i.e., damping length) and the scale lengths of pressure, temperature, and velocity. We simulate wave propagation in three different equilibrium loop models and find that dissipation and pressure and temperature stratification are the most important effects in the low corona where the waves are most easily detected. Velocity effects are small, and cross-sectional area variations play no direct role for lines-of-sight that are normal to the loop axis. The intensity perturbation scale lengths in our simulations agree very well with the scale lengths we measure in a sample of loops observed by TRACE. The median observed value is 4.35x10^9 cm. In some cases the intensity perturbation increases with height, which is likely an indication of a temperature inversion in the loop (i.e., temperature that decreases with height). Our most important conclusion is that thermal conduction, the primary damping mechanism, is accurately described by classical transport theory. There is no need to invoke anomalous processes to explain the observations.

J. A. Klimchuk; S. E. M. Tanner; I. De Moortel

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

462

Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

463

Millimeter-wave active probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza (Sunnyvale, CA); Bloom, David M. (Portola Valley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Statistics of Extreme Waves in Random Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves traveling through random media exhibit random focusing that leads to extremely high wave intensities even in the absence of nonlinearities. Although such extreme events are present in a wide variety of physical systems and the statistics of the highest waves is important for their analysis and forecast, it remains poorly understood in particular in the regime where the waves are highest. We suggest a new approach that greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis and calculate the scaling and the distribution of the highest waves valid for a wide range of parameters.

Jakob J. Metzger; Ragnar Fleischmann; Theo Geisel

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

466

NIST Quantum Physics Division 1998 - Current Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These include quantitative measurements of the basic thermodynamics and energetics of condensates and their response to standing-wave ...

467

OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OTRC Wave Basin OTRC Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name OTRC Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (OTRC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 5.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $300/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 25 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.6 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description GEDAP 3D wave generation software, 48 hinged flap wave generator

468

MHK Technologies/Uppsala Seabased AB Wave Energy Converter | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AB Wave Energy Converter AB Wave Energy Converter < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uppsala Seabased AB Wave Energy Converter.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Uppsala University Division for Electricity Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The system consists of a linear permanent magnet synchronous generator located on the sea floor The generator is connected directly via a line to a buoy on the surface There are no intermediate energy conversion steps thus the generator motion is the same as the buoy motion Several generators 3 today are connected to a marine substation where the voltage is converted to grid frequency transformed to higher voltage and transmitted to shore All electrical cables throughout the system are fixed i e there are no motions that subject the cables to bending moments

469

PPPL3252 Preprint: June 1997, UC420, 427 Role of Plasma Edge in the Direct Launch Ion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installed in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to test a concept of generating sheared flow 2 in order efficiency for the core deposition. In order to launch IBW, it is necessary to first couple to cold plasma that it is difficult to couple directly. There are two cold plasma waves which can couple directly to IBW, namely

470

PPPL-3252 -Preprint: June 1997, UC-420, 427 Role of Plasma Edge in the Direct Launch Ion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to test a concept of generating sheared flow2 in order to trigger efficiency for the core deposition. In order to launch IBW, it is necessary to first couple to cold plasma that it is difficult to couple directly. There are two cold plasma waves which can couple directly to IBW, namely

471

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Direct Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Use Direct Use Photo of alligators on a farm. Geothermally heated waters allow alligators to thrive on a farm in Colorado, where temperatures can drop below freezing. Geothermal reservoirs of hot water, which are found a few miles or more beneath the Earth's surface, can be used to provide heat directly. This is called the direct use of geothermal energy. Geothermal direct use has a long history, going back to when people began using hot springs for bathing, cooking food, and loosening feathers and skin from game. Today, hot springs are still used as spas. But there are now more sophisticated ways of using this geothermal resource. In modern direct-use systems, a well is drilled into a geothermal reservoir to provide a steady stream of hot water. The water is brought up through

472

Waves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acerca de las ondas Acerca de las ondas Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Hablando en términos simples, una onda es algo que oscila en el tiempo y en el espacio. Las ondas se extienden de un lugar a otro. Pueden vibrar periódicamente (como el sonido de la nota de un violín) o de modo no periódico (como en el sonido de una explosión, por ejemplo.) Todas las ondas tienen las siguientes propiedades: El tamaño de la vibración se llama su amplitud. Cuán seguido ocurre la vibración es la frecuencia. La distancia que la onda ha recorrido entre dos máximos es la longitud de onda. Puesto que una onda dada se propaga a una determinada velocidad, a través de un material, si Usted incrementa la frecuencia de la onda, la distancia entre crestas disminuirá (es decir se produce una disminución

473

Searching for Gravitational-Wave Bursts with LIGO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent results from searches by the LIGO Science Collaboration for bursts of gravitational-wave radiation, as well as the status of other ongoing searches. These include directed searches for bursts associated with observed sources (gamma-ray bursts, soft gamma repeaters) and untriggered searches for bursts from unknown sources. We also present the status of some newer investigations, such as coherent network methods. We show methods for interpreting our search results in terms of astrophysical source distributions that improve their accessibility to the wider community.

K. A. Thorne

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

474

Quality Assurance: Policy and Directives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy and Directives The Office of Quality Assurance is responsible for DOE's quality assurance (QA) policy and requirements, and for providing assistance with QA implementation....

475

DOE Directives | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

476

Direct cooled power electronics substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

Wiles, Randy H. (Powell, TN), Wereszczak, Andrew A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN); Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

The universally growing mode in the solar atmosphere: coronal heating by drift waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heating of the plasma in the solar atmosphere is discussed within both frameworks of fluid and kinetic drift wave theory. We show that the basic ingredient necessary for the heating is the presence of density gradients in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field vector. Such density gradients are a source of free energy for the excitation of drift waves. We use only well established basic theory, verified experimentally in laboratory plasmas. Two mechanisms of the energy exchange and heating are shown to take place simultaneously: one due to the Landau effect in the direction parallel to the magnetic field, and another one, stochastic heating, in the perpendicular direction. The stochastic heating i) is due to the electrostatic nature of the waves, ii) is more effective on ions than on electrons, iii) acts predominantly in the perpendicular direction, iv) heats heavy ions more efficiently than lighter ions, and v) may easily provide a drift wave heating rate that is orders of magnitude above the ...

Vranjes, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements  

SciTech Connect

Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Microsensor Research and Development Dept.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W. [Univ. Tuebingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Numerical simulation and analysis to tidal currents and wave field of pearl river  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrodynamic model (MOCOE) is used in tidal current and wave calculation in Yamen river, which is one of the eight estuaries of Pearl River. The method of combining curvilinear orthogonal coordinates in the horizontal direction with Sigma mapping coordinates ... Keywords: curvilinear orthogonal, numerical simulation, tidal currents

Wu Hongxu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

On Stable and Unstable Rossby Waves in Non-Zonal Oceanic Shear Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive linear equations for the study of baroclinic instability of a non-zonal oceanic shear flow whose direction is allowed to change with depth. These equations can be used to study unstable disturbances as well as stable Rossby waves in ...

Yong Q. Kang; James Michael Price; Lorenz Magaard

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Nonlinear whistler wave scattering in space plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the evolution of nonlinear scattering of whistler mode waves by kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) in time and two spatial dimensions is studied analytically. The authors suggest this nonlinear process as a mechanism of kinetic Alfven wave generation in space plasmas. This mechanism can explain the dependence of Alfven wave generation on whistler waves observed in magnetospheric and ionospheric plasmas. The observational data show a dependence for the generation of long periodic pulsations Pc5 on whistler wave excitation in the auroral and subauroral zone of the magnetosphere. This dependence was first observed by Ondoh T.I. For 79 cases of VLF wave excitation registered by Ondoh at College Observatory (L=64.6 N), 52 of them were followed by Pc5 geomagnetic pulsation generation. Similar results were obtained at the Loparskaia Observatory (L=64 N) for auroral and subauroral zone of the magnetosphere. Thus, in 95% of the cases when VLF wave excitation occurred the generation of long periodic geomagnetic pulsations Pc5 were observed. The observations also show that geomagnetic pulsations Pc5 are excited simultaneously or insignificantly later than VLF waves. In fact these two phenomena are associated genetically: the excitation of VLF waves leads to the generation of geomagnetic pulsations Pc5. The observations show intensive generation of geomagnetic pulsations during thunderstorms. Using an electromagnetic noise monitoring system covering the ULF range (0.01-10 Hz) A.S. Fraser-Smith observed intensive ULF electromagnetic wave during a large thunderstorm near the San-Francisco Bay area on September 23, 1990. According to this data the most significant amplification in ULF wave activity was observed for waves with a frequency of 0.01 Hz and it is entirely possible that stronger enhancements would have been measured at lower frequencies.

Yukhimuk, V.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Instabilities and generation of a quasistationary magnetic field by the interaction of relativistically intense electromagnetic wave with a plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the interaction of the superstrong laser radiation with an isotropic plasma leads to the generation of low frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves and in particular a quasistationary magnetic field. When the relativistic circularly polarized transverse EM wave propagates along z-axis, it creates a ponderomotive force, which affects the motion of particles along the direction of its propagation. On the other hand, motion of the particles across the direction of propagation is defined by the ponderomotive potential. The dispersion relation for the transverse EM wave using a special distribution function, which has an anisotropic form, is derived. The dispersion relation is subsequently investigated for a number of special cases. In general, it is shown that the growth rate of the EM wave strongly depends upon its intensity.

Gillani, S. S. A.; Shah, H. A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Tsintsadze, N. L. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Institute of Physics, Tbilisi 380077 (Georgia); Razzaq, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Existence and conditional energetic stability of three-dimensional fully localised solitary gravity-capillary water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show that the hydrodynamic problem for three-dimensional water waves with strong surface-tension effects admits a fully localised solitary wave which decays to the undisturbed state of the water in every horizontal direction. The proof is based upon the classical variational principle that a solitary wave of this type is a critical point of the energy subject to the constraint that the momentum is fixed. We prove the existence of a minimiser of the energy subject to the constraint that the momentum is fixed and small. The existence of a small-amplitude solitary wave is thus assured, and since the energy and momentum are both conserved quantities a standard argument may be used to establish the stability of the set of minimisers as a whole. `Stability' is however understood in a qualified sense due to the lack of a global well-posedness theory for three-dimensional water waves.

Buffoni, Boris; Sun, Shu-Ming; Wahlén, Erik

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Existence and conditional energetic stability of three-dimensional fully localised solitary gravity-capillary water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show that the hydrodynamic problem for three-dimensional water waves with strong surface-tension effects admits a fully localised solitary wave which decays to the undisturbed state of the water in every horizontal direction. The proof is based upon the classical variational principle that a solitary wave of this type is a critical point of the energy subject to the constraint that the momentum is fixed. We prove the existence of a minimiser of the energy subject to the constraint that the momentum is fixed and small. The existence of a small-amplitude solitary wave is thus assured, and since the energy and momentum are both conserved quantities a standard argument may be used to establish the stability of the set of minimisers as a whole. `Stability' is however understood in a qualified sense due to the lack of a global well-posedness theory for three-dimensional water waves.

Boris Buffoni; Mark D. Groves; Shu-Ming Sun; Erik Wahlén

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

485

Directional Distributions and Mean Square Slopes in the Equilibrium and Saturation Ranges of the Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field observations show that the crosswind component constitutes a significant portion of the ocean surface mean square slope. The average ratio between the crosswind and upwind mean square slope components is 0.88 in slick-covered ocean ...

Paul A. Hwang; David W. Wang

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

The Variational Bayesian Approach to Fitting Mixture Models to Circular Wave Direction Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emerging variational Bayesian (VB) technique for approximate Bayesian statistical inference is a non-simulation-based and time-efficient approach. It provides a useful, practical alternative to other Bayesian statistical approaches such as ...

Burton Wu; Clare A. McGrory; Anthony N. Pettitt