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1

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California...

2

Anisotropies in the gravitational-wave stochastic background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider anisotropies in the stochastic background of gravitational-waves (SBGW) arising from random fluctuations in the number of gravitational-wave sources. We first develop the general formalism which can be applied to different cosmological or astrophysical scenarios. We then apply this formalism to calculate the anisotropies of SBGW associated with the fluctuations in the number of cosmic string loops, considering both cosmic string cusps and kinks. We calculate the anisotropies as a function of angle and frequency.

Ölmez, S.; Mandic, V. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Siemens, X., E-mail: olmez@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: mandic@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: siemens@gravity.phys.uwm.edu [Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Electromagnetic waves and electron anisotropies downstream of supercritical interplanetary shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present waveform observations of electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler waves with f_ci 1.01. Thus, the whistler mode waves appear to be driven by a heat flux instability and cause perpendicular heating of the halo electrons. The lower hybrid waves show a much weaker correlation between \\partialB and normalized heat flux magnitude and are often observed near magnetic field gradients. A third type of event shows fluctuations consistent with a mixture of both lower hybrid and whistler mode waves. These results suggest that whistler waves may indeed be regulating the electron heat flux and the halo temperature anisotropy, which is important for theories and simulations of electron distribution evolution from the sun to the earth.

Wilson, L B; Szabo, A; Breneman, A; Cattell, C A; Goetz, K; Kellogg, P J; Kersten, K; Kasper, J C; Maruca, B A; Pulupa, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Anisotropy and mantle flow in the Chile-Argentina subduction zone from shear wave splitting analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropy and mantle flow in the Chile-Argentina subduction zone from shear wave splitting subduction zone. Data is from the CHARGE network, which traversed Chile and western Argentina across two, M. L., G. Zandt, E. Triep, M. Fouch, and S. Beck (2004), Anisotropy and mantle flow in the Chile-Argentina

Fouch, Matthew J.

5

Stress-wave energy management through material anisotropy Alireza V. Amirkhizi, Aref Tehranian, Sia Nemat-Nasser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress-wave energy management through material anisotropy Alireza V. Amirkhizi, Aref Tehranian, Sia that if this axis initially coincides with the stress-wave vector, then the energy of the plane waves would closely the required anisotropy, and to experimentally demonstrate the management of stress-wave energy in a desired

Nemat-Nasser, Sia

6

Statistical Anisotropies in Gravitational Waves in Solid Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid inflation can support a long period of anisotropic inflation. We calculate the statistical anisotropies in the scalar and tensor power spectra and their cross-correlation in anisotropic solid inflation. The tensor-scalar cross-correlation can either be positive or negative, which impacts the statistical anisotropies of the TT and TB spectra in CMB map more significantly compared with the tensor self-correlation. The tensor power spectrum contains potentially comparable contributions from quadrupole and octopole angular patterns, which is different from the power spectra of scalar, the cross-correlation or the scalar bispectrum, where the quadrupole type statistical anisotropy dominates over octopole.

Mohammad Akhshik; Razieh Emami; Hassan Firouzjahi; Yi Wang

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Ion anisotropy driven waves in the earth`s magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies of low frequency waves ({omega}{sub r} {le} {Omega}{sub p}, where {Omega}{sub p} is the proton gyrofrequency) observed by AMPTE/CCE in the plasma depletion layer and magnetosheath proper arereviewed. These waves are shown to be well identified with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves. By statistically analyzing the transitions between the magnetopause and time intervals with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves, it is established that the regions in which ion cyclotron waves occur are between the magnetopause and the regions where the mirror mode is observed. This result is shown to follow from the fact that the wave spectral properties are ordered with respect to the proton parallel beta, {beta}{sub {parallel}p}. The later result is predicted by linear Vlasov theory using a simple model for the magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer. Thus, the observed spectral type can be associated with relative distance from the magnetopause. The anisotropy-beta relation, A{sub p} {triple_bond} (T{perpendicular}/T{sub {parallel}}){sub p} {minus} 1 = 0.50{beta}{sub {parallel}p}{sup {minus}0.48} results from the fact that the waves pitch angle scatter the particles so that the plasma is near marginal stability, and is a fundamental constraint on the plasma.

Denton, R.E.; Hudson, M.K. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Anderson, B.J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Fuselier, S.A. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Labs., CA (United States); Gary, S.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ion anisotropy driven waves in the earth's magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies of low frequency waves ([omega][sub r] [le] [Omega][sub p], where [Omega][sub p] is the proton gyrofrequency) observed by AMPTE/CCE in the plasma depletion layer and magnetosheath proper arereviewed. These waves are shown to be well identified with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves. By statistically analyzing the transitions between the magnetopause and time intervals with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves, it is established that the regions in which ion cyclotron waves occur are between the magnetopause and the regions where the mirror mode is observed. This result is shown to follow from the fact that the wave spectral properties are ordered with respect to the proton parallel beta, [beta][sub [parallel]p]. The later result is predicted by linear Vlasov theory using a simple model for the magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer. Thus, the observed spectral type can be associated with relative distance from the magnetopause. The anisotropy-beta relation, A[sub p] [triple bond] (T[perpendicular]/T[sub [parallel

Denton, R.E.; Hudson, M.K. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Anderson, B.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.); Fuselier, S.A. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Labs., CA (United States)); Gary, S.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

CBR Anisotropy from Primordial Gravitational Waves in Two-Component Inflationary Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine stochastic temperature fluctuations of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) arising via the Sachs-Wolfe effect from gravitational wave perturbations produced in the early universe. We consider spatially flat, perturbed FRW models that begin with an inflationary phase, followed by a mixed phase containing both radiation and dust. The scale factor during the mixed phase takes the form $a(\\eta)=c_1\\eta^2+c_2\\eta+c_3$, where $c_i$ are constants. During the mixed phase the universe smoothly transforms from being radiation to dust dominated. We find analytic expressions for the graviton mode function during the mixed phase in terms of spheroidal wave functions. This mode function is used to find an analytic expression for the multipole moments $\\langle a_l^2\\rangle$ of the two-point angular correlation function $C(\\gamma)$ for the CBR anisotropy. The analytic expression for the multipole moments is written in terms of two integrals, which are evaluated numerically. The results are compared to multipoles calculated for models that are {\\it completely} dust dominated at last-scattering. We find that the multipoles $\\langle a_l^2\\rangle$ of the CBR temperature perturbations for $l>10$ are significantly larger for a universe that contains both radiation and dust at last-scattering. We compare our results with recent, similar numerical work and find good agreement. The spheroidal wave functions may have applications to other problems of cosmological interest.

Scott Koranda; Bruce Allen

1994-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geophys. J. Int. (1997) 129,439-449 Shear-wave anisotropy and the stress field from borehole recordings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geophys. J. Int. (1997) 129,439-449 Shear-wave anisotropy and the stress field from borehole of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740, USA Accepted 1997 January 16. Received 1997 January 14; in original form 1995 August 30. S U M M A R Y 53 local earthquakes

Edinburgh, University of

11

CONSTRAINTS ON THE HIGH-l POWER SPECTRUM OF MILLIMETER-WAVE ANISOTROPIES FROM APEX-SZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the angular power spectrum of millimeter wave anisotropies with the APEX-SZ instrument. APEX-SZ has mapped 0.8 deg{sup 2} of sky at a frequency of 150 GHz with an angular resolution of 1'. These new measurements significantly improve the constraints on anisotropy power at 150 GHz over the range of angular multipoles 3000 < l < 10, 000, limiting the total astronomical signal in a flat band power to be less than 105 {mu}K{sup 2} at 95% CL. We expect both submillimeter-bright, dusty galaxies and to a lesser extent secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) to significantly contribute to the observed power. Subtracting the SZE power spectrum expected for {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.8 and masking bright sources, the best-fit value for the remaining power is C {sub l} = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} x 10{sup -5} {mu}K{sup 2} (1.7{sup +1.4} {sub -1.3} Jy{sup 2} sr{sup -1}). This agrees well with model predictions for power due to submillimeter-bright, dusty galaxies. Comparing this power to the power detected by BLAST at 600 GHz, we find the frequency dependence of the source fluxes to be S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup 2.6+0.4}{sub -0.2}} if both experiments measure the same population of sources. Simultaneously fitting for the amplitude of the SZE power spectrum and a Poisson-distributed point source population, we place an upper limit on the matter fluctuation amplitude of {sigma}{sub 8} < 1.18 at 95% confidence.

Reichardt, C. L.; Zahn, O.; Ferrusca, D.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Johnson, B. R.; Lee, A. T.; Lueker, M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ade, P. A. R.; Lanting, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, CF24 3YB (United Kingdom); Basu, K.; Chon, G.; Kneissl, R. [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Bender, A. N.; Halverson, N. W. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Bertoldi, F. [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, Bonn University, Bonn (Germany); Cho, H.-M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Dobbs, M.; Kennedy, J. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Horellou, C.; Johansson, D. [Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden)] (and others)

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

Analysis of PS-converted wave seismic data in the presence of azimuthal anisotropy   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shear-wave splitting and azimuthal variations of seismic attributes are two major anisotropic effects induced by vertically-aligned fractures. They both have influences on seismic data processing and interpretation, and ...

Liu, Weining

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Detection of azimuthal anisotropy from 3-D p-wave seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the equation; (II ? 1) for u(z) = V t(z) is wave slowness. Velocity estimation using reflections and the tau-p approach was first suggested by Schultz and Claerbout (1978), They showed that velocity analysis can be done in a ' similar manner... to conventional analysis by looking for maximum coherency over each ' trajectory of ellipses in r-p domain instead of a hyperbola in conventional analysis. Schultz (1982) also suggested a method of layer-stripping for velocity estimation in the r-p domain...

Yildizel, Ali

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The elastic anisotropy of marble  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on acoustic anisotropy in marble has been shown to be negligable in four naturally-deformed samples. Compressional-wave velocities in each of the samples were calculated from the single crystal elastic constants of calcite and the orien- tat1ons... thanks to my husband, Fred Tubb, for his patience and support. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under grant OCN 7817919 and Office of Naval Research contract N-00014- 80-0-0013. To my mother and father, for al1...

Gebhard, Susan Nash

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Stratification of anisotropy in the Pacific upper mantle Daniel B. Smith, Michael H. Ritzwoller, and Nikolai M. Shapiro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratification of anisotropy in the Pacific upper mantle Daniel B. Smith, Michael H. Ritzwoller: surface waves, azimuthal anisotropy, Pacific Citation: Smith, D. B., M. H. Ritzwoller, and N. M. Shapiro

Shapiro, Nikolai

16

Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

CMB ANISOTROPIES: AN OVERVIEW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A brief outline of the current status of CMB anisotropies and what they might mean, heavily biased towards the perspective of Berkeley theorists. Based on a talk presented at the 17th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics held in Munich, December 1994.

Douglas Scott

1995-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ion temperature anisotropy limitation in high beta plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies (LEIA) space simulation chamber display an inverse correlation between the upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy and the parallel ion beta ({beta}=8{pi}nkT/B{sup 2}). Fluctuation measurements indicate the presence of low frequency, transverse, electromagnetic waves with wave numbers and frequencies that are consistent with predictions for Alfven Ion Cyclotron instabilities. These observations are also consistent with in situ spacecraft measurements in the Earth's magnetosheath and with a theoretical/computational model that predicts that such an upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy is imposed by scattering from enhanced fluctuations due to growth of the Alfven ion cyclotron instability. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Keiter, Paul A. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Balkey, Matthew M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Boivin, Robert F. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kline, John L. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Blackburn, Melanie [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Structure and evolution of the Australian continent : insights from seismic and mechanical heterogeneity and anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I explore the geophysical structure and evolution of the Australian continental lithosphere. I combine insights from isotropic and anisotropic seismic surface-wave tomography with an analysis of the anisotropy ...

Simons, Frederik Jozef Maurits, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

SELF-CONSISTENT ION CYCLOTRON ANISOTROPY-BETA RELATION FOR SOLAR WIND PROTONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive a set of self-consistent marginally stable states for a system of ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the large-scale magnetic field through a homogeneous proton-electron plasma. The proton distributions and the wave dispersions are related through the condition that no further ion-cyclotron resonant particle scattering or wave growth/damping may take place. The thermal anisotropy of the protons in these states therefore defines the threshold value for triggering the proton-cyclotron anisotropy instability. A number of recent papers have noted that the anisotropy of solar wind protons at 1 AU does not seem to be limited by the proton-cyclotron anisotropy threshold, even at low plasma beta. However, this puzzle seems to be due solely to the estimation of this anisotropy threshold under the assumption that the protons have a bi-Maxwellian distribution. We note that bi-Maxwellian distributions are never marginally stable to the resonant cyclotron interaction, so these estimates do not represent physically valid thresholds. The threshold anisotropies obtained from our marginally stable states are much larger, as a function of proton parallel beta, than the bi-Maxwellian estimates, and we show that the measured data remains below these more rigorous thresholds. Thus, the results of this paper resolve the apparent contradiction presented by the solar wind anisotropy observations at 1 AU: the bi-Maxwellian anisotropies are not rigorous thresholds, and so do not limit the proton distributions in the solar wind.

Isenberg, Philip A. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Maruca, Bennett A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kasper, Justin C., E-mail: phil.isenberg@unh.edu, E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jkasper@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Studying Hydraulic Fracturing through Time-variant Seismic Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Chan (1991) and an improvement of window selection by Teanby, Kendall and van der Baan (2004). These methods will be discussed in detail in the next section. The result of this process should indicate the best fit value of polarization direction... showing linear pattern. Type 1 indicates anisotropy effects at the wave propagation path. Type 2 does not. File # P wave motion S wave motion Looking through Propagation Dir. 1604 1603 1310 0.5 0.0 0.5 X 0.5 0.0 0.5 Y 0.5 0.0 0.5 Z 2 1 0...

Liu, Qifan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Permeability anisotropy and resistivity anisotropy of mechanically compressed mudrocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permeability anisotropy (the ratio of the horizontal to vertical permeability) is an important parameter used in sedimentary basin models and geotechnical design to model fluid flow, locate hydrocarbon reserves and estimate ...

Adams, Amy Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Wind anisotropies and GRB progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of wind anisotropies on the stellar evolution leading to collapsars. Rotating models of a 60 M$_\\odot$ star with $\\Omega/\\Omega_{\\rm crit}=0.75$ on the ZAMS, accounting for shellular rotation and a magnetic field, with and without wind anisotropies, are computed at $Z$=0.002 until the end of the core He-burning phase. Only the models accounting for the effects of the wind anisotropies retain enough angular momentum in their core to produce a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB). The chemical composition is such that a type Ic supernova event occurs. Wind anisotropies appear to be a key physical ingredient in the scenario leading to long GRBs.

Georges Meynet; Andre Maeder

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

TACMB-1: The Theory of Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (Bibliographic Resource Letter)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the theory of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. Journal articles, web pages, and books are cited for the following topics: discovery, cosmological origin, early work, recombination, general CMB anisotropy references, primary CMB anisotropies (numerical, analytical work), secondary effects, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect(s), lensing, reionization, polarization, gravity waves, defects, topology, origin of fluctuations, development of fluctuations, inflation and other ties to particle physics, parameter estimation, recent constraints, web resources, foregrounds, observations and observational issues, and gaussianity.

Martin White; J. D. Cohn

2002-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Effect on high-T{sub c} superconductivity of the a-b anisotropy in the normal phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously proposed a two-dimensional d+s-wave superconductivity model in order to account for high-T{sub c} cuprates, in which an orthorhombic distorsion is present within the layers. Conversely, recent microwave conductivity data suggest that a substantial portion of the a-b anisotropy in the magnetic penetration depth is a normal-state effect. We thus generalize in this paper our d+s model to take into account the normal-state anisotropy. We show that such an anisotropy reacts not only on the a-b anisotropy in the transport coefficients but also on the density of states and other thermodynamic quantities. We hope that future experiments will confirm this effect and help us to sort out the a-b anisotropies due to the normal state with higher precision in a number of different compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Beal-Monod, M.T. [Physique des Solides, Universite de Paris-sud, 91400 Orsay (France)] [Physique des Solides, Universite de Paris-sud, 91400 Orsay (France); Maki, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Thickness dependence of magnetic anisotropy in thin Ni films electrodeposited onto the (011) and (001) surfaces of n-GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brillouin light scattering from thermal spin waves has been exploited to investigate the thickness dependence of magnetic anisotropy of Ni films, with thickness in the range 7-35 nm, grown by electrodeposition onto either (011)- or (001)-GaAs substrates. In the former case, Ni films exhibit a well-defined in-plane uniaxial anisotropy induced by the symmetry of the substrate. In the case of the (001)-GaAs substrate, instead, the magnetic anisotropy results from a combination of both a fourfold and a twofold contribution. The physical mechanisms responsible for the observed anisotropy, as well as its dependence on film thickness, are discussed in detail.

Gubbiotti, G.; Carlotti, G.; Tacchi, S.; Liu, Y.-K.; Scheck, C.; Schad, R.; Zangari, G. [INFM CRS-SOFT, c/o Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', I-00185, Rome (Italy); INFM UdR-Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); INFM-National Center for nanoStructures and bioSystem at Surfaces (S3) Modena, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); IINFM UdR-Perugia, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa Alabama 35401 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Gravimagnetic shock waves in the anisotropic plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations for the anisotropic magnetoactive plasma are obtained and accurately integrated in the plane gravitational wave metrics. The dependence of the induction mechanism of the gravimagnetic shock waves on the degree of the magnetoactive plasma anisotropy is analyzed.

Yu. G. Ignatyev; D. N. Gorokhov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Imaging CSEM data in the presence of electrical anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formation anisotropy should be incorporated into the analysis of controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data because failure to do so can produce serious artifacts in the resulting resistivity images for certain data configurations of interest. This finding is demonstrated in model and case studies. Sensitivity to horizontal resistivity will be strongest in the broadside electric field data where detectors are offset from the tow line. Sensitivity to the vertical resistivity is strongest for over flight data where the transmitting antenna passes directly over the detecting antenna. Consequently, consistent treatment of both over flight and broadside electric field measurements requires an anisotropic modeling assumption. To produce a consistent resistivity model for such data we develop and employ a 3D CSEM imaging algorithm that treats transverse anisotropy. The algorithm is based upon non-linear conjugate gradients and full wave equation modeling. It exploits parallel computing systems to effectively treat 3D imaging problems and CSEM data volumes of industrial size. Here we use it to demonstrate the anisotropic imaging process on model and field data sets from the North Sea and offshore Brazil. We also verify that isotropic imaging of over flight data alone produces an image generally consistent with the vertical resistivity. However, superior data fits are obtained when the same over flight data are analyzed assuming an anisotropic resistivity model.

Newman, G.A.; Commer, M.; Carazzone, J.J.

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

Inflation and CMB Anisotropy from Quantum Metric Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model of cosmological evolution of the early and late Universe which is consistent with observational data and naturally explains the origin of inflation and dark energy. We show that the de Sitter accelerated expansion of the FLRW space with no matter fields (hereinafter, empty space) is its natural state, and the model does not require either a scalar field or cosmological constant or any other hypotheses. This is due to the fact that the de Sitter state is an exact solution of the rigorous mathematically consistent equations of one-loop quantum gravity for the empty FLRW space that are finite off the mass shell. Space without matter fields is not empty, as it always has the natural quantum fluctuations of the metric, i.e. gravitons. Therefore, the empty (in this sense) space is filled with gravitons, which have the backreaction effect on its evolution over time forming a self-consistent de Sitter instanton leading to the exponentially accelerated expansion of the Universe. At the start and the end of cosmological evolution, the Universe is assumed to be empty, which explains the origin of inflation and dark energy. This scenario leads to the prediction that the signs of the parameter 1+w should be opposite in both cases, and this fact is consistent with observations. The fluctuations of the number of gravitons lead to fluctuations of their energy density which in turn leads to the observed CMB temperature anisotropy of the order of 10^-5 and CMB polarization. In the frame of this scenario, it is not a hypothetical scalar field that generates inflation and relic gravitational waves but on the contrary, the gravitational waves (gravitons) generate dark energy, inflation, CMB anisotropy and polarization.

Leonid Marochnik; Daniel Usikov

2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

30

Cosmological Rotation of Quantum-Mechanical Origin and Anisotropy of the Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that rotational cosmological perturbations can be generated in the early Universe, similarly to gravitational waves. The generating mechanism is quantum-mechanical in its nature, and the created perturbations should now be placed in squeezed vacuum quantum states. The physical conditions under which the phenomenon can occur are formulated. The generated perturbations can contribute to the large-angular-scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. An exact formula is derived for the angular correlation function of the temperature variations caused by the quantum-mechanically generated rotational perturbations. The multipole expansion begins from the dipole component. The comparison with the case of gravitational waves is made.

L. P. Grishchuk

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT AND ANISOTROPIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy at {approx}10 TeV can be explained by a modified Compton-Getting effect in the magnetized flow field of old supernova remnants. Cosmic rays arrive isotropically to the flow field and are then carried along with the flow to produce a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction. This approach suggests an optimum energy scale for detecting the anisotropy. Two key assumptions are that propagation is based on turbulence following a Kolmogorov law and that cosmic-ray interactions are dominated by transport via cosmic-ray-excited magnetic irregularities through the stellar wind of an exploding star and its shock shell. A prediction is that the amplitude is smaller at lower energies due to incomplete sampling of the velocity field and also smaller at larger energies due to smearing.

Biermann, Peter L. [MPI for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Becker Tjus, Julia; Mandelartz, Matthias [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Seo, Eun-Suk [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Overview of Secondary Anisotropies of the CMB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the major contribution to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies are the sought-after primordial fluctuations produced at the surface of last scattering, other effects produce secondary fluctuations at lower redshifts. These secondary fluctuations must be carefully accounted for, in order to isolate primordial fluctuations. In addition, they are interesting in their own right, since they provide a wealth of information on the geometry and local properties of the universe. Here, I survey the different sources of secondary anisotropies and extragalactic foregrounds of the CMB. I show their relative importance on the multipole-frequency plane. I discuss in particular their impact in the future CMB missions MAP and Planck Surveyor.

A. Refregier

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Gravity Waves Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;14/03/2014 6 H L H L L Phase & Group Velocity #12;14/03/2014 7 Doppler Effect #12;14/03/2014 8 Shock Waves #12;14/03/2014 14 Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Supernova blast waves #12;14/03/2014 15 Tycho's Remnant (SN 1572AD A SNR flythrough Theory of Supernova Blast Waves Supernovae: Type Ia Subsonic deflagration wave turning

Weijgaert, Rien van de

34

Role of anisotropy in noncontacting thermoelectric materials characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of anisotropy in noncontacting thermoelectric materials characterization Adnan H. Nayfeh by the intrinsic thermoelectric anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the material to be inspected. This article presents for non- destructive evaluation NDE and materials characterization. Most existing thermoelectric NDE

Nagy, Peter B.

35

Harmonic experiments to model fracture induced anisotropy KAUST ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 9, 2012 ... hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs are mainly composed of fractured rocks. Harmonic experiments to model fracture induced anisotropy ...

santos,,,

36

Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and K. , Helbig, 1994, Oilfield anisotropy--its originscharacteristics: Schlumberger Oilfield Review, 6.4, 48-56.

Brown, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

Carlos Hojvat et al.

2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

Relative sensitivity of formability to anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work compares the relative importance of material anisotropy in sheet forming as compared to other material and process variables. The comparison is made quantitative by the use of normalized dependencies of depth to failure (forming limit is reached) on various measures of anisotropy, as well as strain and rate sensitivity, friction, and tooling. Comparisons are made for a variety of forming processes examined previously in the literature as well as two examples of complex stampings in this work. 7 The examples rover a range from nearly pure draw to nearly pure stretch situations, and show that for materials following a quadratic yield criterion, anisotropy is among the most sensitive parameters influencing formability. For materials following higher-exponent yield criteria, the dependency is milder but is still of the order of most other process parameters. However, depending on the particular forming operation, it is shown that in some cases anisotropy may be ignored, whereas in others its consideration is crucial to a good quality analysis.

Logan, R.W.; Maker, B.N.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Supplementary Information for `Spintronic magnetic anisotropy'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-filtering effect 19 G. On-demand bistability: writing and storing spin 20 H. Magnetic switching of spintronic of anisotropy by analysing the trans- port properties of a high-spin quantum dot embedded between two Heisenberg interaction K energy of a single electron occupying

Loss, Daniel

40

The Standard Cosmological Model and CMB Anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a course on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in the standard cosmological model, designed for beginning graduate students and advanced undergraduates. ``Standard cosmological model'' in this context means a Universe dominated by some form of cold dark matter (CDM) with adiabatic perturbations generated at some initial epoch, e.g., Inflation, and left to evolve under gravity alone (which distinguishes it from defect models). The course is primarily theoretical and concerned with the physics of CMB anisotropies in this context and their relation to structure formation. Brief presentations of the uniform Big Bang model and of the observed large--scale structure of the Universe are given. The bulk of the course then focuses on the evolution of small perturbations to the uniform model and on the generation of temperature anisotropies in the CMB. The theoretical development is performed in the (pseudo--)Newtonian gauge because it aids intuitive understanding by providing a quick reference to classical (Newtonian) concepts. The fundamental goal of the course is not to arrive at a highly exact nor exhaustive calculation of the anisotropies, but rather to a good understanding of the basic physics that goes into such calculations.

James G. Bartlett

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The expected anisotropy in solid inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the "solid" must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy $\\gtrsim 3\\%$ in the power spectrum is to be expected, if inflation lasted $\\gtrsim 20-30$ e-folds more than the final $50-60$ efolds required to generare the CMB modes. We also comment and point out various similarities between solid inflation and models of inflation where a suitable coupling of the inflaton to a vector kinetic term $F^{2}$ gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

Nicola Bartolo; Marco Peloso; Angelo Ricciardone; Caner Unal

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Shear-wave splitting as a tool for the characterization of geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SWS is a phenomenon whereby shear seismic waves split into two as a result of the mechanical anisotropy created in an otherwise isotropic rock by aligned micro-fractures. The...

43

Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, H{sub c2}(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was #12;tted with a power-law function {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T) = AT{sup n}. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s{sub {+-}}#6; scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s{sub {+-}}#6; gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at {lambda}#21;(T), in optimally - doped, SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (T{sub c} ~ #25;25 K) and annealed (T{sub c} ~ #25;35 K) single crystals of SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from #21;{lambda}(0) = 300 {+-}#6; 10 nm in as-grown samples to {lambda}#21;(0) = 275{+-}#6;10 nm. At low temperatures, {lambda}#21;(T) #24;~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from the charge-doped materials. In-plane resistivity measurements as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and its orientation with respect to the crystallographic ab-plane were used to study the upper critical field, H{sub c2}, of two overdoped compositions of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}, x=0.054 and x=0.072. Measurements were performed using precise alignment (with accuracy less than 0.1{degree}) of the magnetic field with respect to the Fe-As plane. The dependence of the H{sub c2} on angle {theta}#18; between the field and the ab- plane was measured in isothermal conditions in a broad temperature range. We found that the shape of the H{sub c2} vs. {theta}#18; curve clearly deviates from the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

Murphy, Jason [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background: Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contain a wealth of information about the past history of the universe and the present values of cosmological parameters. I ouline some of the theoretical advances of the last few years. In particular, I emphasize that for a wide class of cosmological models, theorists can accurately calculate the spectrum to better than a percent. The specturm of anisotropies today is directly related to the pattern of inhomogeneities present at the time of recombination. This recognition leads to a powerful argument that will enable us to distinguish inflationary models from other models of structure formation. If the inflationary models turn out to be correct, the free parameters in these models will be determined to unprecedented accuracy by the upcoming satellite missions.

Scott Dodelson

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming e-e, and e-p plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existence of Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming electron-electron (e-e), and electron-positron (e-p) plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy is investigated. The temperature anisotropy is included in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the streaming direction. It is shown that the beam mean speed changes the instability mode, for a streaming electron beam, from the classic Weibel to the Weibel-like mode. The analytical and numerical solutions approved that Weibel-like modes are excited for both counterstreaming e-e and e-p plasmas. The growth rates of the instabilities in e-e and e-p plasmas are compared. The growth rate is larger for e-p plasmas if the thermal anisotropy is small and the opposite is true for large thermal anisotropies. The analytical and numerical solutions are in good agreement only in the small parallel temperature and wave number limits, when the instability growth rate increases linearly with normalized wave number kc??{sub p}.

Ghorbanalilu, M. [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadegzadeh, S.; Ghaderi, Z. [Physics Department, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Microstructures and petro-fabrics of lawsonite blueschist in the North Qilian suture zone, NW China: Implications for seismic anisotropy of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are much stronger in foliated LBS than in massive LBS. In addition, a kinematic vorticity analysis suggests anisotropies occurs between glaucophane and lawsonite, the delay time of fast S-wave polarization an- isotropy). Hydrous minerals are therefore consid- ered to have enormous implications for the transportation of water

Jung, Haemyeong

47

LIMITS ON ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY AND DIFFERENTIAL FLOW FROM KINETIC INSTABILITIES: SOLAR WIND OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure and anisotropy driven instabilities such as the Alfvén/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this Letter, we use a long period of in situ measurements provided by the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha proton differential flow velocity and the alpha particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of T {sub ?}/T {sub p} (T {sub ??}/T {sub ?p}) when the alpha proton differential flow velocity is small, where T {sub ?} and T {sub p} (T {sub ??} and T {sub ?p}) are the perpendicular (parallel) temperatures of alpha particles and protons. We conjecture that this observed feature might arise from preferential alpha particle heating which can drive the alpha particles beyond the instability thresholds.

Bourouaine, Sofiane; Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)] [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Maruca, Bennett A. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kasper, Justin C., E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Radio Background from Dark Matter Annihilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of the extragalactic radio background have uncovered a significant isotropic emission across multiple frequencies spanning from 22 MHz to 10 GHz. The intensity of this non-thermal emission component significantly exceeds the expected contribution from known astrophysical sources. Interestingly, models have indicated that the annihilation of dark matter particles may reproduce both the flux and spectrum of the excess. However, the lack of a measurable anisotropy in the residual emission remains challenging for both dark matter and standard astrophysical interpretations of the ARCADE-2 data. We calculate the expected synchrotron anisotropy from dark matter annihilation and show that these models can produce very small anisotropies, though this requires galaxy clusters to have large substructure contributions and strong magnetic fields. We show that this constraint can be significantly relaxed, however, in scenarios where electrons produced via dark matter annihilation can be efficiently reaccelerated by Alfv\\'en waves in the intra-Cluster medium. Our analysis indicates that any source capable of explaining the intensity and isotropy of the extragalactic radio excess must have a spatial extension far larger than typical for baryons in galaxies, suggesting a novel physics interpretation.

Ke Fang; Tim Linden

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

anisotropy probe wmap1: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These...

50

anisotropy probe wmapobservations: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These...

51

anisotropy probe 5-yr: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These...

52

Concave nanomagnets with widely tunable anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nanomagnet having widely tunable anisotropy is disclosed. The disclosed nanomagnet is a magnetic particle with a convex shape having a first magnetically easy axis. The convex shape is modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form substantially offset from the first magnetically easy axis. In at least one embodiment, the convex shape is also modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form with a magnetic strength substantially different from the first magnetically easy axis.

Lambson, Brian; Gu, Zheng; Carlton, David; Bokor, Jeffrey

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

Stone, Kevin H.

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand the differences between transverse and longitudinal waves. APPARATUS: Buzzer board with string, meter stick

Glashausser, Charles

55

Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Window Functions Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary results of most observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are estimates of the angular power spectrum averaged through some broad band, called band-powers. These estimates are in turn what are used to produce constraints on cosmological parameters due to all CMB observations. Essential to this estimation of cosmological parameters is the calculation of the expected band-power for a given experiment, given a theoretical power spectrum. Here we derive the "band power" window function which should be used for this calculation, and point out that it is not equivalent to the window function used to calculate the variance. This important distinction has been absent from much of the literature: the variance window function is often used as the band-power window function. We discuss the validity of this assumed equivalence, the role of window functions for experiments that constrain the power in {\\it multiple} bands, and summarize a prescription for reporting experimental results. The analysis methods detailed here are applied in a companion paper to three years of data from the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement.

Lloyd Knox

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Experiments to Separate the Effect of Texture on Anisotropy of Pipeline Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments to Separate the Effect of Texture on Anisotropy of Pipeline Steel M. S. Jooa , D the anisotropy of Charpy test energy. Keywords: pipeline steel, anisotropy, crystallographic texture, memory

Cambridge, University of

57

Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pinning in multi-band superconductors 2 1. Introduction The multi-band nature of superconductivity in iron the anisotropy of superconducting parameters in the iron-based superconductors. In particular, Kidzun et al. [23Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors C.J. van der Beek, M. Konczykowski

Boyer, Edmond

58

Giant Magnetic Anisotropy of Single Cobalt Atoms and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Giant Magnetic Anisotropy of Single Cobalt Atoms and Nanoparticles P. Gambardella,1,2 * S. Rusponi. Dederichs,5 K. Kern,1,2 C. Carbone,3,5 H. Brune1 The isotropic magnetic moment of a free atom is shown to develop giant magnetic anisotropy energy due to symmetry reduction at an atomically ordered surface

Brune, Harald

59

ANNIVERSARY REVIEW Grain boundary energy anisotropy: a review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy (B) gained when the two surfaces are brought together and new bonds are formed. The grain boundaryANNIVERSARY REVIEW Grain boundary energy anisotropy: a review Gregory S. Rohrer Received: 29 April 2011 Abstract This paper reviews findings on the anisotropy of the grain boundary energies. After

Rohrer, Gregory S.

60

SUBMITTED TO GRL 1 Thermal Anisotropies in the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBMITTED TO GRL 1 E Thermal Anisotropies in the Solar Wind: vidence of Heating by Interstellar cyclotron instabilit s generated by newly created pickup ions and heats the thermal solar wind protons TO GRL 2 T Introduction he thermal anisotropy of the solar wind is the ratio between the temperatures p

Richardson, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic UNLP, 11 Octubre de 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic media UNLP, 11 Octubre de 2012 . Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic media ­ p. #12;Fractured media. I Fractures are common in the earth's crust due to different factors, for instance, tectonic stresses and natural or artificial hydraulic fracturing caused

Santos, Juan

62

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori- entations and intensity anisotropy as a routine technique for fracture characterization is partly because of its inability to pro- vide information about sizes and vol- ume of fractures. Although both grain-scale micro

Edinburgh, University of

63

Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field-angular dependence and anisotropy of the critical current density in iron-based superconductors is evaluated using a phenomenological approach featuring distinct anisotropy factors for the penetration depth and the coherence length. Both the weak collective pinning limit and the strong pinning limit relevant for iron-based superconductors at low magnetic fields are considered. It is found that in the more anisotropic materials, such as SmFeAsO and NdFeAsO, the field-angular dependence is completely dominated by the coherence length (upper critical field) anisotropy, thereby explaining recent results on the critical current in these materials. In less anisotropic superconductors, strong pinning can lead to an apparent inversion of the anisotropy. Finally, it is shown that, under all circumstances, the ratio of the c-axis and ab-plane critical current densities for the magnetic field along the ab-plane directly yields the coherence length anisotropy factor ??.

van der Beek, C.J.; Konczykowski, M.; Prozorov, Ruslan

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Mapping the nano-Hertz gravitational wave sky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a new method for extracting gravitational wave signals from pulsar timing data. We show that any gravitational wave signal can be decomposed into an orthogonal set of sky maps, with the number of maps equal to the number of pulsars in the timing array. These maps may be used as a basis to construct gravitational wave templates for any type of source, including collections of point sources. A variant of the standard Hellings-Downs correlation analysis is recovered for statistically isotropic signals. The template based approach allows us to probe potential anisotropies in the signal and produce maps of the gravitational wave sky.

Neil J. Cornish; Rutger van Haasteren

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - azimuthal anisotropy relative Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

revised methodology was developed where... electrical anisotropy, which is related to fracture direction and intensity. The method is applied... the electrical anisotropy from the...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy contrast study Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for (i) studying the dependence of the proposed anisotropy attribution on scatterer phenomenology... for classifying anisotropy and to study behavior of the attribution under...

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy instability thresholds Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fluctuation power near proton temperature anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar... - retical thresholds for pressure anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here we use...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy probe observations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anisotropies are significantly higher than... anisotropies of 2D and 3D ran- dom resistor networks, Labendz (1999) only observed dependence on models... , is better observed...

69

Rotation and anisotropy of galaxies revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of the tensor virial theorem (TVT) as a diagnostic of anisotropic velocity distributions in galaxies is revisited. The TVT provides a rigorous global link between velocity anisotropy, rotation and shape, but the quantities appearing in it are not easily estimated observationally. Traditionally use has been made of a centrally averaged velocity dispersion and the peak rotation velocity. Although this procedure cannot be rigorously justified, tests on model galaxies show that it works surprisingly well. With the advent of integral-field spectroscopy it is now possible to establish a rigorous connection between the TVT and observations. The TVT is reformulated in terms of sky-averages, and the new formulation is tested on model galaxies.

James Binney

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Possible origin of the nonmonotonic doping dependence of the in-plane resistivity anisotropy of Ba(Fe1-xTx)?As? (T=Co, Ni and Cu)  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The in-plane resistivity anisotropy has been measured for detwinned single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xNix)?As? and Ba(Fe1-xCux)?As?. The data reveal a nonmonotonic doping dependence, similar to previous observations for Ba(Fe1-xCox)?As?. Magnetotransport measurements of the parent compound reveal a nonlinear Hall coefficient and a large linear term in the transverse magnetoresistance. Both effects are rapidly suppressed with chemical substitution over a similar compositional range as the onset of the large in-plane resistivity anisotropy. This suggests that the relatively small in-plane anisotropy of the parent compound in the spin-density wave state is due to the presence of an isotropic, high mobility pocket of the reconstructed Fermi surface. Progressive suppression of the contribution to the conductivity arising from this isotropic pocket with chemical substitution eventually reveals the underlying in-plane anisotropy associated with the remaining Fermi surface pockets

Kuo, Hsueh-Hui; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Riggs, Scott C.; Yu, Leo; McMahon, Peter L.; De Greve, Kristiaan; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Analytis, James G.; Fisher, Ian R.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

COMPARISON OF FRACTIONAL AND GEODESIC ANISOTROPY IN DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGES OF 90 MONOZYGOTIC AND DIZYGOTIC TWINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF FRACTIONAL AND GEODESIC ANISOTROPY IN DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGES OF 90 MONOZYGOTIC anisotropy (FA), and geodesic anisotropy (GA), which measures the geodesic distance between tensors be used to map disease effects on white matter. A related scalar measure, the Geodesic Anisotropy (GA) [3

Thompson, Paul

72

Current sheets and pressure anisotropy in the reconnection exhaust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A particle-in-cell simulation shows that the exhaust during anti-parallel reconnection in the collisionless regime contains a current sheet extending 100 inertial lengths from the X line. The current sheet is supported by electron pressure anisotropy near the X line and ion anisotropy farther downstream. Field-aligned electron currents flowing outside the magnetic separatrices feed the exhaust current sheet and generate the out-of-plane, or Hall, magnetic field. Existing models based on different mechanisms for each particle species provide good estimates for the levels of pressure anisotropy. The ion anisotropy, which is strong enough to reach the firehose instability threshold, is also important for overall force balance. It reduces the outflow speed of the plasma.

Le, A.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V. [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)] [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, California 92014 (United States); Egedal, J. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ng, J. [PPPL, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [PPPL, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Scudder, J. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Daughton, W.; Liu, Y.-H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Friction anisotropy: A unique and intrinsic property of decagonal quasicrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that friction anisotropy is an intrinsic property of the atomic structure of Al-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystals and not only of clean and well-ordered surfaces that can be prepared in vacuum [J.Y. Park et al., Science309, 1354 (2005)]. Friction anisotropy is manifested in both nanometer-size contacts obtained with sharp atomic force microscope tips and macroscopic contacts produced in pin-on-disk tribometers. We show that the friction anisotropy, which is not observed when an amorphous oxide film covers the surface, is recovered when the film is removed due to wear. Equally important is the loss of the friction anisotropy when the quasicrystalline order is destroyed due to cumulative wear. These results reveal the intimate connection between the mechanical properties of these materials and their peculiar atomic structure.

Park, J. Y.; Ogletree, D.; Salmeron, M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

On the drift magnetosonic waves in anisotropic low beta plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generalized dispersion relation of obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic waves is derived by using the gyrokinetic theory for anisotropic low beta plasmas. The stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is performed to understand the stabilization mechanism of the drift magnetosonic instability and the estimation of the growth rate is also presented. It is noted that the growth rate of the drift instability enhances for small anisotropy (A{sub e,i}?=?T{sub ?e,i}/T{sub ?e,i}?anisotropy (A{sub e,i}?>?1)

Naim, Hafsa, E-mail: roohi-phy@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, G. C. University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Bashir, M. F., E-mail: frazbashir@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Role of anisotropy configuration in exchange-biased systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of the anisotropy configuration effects on the magnetic properties of exchange-biased ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AFM) Co/IrMn bilayers. The interfacial unidirectional anisotropy is set extrinsically via a field cooling procedure with the magnetic field misaligned by an angle {beta}{sub FC} with respect to the intrinsic FM uniaxial anisotropy. High resolution angular dependence in-plane resolved Kerr magnetometry measurements have been performed for three different anisotropy arrangements, including collinear {beta}{sub FC} = 0 and two opposite noncollinear cases. The symmetry breaking of the induced noncollinear configurations results in a peculiar nonsymmetric magnetic behavior of the angular dependence of magnetization reversal, coercivity, and exchange bias. The experimental results are well reproduced without any fitting parameter by using a simple model including the induced anisotropy configuration. Our finding highlights the importance of the relative angle between anisotropies in order to properly account for the magnetic properties of exchange-biased FM/AFM systems.

Jimenez, E.; Camarero, J.; Perna, P.; Mikuszeit, N.; Teran, F. J.; Sort, J.; Nogues, J.; Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Hoffmann, A.; Dieny, B.; Miranda, R. (Materials Science Division); (Univ. Autonoma de Madrid); (Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona); (SPINTEC); (Inst. de Microelectronica de Madrid)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Excitation of Banded Whistler Waves in the Magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Banded whistler waves can be generated by the whistler anisotropy instability driven by two bi-Maxwellian electron components with T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} > 1 at different T{sub {parallel}} For typical magnetospheric condition of 1 < {omega}{sub e}/{Omega}{sub e} < 5 in regions associated with strong chorus, upper-band waves can be excited by anisotropic electrons below {approx} 1 keV, while lower-band waves are excited by anisotropic electrons above {approx} 10 keV. Lower-band waves are generally field-aligned and substantially electromagnetic, while upper-band waves propagate obliquely and have quasi-electrostatic fluctuating electric fields. The quasi-electrostatic feature of upper-band waves suggests that they may be more easily identified in electric field observations than in magnetic field observations. Upper-band waves are liable to Landau damping and the saturation level of upperband waves is lower than lower-band waves, consistent with observations that lower-band waves are stronger than upper-band waves on average. The oblique propagation, the lower saturation level, and the more severe Landau damping together would make upper-band waves more tightly confined to the geomagnetic equator (|{lambda}{sub m}| < {approx}10{sup o}) than lower-band waves.

Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

An estimator for statistical anisotropy from the CMB bispectrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various data analyses of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provide observational hints of statistical isotropy breaking. Some of these features can be studied within the framework of primordial vector fields in inflationary theories which generally display some level of statistical anisotropy both in the power spectrum and in higher-order correlation functions. Motivated by these observations and the recent theoretical developments in the study of primordial vector fields, we develop the formalism necessary to extract statistical anisotropy information from the three-point function of the CMB temperature anisotropy. We employ a simplified vector field model and parametrize the bispectrum of curvature fluctuations in such a way that all the information about statistical anisotropy is encoded in some parameters ?{sub LM} (which measure the anisotropic to the isotropic bispectrum amplitudes). For such a template bispectrum, we compute an optimal estimator for ?{sub LM} and the expected signal-to-noise ratio. We estimate that, for f{sub NL} ? 30, an experiment like Planck can be sensitive to a ratio of the anisotropic to the isotropic amplitudes of the bispectrum as small as 10%. Our results are complementary to the information coming from a power spectrum analysis and particularly relevant for those models where statistical anisotropy turns out to be suppressed in the power spectrum but not negligible in the bispectrum.

Bartolo, N.; Dimastrogiovanni, E.; Matarrese, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica ''G. Galilei'', Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Liguori, M. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR-7095 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Riotto, A., E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: dimastro@pd.infn.it, E-mail: liguori@iap.fr, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it, E-mail: riotto@mail.cern.ch [INFN — Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Electromagnetic waves destabilized by runaway electrons in near-critical electric fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Runaway electron distributions are strongly anisotropic in velocity space. This anisotropy is a source of free energy that may destabilize electromagnetic waves through a resonant interaction between the waves and the energetic electrons. In this work, we investigate the high-frequency electromagnetic waves that are destabilized by runaway electron beams when the electric field is close to the critical field for runaway acceleration. Using a runaway electron distribution appropriate for the near-critical case, we calculate the linear instability growth rate of these waves and conclude that the obliquely propagating whistler waves are most unstable. We show that the frequencies, wave numbers, and propagation angles of the most unstable waves depend strongly on the magnetic field. Taking into account collisional and convective damping of the waves, we determine the number density of runaways that is required to destabilize the waves and show its parametric dependences.

Komar, A.; Pokol, G. I. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Fueloep, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology and Euratom-VR Association, Goeteborg (Sweden)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Magnetic instability in a dilute circular rarefaction wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of magnetic fields in the density gradient of a rarefaction wave has been observed in simulations and in laboratory experiments. The thermal anisotropy of the electrons, which gives rise to the magnetic instability, is maintained by the ambipolar electric field. This simple mechanism could be important for the magnetic field amplification in astrophysical jets or in the interstellar medium ahead of supernova remnant shocks. The acceleration of protons and the generation of a magnetic field by the rarefaction wave, which is fed by an expanding circular plasma cloud, is examined here in form of a 2D particle-in-cell simulation. The core of the plasma cloud is modeled by immobile charges, and the mobile protons form a small ring close to the cloud's surface. The number density of mobile protons is thus less than that of the electrons. The protons of the rarefaction wave are accelerated to 1/10 of the electron thermal speed, and the acceleration results in a thermal anisotropy of the electron distribution in the entire plasma cloud. The instability in the rarefaction wave is outrun by a TM wave, which grows in the dense core distribution, and its magnetic field expands into the rarefaction wave. This expansion drives a secondary TE wave.

Dieckmann, M. E. [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Linkoping University, 60174 Norrkoping (Sweden); Sarri, G.; Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Vacuum Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

Paul S. Wesson

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Anisotropy of radiation emitted from planar wire arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The planar wire array (PWA) is a promising load for new multi-source inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums [B. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The hohlraum radiation symmetry is an important issue for ICF. It was found that extreme ultraviolet and sub-keV photon emission from PWAs may have considerable anisotropy in the load azimuthal plane. This experimental result is obtained on the UNR 1–1.7 MA Zebra generator. The time-dependent anisotropy effect is detected. This feature is studied in 2D numerical simulations and can be explained by initial anisotropy of implosion of those non-cylindrical loads radiating essentially as surface sources in sub-keV quanta and also by radiation absorption in cold magnetized plasma tails forming in the direction of magnetic compression.

Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I. K.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Chuvatin, A. S. [Laboratorie de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratorie de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Rudakov, L. I. [Icarus Research, Inc., P. O. Box 30780, Bethesda, Maryland 20824-0780 (United States)] [Icarus Research, Inc., P. O. Box 30780, Bethesda, Maryland 20824-0780 (United States); Velikovich, A. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Plastic anisotropy in a superplastic duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the plastic anisotropy in uniaxial tension of the duplex stainless steel, SAF2304, have been made at room temperature and under conditions where the material was superplastic. There was significant plastic anisotropy in both types of deformation and there were some similarities between the low and high temperature variations with tensile axis orientation. Although it was possible to model the high temperature anisotropy using a grain boundary sliding model, the assumed distribution of sliding boundaries was considered to be unrealistic. This, together with aspects of microstructural and textural development, indicated that deformation was principally occurring by intragranular slip with a significant contribution caused by mechanical inhomogeneity in the two-phase material.

Song, J.L.; Bate, P.S. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

SUTHERLAND,J.C.

2002-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

84

Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space, and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the \\Alfvenic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scal...

Klein, Kristopher G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

CMB Anisotropies from Outflows in Lyman Break Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomson scattering of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on moving electrons in the outflows of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at redshifts 2-8 contributes to the small-scale CMB anisotropies. The net effect produced by each outflow depends on its level of deviation from spherical symmetry, caused either by an anisotropic energy injection from the nuclear starburst or quasar activity, or by an inhomogeneous intergalactic environment. We find that for plausible outflow parameters consistent with spectroscopic observations of LBGs, the induced CMB anisotropies on arcminute scales reach up to $\\sim 1 \\mu$K, comparable to the level produced during the epoch of reionization.

Daniel Babich; Abraham Loeb

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

Enhancing Magnetic Properties of Molecular Magnetic Materials: The Role of Single-Ion Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trend in the field is enhancing the global anisotropy in metal complexes using single-ion anisotropy. The work in this dissertation is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of new building blocks of the highly anisotropic early transition metal...

Saber, Mohamed Rashad Mohamed

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analysis of seismic anisotropy in 3D multi-component seismic data   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The importance of seismic anisotropy has been recognized by the oil industry since its first observation in hydrocarbon reservoirs in 1986, and the application of seismic anisotropy to solve geophysical problems has been ...

Qian, Zhongping

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

STRUCTURAL CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRUCTURAL CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION WITHIN THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION WITHIN THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT, NORTHERN CHILE the Chuquicamata Porphyry Copper Deposit, northern Chile DEPARTMENT OR SCHOOL: Department of Earth Sciences DEGREE

Beaumont, Christopher

89

Anisotropic wave propagation in nematic liquid crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the fact that quantitative experimental data have been available for more than forty years now, nematoacoustics still poses intriguing theoretical and experimental problems. In this paper, we prove that the main observed features of acoustic wave propagation through a nematic liquid crystal cell -- namely, the anisotropy of sound velocity and its frequency dependence -- may be plausibly explained by a first-gradient continuum theory characterized by a hyperelastic anisotropic response from an evolving relaxed configuration. We compare and contrast our proposal with a competing theory where the liquid crystal is modeled as an isotropically compressible, anisotropic second-gradient fluid.

Paolo Biscari; Antonio DiCarlo; Stefano S. Turzi

2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors C.J. van der Beek, M. Konczykowski of the critical current density in iron-based superconductors is evaluated using a phenomenological approach collective pinning limit, and the strong pinning limit relevant for iron-based superconductors at low

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

91

ANISOTROPY OF SOURCE PARAMETERS FROM INDUCED MICROSEISMICITY Peter Starzec1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ANISOTROPY OF SOURCE PARAMETERS FROM INDUCED MICROSEISMICITY Peter Starzec1 , Michael Fehler2 distributions of shear displacement at the source of microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing were the reservoir that are far from injection wells. Background The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy (HDR) concept

92

Issues and methods for CMB anisotropy data reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major issues and existing methods for the reduction of CMB anisotropy data are reviewed. An emphasis is put on the proper modelling of the data. It is suggested that the robustness of methods could be improved by taking into account the uncertainty of the model for finding optimal solutions.

J. Delabrouille

2000-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

93

Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combination of 1D and 3D forward and inverse solutions is used to quantify the sensitivity and resolution of conventional controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data collected using a horizontal electric dipole source to transverse electrical anisotropy located in a deep-water exploration reservoir target. Since strongly anisotropic shale layers have a vertical resistivity that can be comparable to many reservoirs, we examine how CSEM can discriminate confounding shale layers through their characteristically lower horizontal resistivity. Forward modeling demonstrates that the sensitivity to reservoir level anisotropy is very low compared to the sensitivity to isotropic reservoirs, especially when the reservoir is deeper than about 2 km below the seabed. However, for 1D models where the number of inversion parameters can be fixed to be only a few layers, both vertical and horizontal resistivity of the reservoir can be well resolved using a stochastic inversion. We find that the resolution of horizontal resistivity increases as the horizontal resistivity decreases. We show that this effect is explained by the presence of strong horizontal current density in anisotropic layers with low horizontal resistivity. Conversely, when the reservoir has a vertical to horizontal resistivity ratio of about 10 or less, the current density is vertically polarized and hence has little sensitivity to the horizontal resistivity. Resistivity anisotropy estimates from 3D inversion for 3D targets suggest that resolution of reservoir level anisotropy for 3D targets will require good a priori knowledge of the background sediment conductivity and structural boundaries.

Brown, V.; Hoversten, G.M.; Key, K.; Chen, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Statistical Isotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Isotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Amir Hajian #3; I.U.C.A.A., Pune to be statistically isotropic, i.e., statistical expectation values of the temperature #29;uctuations are preserved under rotations of the sky. Only under statistical isotropy does the widely used angular power spectrum

Souradeep, Tarun

95

ANISOTROPY LENGTHENS THE DECAY TIME OF TURBULENCE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decay of isothermal turbulence with velocity anisotropy is investigated using computational simulations and synthetic observations. We decompose the turbulence into isotropic and anisotropic components with total velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub iso} and {sigma}{sub ani}, respectively. We find that the decay rate of the turbulence depends on the crossing time of the isotropic component only. A cloud of size L with significant anisotropy in its turbulence has a dissipation time, t{sub diss} = L/(2{sigma}{sub iso}). This translates into turbulent energy decay rates on the cloud scale that can be much lower for anisotropic turbulence than for isotropic turbulence. To help future observations determine whether observed molecular clouds have the level of anisotropy required to maintain the observed level of turbulence over their lifetimes, we performed a principal component analysis on our simulated clouds. Even with projection effects washing out the anisotropic signal, there is a measurable difference in the axis-constrained principal component analysis performed in directions parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum velocity dispersion. When this relative difference, {psi}, is 0.1, there is enough anisotropy for the dissipation time to triple the expected isotropic value. We provide a fit for converting {psi} into an estimate for the dissipation time, t{sub diss}.

Hansen, Charles E.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1?}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

1980-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

97

Vitrinite reflectance anisotropy as a tectonic fabric element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anisotropy of the coal maceral vitrinite was analyzed in relation to the tectonic setting of a coal from the Southern Anthracite Field in Pennsylvania. For the coal studied, the maximum-intermediate reflectance plane essentially paralleled the axial plane of the synclinorium (N66/sup 0/E strike, 64/sup 0/SE dip).

Hower, J.C. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington); Davis, A.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

anisotropy energy spectrum: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anisotropy energy spectrum First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ultra High Energy Cosmic...

99

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

100

Spin wave localization in one-dimensional magnonic microcavity comprising yttrium iron garnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the localization of magnetostatic surface waves, i.e., spin waves, in a one-dimensional magnonic microcavity substantialized with periodical conductivity modulation. The narrow localized state is observed inside band gaps and is responsible for a sharp transmission peak. The experimental results strongly agree with the theoretical prediction made with the shape magnetic anisotropy of the propagating medium composed of yttrium iron garnet taken into account.

Kanazawa, Naoki; Goto, Taichi, E-mail: goto@ee.tut.ac.jp; Inoue, Mitsuteru [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibari-Ga-Oka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gravitational wave radiometry: Mapping a stochastic gravitational wave background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of the detection and mapping of a stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB), either cosmological or astrophysical, bears a strong semblance to the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and polarization, which too is a stochastic field, statistically described in terms of its correlation properties. An astrophysical gravitational wave background (AGWB) will likely arise from an incoherent superposition of unmodelled and/or unresolved sources and cosmological gravitational wave backgrounds (CGWB) are also predicted in certain scenarios. The basic statistic we use is the cross correlation between the data from a pair of detectors. In order to ''point'' the pair of detectors at different locations one must suitably delay the signal by the amount it takes for the gravitational waves (GW) to travel to both detectors corresponding to a source direction. Then the raw (observed) sky map of the SGWB is the signal convolved with a beam response function that varies with location in the sky. We first present a thorough analytic understanding of the structure of the beam response function using an analytic approach employing the stationary phase approximation. The true sky map is obtained by numerically deconvolving the beam function in the integral (convolution) equation. We adopt the maximum likelihood framework to estimate the true sky map using the conjugate gradient method that has been successfully used in the broadly similar, well-studied CMB map-making problem. We numerically implement and demonstrate the method on signal generated by simulated (unpolarized) SGWB for the GW radiometer consisting of the LIGO pair of detectors at Hanford and Livingston. We include 'realistic' additive Gaussian noise in each data stream based on the LIGO-I noise power spectral density. The extension of the method to multiple baselines and polarized GWB is outlined. In the near future the network of GW detectors, including the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors that will be sensitive to sources within a thousand times larger spatial volume, could provide promising data sets for GW radiometry.

Mitra, Sanjit [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Souradeep, Tarun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Lazzarini, Albert; Mandic, Vuk; Ballmer, Stefan [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 18-34, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bose, Sukanta [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves Hiu Ning Chan (1 waves; Long-short resonance PACS Classification: 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg #12;2 ABSTRACT A resonance between long and short waves will occur if the phase velocity of the long wave matches the group velocity

103

Vortices in Brain waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003). Vortices in Brain Waves 62. M. E. Raichle, ScienceVORTICES IN BRAIN WAVES WALTER J. FREEMAN Department ofthat is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG).

Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesa IOvonic BatteryValleyCalifornia |

105

FIVE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE OBSERVATIONS: SOURCE CATALOG  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the list of point sources found in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year maps. The technique used in the first-year and three-year analyses now finds 390 point sources, and the five-year source catalog is complete for regions of the sky away from the Galactic plane to a 2 Jy limit, with SNR >4.7 in all bands in the least covered parts of the sky. The noise at high frequencies is still mainly radiometer noise, but at low frequencies the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is the largest uncertainty. A separate search of CMB-free V-W maps finds 99 sources of which all but one can be identified with known radio sources. The sources seen by WMAP are not strongly polarized. Many of the WMAP sources show significant variability from year to year, with more than a 2:1 range between the minimum and maximum fluxes.

Wright, E. L.; Chen, X. [UCLA Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S.; Weiland, J. L. [Adnet Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Dr., Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Bennett, C. L.; Gold, B.; Larson, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L.; Dunkley, J. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, 2511 Speedway, RLM 15.306, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W. 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: wright@astro.ucla.edu (and others)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Anisotropy of flow in stochastically generated porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models of porous media are often applied to relatively small systems, which leads not only to system-size-dependent results, but also to phenomena that would be absent in larger systems. Here we investigate one such finite-size effect: anisotropy of the permeability tensor. We show that a non-zero angle between the external body force and macroscopic flux vector exists in three-dimensional periodic models of sizes commonly used in computer simulations and propose a criterion, based on the system size to the grain size ratio, for this phenomenon to be relevant or negligible. The finite-size anisotropy of the porous matrix induces a pressure gradient perpendicular to the axis of a porous duct and we analyze how this effect scales with the system and grain sizes.

Matyka, Maciej; Go?embiewski, Jaros?aw; Kostur, Marcin; Januszewski, Micha?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

CMB Anisotropies, Large-Scale Structure and the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are now beginning to learn detailed information about cosmological parameters from the shapes of the matter and radiation power spectra, together with their relative normalization. As more high quality data are gathered from galaxy surveys and from microwave anisotropies, the range of allowed models is expected to get incrementally smaller. The amount of information potentially available from a high-resolution satellite experiment should allow a determination of essentially {\\it all} currently discussed cosmological parameters to less than ~10%.

Douglas Scott

1995-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Role of magnetic anisotropy in spin-filter junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have fabricated oxide-based spin-filter junctions in which we demonstrate that magnetic anisotropy can be used to tune the transport behavior of spin-filter junctions. We have demonstrated spin-filtering behavior in La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} junctions where the interface anisotropy plays a significant role in determining transport behavior. Detailed studies of chemical and magnetic structure at the interfaces indicate that abrupt changes in magnetic anisotropy across the nonisostructural interface is the cause of the significant suppression of junction magnetoresistance in junctions with MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} barrier layers.

Chopdekar, R.V.; Wong, F.; Nelson-Cheeseman, B.B.; Liberati, M.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

VELOCITY ANISOTROPY AND SHAPE BIAS IN THE CAUSTIC TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use the Millennium Simulation to quantify the statistical accuracy and precision of the escape-velocity technique for measuring cluster-sized halo masses at z {approx} 0.1. We show that in three dimensions one can measure nearly unbiased (<4%) halo masses (>1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} h {sup -1}) with 10%-15% scatter. Line-of-sight projection effects increase the scatter to {approx}25%, where we include the known velocity anisotropies. The classical ''caustic'' technique incorporates a calibration factor that is determined from N-body simulations. We derive and test a new implementation that eliminates the need for calibration and utilizes only the observables: the galaxy velocities with respect to the cluster mean v, the projected positions r{sub p} , an estimate of the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density concentration, and an estimate of the velocity anisotropies {beta}. We find that differences between the potential and density NFW concentrations induce a 10% bias in the caustic masses. We also find that large (100%) systematic errors in the observed ensemble average velocity anisotropies and concentrations translate to small (5%-10%) biases in the inferred masses.

Gifford, Daniel; Miller, Christopher J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

Snieder, Roel

111

Exchange coupling between silicon donors: the crucial role of the central cell and mass anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Donors in silicon are now demonstrated as one of the leading candidates for implementing qubits and quantum information processing. Single qubit operations, measurements and long coherence times are firmly established, but progress on controlling two qubit interactions has been slower. One reason for this is that the inter donor exchange coupling has been predicted to oscillate with separation, making it hard to estimate in device designs. We present a multivalley effective mass theory of a donor pair in silicon, including both a central cell potential and the effective mass anisotropy intrinsic in the Si conduction band. We are able to accurately describe the single donor properties of valley-orbit coupling and the spatial extent of donor wave functions, highlighting the importance of fitting measured values of hyperfine coupling and the orbital energy of the $1s$ levels. Ours is a simple framework that can be applied flexibly to a range of experimental scenarios, but it is nonetheless able to provide fast and reliable predictions. We use it to estimate the exchange coupling between two donor electrons and we find a smoothing of its expected oscillations, and predict a monotonic dependence on separation if two donors are spaced precisely along the [100] direction.

G. Pica; B. W. Lovett; R. N Bhatt; S. A. Lyon

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

Resolving Spacecraft Earth-Flyby Anomalies with Measured Light Speed Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doppler shift observations of spacecraft, such as Galileo, NEAR, Cassini, Rosetta and MESSENGER in earth flybys, have all revealed unexplained speed `anomalies' - that the doppler-shift determined speeds are inconsistent with expected speeds. Here it is shown that these speed anomalies are not real and are actually the result of using an incorrect relationship between the observed doppler shift and the speed of the spacecraft - a relationship based on the assumption that the speed of light is isotropic in all frames, i.e. invariant. Taking account of the repeatedly measured light-speed anisotropy the anomalies are resolved. The Pioneer 10/11 anomalies are discussed, but not resolved. The spacecraft observations demonstrate again that the speed of light is not invariant, and is isotropic only with respect to a dynamical 3-space. The existing doppler shift data also offers a resource to characterise a new form of gravitational waves, the dynamical 3-space turbulence, that has also been detected by other techniques.

Reginald T. Cahill

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropies constrain mini-charged Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: anisotropies constrain mini-charged Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 158 (2006) 8591 Tectonic fabric of the subcontinental...

114

Synchrotron X-ray Applications Toward an Understanding of Elastic Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anisotropy of hydrocarbon source rock. Geophysics, 57, 727-of hydrocarbons in Toarcian source rocks of differentDeposition of petroleum source rocks. In: Welte, D.H. ,

Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Graphene Signal Amplification for Sensitive and Real-Time Fluorescence Anisotropy Detection of Small Molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene Signal Amplification for Sensitive and Real-Time Fluorescence Anisotropy Detection graphene oxide (GO) as the signal amplifier. Because of the extraordinarily larger volume of GO

Tan, Weihong

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy physics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

physics Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anisotropy physics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Gallium crystallization: implication for the...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - azimuthal anisotropy etude Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resistivity to Characterize Fractures in a Glacial Till Mark Boris, University of Saskatchewan Summary: . There was no interpretable anisotropy in the azimuthal resistivity data....

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy probe wmap Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 5 > >> 1 Current research themes (Contribution to the IUCAA annual report 2006-2007) Summary: from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe com- bine high angular resolution with...

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy-driven weibel instability Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Survey of collective instabilities and beamplasma interactions in intense heavy ion beams Summary: detailed infor- mation. 2. Anisotropy-driven collective instabilities in...

120

anisotropy probe five-year: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effect of radiation-like solid on CMB anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the power in the lowest multipoles of CMB anisotropies in the presence of radiation-like solid, a hypothetical new kind of radiation with nonzero shear modulus. If only the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe effect is taken into account, the shear modulus to energy density ratio must be in absolute value of order $10^{-5}$ or less for the theory to be consistent with observations within cosmic variance. With the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect switched on, the constraint is relaxed almost by two orders of magnitude.

Vladimír Balek; Matej Škovran

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

Translational invariance and the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primordial quantum fluctuations produced by inflation are conventionally assumed to be statistically homogeneous, a consequence of translational invariance. In this paper we quantify the potentially observable effects of a small violation of translational invariance during inflation, as characterized by the presence of a preferred point, line, or plane. We explore the imprint such a violation would leave on the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, and provide explicit formulas for the expected amplitudes of the spherical-harmonic coefficients.

Carroll, Sean M.; Tseng, C.-Y.; Wise, Mark B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Elastic anisotropy in multifilament Nb3Sn superconducting wires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The elastic anisotropy caused by the texture in the Nb3Sn filaments of PIT and RRP wires has been calculated by averaging the estimates of Voigt and Reuss, using published Nb3Sn single crystal elastic constants and the Nb3Sn grain orientation distribution determined in both wire types by Electron Backscatter Diffraction. At ambient temperature the calculated Nb3Sn E-moduli in axial direction in the PIT and the RRP wire are 130 GPa and 140 GPa, respectively. The calculated E-moduli are compared with tensile test results obtained for the corresponding wires and extracted filament bundles.

Scheuerlein, C; Alknes, P; Arnau, G; Bjoerstad, R; Bordini, B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Large-Scale Anisotropy of EGRET Gamma Ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the course of its operation, the EGRET experiment detected high-energy gamma ray sources at energies above 100 MeV over the whole sky. In this communication, we search for large-scale anisotropy patterns among the catalogued EGRET sources using an expansion in spherical harmonics, accounting for EGRET's highly non-uniform exposure. We find significant excess in the quadrupole and octopole moments. This is consistent with the hypothesis that, in addition to the galactic plane, a second mid-latitude (5^{\\circ} < |b| < 30^{\\circ}) population, perhaps associated with the Gould belt, contributes to the gamma ray flux above 100 MeV.

Luis Anchordoqui; Thomas McCauley; Thomas Paul; Olaf Reimer; Diego F. Torres

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

125

Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with anisotropy and flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes pressure anisotropy and general plasma flows. This anisotropic extension to our previous isotropic model is motivated by Sun and Finn's model of relaxed anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic equilibria. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, our anisotropic extension of MRxMHD reduces to anisotropic ideal MHD with flow. The continuously nested flux surface limit of our MRxMHD model is the first variational principle for anisotropic plasma equilibria with general flow fields.

Dennis, G. R., E-mail: graham.dennis@anu.edu.au; Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Hudson, S. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant $v_2$ ($v_{2}\\{2\\}$ and $v_{2}\\{4\\}$) from U+U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of $v_{2}\\{2\\}$ for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of $v_{2}\\{2\\}$ in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results.

Hui Wang; Paul Sorensen

2014-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at ?sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Optical Anisotropy of Schwarzschild Metric within Equivalent Medium Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is has been long known that the curved space in the presence of gravitation can be described as a non-homogeneous anisotropic medium in flat geometry with different constitutive equations. In this article, we show that the eigenpolarizations of such medium can be exactly solved, leading to a pseudo-isotropic description of curved vacuum with two refractive index eigenvalues having opposite signs, which correspond to forward and backward travel in time. We conclude that for a rotating universe, time-reversal symmetry is broken. We also demonstrate the applicability of this method to Schwarzschild metric and derive exact forms of refractive index. We derive the subtle optical anisotropy of space around a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and uncharged blackhole in the form of an elegant closed form expression, and show that the refractive index in such a pseudo-isotropic system would be a function of coordinates as well as the direction of propagation. Corrections arising from such anisotropy in the bending of light are shown and a simplified system of equations for ray-tracing in the equivalent medium of Schwarzschild metric is found.

Sina Khorasani; Bizhan Rashidian

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

129

Plane waves Lumped systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems S x y z Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · open tube #12;2 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · closed tube Impedance · Cylindrical waves z x y r #12;3 Impedance · Cylindrical waves ­ Circumferential part n=0 n=1 n=2 n=3 Impedance · Cylindrical

Berlin,Technische Universität

130

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a quarter of the proven natural gas reserves in the United States. Rulison Field, located in the PiceanceSEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Gerardo J-based rock physics to estimate the seismic anisotropy of the tight gas reservoir at Rulison Field. Seismic

131

Wind observations of extreme ion temperature anisotropies in the D. Clack,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind observations of extreme ion temperature anisotropies in the lunar wake D. Clack,1,2 J. C directional changes show that the wake geometry is dependent upon the prevailing magnetic field orientation (2004), Wind observations of extreme ion temperature anisotropies in the lunar wake, Geophys. Res. Lett

Richardson, John

132

Voltage control of magnetic anisotropy in Fe films with quantum well states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of a gate voltage on magnetic anisotropy is investigated in a thin Fe film epitaxially grown on a Ag(1,1,10) substrate and covered by MgO. Oscillations in step-induced magnetic anisotropy due to quantum well ...

Bauer, Uwe

133

HANDLING WHITE-MATTER ANISOTROPY IN BEM FOR THE EEG FORWARD PROBLEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HANDLING WHITE-MATTER ANISOTROPY IN BEM FOR THE EEG FORWARD PROBLEM Emmanuel Olivi Th and EEG for- ward fields. Those tissues include white matter, whose con- ductivity is anisotropic because of its fiber structure. While white matter anisotropy can be measured thanks to Diffusion- Weighted MRI

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

Plasticity-induced structural anisotropy of silica glass C. L. Rountree1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasticity-induced structural anisotropy of silica glass C. L. Rountree1 , D. Vandembroucq2 , M anisotropic structure after extended shear plastic flow. This anisotropy which survives for an un- stressed tetrahedra microstructure remains mostly unaltered. PACS numbers: 62.20.F, 81.05.Kf Plasticity of amorphous

Boyer, Edmond

135

ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES H.K. Jung* , Y; Metal matrix composite; Elastic constants; Aspect ratio; Anisotropy 1. Introduction Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are becoming attractive materials for advanced aerospace structures because

Hong, Soon Hyung

136

X-ray absorption anisotropy for polychromatic illumination--Crystal views from inside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray absorption anisotropy for polychromatic illumination--Crystal views from inside P. Korecki a Keywords: X-ray absorption Real-space imaging X-ray holography Electron channeling Electron backscatter of the fine structure in X-ray absorption anisotropy, which results from incident beam diffraction

Korecki, Pawe³

137

Smooth sandwich gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves which are smooth and contain two asymptotically flat regions are constructed from the homogeneous pp-waves vacuum solution. Motion of free test particles is calculated explicitly and the limit to an impulsive wave is also considered.

J. Podolsky

1998-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Field dependence of the superconducting basal plane anisotropy of TmNi2B2C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The superconductor TmNi2B2C possesses a significant fourfold basal plane anisotropy, leading to a square vortex lattice (VL) at intermediate fields. However, unlike other members of the borocarbide superconductors, the anisotropy in TmNi2B2C appears to decrease with increasing field, evident by a reentrance of the square VL phase. We have used small-angle neutron scattering measurements of the VL to study the field dependence of the anisotropy. Our results provide a direct, quantitative measurement of the decreasing anisotropy. We attribute this reduction of the basal plane anisotropy to the strong Pauli paramagnetic effects observed in TmNi2B2C and the resulting expansion of vortex cores near Hc2.

Das, P.; Densmore, J.M.; Rastovski, C.; Schlesinger, K.J.; Laver, M.; Dewhurst, C.D.; Littrell, K.; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Eskildsen, M.R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Is inner core seismic anisotropy a marker of plastic flow of cubic iron?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates whether observations of seismic anisotropy are compatible with a cubic structure of the inner core Fe alloy. We assume that anisotropy is the result of plastic deformation within a large scale flow induced by preferred growth at the inner core equator. Based on elastic moduli from the literature, bcc- or fcc-Fe produce seismic anisotropy well below seismic observations ($\\textless{}0.4\\%$). A Monte-Carlo approach allows us to generalize this result to any form of elastic anisotropy in a cubic system. Within our model, inner core global anisotropy is not compatible with a cubic structure of Fe alloy. Hence, if the inner core material is indeed cubic, large scale coherent anisotropic structures, incompatible with plastic deformation induced by large scale flow, must be present.

Lincot, A; Cardin, Philippe

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Azimuthal Anisotropies as Stringent Test for Nuclear Transport Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Azimuthal distributions of charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in Au+Au collisions at 600AMeV have been measured using the FOPI facility at GSI-Darmstadt. Data show a strong increase of the in-plane azimuthal anisotropy ratio with the charge of the detected fragment. Intermediate mass fragments are found to exhibit a strong momentum-space alignment with respect of the reaction plane. The experimental results are presented as a function of the polar center-of-mass angle and over a broad range of impact parameters. They are compared to the predictions of the Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics model using three different parametrisations of the equation of state. We show that such highly accurate data provide stringent test for microscopic transport models and can potentially constrain separately the stiffness of the nuclear equation of state and the momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction.

P. Crochet; F. Rami; R. Dona; the FOPI Collaboration

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electric-field-induced spin wave generation using multiferroic magnetoelectric cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we report on the demonstration of voltage-driven spin wave excitation, where spin waves are generated by multiferroic magnetoelectric (ME) cell transducers driven by an alternating voltage, rather than an electric current. A multiferroic element consisting of a magnetostrictive Ni film and a piezoelectric [Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}]{sub (1?x)}–[PbTiO{sub 3}]{sub x} substrate was used for this purpose. By applying an AC voltage to the piezoelectric, an oscillating electric field is created within the piezoelectric material, which results in an alternating strain-induced magnetic anisotropy in the magnetostrictive Ni layer. The resulting anisotropy-driven magnetization oscillations propagate in the form of spin waves along a 5??m wide Ni/NiFe waveguide. Control experiments confirm the strain-mediated origin of the spin wave excitation. The voltage-driven spin wave excitation, demonstrated in this work, can potentially be used for low-dissipation spin wave-based logic and memory elements.

Cherepov, Sergiy; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Alzate, Juan G.; Wong, Kin; Lewis, Mark; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Nath, Jayshankar; Bao, Mingqiang; Wang, Kang L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bur, Alexandre; Wu, Tao; Carman, Gregory P. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Khitun, Alexander [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Water Waves Roger Grimshaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

143

PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

Okamoto, Takenori J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

Winokur, Michael

145

Measurement of the elliptic anisotropy of charged particles produced in PbPb collisions at ?sNN=2.76 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The anisotropy of the azimuthal distributions of charged particles produced in [? over s[subscript NN

Bauer, Gerry P.

146

Enhanced current-induced domain wall motion by tuning perpendicular magnetic anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) on current-induced domain wall (DW) motion is investigated by micromagnetic simulations. The critical current density J[subscript C] to drive DWs into periodic ...

Emori, Satoru

147

Structure, magnetic properties and magnetoelastic anisotropy in epitaxial Sr(Ti???Co?)O? films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the structure, magnetic properties and magnetoelastic anisotropy of epitaxial Sr(Ti???Co?)O? films grown on LaAlO? (001) and SrTiO? (001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Room temperature ferromagnetism was ...

Bi, Lei

148

Evaluating permeability anisotropy in the early Jurassic Tilje formation, offshore mid-Norway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of evaluating permeability anisotropy in the Tilje Formation, Heidrum field, offshore mid-Norway, has been investigated by the Statoil Research Centre by a detailed combination of the geological and petrophysical data. The large...

Aliyev, Kanan

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Achieving perpendicular anisotropy in half-metallic Heusler alloys for spin device applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various full Heusler alloys are interfaced with MgO and the magnetic properties of the Heusler-MgO junctions are studied. Next to MgO, the cubic Heusler system distorts to a tetragonal one, thereby inducing an anisotropy. The half-metallicity and nature of anisotropy (in-plane or perpendicular) in the Heusler-MgO system is governed mostly by the interface Heusler layers. There is a trend that Mn-O bonding near the MgO-Heusler junction results in perpendicular anisotropy. The ability to remain half-metallic and have perpendicular anisotropy makes some of these alloys potential candidates as free-layers in Spin Transfer Torque Random Access Memory (STT-RAM) devices, particularly, Cr{sub 2}MnAs-MgO system with MnAs interface layers and Co{sub 2}MnSi-MgO system with Mn{sub 2} interface layers.

Munira, Kamaram, E-mail: kmunira@mint.ua.edu [Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 (United States); Romero, Jonathon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 (United States); Butler, William H. [Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Azimuthal Anisotropy in Heavy Ion Collisions from the Maximum Entropy Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the azimuthal anisotropy v2 of particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the maximum entropy approach. This necessitates two new parameters delta and lambda2. The parameter delta describes the deformation of transverse configuration space and is related to the anisotropy of the overlap zone of the two nuclei. The parameter lambda2 defines the anisotropy of the particle distribution in momentum space. Assuming deformed flux tubes at the early stage of the collision we relate the momentum to the space asymmetry i.e. lambda2 to delta with the uncertainty relation. We compute the anisotropy v2 as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity using gluon-hadron duality. The general features of LHC data are reproduced.

Pirner, Hans J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Azimuthal Anisotropy in Heavy Ion Collisions from the Maximum Entropy Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the azimuthal anisotropy v2 of particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the maximum entropy approach. This necessitates two new parameters delta and lambda2. The parameter delta describes the deformation of transverse configuration space and is related to the anisotropy of the overlap zone of the two nuclei. The parameter lambda2 defines the anisotropy of the particle distribution in momentum space. Assuming deformed flux tubes at the early stage of the collision we relate the momentum to the space asymmetry i.e. lambda2 to delta with the uncertainty relation. We compute the anisotropy v2 as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity using gluon-hadron duality. The general features of LHC data are reproduced.

Hans J. Pirner

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

152

Photon wave function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, the photon wave function exists as long as it can be precisely defined and made useful.

Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

154

Phase-controllable spin wave generation in iron garnet by linearly polarized light pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A phase-controlled spin wave was non-thermally generated in bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnet by linearly polarized light pulses. We controlled the initial phase of the spin wave continuously within a range of 180° by changing the polarization azimuth of the excitation light. The azimuth dependences of the initial phase and amplitude of the spin wave were attributed to a combination of the inverse Cotton-Mouton effect and photoinduced magnetic anisotropy. Temporally and spatially resolved spin wave propagation was observed with a CCD camera, and the waveform was in good agreement with calculations. A nonlinear effect of the spin excitation was observed for excitation fluences higher than 100 mJ/cm{sup 2}.

Yoshimine, Isao; Iida, Ryugo; Shimura, Tsutomu [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Satoh, Takuya, E-mail: satoh@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Stupakiewicz, Andrzej; Maziewski, Andrzej [Laboratory of Magnetism, Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Bialystok 15-424 (Poland)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

New wave generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

Mercier, Matthieu J.

156

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

157

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

Merlino, Robert L.

158

A comparison between matter wave and light wave interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate and compare the response of light wave interferometers and matter wave interferometers to gravitational waves. We find that metric matter wave interferometers will not challenge kilometric light wave interferometers such as Virgo or LIGO, but could be a good candidate for the detection of very low frequency gravitational waves.

Pacôme Delva; Marie-Christine Angonin; Philippe Tourrenc

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Development and anisotropy of three-dimensional turbulence in a current sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear evolution of three-dimensional reconnection instabilities are studied in a current sheet where many resonant surfaces are simultaneously present at different locations of the simulation domain. The nonlinear evolution produces the development of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The development of the energy spectrum is followed until the energy is transported to the dissipative length scale and the anisotropy of the spectrum is analyzed. The energy cascade is affected by the Alfven effect and it takes place mainly in the direction perpendicular to the local average magnetic field. Anisotropy is also affected by propagation of perturbations across the main magnetic field, due to the growth of a transverse component related to reconnection. The direction of anisotropy varies with the position in space. The spectral index is different both from what is found in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and from the values predicted for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a uniform large-scale magnetic field.

Onofri, M.; Veltri, P.; Malara, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, via P. Bucci, 87036 Rende (Serbia and Montenegro) (Italy)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electric field controlled reversible magnetic anisotropy switching studied by spin rectification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this letter, spin rectification was used to study the electric field controlled dynamic magnetic properties of the multiferroic composite which is a Co stripe with induced in-plane anisotropy deposited onto a Pb(Mg{sub 1?3}Nb{sub 2?3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} substrate. Due to the coupling between piezoelectric and magnetoelastic effects, a reversible in-plane anisotropy switching has been realized by varying the history of the applied electric field. This merit results from the electric hysteresis of the polarization in the nonlinear piezoelectric regime, which has been proved by a butterfly type electric field dependence of the in-plane anisotropy field. Moreover, the electric field dependent effective demagnetization field and linewidth have been observed at the same time.

Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong, E-mail: fanxiaolong@lzu.edu.cn; Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Xue, Desheng [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Anisotropy enhancement of the Casimir-Polder force between a nanoparticle and graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the analytical expressions for the thermal Casimir-Polder energy and force between a spheroidal nanoparticle above a semi-infinite material and a graphene covered interface. We analyze in detail the Casimir-Polder force between a gold nanoparticle and a single sheet of pristine graphene focusing on the impact of anisotropy. We show that the effect of anisotropy, i.e. the shape and orientation of the spheroidal nanoparticle, has a much larger influence on the force than the tunability of graphene. The effect of tuning and anisotropy both add up such that we observe a force which is between 20-50% of that in the ideal metal case which is much larger than the results found for the Casimir force between a metal halfspace and a layer of graphene.

Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

Beta-dependent upper bound on ion temperature anisotropy in a laboratory plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion temperatures, parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field, in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies space simulation chamber (a steady-state, high beta, argon plasma) display an inverse correlation between the upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy and the parallel ion beta ({beta}=8{pi}nkT/B{sup 2}). These observations are consistent with in situ spacecraft measurements in the Earth's magnetosheath and with a theoretical/computational model that predicts that such an upper bound is imposed by scattering from enhanced fluctuations due to growth of the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability (the Alfven ion cyclotron instability). (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Keiter, Paul A. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Balkey, Matthew M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Boivin, Robert [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kline, John L. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Anisotropy enhancement of the Casimir-Polder force between a nanoparticle and graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the analytical expressions for the thermal Casimir-Polder energy and force between a spheroidal nanoparticle above a semi-infinite material and a graphene covered interface. We analyze in detail the Casimir-Polder force between a gold nanoparticle and a single sheet of pristine graphene focusing on the impact of anisotropy. We show that the effect of anisotropy, i.e. the shape and orientation of the spheroidal nanoparticle, has a much larger influence on the force than the tunability of graphene. The effect of tuning and anisotropy both add up such that we observe a force which is between 20-50% of that in the ideal metal case which is much larger than the results found for the Casimir force between a metal halfspace and a layer of graphene.

Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Nonlinear spherical Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an one-dimensional numerical study of Alfven waves propagating along a radial magnetic field. Neglecting losses, any spherical Alfven wave, no matter how small its initial amplitude is, becomes nonlinear at sufficiently large radii. From previous simulations of Alfven waves in plane parallel atmospheres we did expect the waves to steepen and produce current sheets in the nonlinear regime, which was confirmed by our new calculations. On the other hand we did find that even the least nonlinear waves were damped out almost completely before 10 solar radii. A damping of that kind is required by models of Alfven wave-driven winds from old low-mass stars as these winds are mainly accelerated within a few stellar radii.

Ulf Torkelsson; G. Christopher Boynton

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hysteresis of ionization waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H. [Institut fuer Physik, E.-M.-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Wilke, C. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung und Technologie, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

Berlin,Technische Universität

168

Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived #12;66 2. Wave Propagation Theory quantities of the quiescent (time independent) medium are identified perturbations is much smaller than the speed of sound. 2.1.1 The Nonlinear Wave Equation Retaining higher

169

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

US Army Corps of Engineers

170

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer of the Subject II. Introduction­Historical Perspective III. Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations IV. Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics V. Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions VI

Hereman, Willy A.M.

171

New wave generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (2007). This mechanism, which involves a tunable source comprised of oscillating plates, has so far been used for a few fundamental studies of internal waves, but its full potential has yet to be realized. Our studies reveal that this approach is capable of producing a wide variety of two-dimensional wave fields, including plane waves, wave beams and discrete vertical modes in finite-depth stratifications. The effects of discretization by a finite number of plates, forcing amplitude and angle of propagation are investigated, and it is found that the method is remarkably efficient at generating a complete wave field despite forcing only one velocity component in a controllable manner. We furthermore find that the nature of the radiated wave field is well predicted using Fourier transforms of the spatial structure of the wave generator.

Mercier, Matthieu J; Mathur, Manikandan; Gostiaux, Louis; Peacock, Thomas; Dauxois, Thierry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Directed Relativistic Blast Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

Andrei Gruzinov

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

A study of magnetic anisotropy energy in CuMn spin glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF MAGNETIC ANISOTROPY ENERGY IN CuMn SPIN GLASS A Thesis by CHRISTINE ADELE ALLEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986... Major Subject: Physics A STUDY OF MAGNETIC ANISOTROPY ENERGY IN CuMn SPIN GLASS A Thesis by CHRISTINE ADELE ALLEN Approved as to style and content by: Thomas W. Adair, III (Chai man of Committee) Robert A. enefick (Member) Donald L. Parker...

Allen, Christine Adele

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

OBSERVATION OF COSMIC-RAY ANISOTROPY WITH THE ICETOP AIR SHOWER ARRAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for any particular model, they lend support to scenarios where the large-scale anisotropy is a superposition of the flux from a few nearby sources. The sparse spatial distribution and the different ages of nearby supernova remnants are expected to lead... shower array at the south pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10?3 level can, for the first time...

Aartsen, M. G.; Besson, David Zeke

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Momentum anisotropies in the quark coalescence model RID A-2398-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimentally accessible. The experimental data further indicate that there is a scaling relation among the hadronic anisotropy coeffi- cients vn, i.e., vnspTd,1.2v2n/2spTd. To gain insight in the ori- gin of this scaling relation, we relate in the present... of the parton transverse mo- mentum spectra to the third power, i.e., F? swd ~ fswd3 ~ 1 + 2o n=1 ` V?n cos nw . s5d The calculations given in the Appendix then lead to a some- what more complicated expression for the nth order baryon anisotropy V?n, V...

Kolb, PF; Chen, LW; Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Determine if fracturing could be used to enhance permeability; and whether dilution of existing fluids with injected water would lower corrosivity enough to allow economic production of power.

177

Shear-wave splitting, lithospheric anisotropy, and mantle deformation beneath the ArabiaEurasia collision zone in Iran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­Eurasia collision zone in Iran Ayoub Kaviani a,b,c , Denis Hatzfeld c, , Anne Paul c , Mohammad Tatar b , Keith Priestley d a Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan, Iran b International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, P.O. Box 19395-3913, Tehran, Iran c

Hatzfeld, Denis

178

Laboratory-based recording of holographic fine structure in X-ray absorption anisotropy using polycapillary optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 April 2012 Available online 17 May 2012 Keywords: X-ray absorption Atomic structure XLaboratory-based recording of holographic fine structure in X-ray absorption anisotropy using) was characterized and used for recording two-dimensional maps of X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA). XAA originates

Korecki, Pawe³

179

Pump-Probe Polarization Anisotropy Study of Femtosecond Energy Transfer within the Photosynthetic Reaction Center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pump-Probe Polarization Anisotropy Study of Femtosecond Energy Transfer within the Photosynthetic) in the photosynthetic reaction center has been time resolved with pump-probe polarization anisotropy measurements using artifacts from saturation and photoexcitation of incompletely relaxed reaction centers. The pump excitation

Lang, Matthew

180

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis...

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

183

Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

Developing de Broglie Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

2006-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

185

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C 1, supplktnent au no 2-3, Tome 32, Fkvrier-Mars 1971, page C 1 -920 STUDIES OF MAGNETIC ANISOTROPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5lEu pour etudier l'anisotropie magnetique de plusieurs grenats de terres rares deformule :RZSm~/2-x

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

186

Secondary dust density waves excited by nonlinear dust acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary dust density waves were observed in conjunction with high amplitude (n{sub d}/n{sub d0}>2) dust acoustic waves (DAW) that were spontaneously excited in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma in the moderately coupled, {Gamma}{approx}1, state. The high amplitude dust acoustic waves produced large dust particle oscillations, displacements, and trapping. Secondary dust density waves were excited in the wave troughs of the high amplitude DAWs. The waveforms, amplitudes, wavelengths, and wave speeds of the primary DAWs and the secondary waves were measured. A dust-dust streaming instability is discussed as a possible mechanism for the production of the secondary waves.

Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus and efficiency of seismic processing algorithms, especially for application to regions of structural complexity

188

Rainbow trapping of guided waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rainbow trapping of guided waves Javier Polanco and Rosa M.the propagation of a wave packet that is a superpositionof three s-polarized guided waves with different frequencies

Polanco, Javier; Fitzgerald, Rosa M; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

190

Magnetic anisotropy in a permalloy microgrid fabricated by near-field optical lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the fabrication and magnetic properties of permalloy microgrids prepared by near-field optical lithography and characterized using high-sensitivity magneto-optical Kerr effect techniques. A fourfold magnetic anisotropy induced by the grid architecture is identified. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

Li, S. P.; Lebib, A.; Peyrade, D.; Natali, M.; Chen, Y.; Lew, W. S.; Bland, J. A. C.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in ion beam sputtered Co/Ni multilayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co/Ni multilayers display perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and have applications in magnetic devices that could lead to a large increase in the density of magnetic storage. Co/Ni 10-(2 Å Co/ 8Å Ni) and 10-(2 Å Co/ 4 Å Ni) ...

Rasin, Boris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Influence of Tissue Conductivity Inhomogeneity and Anisotropy on EEG/MEG based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source in the brain using a volume-conduction model of the head. The associated differential equations in the Human Brain #12;Die Deutsche Bibliothek - CIP-Einheitsaufnahme Wolters, Carsten Hermann: Influence of Tissue Conductivity Inhomogeneity and Anisotropy on EEG/MEG based Source Localization in the Human Brain

Utah, University of

193

The Large Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as Observed with Milagro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results are presented of a harmonic analysis of the large scale cosmic-ray anisotropy as observed by the Milagro observatory. We show a two-dimensional display of the sidereal anisotropy projections in right ascension generated by the fitting of three harmonics to 18 separate declination bands. The Milagro observatory is a water Cherenkov detector located in the Jemez mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico. With a high duty cycle and large field-of-view, Milagro is an excellent instrument for measuring this anisotropy with high sensitivity at TeV energies. The analysis is conducted using a seven year data sample consisting of more than 95 billion events. We observe an anisotropy with a magnitude around 0.1% for cosmic rays with a median energy of 6 TeV. The dominant feature is a deficit region of depth (-2.85 +/- 0.06 stat. +/- 0.08 syst.)x10^(-3) in the direction of the Galactic North Pole with a range in declination of -10 to 45 degrees and 150 to 225 degrees in right ascension. We observe a steady increase ...

Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Hopper, B; Hüntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

On the Computation of CMBR Anisotropies from Simulations of Topological Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Techniques for computing the CMBR anisotropy from simulations of topological defects are discussed with an eye to getting as much information from a simulation as possible. Here we consider the practical details of which sums and multiplications to do and how many terms there are.

Albert Stebbins; Scott Dodelson

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Large Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as Observed with Milagro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results are presented of a harmonic analysis of the large scale cosmic-ray anisotropy as observed by the Milagro observatory. We show a two-dimensional display of the sidereal anisotropy pro jections in right ascension generated by the fitting of three harmonics to 18 separate declination bands. The Milagro observatory is a water Cherenkov detector located in the Jemez mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico. With a high duty cycle and large field-of-view, Milagro is an excellent instrument for measuring this anisotropy with high sensitivity at TeV energies. The analysis is conducted using a seven year data sample consisting of more than 95 billion events, the largest such data set in existence. We observe an anisotropy with a magnitude around 0.1% for cosmic rays with a median energy of 6 TeV. The dominant feature is a deficit region of depth (2.49 +/- 0.02 stat. +/- 0.09 sys.)x10^(-3) in the direction of the Galactic North Pole centered at 189 degrees right ascension. We observe a steady increase in the magnitude of the signal over seven years.

A. A. Abdo; B. T. Allen; T. Aune; D. Berley; S. Casanova; C. Chen; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; C. M. Hoffman; B. Hopper; P. H. Hüntemeyer; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. Pretz; J. M. Ryan; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; G. B. Yodh

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field ZHEN Liang( )1 of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China; 2. Department 27599-3255, USA Received 29 June 2006; accepted 15 January 2007 Abstract: Structural and magnetic

Qin, Lu-Chang

197

Manipulation of magnetic anisotropy of Co ultrathin films by substrate engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manipulation of magnetic anisotropy of Co ultrathin films by substrate engineering Yuki Saisyu September 2011) The magnetic and structural properties of Co films prepared on various substrates were-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The magnetic signals of the Co films

Hasegawa, Shuji

198

Nuclear modification and azimuthal anisotropy of D mesons produced in relativistic heavy ion collision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a phenomenological treatment of charm quark energy loss before fragmenting into D mesons and calculate nuclear modification factor, '$R_{AA}$' and azimuthal anisotropy, '$v_2$' of D mesons for lead on lead collision at LHC energy of $\\sqrt{s}$=2.76 A TeV.

Younus, Mohammed

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Effect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in deep saline aquifers is considered one of the most effective methods for carbon sequestration., 48, W09539, doi:10.1029/2012WR011939.* 1. Introduction [2] Carbon sequestration in deep salineEffect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

Firoozabadi, Abbas

200

Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading-rich shale recovered from the Wilcox formation and saturated with 1 M NaCl solution varies from 3 Ã? 10Ã?22 transport; KEYWORDS: permeability, shale, connected pore space Citation: Kwon, O., A. K. Kronenberg, A. F

Herbert, Bruce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Diagonalization of pp-waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

B. V. Ivanov

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

203

UT of bimetallic welds by shear horizontal waves and electromagnetic ultrasonic (EMUS) probes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bimetallic transition welds include in most cases besides the austenitic weldment an austenitic buttering. Their inspection by ultrasound is strongly complicated by a high degree of elastic anisotropy. The elastic anisotropy results in phase and group velocities of the elastic wave-modes, which are functions of the propagation direction inside the weld metal and which cause skewing of the sound beams. The coarse grain structure leads to enhanced scattering. Furthermore, there exists a mismatch of the acoustical impedances between the weld metal and the base metal, which depends on the angle of incidence at the interface base metal/weld metal and weld metal/buttering. Due to these facts up to now using standard UT-techniques only the HAZ`s are inspected from both sides. In many cases dissimilar metal welds are only accessible from one side. Therefore, US-techniques are necessary which are capable to inspect the whole weld even if there is only access from one side. By improvement of the technology of the EMUS-probes and of the EMUS-instrumentation for the US-transduction of SH-waves a reliable technique for the ISI of dissimilar metal welds and also of austenitic welds is available. The contribution will shortly introduce into the physical basis of the SH-wave technique and present the results of test specimen measurements. The main part of the paper will report about the experiences and the results of field applications in different nuclear power plants.

Huebschen, G.; Salzburger, H.J.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Saarbruecken (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

The interplay of long-range magnetic order and single-ion anisotropy in rare earth nickel germanides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation is concerned with the interplay of long-range order and anisotropy in the tetragonal RNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = rare earth) family of compounds. Microscopic magnetic structures were studied using both neutron and x-ray resonant exchange scattering (XRES) techniques. The magnetic structures of Tb, Dy, Eu and Gd members have been determined using high-quality single-crystal samples. This work has correlated a strong Fermi surface nesting to the magnetic ordering in the RNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} compounds. Generalized susceptibility, {chi}{sub 0}(q), calculations found nesting to be responsible for both incommensurate ordering wave vector in GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, and the commensurate structure in EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}. A continuous transition from incommensurate to commensurate magnetic structures via band filling is predicted. The surprisingly higher T{sub N} in EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} than that in GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} is also explained. Next, all the metamagnetic phases in TbNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} with an applied field along the c axis have been characterized with neutron diffraction measurements. A mixed phase model for the first metamagnetic structure consisting of fully-saturated as well as reduced-moment Tb ions is presented. The moment reduction may be due to moment instability which is possible if the exchange is comparable to the low-lying CEF level splitting and the ground state is a singlet. In such a case, certain Tb sites may experience a local field below the critical value needed to reach saturation.

Islam, Z.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks J. C. Wright , P. T. Bonoli , C hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron

Wright, John C.

206

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

207

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

208

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli MIT E .J. Porkolab Sherwood/Spring APS Denver May 2009 #12; 2 Participants in the Center for Simulation of Wave hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance

Wright, John C.

209

On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

Surface wave interferometry   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

Halliday, David Fraser

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Traveling-wave photodetector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave...

214

Anisotropic superconductivity: ({ital s}+{ital d})-wave model, ({ital d}+{ital s})-wave model and the effect of normal impurities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study in three and two dimensions (3D and 2D), some of the superconducting properties of anisotropic hybrid ({ital s}+{ital d})- and ({ital d}+{ital s})-wave superconductor models (depending whether the {ital s} or {ital d} component predominates). The anisotropy is contained in the fermion-fermion pairing interaction as reflecting structural anisotropies of the kind found in layered high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} cuprates, in particular the orthorhombic ones. We show that even within the weak-coupling formalism and for an isotropic Fermi surface (so that the interaction has a lower symmetry than the Fermi surface), we obtain enhanced values of {Delta}{sub {ital M}}/{ital T}{sub {ital c}} ({Delta}{sub {ital M}} is the maximum value of the gap energy) compared to the BCS one, as well as enhanced {ital T}{sub {ital c}} values. Depending on the anisotropy parameters we can get a four-leaf clover kind of shape for the gap in {bold k} space in 2D, with the size of the leaves in one direction being different from one of those in the perpendicular direction. We also find unusual shapes for the density of states; in particular we can recover the {open_quote}{open_quote}gapless{close_quote}{close_quote} case similar to the one of the purely {ital d}-wave model of the literature. We study two kinds of anisotropic pairings: the first one, in 3D and 2D yields an ({ital s}+{ital d}) pairing; the other one, in 2D, yields a ({ital d}+{ital s}) pairing and is more specifically adapted to orthorhombic high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} cuprates, the {ital s} component disappearing in the tetragonal case where the distortion is absent and for which the purely {ital d} pairing is recovered. (Abstract Truncated)

Beal-Monod, M.T. [Physique des Solides, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91400 Orsay (France); Maki, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Mathematical Caricature of Large Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kadomtsev-Petviiashvili equation is considered as a mathematical caricature of large and rogue waves.

Mikhail Kovalyov

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

216

Clustering of floaters by waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study experimentally how waves affect distribution of particles that float on a water surface. We show that clustering of small particles in a standing wave is a nonlinear effect with the clustering time decreasing as the square of the wave amplitude. In a set of random waves, we show that small floaters concentrate on a multi-fractal set.

P. Denissenko; G. Falkovich; S. Lukaschuk

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

217

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES Tuning Wave Dispersion in Resonant Networks Eyal Feigenbaum with meta-atoms. Resonant guided wave networks (RGWNs) are a new class of artificial photonic material,5 distinct from photonic crystals and metamateri- als, in which localized waves resonate in closed paths

Atwater, Harry

218

Autoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wave, the pump and the wave will phase lock at very low wave amplitude. When the pump reachesAutoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves J. Fajans E. Gilson U.C. Berkeley L. Friedland Hebrew of phase with the oscillator, and the os- cillator's amplitude will decrease, eventually reaching zero

Wurtele, Jonathan

219

Spin-waves in antiferromagnetic single-crystal LiFePO4 Jiying Li,* Vasile O. Garlea, Jerel L. Zarestky, and David Vaknin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wave theory by including in the spin Hamiltonian in-plane nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions J1 and J2 , inter-plane nearest-neighbor interactions J and a single-ion anisotropy D . A weak 0 number s : 75.25. z, 75.30.Ds, 75.50.Ee I. INTRODUCTION Lithium-orthophosphates LiMPO4 M=Mn,Fe,Co,Ni have

Vakni, David

220

Selection Rules for the Nonlinear Interactions of Internal Gravity Waves and Inertia-Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Gravity Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.1 Twodimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . . . . .Three dimensional inertia-gravity wave physics . . . . . .

Jiang, Chung-Hsiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

Maneva, Y. G. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Vinas, A. F. [Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

222

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves P. Junga: a subexcitable photosensitive Belousov­Zhabotinsky reaction, hippocampal slices of rat brains, and astrocyte of such a behavior for calcium wave net- works in interconnected brain cells. I. INTRODUCTION Since the early days

Showalter, Kenneth

223

Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in epitaxially strained cobalt-ferrite (001) thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the dependencies of both the magnetization characteristics and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3–x}O{sub 4}(001) epitaxial films (x?=?0.5 and 0.75) on the growth conditions of the reactive magnetron sputtering process. Both saturation magnetization and the magnetic uniaxial anisotropy constant K{sub u} are strongly dependent on the reactive gas (O{sub 2}) flow rate, although there is little difference in the surface structures for all samples observed by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. In addition, certain dead-layer-like regions were observed in the initial stage of the film growth for all films. Our results suggest that the magnetic properties of Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3–x}O{sub 4} epitaxial films are governed by the oxidation state and the film structure at the vicinity of the interface.

Yanagihara, H., E-mail: yanagiha@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Utsumi, Y.; Niizeki, T., E-mail: t-niizeki@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Inoue, J.; Kita, Eiji [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Visualization of microcrack anisotropy in granite affected by afault zone, using confocal laser scanning microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brittle deformation in granite can generate a fracture system with different patterns. Detailed fracture analyses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales, together with physical property data from a drill-core, are used to classify the effects of reverse fault deformation in four domains: (1) undeformed granite, (2) fractured granite with cataclastic seams, (3) fractured granite from the damage zone, and (4) foliated cataclasite from the core of the fault. Intact samples from two orthogonal directions, horizontal (H) and vertical (V), from the four domains indicate a developing fracture anisotropy toward the fault, which is highly developed in the damage zone. As a specific illustration of this phenomenon, resin impregnation, using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) technique is applied to visualize the fracture anisotropy developed in the Toki Granite, Japan. As a result, microcrack networks have been observed to develop in H sections and elongate open cracks in V sections, suggesting that flow pathways can be determined by deformation.

Onishi, Celia T.; Shimizu, Ichiko

2004-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Sputtering of cobalt film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on disorder-free graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth of thin cobalt film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has been investigated on pristine graphene for spin logic and memory applications. By reduction of the kinetic energy of the sputtered atoms using indirect sputtered deposition, deposition induced defects in the graphene layer have been controlled. Cobalt film on graphene with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has been developed. Raman spectroscopy of the graphene surface shows very little disorder induced in the graphene by the sputtering process. In addition, upon increasing the cobalt film thickness, the disorder density increases on the graphene and saturates for thicknesses of Co layers above 1 nm. The AFM image indicates a surface roughness of about 0.86 nm. In addition, the deposited film forms a granular structure with a grain size of about 40 nm.

Jamali, Mahdi; Lv, Yang; Zhao, Zhengyang; Wang, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpwang@umn.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, 4-174 200 Union Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Local control of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Ga,Mn)As microdevices: Demonstration in current-induced switching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large saturation magnetization in conventional dense moment ferromagnets offers a flexible means of manipulating the ordered state through demagnetizing shape anisotropy fields, but these dipolar fields, in turn, limit the integrability...

Wunderlich, J.; Irvine, A. C.; Zemen, J.; Holy, V.; Rushforth, A. W.; De Ranieri, E.; Rana, U.; Vyborny, K.; Sinova, Jairo; Foxon, C. T.; Campion, R. P.; Williams, D. A.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Interfacial oxygen migration and its effect on the magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the interfacial oxygen migration effect and its induced magnetic anisotropy evolution in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt films. During depositing the MgO layer, oxygen atoms from the MgO combine with the neighboring Co atoms, leading to the formation of CoO at the Co/MgO interface. Meanwhile, the films show in-plane magnetic anisotropy (IMA). After annealing, most of the oxygen atoms in CoO migrate back to the MgO layer, resulting in obvious improvement of Co/MgO interface and the enhancement of effective Co-O orbital hybridization. These favor the evolution of magnetic anisotropy from IMA to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). The oxygen migration effect is achieved by the redox reaction at the Co/MgO interface. On the contrary, the transfer from IMA to PMA cannot be observed in Pt/Co/Pt films due to the lack of interfacial oxygen migration.

Chen, Xi; Feng, Chun, E-mail: fengchun@ustb.edu.cn, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Shaolong; Hua Li, Ming; Hua Yu, Guang, E-mail: fengchun@ustb.edu.cn, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Long Wu, Zheng [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

228

Excited level anisotropy produced by ion-solid and ion-liquid surface interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXCITED LEPEL ANISOTPOPY PRODUCED BY ION-SOLID AND ION-LIQUID SURFACE INTERACTIONS A Thesis CHIN SHUANG LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Physics EXCITED LEVEL ANISOTROPY PRODUCED BY ION-SOLID AND ION-LIQUID SURFACE 'INTERACTIONS A Thesis by CHIN SHUANG LEE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Departmert Member...

Lee, Chin Shuang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Phase-Diagram of Ultrathin Ferromagnetic-Films with Perpendicular Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of numerous ultrathin ferromagnetic films that show (l) a planar mag- netization for temperature T above the spin reorientation transition temperature Tz, (2) a perpendicular magneti- zation at low temperatures, and (3) an intermediate tem- perature... regime having a perpendicular magnetization with an up-and-down stripe-domain structure. It is based upon the usual ferromagnetic exchange Hamiltoni- an, including the magnetostatic dipolar interaction, sup- plemented by an easy-axis spin anisotropy...

Abanov, Artem; KALATSKY, V.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.; SASLOW, WM.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND INTENSITY AND ANISOTROPIES DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fraction of the extragalactic near-infrared (near-IR) background light involves redshifted photons from the ultraviolet (UV) emission from galaxies present during reionization at redshifts above 6. The absolute intensity and the anisotropies of the near-IR background provide an observational probe of the first-light galaxies and their spatial distribution. We estimate the extragalactic background light intensity during reionization by accounting for the stellar and nebular emission from first-light galaxies. We require the UV photon density from these galaxies to generate a reionization history that is consistent with the optical depth to electron scattering from cosmic microwave background measurements. We also require the bright-end luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in our models to reproduce the measured Lyman-dropout LFs at redshifts of 6-8. The absolute intensity is about 0.1-0.4 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at the peak of its spectrum at {approx}1.1 {mu}m. We also discuss the anisotropy power spectrum of the near-IR background using a halo model to describe the galaxy distribution. We compare our predictions for the anisotropy power spectrum to existing measurements from deep near-IR imaging data from Spitzer/IRAC, Hubble/NICMOS, and AKARI. The predicted rms fluctuations at tens of arcminute angular scales are roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the existing measurements. While strong arguments have been made that the measured fluctuations do not have an origin involving faint low-redshift galaxies, we find that measurements in the literature are also incompatible with galaxies present during the era of reionization. The measured near-IR background anisotropies remain unexplained with an unknown origin.

Cooray, Asantha; Gong Yan; Smidt, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Santos, Mario G. [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Analysis of stress-induced Burgers vector anisotropy in pressurized tube specimens of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steel: JLF-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure for determining the Burgers vector anisotropy in irradiated ferritic steels allowing identification of all a<100> and all a/2<111> dislocations in a region of interest is applied to a pressurized tube specimen of JLF-1 irradiated at 430 C to 14.3 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) or 61 dpa. Analysis of micrographs indicates large anisotropy in Burgers vector populations develop during irradiation creep.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shibayama, T. [Univ. of Hokkaido, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nonlinear Evolution of Cosmic Magnetic Fields and Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we investigate the effects of the primordial magnetic fields on cosmic microwave background anisotropies (CMB). Based on cosmological magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations we calculate the CMB anisotropy spectra and polarization induced by fluid fluctuations (Alfv\\'en modes) generated by primordial magnetic fields. The strongest effect on the CMB spectra comes from the transition epoch from a turbulent regime to a viscous regime. The balance between magnetic and kinetic energy until the onset of the viscous regime provides a one to one relation between the comoving coherence length $L$ and the comoving magnetic field strength $B$, such as $L \\sim 30 (B/10^{-9}{\\rm G})^3 \\rm pc$. The resulting CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies are somewhat different from the ones previously obtained by using linear perturbation theory. Our calculation gives a constraint on the magnetic field strength in the intermediate scale of CMB observations. Upper limits are set by WMAP and BOOMERANG results for comoving magnetic field strength of $B 0.7 \\rm Mpc$ for the most extreme case, or $B 0.8 \\rm Mpc$ for the most conservative case.

Hiroyuki Tashiro; Naoshi Sugiyama; Robi Banerjee

2006-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

233

Effects of pressure anisotropy on magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium of an internal ring current system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of pressure anisotropy on magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium are studied analytically and numerically, where the plasma is confined by only poloidal magnetic field generated by an internal ring current. The plasma current due to finite pressure can be divided into two components; one remains at isotropic pressure and the other arises from pressure anisotropy. When p{sub ?}, the pressure perpendicular to the magnetic field, is larger than p{sub ?}, the pressure parallel to the magnetic field, those two components of plasma current tend to cancel each other to reduce the total amount of plasma current. Equilibrium beta limit is also examined, where the beta is a ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure. The equilibrium beta limit decreases as the pressure anisotropy becomes strong. The beta value is strictly limited by ellipticity of the equilibrium equation when p{sub ?}>p{sub ?}. On the other hand, when p{sub ?}>p{sub ?}, although the tendency of the beta limit agrees with the ellipticity condition of the equilibrium equation, equilibria with a hyperbolic region can be obtained by iterative procedure with practically reasonable convergence criteria.

Furukawa, M., E-mail: furukawa@damp.tottori-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8552 (Japan)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Most spin-1/2 transition-metal ions do have single ion anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cause for the preferred spin orientation in magnetic systems containing spin-1/2 transition-metal ions was explored by studying the origin of the easy-plane anisotropy of the spin-1/2 Cu{sup 2+} ions in CuCl{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, LiCuVO{sub 4}, CuCl{sub 2}, and CuBr{sub 2} on the basis of density functional theory and magnetic dipole-dipole energy calculations as well as a perturbation theory treatment of the spin-orbit coupling. We find that the spin orientation observed for these spin-1/2 ions is not caused by their anisotropic spin exchange interactions, nor by their magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, but by the spin-orbit coupling associated with their crystal-field split d-states. Our study also predicts in-plane anisotropy for the Cu{sup 2+} ions of Bi{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}. The results of our investigations dispel the mistaken belief that magnetic systems with spin-1/2 ions have no magnetic anisotropy induced by spin-orbit coupling.

Liu, Jia; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan, E-mail: hxiang@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Koo, Hyun-Joo [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Xiang, Hongjun, E-mail: hxiang@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu [Key Laboratory of Computational Physical Sciences (Ministry of Education), State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Kremer, Reinhard K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

OBSERVATION OF COSMIC-RAY ANISOTROPY WITH THE ICETOP AIR SHOWER ARRAY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at PeV energies. The analysis is based on data taken between 2009 and 2012 with the IceTop air shower array at the south pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10{sup -3} level can, for the first time, be extended to PeV energies. We divide the data set into two parts with median energies of 400 TeV and 2 PeV, respectively. In the low energy band, we observe a strong deficit with an angular size of about 30 Degree-Sign and an amplitude of (- 1.58 {+-} 0.46{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} at a location consistent with previous observations of cosmic rays with the IceCube neutrino detector. The study of the high energy band shows that the anisotropy persists to PeV energies and increases in amplitude to (- 3.11 {+-} 0.38{sub stat} {+-} 0.96{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}.

Aartsen, M. G. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 Australia (Australia)] [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 Australia (Australia); Abbasi, R.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Ackermann, M. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany)] [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J. A. [Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland)] [Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland); Altmann, D. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)] [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)] [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Tjus, J. Becker [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)] [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)] [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fermi-LAT gamma-ray anisotropy and intensity explained by unresolved Radio-Loud Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) are expected to contribute substantially to both the intensity and anisotropy of the isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB). In turn, the measured properties of the IGRB can be used to constrain the characteristics of proposed contributing source classes. We consider individual subclasses of radio-loud AGN, including low-, intermediate-, and high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and misaligned AGN. Using updated models of the gamma-ray luminosity functions of these populations, we evaluate the energy-dependent contribution of each source class to the intensity and anisotropy of the IGRB. We find that collectively radio-loud AGN can account for the entirety of the IGRB intensity and anisotropy as measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Misaligned AGN provide the bulk of the measured intensity but a negligible contribution to the anisotropy, while high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects provide the dominant contribution to the anisotropy. In anticipation of upcoming measurements with the Fermi-LAT and the forthcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array, we predict the anisotropy in the broader energy range that will be accessible to future observations.

Mattia Di Mauro; Alessandro Cuoco; Fiorenza Donato; Jennifer M. Siegal-Gaskins

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

Are you sure that the anisotropies in the microwave background radiation are really cosmological rather than purely Galactic in origin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New calculations of the Galactic contamination over microwave background radiation anisotropies are carried out. On one hand, when a frequency-dependent contrast of molecular clouds with respect to the Galactic background of the diffuse interstellar medium is taken into account, the anisotropic amplitude produced by Galactic dust is increased with respect to previous calculations and this is of the same order as that of the data from the observations. On the other hand, if we take into account rotational dust emission, for instance, a frequency independence of anisotropies in the microwave range may be obtained. This leads to the possibility that under some particular, but not impossible, conditions all the microwave background radiation anisotropies may be due to Galactic foregrounds rather than cosmological in origin. Moreover, a suspected coincidence between the typical angular sizes of the microwave background radiation anisotropies and those of nearby molecular clouds makes more plausible the hypothesis of a purely Galactic origin for these anisotropies. It is also argued that the correlation among structures at different frequencies, the comparison of the power spectrum at different frequencies and the galactic latitude dependence of the anisotropies are not yet proofs in favour of either a cosmological or Galactic origin.

M. Lopez-Corredoira

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

239

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

Primordial Gravitational Waves Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconsider the enhancement of primordial gravitational waves that arises from a quantum gravitational model of inflation. A distinctive feature of this model is that the end of inflation witnesses a brief phase during which the Hubble parameter oscillates in sign, changing the usual Hubble friction to anti-friction. An earlier analysis of this model was based on numerically evolving the graviton mode functions after guessing their initial conditions near the end of inflation. The current study is based on an equation which directly evolves the normalized square of the magnitude. We are also able to make a very reliable estimate for the initial condition using a rapidly converging expansion for the sub-horizon regime. Results are obtained for the energy density per logarithmic wave number as a fraction of the critical density. These results exhibit how the enhanced signal depends upon the number of oscillatory periods; they also show the resonant effects associated with particular wave numbers.

Maria G. Romania; N. C. Tsamis; R. P. Woodard

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

IR Hot Wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

Graham, T. B.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

243

Piezoelectric wave motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

Standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Formation of electron kappa distributions due to interactions with parallel propagating whistler waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In space plasmas, charged particles are frequently observed to possess a high-energy tail, which is often modeled by a kappa-type distribution function. In this work, the formation of the electron kappa distribution in generation of parallel propagating whistler waves is investigated using fully nonlinear particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A previous research concluded that the bi-Maxwellian character of electron distributions is preserved in PIC simulations. We now demonstrate that for interactions between electrons and parallel propagating whistler waves, a non-Maxwellian high-energy tail can be formed, and a kappa distribution can be used to fit the electron distribution in time-asymptotic limit. The ?-parameter is found to decrease with increasing initial temperature anisotropy or decreasing ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency. The results might be helpful to understanding the origin of electron kappa distributions observed in space plasmas.

Tao, X., E-mail: xtao@ustc.edu.cn; Lu, Q. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China) [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Mengcheng National Geophysical Observatory, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sixteen-moment approximation for a collisionless space plasma: Waves and instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study is carried out of waves and instabilities in an anisotropic collisionless plasma. In a strongly magnetized plasma, the velocity distributions along and across the magnetic field lines are different, which results in anisotropy of the total pressure and gives rise to an anisotropic heat flux. The fluid description of the plasma is based on the 16-moment integral transport equations, which are integral equations obtained from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation. For small incompressible perturbations in a homogeneous plasma, the general dispersion relation implies that there are not only firehose modes, but also three additional modes, and that all four wave modes interact with each other if a heat flux is present. Heat fluxes do not change the properties of conventional firehose modes. The conditions for the onset of instabilities are investigated as functions of the parameters of the problems. Qualitative estimates for conditions typical of the solar corona are presented.

Kuznetsov, V. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (Russian Federation); Dzhalilov, N. S. [Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Shemakha Astrophysical Observatory (Azerbaijan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

Yuksel, Cem

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

Uchava, E. S. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Nodia Institute of Geophysics, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Shergelashvili, B. M. [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); CODeS, KU Leuven Campus Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, 8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Tevzadze, A. G. [Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Center (LMCC), KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. (2005) “Modeling guided wave propagation with applicationMultiple Guided Ultrasonic Wave Features,” ASME Journal ofto-spar joints using guided waves and macro fiber composite

Bartoli, Ivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Propagation of seismic waves through liquefied soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mechanisms of wave propagation and ARTICLE IN PRESS M.Numerical analysis Wave propagation Earthquake Liquefactionenergy during any wave propagation. This paper summarizes

Taiebat, Mahdi; Jeremic, Boris; Dafalias, Yannis; Kaynia, Amir; Cheng, Zhao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

Walsh, Donald Eugene

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

James, L. Allan

257

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However prerecombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects, we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peak and dip multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast, the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis of the location of WMAP extrema to constrain, in combination with recent BAO data, a constant dark energy equation of state parameter w. For a flat universe we find a strong 2{sigma} upper limit w<-1.10, and including the Hubble Space Telescope prior, we obtain w<-1.14, which is only marginally consistent with limits derived from the Supernova Legacy Survey sample. On the other hand, we infer larger limits for nonflat cosmologies. From the full CMB likelihood analysis, we also estimate the values of the shift parameter R and the multipole l{sub a} of the acoustic horizon at decoupling for several cosmologies, to test their dependence on model assumptions. Although the analysis of the full CMB spectra should always be preferred, using the position of the CMB peaks and dips provides a simple and consistent method for combining CMB constraints with other data sets.

Corasaniti, Pier Stefano [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8102, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Melchiorri, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica e Sezione INFN, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Zonal flow and field generation by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zonal flow and field generation by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves P. N magnetic fields by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves is presented. The analysis by electrostatic drift waves to finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves. The drift wave driven

Rubloff, Gary W.

260

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Spherical waves r Legendre polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Spherical waves r er e e Impedance · Legendre polynomials P0(x) = 1 P1(x) = x P2(x · Spherical waves ­ Spherical Hankel functions hn (2)(kr)=jn(kr)-iyn(kr) Impedance · Spherical waves Order: 0 1 4 Circumferential And azimuthal: 0,0 1,1 3,2 #12;3 Impedance · Spherical waves ­ Arbitrary

Berlin,Technische Universität

262

CX-011384: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Controls for the Multi-pod Centipod Wave Energy Converter Device CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12022013 Location(s): California...

263

CX-003761: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-003761: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ramgen Supersonic Shock Wave Compression and Engine Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09032010 Location(s):...

264

CX-005120: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005120: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wavebob Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01272011 Location(s):...

265

2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NHESSD 2, 7017­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

266

2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker, meterstick, sound tube apparatus, thermometer, microphone INTRODUCTION traveling wave of sinusoidal shape

Glashausser, Charles

267

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

268

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

Ryu, Yong Uk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number characteristics 14 3.5. Characteristics of the primary pressure wave 21 3.6. Pressure propagation over a hard

270

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since radar involves the transmission, propagation and scattering of EM waves by various is the electrostatic force between two point charges. #12;Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves Electric fields

Rutledge, Steven

271

Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains NearMaster University Tsunamis and ocean waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent

Craig, Walter

272

Gap anisotropy and universal pairing scale in a spin-fluctuation model of cuprate superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gap anisotropy and universal pairing scale in a spin-fluctuation model of cuprate superconductors Ar. Abanov,1 A. V. Chubukov,2 and M. R. Norman3 1Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA 2Department...-Tc cu- prate superconductors is a key problem.1 Some argue that the pseudogap originates from #1;quasi-#2;long-range order in a non- pairing channel #1;two-gap scenario#2;.2 Others argue instead that the pseudogap is a phase in which fermions already...

Abanov, Artem; Chubukov, A. V.; Norman, M. R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Unidirectional anisotropy in the spin pumping voltage in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed measurements of the dc voltage generated in a thin Pt layer deposited on films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) have been carried out to study the spin pumping effect produced by magnetostatic (MS) modes excited by a microwave field. In relatively thick YIG films the modes are far apart so that one can identify clearly the spin pumping voltage in V{sub SP} produced by each MS mode. We have discovered that when the sputter deposition of the thin Pt layer is made on the YIG film magnetized by a static magnetic field, V{sub SP} exhibits a strong unidirectional anisotropy.

Vilela-Leao, L. H.; Salvador, C.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

274

Random anisotropy disorder in superfluid 3He-A in aerogel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The anisotropic superfluid 3He-A in aerogel provides an interesting example of a system with continuous symmetry in the presence of random anisotropy disorder. Recent NMR experiments allow us to discuss two regimes of the orientational disorder, which have different NMR properties. One of them, the (s)-state, is identified as the pure Larkin-Imry-Ma state. The structure of another state, the (f)-state, is not very clear: probably it is the Larkin-Imry-Ma state contaminated by the network of the topological defects pinned by aerogel.

G. E. Volovik

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

On the Experimental Substantiation of Anisotropy of Inertial Mass of Body in the Earth Gravitation Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of the field concept of gravitation and gravitational analogue of the Faradays induction law the difference of inertial mass of a body at its accelerated movement in horizontal and vertical directions relative to the Earth is shown. For an illustration of such a distinction the results of comparison of a motion of balance mechanical watch at horizontal and vertical orientations of balance axis are given. The expediency of statement of precision mechanical experiments with measurement of anisotropy of the inertial mass is noted, allowing to estimate the validity of the field approach in the description of gravitation.

Alexander L. Dmitriev

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stabilization of the filamentation instability and the anisotropy of the background plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of a relativistic electron beam with an anisotropic Maxwellian plasma is investigated, with a focus on the stabilization condition for the filamentation instability. It is found that this condition is very sensitive to the anisotropy degree of the background plasma so that the investigation of the beam instability may not be easily decoupled from the state of the background plasma in typical fusion conditions. Furthermore, regardless of the plasma isotropy, filamentation can no longer be suppressed when the beam density exceeds a threshold value that is determined.

Bret, A.; Deutsch, C. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (CNRS-UMR 8578), Universite Paris XI, Batiment 210, 91405 Orsay cedex (France)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Spatial modulation of in-plane magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial Co(111) films grown on macrostep-bunched Si(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compared magnetic properties of epitaxial Co(111) films grown on microstep- and macrostep-bunched vicinal Si(111) substrates. A surface of the microstep-bunched Si(111) substrate represents regular array of step-bunches with height of 1.7?nm divided from each other by flat microterraces with a width of 34?nm. A surface of the macrostep-bunched Si(111) substrate is constituted by macrostep bunches with a height of 75–85?nm divided by atomically flat macroterraces. The average sum width of a macrostep bunch and a macroterrace is 2.3??m. While in-plane magnetic anisotropy was spatially uniform in Co(111) films grown on the microstep-bunched Si(111), periodic macromodulation of the topography of the Si(111) substrate induced spatial modulation of in-plane magnetic anisotropy in Co(111) film grown on the macrostep-bunched Si(111) surface. The energy of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the areas of the Co(111) film deposited on the Si(111) macrosteps was higher more than by the order of magnitude than the energy of the magnetic anisotropy in the areas grown on macroterraces. Magnetization reversal in the areas with different energy of the magnetic anisotropy occurred in different magnetic fields. We showed the possibility of obtaining high density of domain walls in Co(111) film grown on the macrostep-bunched Si(111) by tuning the spatial step density of the Si(111) substrate.

Davydenko, A. V., E-mail: avdavydenko@gmail.com; Kozlov, A. G.; Chebotkevich, L. A. [Laboratory of Thin Film Technologies, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

J. Cabaret; P. Béquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control de...

Cabaret, J; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

DNA waves and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fractional Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gravitational wave astronomy and cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first direct observation of gravitational waves' action upon matter has recently been reported by the BICEP2 experiment. Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are being installed. They will soon be commissioned, and then begin searches for high-frequency gravitational waves at a sensitivity level that is widely expected to reach events involving compact objects like stellar mass black holes and neutron stars. Pulsar timing arrays continue to improve the bounds on gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies, and may detect a signal on roughly the same timescale as ground-based detectors. The science case for space-based interferometers targeting millihertz sources is very strong. The decade of gravitational-wave discovery is poised to begin. In this writeup of a talk given at the 2013 TAUP conference, we will briefly review the physics of gravitational waves and gravitational-wave detectors, and then discuss the promise of these measurements for making cosmological measurements in the near future.

Scott A. Hughes

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

283

PROPAGATION OF SEISMIC WAVES THROUGH A SPATIO-TEMPORALLY FLUCTUATING MEDIUM: HOMOGENIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of seismic wave travel times at the photosphere of the Sun have enabled inferences of its interior structure and dynamics. In interpreting these measurements, the simplifying assumption that waves propagate through a temporally stationary medium is almost universally invoked. However, the Sun is in a constant state of evolution, on a broad range of spatio-temporal scales. At the zero-wavelength limit, i.e., when the wavelength is much shorter than the scale over which the medium varies, the WKBJ (ray) approximation may be applied. Here, we address the other asymptotic end of the spectrum, the infinite-wavelength limit, using the technique of homogenization. We apply homogenization to scenarios where waves are propagating through rapidly varying media (spatially and temporally), and derive effective models for the media. One consequence is that a scalar sound speed becomes a tensorial wave speed in the effective model and anisotropies can be induced depending on the nature of the perturbation. The second term in this asymptotic two-scale expansion, the so-called corrector, contains contributions due to higher-order scattering, leading to the decoherence of the wave field. This decoherence may be causally linked to the observed wave attenuation in the Sun. Although the examples we consider here consist of periodic arrays of perturbations to the background, homogenization may be extended to ergodic and stationary random media. This method may have broad implications for the manner in which we interpret seismic measurements in the Sun and for modeling the effects of granulation on the scattering of waves and distortion of normal-mode eigenfunctions.

Hanasoge, Shravan M. [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Gizon, Laurent [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Bal, Guillaume [Department of Applied and Physical Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

Tunable exchange bias-like effect in patterned hard-soft two-dimensional lateral composites with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patterned hard-soft 2D magnetic lateral composites have been fabricated by e-beam lithography plus dry etching techniques on sputter-deposited NdCo{sub 5} thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Their magnetic behavior is strongly thickness dependent due to the interplay between out-of-plane anisotropy and magnetostatic energy. Thus, the spatial modulation of thicknesses leads to an exchange coupled system with hard/soft magnetic regions in which rotatable anisotropy of the thicker elements provides an extra tool to design the global magnetic behavior of the patterned lateral composite. Kerr microscopy studies (domain imaging and magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry) reveal that the resulting hysteresis loops exhibit a tunable exchange bias-like shift that can be switched on/off by the applied magnetic field.

Hierro-Rodriguez, A., E-mail: ahierro@fc.up.pt; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Martín, J. I.; Alameda, J. M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Centro de Investigación en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnología—CINN (CSIC—Universidad de Oviedo—Principado de Asturias), Parque Tecnológico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain); Teixeira, J. M. [IN-IFIMUP, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Vélez, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Magnetic anisotropies in epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GaAs(100) patterned structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies on epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} rings in the context of spin-transfer torque effect have revealed complicated and undesirable domain structures, attributed to the intrinsic fourfold magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the ferrite. In this Letter, we report a viable solution to this problem, utilizing a 6-nm-thick epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin film on GaAs(100), where the fourfold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is negligible. We demonstrate that in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} planar wires patterned from our thin film, such a unique magnetic anisotropy system has been preserved, and relatively simple magnetic domain configurations compared to those previous reports can be obtained.

Zhang, W., E-mail: xiaotur@gmail.com; Zhang, D.; Yuan, S. J.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y. [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Wong, P. K. J. [NanoElectronics Group, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Wu, J. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Xu, Y. B. [Spintronics and Nanodevice Laboratory, Department of Electronics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Analysis of Small Scale MBR Anisotropy in the Presence of Foreground Contamination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many of the current round of experiments searching for anisotropies in the MBR are confronting the problem of how to disentangle the cosmic signal from contamination due to galactic and intergalactic foreground sources. Here we show how commonly used likelihood function techniques can be generalized to account for foreground. Specifically we set some restrictions on the spectrum of foreground contamination but allow the amplitude to vary arbitrarily. The likelihood function thus generalized gives reasonable limits on the MBR anisotropy which, in some cases, are not much less restrictive than what one would get from more detailed modeling of the foreground. Furthermore, the likelihood function is exactly the same as one would obtain by simply projecting out foreground contamination and just looking at the reduced data set. We apply this generalized analysis to the recent medium angle data sets of ACME-HEMT and MAX. The resulting analysis constrains the one free parameter in the standard cold dark matter theory to be Q=18_-5^+8 microK. This best fit value, although in striking agreement with the normalization from COBE, is not a very good fit, with an overall chi^2/ degree of freedom =208/168. We also argue against three commonly used methods of dealing with foreground: (i) ignoring it completely; (ii) subtracting off a best fit foreground and treating the residuals as if uncontaminated; and (iii) culling data which appears to be contaminated by foreground.

Scott Dodelson; Albert Stebbins

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Interplay of anisotropies of momentum distribution and mean field in heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two important parametrizations of momentum-dependent nucleonic fields, proposed for the simulations of central heavy-ion collisions, one by Gale et al. and the other by Welke et al., suffer from practical limitations. The first gives rise to mean fields isotropic in momentum, even when underlying momentum distributions are anisotropic, making descriptions of early nonequilibrium stages of collisions unrealistic. The second parametrization gives rise to anisotropic mean fields, but is computationally expensive, because the mean field has to be computed separately for every location of a nucleon in phase space, through folding. Here we construct a parametrization of the nucleonic mean field that yields an anisotropic mean field for an anisotropic momentum distribution and is inexpensive computationally. To demonstrate the versatility of our parametrization, we take the case of results from the parametrization by Welke et al. and attempt to approximate them. In arriving at a suitable anisotropic mean-field potential, we draw, on one hand, from the idea behind the parametrization of Gale et al., of a separable expansion of the potential energy, and, on the other, from the idea of a parallel expansion of the energy and mean field in anisotropy. We show that using our novel parametrization we can qualitatively and partially quantitatively reproduce the features of the mean-field parametrization of Welke et al.. This opens up the possibility of exploring the effects of mean-field anisotropy in collisions, without the penalty of computational cost behind the folding parametrization.

C. H. Simon; P. Danielewicz

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

Conductivity anisotropy in the doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} single crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature dependences (temperature range T = 0.5-300 K) of resistivity in the plane of layers and in the direction perpendicular to the layers, and the galvanomagnetic effects in undoped and doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} single crystals are studied (magnetic field H < 80 kOe, T = 0.5-4.2 K). It is shown that upon doping of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} with the Group III atoms (In and B), conductivity anisotropy increases mainly due to an increase in resistivity in the direction perpendicular to the layers. This fact makes it possible to assume that the atoms of these impurities are incorporated mainly into the van der Waal gaps between the layers upon doping. It is also revealed that, upon doping of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} with In and B, the temperature dependence of conductivity becomes weaker, which indicates an increase in the role of scattering by defects in scattering mechanisms. The concentrations and mobilities of charge carriers, values of the Hall factor conditioned by the anisotropy of effective masses and orientation of ellipsoids with respect to crystallographic axes, areas of the extreme section of the Fermi surface by the plane perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field, and the Fermi energy are evaluated.

Abdullaev, N. A., E-mail: anadir@azintex.com; Kakhramanov, S. Sh.; Kerimova, T. G.; Mustafayeva, K. M. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan); Nemov, S. A. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

MEASUREMENT OF THE ANISOTROPY OF COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS WITH ICECUBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first observation of an anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays with energies in the multi-TeV region in the Southern sky using data from the IceCube detector. Between 2007 June and 2008 March, the partially deployed IceCube detector was operated in a configuration with 1320 digital optical sensors distributed over 22 strings at depths between 1450 and 2450 m inside the Antarctic ice. IceCube is a neutrino detector, but the data are dominated by a large background of cosmic-ray muons. Therefore, the background data are suitable for high-statistics studies of cosmic rays in the southern sky. The data include 4.3 billion muons produced by downward-going cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere; these events were reconstructed with a median angular resolution of 3{sup 0} and a median energy of {approx}20 TeV. Their arrival direction distribution exhibits an anisotropy in right ascension with a first-harmonic amplitude of (6.4 {+-} 0.2 stat. {+-} 0.8 syst.) x 10{sup -4}.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K., E-mail: rasha.abbasi@icecube.wisc.ed, E-mail: paolo.desiati@icecube.wisc.ed [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Spin waves in the (  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

Lipscombe, O. J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, G. F. [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fang, Chen [Purdue University; Perring, T. G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Wang, Nanlin [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Hu, Jiangping [Purdue University and Chinese Academy of Sciences; Dai, Pengcheng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Gravity Waves in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present numerical simulations of penetrative convection and gravity wave excitation in the Sun. Gravity waves are self-consistently generated by a convective zone overlying a radiative interior. We produce power spectra for gravity waves in the radiative region as well as estimates for the energy flux of gravity waves below the convection zone. We calculate a peak energy flux in waves below the convection zone to be three orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates for m=1. The simulations show that the linear dispersion relation is a good approximation only deep below the convective-radiative boundary. Both low frequency propagating gravity waves as well as higher frequency standing modes are generated; although we find that convection does not continually drive the standing g-mode frequencies.

Tamara M. Rogers; Gary A. Glatzmaier

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

293

Projections of local atomic structure revealed by wavelet analysis of x-ray absorption anisotropy P. Korecki,1,* D. V. Novikov,2 and M. Tolkiehn2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Projections of local atomic structure revealed by wavelet analysis of x-ray absorption anisotropy P x-ray field amplitude at the sites of absorbing atoms and effectively changes the atomic absorption in an experiment a wavelet transform approach for analysis of x-ray absorption anisotropy XAA patterns recorded

Korecki, Pawe³

294

Electrical anisotropy of mineralized and non mineralized rocks T.J. Katsube, M.E. Best*, and Jones, A.G., Geological Survey of Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PP 10.2 Electrical anisotropy of mineralized and non mineralized rocks T.J. Katsube, M.E. Best*, and Jones, A.G., Geological Survey of Canada Summary Significant electrical resistivity anisotropy, up to 1 to understand the electrical mechanisms involved in such anisotropic processes in order to provide information

Jones, Alan G.

295

Pn Tomographic Velocity and Anisotropy beneath the Iran Region by Yan L, Bin Liu, Shunping Pei, Youshun Sun, M. Nafi Toksz, and Xiangfang Zeng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Note Pn Tomographic Velocity and Anisotropy beneath the Iran Region by Yan Lü, Bin Liu and anisotropy models of the upper- most mantle beneath the Iran region. A total of 74,375 Pn phase readings from). The tomography results show some interesting anomalies. The average Pn velocity under the Iran region

Sun, Youshun

296

Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Reconsideration of Matter Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matter waves were discovered in the early 20th century from their wavelength, predicted by DeBroglie, Planck's constant divided by the particle's momentum, that is, lmw = h/mv. But, the failure to obtain a reasonable theory for the matter wave frequency resulted somewhat in loss of further interest. It was expected that the frequency of the matter wave should correspond to the particle kinetic energy, that is, fmw = 1/2mv^2/h but the resulting velocity of the matter of the particle, v = fmw x lmw, is that the matter wave moves at one half the speed of the particle, obviously absurd as the particle and its wave must move together. If relativistic mass is used (as it should in any case) the problem remains, the same mass appearing in numerator and denominator and canceling. It is no help to hypothesize that the total energy, not just the kinetic energy, yields the matter wave. That attributes a matter wave to a particle at rest. It also gives the resulting velocity as c^2/v, the wave racing ahead of its particle. A reinterpretation of Einstein's derivation of relativistic kinetic energy (which produced his famous E = mc^2) leads to a valid matter wave frequency and a new understanding of particle kinetics and of the atom's stable orbits.

Roger Ellman

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

298

Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

Chen, Yi-Chiuan, E-mail: YCChen@math.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shyan-Shiou, E-mail: sschen@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Juan-Ming, E-mail: jmyuan@pu.edu.tw [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Discrete wave turbulence of rotational capillary water waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the discrete wave turbulent regime of capillary water waves with constant non-zero vorticity. The explicit Hamiltonian formulation and the corresponding coupling coefficient are obtained. We also present the construction and investigation of resonance clustering. Some physical implications of the obtained results are discussed.

Adrian Constantin; Elena Kartashova; Erik Wahlén

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Laboratory Studies of Nonlinear and Breaking Surface Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Breaking-wave generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the wave tank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On steep gravity waves meeting a vertical wall: a triple

Drazen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wave Evolution On the Evolution of Curvelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curvelets Wave Evolution On the Evolution of Curvelets by the Wave Equation Hart F. Smith of Curvelets by the Wave Equation #12;Curvelets Wave Evolution Curvelets and the Second Dyadic Decomposition Curvelets A curvelet frame {} is a wave packet frame on L2(R2) based on second dyadic decomposition. f

Smith, Hart F.

302

Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computed by Wheeler Stretching and Linear Extrapolation modifications to Linear Random Wave Theory and the Hybrid Wave Model. Extreme wave acceleration fields arc compared with Hybrid Wave Model acceleration fields only. Comparisons between measurements...

Longridge, Jonathon Kent

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Magnetic domain pinning in an anisotropy-engineered GdTbFe thin film Stan Konings,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fields, these do- mains collapse to bubble domains which are found to local- ize on the irradiated dots lattices of 50 nm sized dots. The effect of the anisotropy patterns, differing in ion fluence and interdot of the irregularly shaped domains is observed. In perpendicular magnetic fields, however, the high field bubble

305

Friction anisotropy at Ni,,100...,,100... interfaces: Molecular dynamics studies Yue Qi and Yang-Tse Cheng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction anisotropy at Ni,,100...Ã?,,100... interfaces: Molecular dynamics studies Yue Qi and Yang of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125 Received 8 March 2002; published 30 August 2002 The friction theories predict that most perfect clean incommensurate interfaces would produce no static friction

Goddard III, William A.

306

Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media Juan E. Santos a,b,c,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, knowledge of fracture orientation, densities and sizes is essential since these factors control hydrocarbon (fractal) skeleton with fractures. We show that fractures induce strong seismic velocity and Q anisotropy subject in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reser- voir characterization and production [1

Santos, Juan

307

Oxygen-assisted room-temperature deposition of CoPt3 films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen-assisted room-temperature deposition of CoPt3 films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy B Jolla, California 92093 Received 23 July 2002; accepted 30 September 2002 Trace amounts of oxygen CoPt3 grown by vapor deposition at or slightly above room temperature. Oxygen is known to act

Hellman, Frances

308

Seismic Anisotropy and Mantle flow beneath Western Venezuela Jeniffer Masy,1 Fenglin Niu1 and Alan Levander1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Anisotropy and Mantle flow beneath Western Venezuela Jeniffer Masy,1 Fenglin Niu1 and Alan the Caribbean (CAR) and South American (SA) plates in western Venezuela is a wide area where a variety- mic Network of Venezuela. Yellow and red symbols represent temporal de- ployments under the first

Alvarez, Pedro J.

309

OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS AT 400 TeV WITH ICECUBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic-ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic-ray-induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between 2009 May and 2010 May. The data include a total of 33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} muon events with a median angular resolution of {approx}3 Degree-Sign . A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic-ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high-energy sky map shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.3{sigma}. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic-ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Ackermann, M.; Bazo Alba, J. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Allen, M. M. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

Interface boundary conditions for dynamic magnetization and spin wave dynamics in a ferromagnetic layer with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we derive the interface exchange boundary conditions for the classical linear dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic layers with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI). We show that IDMI leads to pinning of dynamic magnetization at the interface. An unusual peculiarity of the IDMI-based pinning is that its scales as the spin-wave wave number. We incorporate these boundary conditions into an existing numerical model for the dynamics of the Damon-Eshbach spin wave in ferromagnetic films. IDMI affects the dispersion and the frequency non-reciprocity of the travelling Damon-Eshbach spin wave. For a broad range of film thicknesses L and wave numbers, the results of the numerical simulations of the spin wave dispersion are in a good agreement with a simple analytical expression, which shows that the contribution of IDMI to the dispersion scales as 1/L, similarly to the effect of other types of interfacial anisotropy. Suggestions to experimentalists how to detect the presence of IDMI in a spin wave experiment are given.

Kostylev, M. [School of Physics, M013, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Perth 6009, Western Australia (Australia)

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

Electron theory of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Co-ferrite thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop an electron theory for the t{sub 2g} electrons of Co{sup 2+} ions to clarify the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) mechanism of Co-ferrite thin films by considering the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and crystal-field (CF) potentials induced by the local symmetry around the Co ions and the global tetragonal symmetry of the film. Uniaxial and in-plane MA constants K{sub u} and K{sub 1} at 0 K, respectively, are calculated for various values of SOI and CF. We show that reasonable parameter values explain the observed PMA and that the orbital moment for the in-plane magnetization reduces to nearly half of that of the out-of-plane magnetization.

Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kita, Eiji [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan)] [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Niizeki, Tomohiko [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan) [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Itoh, Hiroyoshi [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Suita 564-8680 (Japan)] [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Suita 564-8680 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Anisotropy studies around the Galactic Centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ''hybrid'' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; Aramo, C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, IAFE /Buenos Aires, CONICET /Pierre Auger Observ. /La Plata U. /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo U.; ,

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Temporal and Spatial Turbulent Spectra of MHD Plasma and an Observation of Variance Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nature of MHD turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind-tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparison amongst magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor Hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed as well as the role laboratory experiment can play in understanding turbulence typica...

Schaffner, D A; Lukin, V S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Nanoparticle Shape Anisotropy Dictates the Collective Behavior of Surface-Bound Ligands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the modification of the properties of surface-confined ligands in nanoparticle systems through the introduction of shape anisotropy. Specifically, triangular gold nanoprisms, densely functionalized with oligonucleotide ligands, hybridize to complementary particles with an affinity that is several million times higher than that of spherical nanoparticle conjugates functionalized with the same amount of DNA. In addition, they exhibit association rates that are 2 orders of magnitude greater than those of their spherical counterparts. This phenomenon stems from the ability of the flat, extended facets of nonspherical nanoparticles to (1) support more numerous ligand interactions through greater surface contact with complementary particles, (2) increase the effective local concentration of terminal DNA nucleotides that mediate hybridization, and (3) relieve the conformational stresses imposed on nanoparticle-bound ligands participating in interactions between curved surfaces. Finally, these same trends are observed for the pH-mediated association of nanoparticles functionalized with carboxylate ligands, demonstrating the generality of these findings.

Jones, Matthew R.; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Prigodich, Andrew E.; Patel, Pinal C.; Mirkin, Chad A. (NWU)

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and {chi}{sup 2} statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian {Lambda}CDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Observation of Optical Solitons and Abnormal Modulation Instability in Liquid Crystals with Negative Dielectric Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate theoretically and experimentally the optical beam propagation in the nematic liquid crystal with negative dielectric anisotropy, which is aligned homeotropically in a $80\\mu m$-thickness planar cell in the presence of an externally voltage. It is predicted that the nonlocal nonlinearity of liquid crystal undergo an oscillatory response function with a negative nonlinear refractive index coefficient. We found that the oscillatory nonlocal nonlinearity can support stable bright solitons, which are observed in experiment. We also found that abnormal modulation instability occurs with infinity gain coefficient at a fixed spatial frequency, which is no depend on the beam intensity. We observed the modulation instability in the liquid crystal at a very low intensity ($0.26W/cm^2$), and the maximum gain frequency were found kept unchange when beam power changes over 2-3 orders of magnitude.

Wang, Jing; Chen, Junzhu; Liu, Jinlong; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Yiheng; Guo, Qi; Hu, Wei; Xuan, Li

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Creating Wave-Focusing Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

A. G. Ramm

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

B. V. Ivanov

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

Momentum Imparted by Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate momentum imparted by colliding gravitational waves in a closed Friedmann Robertson-Walker background and also by gravitational waves with toroidal wavefronts using an operational procedure. The results obtained for toroidal wavefronts are well behaved and reduce to the spherical wavefronts for a special choice.

M. Sharif

2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri approve the attached thesis Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri Principal

Wood, Stephen L.

323

Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank S. Ryu and the resulting kinematics. In the present paper, the variation of wave amplitude and wave length and minimize wave reflections from the down- stream wall. Nonlinear wave kinematics as a result of nonlinear

Lynett, Patrick

324

Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear ...

Zheng, Yingcai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

2011 Interference -1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Interference - 1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES The objectives of this experiment are: · To measure the wavelength, frequency, and propagation speed of ultrasonic sound waves. · To observe interference phenomena with ultrasonic sound waves. APPARATUS: Oscilloscope, function generator, ultrasonic

Glashausser, Charles

327

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy................................................................. 21 #12;ii List of Tables Table 1 California Small Hydropower And Ocean Wave Energy Resources Table 2

328

Inversion of Scattered Waves for Material Properties in Fractured Rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors apply a recently developed low-frequency, non-linear inversion method which includes near and far field terms to a crosshole data set to determine the bulk and shear modulus, as well as the density for a fractured zone in a granitic rock mass. The method uses the scattered elastic wavefield which is extracted from the recorded data before the inversion is performed. The inversion result is appraised by investigating the resolution and standard deviation of the model estimates. The sensitivity of the three parameters to different features of the medium is revealed. While the bulk modulus appears to be sensitive to voids and welded contacts, the density is mostly affected by fractured zones. The shear modulus is least constrained due to the absence of S wave anisotropy information. It is shown that the three medium parameters are generally sensitive to other medium features than those determined by velocity inversions. Thus this method is viewed as a complimentary approach to travel time tomography which provides more insight into the material properties of inhomogeneous media.

Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri A.; Johnson, Lane R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

POLARIZATION AND COMPRESSIBILITY OF OBLIQUE KINETIC ALFVEN WAVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that a complete description of the solar wind requires a kinetic description and that, particularly at sub-proton scales, kinetic effects cannot be ignored. It is nevertheless usually assumed that at scales significantly larger than the proton gyroscale r{sub L} , magnetohydrodynamics or its extensions, such as Hall-MHD and two-fluid models with isotropic pressures, provide a satisfactory description of the solar wind. Here we calculate the polarization and magnetic compressibility of oblique kinetic Alfven waves and show that, compared with linear kinetic theory, the isotropic two-fluid description is very compressible, with the largest discrepancy occurring at scales larger than the proton gyroscale. In contrast, introducing anisotropic pressure fluctuations with the usual double-adiabatic (or CGL) equations of state yields compressibility values which are unrealistically low. We also show that both of these classes of fluid models incorrectly describe the electric field polarization. To incorporate linear kinetic effects, we use two versions of the Landau fluid model that include linear Landau damping and finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections. We show that Landau damping is crucial for correct modeling of magnetic compressibility, and that the anisotropy of pressure fluctuations should not be introduced without taking into account the Landau damping through appropriate heat flux equations. We also show that FLR corrections to all the retained fluid moments appear to be necessary to yield the correct polarization. We conclude that kinetic effects cannot be ignored even for kr{sub L} << 1.

Hunana, P.; Goldstein, M. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Laveder, D. [Laboratoire J. L. Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [Laboratoire J. L. Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Zank, G. P. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)] [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Walking Wave as a Model of Particle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of walking wave is introduced from classical relativistic positions. One- and three-dimensional walking waves considered with their wave equations and dispersion equations. It is shown that wave characteristics (de Broglie's and Compton's wavelengths) and corpuscular characteristics (energy-momentum vector and the rest mass) of particle may be expressed through parameters of walking wave. By that the new view on a number concepts of physic related with wave-particle duality is suggested.

A. V. Goryunov

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

Are "EIT Waves" Fast-Mode MHD Waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the nature of large-scale, coronal, propagating wave fronts (``EIT waves'') and find they are incongruous with solutions using fast-mode MHD plane-wave theory. Specifically, we consider the following properties: non-dispersive single pulse manifestions, observed velocities below the local Alfven speed, and different pulses which travel at any number of constant velocities, rather than at the ``predicted'' fast-mode speed. We discuss the possibility of a soliton-like explanation for these phenomena, and show how it is consistent with the above-mentioned aspects.

M. J. Wills-Davey; C. E. DeForest; J. O. Stenflo

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Magnetic excitations and anomalous spin-wave broadening in multiferroic FeV2O4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the different roles of two orbital-active Fe2+ at the A site and V3+ at the B site in the magnetic excitations and on the anomalous spin-wave broadening in FeV2O4. FeV2O4 exhibits three structural transitions and successive paramagnetic (PM)–collinear ferrimagnetic (CFI)–noncollinear ferrimagnetic (NCFI)/ferroelectric transitions. The high-temperature tetragonal/PM–orthorhombic/CFI transition is accompanied by the appearance of a large energy gap in the magnetic excitations due to strong spin-orbit-coupling-induced anisotropy at the Fe2+ site. While there is no measurable increase in the energy gap from the orbital ordering of V3+ at the orthorhombic/CFI–tetragonal/NCFI transition, anomalous spin-wave broadening is observed in the orthorhombic/CFI state due to V3+ spin fluctuations at the B site. The spin-wave broadening is also observed at the zone boundary without softening in the NCFI/ferroelectric phase, which is discussed in terms of magnon-phonon coupling. Our study also indicates that the Fe2+ spins without the frustration at the A site may not play an important role in inducing ferroelectricity in the tetragonal/NCFI phase of FeV2O4.

Zhang, Qiang [Ames Laboratory; Ramazanoglu, Mehmet [Ames Laboratory; Chi, Songxue [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Liu, Yong [Ames Laboratory; Lograsso, Thomas A. [Ames Laboratory; Vaknin, David [Ames Laboratory

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A holographic model of d-wave superconductor vortices with Lifshitz scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study analytically the $d$-wave holographic superconductors with Lifshitz scaling in the presence of external magnetic field. The vortex lattice solutions of the model have also been obtained with different Lifshitz scaling. Our results imply that holographic $d$-wave superconductor is indeed a type II one even for different Lifshitz scaling. This is the same as the conventional $d$-wave superconductors in the Ginzburg-Landau theory. Our results also indicate that the dynamical exponent $z$ has no effect to the shape of the vortex lattice even after higher order corrections (away from the phase transition point $B_c$) are included. However, it has effects on the upper critical magnetic field $B_{c_2}$ through the fact that a larger $z$ results in a smaller $B_{c_2}$ and therefore influences the size (characterized by $r_0\\equiv 1/\\sqrt{B_{c_2}}$) of the vortex lattices. Furthermore, close comparisons between our results and those of the Ginzburg-Landau theory reveal the fact that the upper critical magnetic field $B_{c_2}$ is inversely proportional to the square of the superconducting coherence length $\\xi$, regardless of the anisotropy between space and time.

Hong Guo; Fu-Wen Shu; Jing-He Chen; Hui Li; Ze Yu

2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

334

Dispersion and waves in bounded plasmas with subwavelength inhomogeneities: Genesis of MEFIB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bounded plasma exhibit many interesting behavior that are not found in plasmas of 'infinite' extent such as space and astrophysical plasmas. Our studies have revealed that the dispersion properties of waves in a bounded magnetoplasma deviates considerably from the predictions of the Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) model, giving rise to new regimes of wave propagation and absorption. The anisotropy of the medium dictated by the length scales of plasma nonuniformity and magnetostatic field inhomogeneity lead to rotation of the polarization axis an effect similar to the Cotton-Mouton effect in a magneto-optic medium but with distinct differences due to wave induced resonances. This article highlights some of these interesting effects observed experimentally and corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations. One of the principal outcomes of this research is the genesis of a novel multielement focused ion beam (MEFIB) system that utilizes compact bounded plasmas in a minimum – B field to provide intense focused ion beams of a variety of elements for new research in nanoscience and technology.

Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology - Kanpur, Kanpur 208016, UP (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Strain relaxation and enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-assembled BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (BFO:CFO) vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films have been fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The strain relaxation mechanism between BFO and CFO with a large lattice mismatch has been studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared nanocomposite films exhibit enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the BFO composition increases. Different anisotropy sources have been investigated, suggesting that spin-flop coupling between antiferromagnetic BFO and ferrimagnetic CFO plays a dominant role in enhancing the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy.

Zhang, Wenrui; Jiao, Liang; Li, Leigang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Jian, Jie; Khatkhatay, Fauzia; Chu, Frank [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Chen, Aiping [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Jia, Quanxi [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Wang, Haiyan, E-mail: wangh@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nondestructive testing using stress waves: wave propagation in layered media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of stress waves in several civil engineering applications such as nondestructive testing of soil deposits or pavement systems has become extremely popular over the last few years. In all cases, a dynamic impulse is applied to the surface...

Ortega, Jose Alberto

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Branes are Waves and Monopoles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a recent paper it was shown that fundamental strings are null waves in Double Field Theory. Similarly, membranes are waves in exceptional extended geometry. Here the story is continued by showing how various branes are Kaluza-Klein monopoles of these higher dimensional theories. Examining the specific case of the E7 exceptional extended geometry, we see that all branes are both waves and monopoles. Along the way we discuss the O(d; d) transformation of localized brane solutions not associated to an isometry and how true T-duality emerges in Double Field Theory when the background possesses isometries.

David S. Berman; Felix J. Rudolph

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

Backreacting p-wave Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the gravitational backreaction of the non-abelian gauge field on the gravity dual to a 2+1 p-wave superconductor. We observe that as in the $p+ip$ system a second order phase transition exists between a superconducting and a normal state. Moreover, we conclude that, below the phase transition temperature $T_c$ the lowest free energy is achieved by the p-wave solution. In order to probe the solution, we compute the holographic entanglement entropy. For both $p$ and $p+ip$ systems the entanglement entropy satisfies an area law. For any given entangling surface, the p-wave superconductor has lower entanglement entropy.

Raúl E. Arias; Ignacio Salazar Landea

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Plasma waves driven by gravitational waves in an expanding universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with zero spatial curvature, we consider the interaction of the gravitational waves with the plasma in the presence of a weak magnetic field. Using the relativistic hydromagnetic equations it is verified that large amplitude magnetosonic waves are excited, assuming that both, the gravitational field and the weak magnetic field do not break the homogeneity and isotropy of the considered FRW spacetime.

D. B. Papadopoulos

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nonlinear dust acoustic waves and shocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe experiments on (1) nonlinear dust acoustic waves and (2) dust acoustic shocks performed in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma. First, we describe experiments showing nonlinear dust acoustic waves characterized by waveforms of the dust density that are typically sharper in the wave crests and flatter in the wave troughs (compared to sinusoidal waves), indicating the development of wave harmonics. We discuss this behavior in terms of a second-order fluid theory for dust acoustic waves. Second, experimental observations of the propagation and steepening of large-amplitude dust acoustic waves into dust acoustic shock waves are presented. The observed shock wave evolution is compared with numerical calculations based on the Riemann solution of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for dust acoustic waves.

Merlino, R. L.; Heinrich, J. R.; Hyun, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Exchange anisotropy, engineered coercivity and spintronics in atomically engineered L1{sub 0} heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We identified and investigated some of the scientific and technically most challenging issues in thin film magnetism focusing on epitaxially grown layers of specific L1{sub 0} ordered, intermetallic, heterostructures with well-controlled crystallography and interface structures. Specifically, we addressed antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic heterostructures, exhibiting exchange bias (EB) in both in-plane (MnPd/Fe) and perpendicular (IrMn/(Co/Pt){sub n}) geometries, and ferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic (Co/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}) bilayers with strong interlayer exchange coupling and exhibiting spin reorientation transitions. In the former case, the work included experimental and theoretical studies to gain more fundamental insight into the origin and magnitude of EB, as well as to address important aspects of EB such as the asymmetry in the magnetic reversal mechanism, the role of interfacial structure, including compensated or uncompensated spins, AF domains, competing anisotropies and the angular dependence of the magnetization reversal process. Exchange bias is central to many magnetic technologies and driven by the fast development of nanotechnology, there is much interest in understanding the phenomenon of exchange bias on the nanoscale. By patterning, as the FM domain size reaches a lateral scale comparable to the AF domain size (~100nm), each nano-element can be treated as a separate and isolated exchange bias system that behaves independently. Therefore, the non-averaged, intrinsic, exchange bias, in all its complexity, can be studied. Such size and dimensionality effects, particularly in structures with lateral dimension of the order of their domain sizes, were studied by developing and implementing a novel Nano-imprint as well as convention optical lithography/patterning. However, one limitation of the NIL method is that after imprinting the material-deposition or -evaporation has to be done at around room temperature in order to keep the resists structure undisturbed. As a result, the method is unsuitable for epitaxial growth, since the latter often involves growth at elevated temperatures higher than the glass transition temperature of the resist. Therefore, a mask transfer NIL process was developed to grow epitaxial nanostructure arrays at elevated temperatures where organic resists are rendered unstable. In the case of the metal/oxide heterostructures, the domain structure of the metal is carefully modulated by that of the underlying oxide, opening the possibility of carrying out novel experiments to study spin-dependent domain-wall scattering and quantify domain wall resistance in mesoscopic geometries. Utilizing state-of-the-art characterization methods, using synchrotron radiation and electron holography, we addressed the critical role of all aspects of the microstructure, at relevant length scales, in determining these specific magnetic properties. Two significant highlights of this project were the use of photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) work to elucidate their asymmetric magnetization reversal mechanism and the use of element-specific X-ray magnetic reflectivity and x-ray resonant scattering to probe buried interfaces, both of importance in understanding the fundamental physics of exchange bias. In the latter case, a complex magnetic interfacial configuration in Fe/MnPd, consisting of a 2-monolayer-thick induced ferromagnetic region, and pinned uncompensated Mn moments that reach far deeper (~13 Å), both in the antiferromagnet, were found. Such epitaxial EB samples also show in-plane reorientation transitions, determined by the competition between the interface exchange coupling and the intrinsic uniaxial energies, and is driven by the temperature, as well as the thickness of MnPd and Fe layers. Complementing these results, work on multilayers show that perpendicular EB arise from a complex interplay between unidirectional anisotropy at the terminating FM/AFM interface, the perpendicular anisotropy of the FM/nonmagnet(NM) multilayer stack and the overall magnetostatic energy of the structure. Colla

Krishnan, Kannan M [University of washington

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Waves in the ocean Nick Hall, LEGOS, University of Toulouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of waves 2) Deep and shallow water waves 3) Internal waves 4) Waves in geophysical fluids 5) Tides Books: Waves, tides and shallow water processes, Open University, Vibrations and waves in physics, Main and wavenumber #12;Wave kinematics Consider a propagating sinusoidal wave equivalently so and we note

343

Magnetic and elastic anisotropy in magnetorheological elastomers using nickel-based nanoparticles and nanochains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel (Ni) based nanoparticles and nanochains were incorporated as fillers in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers and then these mixtures were thermally cured in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. In this way, macroscopically structured-anisotropic PDMS-Ni based magnetorheological composites were obtained with the formation of pseudo-chains-like structures (referred as needles) oriented in the direction of the applied magnetic field when curing. Nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature, under air ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure) and then calcined at 400?°C (in air atmosphere also). The size distribution was obtained by fitting Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments with a polydisperse hard spheres model and a Schulz-Zimm distribution, obtaining a size distribution centered at (10.0?±?0.6) nm with polydispersivity given by ??=?(8.0?±?0.2) nm. The SAXS, X-ray powder diffraction, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) experiments are consistent with single crystal nanoparticles of spherical shape (average particle diameter obtained by TEM: (12?±?1) nm). Nickel-based nanochains (average diameter: 360?nm; average length: 3??m, obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy; aspect ratio?=?length/diameter ? 10) were obtained at 85?°C and ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure). The magnetic properties of Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains at room temperature are compared and discussed in terms of surface and size effects. Both Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains were used as fillers for obtaining the PDMS structured magnetorheological composites, observing the presence of oriented needles. Magnetization curves, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra, and strain-stress curves of low filler's loading composites (2% w/w of fillers) were determined as functions of the relative orientation with respect to the needles. The results indicate that even at low loadings it is possible to obtain magnetorheological composites with anisotropic properties, with larger anisotropy when using nanochains. For instance, the magnetic remanence, the FMR field, and the elastic response to compression are higher when measured parallel to the needles (about 30% with nanochains as fillers). Analogously, the elastic response is also anisotropic, with larger anisotropy when using nanochains as fillers. Therefore, all experiments performed confirm the high potential of nickel nanochains to induce anisotropic effects in magnetorheological materials.

Landa, Romina A.; Soledad Antonel, Paula; Ruiz, Mariano M.; Negri, R. Martín, E-mail: rmn@qi.fcen.uba.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE), Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Perez, Oscar E. [Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Butera, Alejandro [Centro Atómico Bariloche (Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica. Argentina) and Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina); Jorge, Guillermo [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Oliveira, Cristiano L. P. [Grupo de Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

NINE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: FINAL MAPS AND RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail. We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground-reduced CMB maps are presented. We now implement an optimal C {sup –1} weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained ?CDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N {sub eff} = 3.84 ± 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is t {sub 0} = 13.772 ± 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H {sub 0} = 69.32 ± 0.80 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (n{sub s} = 0.9608 ± 0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (?{sub k} = -0.0027{sup +0.0039}{sub -0.0038}). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six-parameter ?CDM model, based on CMB data alone. For a model including tensors, the allowed seven-parameter volume has been reduced by a factor 117,000. Other cosmological observations are in accord with the CMB predictions, and the combined data reduces the cosmological parameter volume even further. With no significant anomalies and an adequate goodness of fit, the inflationary flat ?CDM model and its precise and accurate parameters rooted in WMAP data stands as the standard model of cosmology.

Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S. [ADNET Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Drive, Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Smith, K. M. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Gold, B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Dunkley, J. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Tucker, G. S., E-mail: cbennett@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States); and others

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gravitational waves: a foundational review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard linear approach to the gravitational waves theory is critically reviewed. Contrary to the prevalent understanding, it is pointed out that this theory contains many conceptual and technical obscure issues that require further analysis.

J. G. Pereira

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

Wave function as geometric entity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new approach to the geometrization of the electron theory is proposed. The particle wave function is represented by a geometric entity, i.e., Clifford number, with the translation rules possessing the structure of Dirac equation for any manifold. A solution of this equation is obtained in terms of geometric treatment. Interference of electrons whose wave functions are represented by geometric entities is considered. New experiments concerning the geometric nature of electrons are proposed.

B. I. Lev

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cluster Dynamics of Planetary Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of nonlinear atmospheric planetary waves is determined by a small number of independent wave clusters consisting of a few connected resonant triads. We classified the different types of connections between neighboring triads that determine the general dynamics of a cluster. Each connection type corresponds to substantially different scenarios of energy flux among the modes. The general approach can be applied directly to various mesoscopic systems with 3-mode interactions, encountered in hydrodynamics, astronomy, plasma physics, chemistry, medicine, etc.

Elena Kartashova; Victor S. L'vov

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

349

Two-photon wave mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The position-representation wave function for multi-photon states and its equation of motion are introduced. A major strength of the theory is that it describes the complete evolution (including polarization and entanglement) of multi-photon states propagating through inhomogeneous media. As a demonstration of the two-photon wave function's use, we show how two photons in an orbital-angular-momentum entangled state decohere upon propagation through a turbulent atmosphere.

Brian J. Smith; M. G. Raymer

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

350

In-Plane Electronic Anisotropy of Underdoped ___122___ Fe-Arsenide Superconductors Revealed by Measurements of Detwinned Single Crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The parent phases of the Fe-arsenide superconductors harbor an antiferromagnetic ground state. Significantly, the Neel transition is either preceded or accompanied by a structural transition that breaks the four fold symmetry of the high-temperature lattice. Borrowing language from the field of soft condensed matter physics, this broken discrete rotational symmetry is widely referred to as an Ising nematic phase transition. Understanding the origin of this effect is a key component of a complete theoretical description of the occurrence of superconductivity in this family of compounds, motivating both theoretical and experimental investigation of the nematic transition and the associated in-plane anisotropy. Here we review recent experimental progress in determining the intrinsic in-plane electronic anisotropy as revealed by resistivity, reflectivity and ARPES measurements of detwinned single crystals of underdoped Fe arsenide superconductors in the '122' family of compounds.

Fisher, Ian Randal

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30?eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

Shikama, T., E-mail: shikama@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaoka, H. [Faculty of Engineering, Undergraduate School of Engineering Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences, 2002 ROSSBY WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVES Peter B. Rhines School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington Large` wave. These waves owe their existence to the rotation and spherical shape of the Earth. Weather reinforce this inequality. Waves then become possible, which are dominated by nearly horizontal wind

Bordoni, Simona

353

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

354

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Rogue Waves UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rogue Waves UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, Florida 33149 http://www.rsmas.miami.edu Taking the Surprise Out of the Freak Wave another to create monster waves that not even the bravest surfer could love. Big waves are big news

Miami, University of

356

Interface-roughening phase diagram of the three-dimensional Ising model for all interaction anisotropies from hard-spin mean-field theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The roughening phase diagram of the d=3 Ising model with uniaxially anisotropic interactions is calculated for the entire range of anisotropy, from decoupled planes to the isotropic model to the solid-on-solid model, using ...

Caglar, Tolga

357

Variations of decay rates of radio-active elements and their connections with global anisotropy of physical space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analysis of correlations between fluctuations of alpha- and beta-decay rates for different radio-active elements is carried out. These fluctuations exceed significantly errors of measurements in many cases. They have the periodical character and reveal definite spatial directions. We suggest that the observed fluctuations are caused by the unique physical reason connected with the global anisotropy of physical space and by the new force.

Yu. A. Baurov; I. F. Malov

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

Surface-Energy-Anisotropy-Induced Orientation Effects on RayleighInstabilities in Sapphire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arrays of controlled-geometry, semi-infinite pore channels of systematically varied crystallographic orientation were introduced into undoped m-plane (10{bar 1}0) sapphire substrates using microfabrication techniques and ion-beam etching and subsequently internalized by solid-state diffusion bonding. A series of anneals at 1700 C caused the breakup of these channels into discrete pores via Rayleigh instabilities. In all cases, channels broke up with a characteristic wavelength larger than that expected for a material with isotropic surface energy, reflecting stabilization effects due to surface-energy anisotropy. The breakup wavelength and the time required for complete breakup varied significantly with channel orientation. For most orientations, the instability wavelength for channels of radius R was in the range of 13.2R-25R, and complete breakup occurred within 2-10 h. To first order, the anneal times for complete breakup scale with the square of the breakup wavelength. Channels oriented along a <11{bar 2}0> direction had a wavelength of {approx} 139R, and required 468 h for complete breakup. Cross-sectional analysis of channels oriented along a <11{bar 2}0> direction showed the channel to be completely bounded by stable c(0001), r{l_brace}{bar 1}012{r_brace}, and s{l_brace}10{bar 1}1{r_brace} facets.

Santala, Melissa; Glaeser, Andreas M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Using SCUBA to place upper limits on arcsecond scale CMB anisotropies at 850 microns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SCUBA instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope has already had an impact on cosmology by detecting relatively large numbers of dusty galaxies at high redshift. Apart from identifying well-detected sources, such data can also be mined for information about fainter sources and their correlations, as revealed through low level fluctuations in SCUBA maps. As a first step in this direction we analyse a small SCUBA data-set as if it were obtained from a Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) differencing experiment. This enables us to place limits on CMB anisotropy at 850 microns. Expressed as Q_{flat}, the quadrupole expectation value for a flat power spectrum, the limit is 152 microKelvin at 95 per cent confidence, corresponding to C_0^{1/2} < 355 microKelvin for a Gaussian autocorrelation function, with a coherence angle of about 20--25 arcsec; These results could easily be reinterpretted in terms of any other fluctuating sky signal. This is currently the best limit for these scales at high frequency, and comparable to limits at similar angular scales in the radio. Even with such a modest data-set, it is possible to put a constraint on the slope of the SCUBA counts at the faint end, since even randomly distributed sources would lead to fluctuations. Future analysis of sky correlations in more extensive data-sets ought to yield detections, and hence additional information on source counts and clustering.

Colin Borys; Scott C. Chapman; Douglas Scott

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

360

Prediction of the Virgo axis anisotropy: CMB radiation illuminates the nature of things  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent findings of the anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation are confusing for standard cosmology. Remarkably, this fact has been predicted several years ago in the framework of our model of the physical world. Moreover, in exact agreement with our prediction the CMB has a preferred direction towards the Virgo Cluster. The transpired structure of the CMB shows workings of the suggested model of the physical world. Comprising the information processes of Nature, this model presents a high-tech version of the previous low-tech developments for mechanical ether and quantum vacuum. In the current model, the phenomenon of Life turns up as a collective effect on the "Internet of the Physical Universe" using DNA structures for access codes. Most convincingly, this construction points to a harmful analogy with so-called "identity theft" - improper manipulations with DNA of individual organisms can destroy these organisms from a remote location without any physical contact. Appearing incredible, such a possibility creates a superlative Experimentum Crucis. In a broad sense, this surmised biological effect is intimately related to the cosmological prediction of the structurization of the CMB, but it is more compelling.

Simon Berkovich

2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Characterization of anisotropy and quantum thermometry in Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick critical systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model describes critical systems with interaction beyond the first-neighbor approximation. Here we address the characterization of LMG systems, i.e. the estimation of anisotropy, and show how criticality may be exploited to improve precision. In particular, we provide exact results for the Quantum Fisher Information of small-size LMG chains made of $N=2, 3$ and $4$ lattice sites and analyze the same quantity in the thermodynamical limit by means of a zero-th order approximation of the system Hamiltonian. We then show that the ultimate bounds to precision may be achieved by tuning the external field and by measuring the total magnetization of the system. We also address the use of LMG systems as quantum thermometers and show that: i) precision is governed by the gap between the lowest energy levels of the systems, ii) field-dependent level crossing provides a resource to extend the operating range of the quantum thermometer.

Giulio Salvatori; Antonio Mandarino; Matteo G. A. Paris

2014-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

362

Non-perturbative modelling of energetic particle effects on resistive wall mode: Anisotropy and finite orbit width  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A non-perturbative magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid formulation is developed and implemented into the MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)] that takes into account the anisotropy and asymmetry [Graves et al., Nature Commun. 3, 624 (2012)] of the equilibrium distribution of energetic particles (EPs) in particle pitch angle space, as well as first order finite orbit width (FOW) corrections for both passing and trapped EPs. Anisotropic models, which affect both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic drift kinetic energy contributions, are implemented for both neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonant heating induced EPs. The first order FOW correction does not contribute to the precessional drift resonance of trapped particles, but generally remains finite for the bounce and transit resonance contributions, as well as for the adiabatic contributions from asymmetrically distributed passing particles. Numerical results for a 9MA steady state ITER plasma suggest that (i) both the anisotropy and FOW effects can be important for the resistive wall mode stability in ITER plasmas; and (ii) the non-perturbative approach predicts less kinetic stabilization of the mode, than the perturbative approach, in the presence of anisotropy and FOW effects for the EPs. The latter may partially be related to the modification of the eigenfunction of the mode by the drift kinetic effects.

Liu, Yueqiang, E-mail: yueqiang.liu@ccfe.ac.uk; Chapman, I. T. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Graves, J. P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hao, G. Z. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, PO Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)] [Southwestern Institute of Physics, PO Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.; Okabayashi, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)] [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey Nazarenko,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey the first simultaneous space-time measurements for gravity wave turbulence in a large laboratory flume. We found that the slopes of k and ! wave spectra depend on wave intensity. This cannot be explained by any

Nazarenko, Sergey

365

Dances with waves Air-sea interaction The generation and growth of waves due to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dances with waves Air-sea interaction · The generation and growth of waves due to wind blowing over to the sea causes the waves to grow until equilibrium is reached between input and dissipation of energy. The most obvious manifestation of wave energy dissipation is breaking waves, often visible as whitecaps

Haak, Hein

366

Physica D 159 (2001) 3557 Wave group dynamics in weakly nonlinear long-wave models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physica D 159 (2001) 35­57 Wave group dynamics in weakly nonlinear long-wave models Roger Grimshawa Communicated by A.C. Newell Abstract The dynamics of wave groups is studied for long waves, using the framework reserved. Keywords: Wave group dynamics; Korteweg­de Vries equation; Nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation 1

Pelinovsky, Dmitry

367

Propagation Plane waves -High order Modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes y x a One wave: p(x,y,t)=p0 cos(k y)e-jk x e j t vy(y,t)= 0 ; y=0,a xy } ky = n a Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes x n a p(x,y,t)=pn cos( y + - +- + + - +- + - + + +- - - (m,n) #12;4 Propagation · Circular duct ­ Helical waves (spiralling waves) kc=m/a kz k

Berlin,Technische Universität

368

Propagation Plane waves -High order Modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes y x a ky = n a One wave: p(x,y,t)=p0 cos(k y)e-jk x e j t vy(y,t)= 0 ; y=0,a xy } Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes x n a p(x,y,t)=pn cos( y;4 Propagation · Circular duct ­ Helical waves (spiralling waves) kc=m/a kz kH Projection: Propagation #12

Berlin,Technische Universität

369

Tri-axial magnetic anisotropies in RE{sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub 15?y} superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a novel quantification method of tri-axial magnetic anisotropy in orthorhombic substances containing rare earth (RE) ions using tri-axial magnetic alignment and tri-axial magnetic anisotropies depending on the type of RE in RE-based cuprate superconductors. From the changes in the axes for magnetization in magnetically aligned powders of (RE?{sub 1?x}RE?{sub x}){sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub y} [(RE?,RE?)247] containing RE ions with different single-ion magnetic anisotropies, the ratios of three-dimensional magnetic anisotropies between RE?247 and RE?247 could be determined. The results in (Y,Er)247, (Dy,Er)247, (Ho,Er)247, and (Y,Eu)247 systems suggest that magnetic anisotropies largely depended on the type of RE? (or RE?), even in the heavy RE ions with higher magnetic anisotropies. An appropriate choice of RE ions in RE-based cuprate superconductors enables the reduction of the required magnetic field for the production of their bulks and thick films based on the tri-axial magnetic alignment technique using modulated rotation magnetic fields.

Horii, Shigeru, E-mail: horii.shigeru.7e@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Doi, Toshiya [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Okuhira, Shota; Yamaki, Momoko [Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Tosa-Yamada, Kami-shi, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Temperature dependence of magnetization and anisotropy in uniaxial NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanomagnets: Deviation from the Callen-Callen power law  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal variation of magnetic anisotropy (K) and saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) for uniaxial nickel ferrite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanomagnets are investigated. Major magnetic hysteresis loops are measured for the sample at temperatures over the range 5–280?K using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The high-field regimes of the hysteresis loops are modeled using the law of approach to saturation, based on the assumption that at sufficiently high field only direct rotation of spin-moment take place, with an additional forced magnetization term that is linear with applied field. The uniaxial anisotropy constant K is calculated from the fitting of the data to the theoretical equation. As temperature increases from 5?K to 280?K, a 49% reduction of K, accompanied by an 85% diminution of M{sub S} is observed. Remarkably, K is linearly proportional to M{sub S}{sup 2.6} in the whole temperature range violating the existing theoretical model by Callen and Callen. The unusual power-law behavior for the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} uniaxial nanomagnets is ascribed to the non-negligible contributions from inter-sublattice pair interactions, Neel surface anisotropy, and higher order anisotropies. A complete realization of the unusual anisotropy-magnetization scaling behavior for nanoscale two-sublattice magnetic materials require a major modification of the existing theory by considering the exact mechanism of each contributions to the effective anisotropy.

Chatterjee, Biplab K.; Ghosh, C. K. [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chattopadhyay, K. K., E-mail: kalyan-chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

Relic Gravitational Waves and Limits on Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that only a narrow class of inflationary models can possibly agree with the available observational data on the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). These models may be governed by ``matter'' with the effective equation of state $-1.2

L. P. Grishchuk

1993-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energy-momentum relation for solitary waves of relativistic wave equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solitary waves of relativistic invariant nonlinear wave equation with symmetry group U(1) are considered. We prove that the energy-momentum relation for spherically symmetric solitary waves coincides with the Einstein energy-momentum relation for point particles.

T. V. Dudnikova; A. I. Komech; H. Spohn

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price, Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and saltacoustics, South Pole, sound speed, pressure waves,shear waves PACS: 47.35.De, 47.35.Rs, 62.65. +k, 92.40.Vq,

Klein, Spencer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Direct measurement of anisotropy of interfacial free energy from grain boundary groove morphology in transparent organic metal analong systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both academia and industry alike have paid close attention to the mechanisms of microstructural selection during the solidification process. The forces that give rise to and the principles which rule the natural selection of particular morphologies are important to understanding and controlling new microstructures. Interfacial properties play a very crucial role to the selection of such microstructure formation. In the solidification of a metallic alloy, the solid-liquid interface is highly mobile and responds to very minute changes in the local conditions. At this interface, the driving force must be large enough to drive solute diffusion, maintain local curvature, and overcome the kinetic barrier to move the interface. Therefore, the anisotropy of interfacial free energy with respect to crystallographic orientation is has a significant influence on the solidification of metallic systems. Although it is generally accepted that the solid-liquid interfacial free energy and its associated anisotropy are highly important to the overall selection of morphology, the confident measurement of these particular quantities remains a challenge, and reported values are scarce. Methods for measurement of the interfacial free energy include nucleation experiments and grain boundary groove experiments. The predominant method used to determine anisotropy of interfacial energy has been equilibrium shape measurement. There have been numerous investigations involving grain boundaries at a solid-liquid interface. These studies indicated the GBG could be used to describe various interfacial energy values, which affect solidification. Early studies allowed for an estimate of interfacial energy with respect to the GBG energy, and finally absolute interfacial energy in a constant thermal gradient. These studies however, did not account for the anisotropic nature of the material at the GBG. Since interfacial energy is normally dependent on orientation of the crystallographic plane of the solid with respect to the liquid, a better calculation of interfacial energy was needed. Herring described this orientation dependence, which related the interfacial undercooling to the principle interfacial curvatures. The present study pertains to the measurement of the anisotropy of interfacial energy by comparison of experimental and theoretical GBG geometries in pure succinonitrile (SCN) and pivalic acid (PVA). A quantity of SCN and PVA was distilled and zone refined using a process that is defined in the experimental procedure portion of this paper. Very thin (100 {micro}m) slide assemblies were created and filled with these organic materials. For each system, several grooves were photographed and their shapes were compared with theoretical predictions. The correlation between experiment and theory was quantified and plotted as a function of the anisotropy for each of the GBG's examined, and a maximum correlation corresponded to the anisotropy of interfacial energy which describes that particular rotation of the GBG. The results from several rotations were statistically analyzed to ensure confidence in the measurement of the anisotropy of interfacial energy and, finally, compared to reported values obtained with other techniques.

Rustwick, Bryce A.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cosmological Perturbations of Quantum-Mechanical Origin and Anisotropy of the Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmological perturbations generated quantum-mechanically (as a particular case, during inflation) possess statistical properties of squeezed quantum states. The power spectra of the perturbations are modulated and the angular distribution of the produced temperature fluctuations of the CMBR is quite specific. An exact formula is derived for the angular correlation function of the temperature fluctuations caused by squeezed gravitational waves. The predicted angular pattern can, in principle, be revealed by the COBE-type observations.

L. P. Grishchuk

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

377

Two-wave interaction in ideal magnetohydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The weakly nonlinear interaction of sound and linearly polarised Alfv{\\'e}n waves propagating in the same direction along an applied magnetic field is studied. It is found that a sound wave is coupled to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave with double period and wavelength when the sound and Alfv{\\'e}n speeds are equal. The Alfv{\\'e}n wave drives the sound wave through the ponderomotive force, while the sound wave returns energy back to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave through the parametric (swing) influence. As a result, the two waves alternately exchange their energy during propagation. The process of energy exchange is faster for waves with stronger amplitudes. The phenomenon can be of importance in astrophysical plasmas, including the solar atmosphere and solar wind.

T. V. Zaqarashvili; B. Roberts

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Global coherence of dust density waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mach reflection of spherical detonation waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When two detonation waves collide, the shape of the wave front at their intersection can be used to categorize the flow as regular or irregular reflection. In the case of regular reflection, the intersection of the waves forms a cusp. In the case of irregular reflection, the cusp is replaced by a leading shock locus that bridges the incident waves. Many workers have studied irregular or Mach reflection of detonation waves, but most of the their experimental work has focused on the interaction of plane detonation waves. Reflection of spherical detonation waves has received less attention. This study also differs from previous work in that the focus is to measure the relationship between the detonation velocity and the local wave curvatue for irregular reflection of spherical detonation waves. Two explosives with different detonation properties, PBX 9501 and PBX 9502, are compared.

Hull, L.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Modulation and kinematics of mechanically-generated short gravity waves riding on long waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering MODULATION AND KINEMATICS OF MECHANICALLY- GENERATED SHORT GRAVITY WAVES RIDING ON LONG WAVES A Thesis by C~S ANTHONY SPELL Approved as to style and content by: Jun Zhang... fundamental nonlinear wave interaction occurring in an irregular wave field. The objectives of the present study are now stated: ~ Generate a dual-component wave formed from the interaction of two inde- pendently propagating monochromatic wave trains in a...

Spell, Charles Anthony

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Effects of ion abundances on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave growth rate in the vicinity of the plasmapause  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in multi-ion species plasmas propagate in branches. Except for the branch corresponding to the heaviest ion species, which has only a resonance at its gyrofrequency, these branches are bounded below by a cutoff frequency and above by a resonant gyrofrequency. The condition for wave growth is determined by the thermal anisotropies of each ion species, j, which sets an upper bound, ?{sub j}{sup ?}, on the wave frequency below which that ion species contributes positively to the growth rate. It follows that the relative positions of the cutoffs and the critical frequencies ?{sub j}{sup ?} play a crucial role in determining whether a particular wave branch will be unstable. The effect of the magnetospheric ion abundances on the growth rate of each branch of the EMIC instability in a model where all the ion species have kappa velocity distributions is investigated by appealing to the above ideas. Using the variation of the cutoff frequencies predicted by cold plasma theory as a guide, optimal ion abundances that maximise the EMIC instability growth rate are sought. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of H{sup +} ions, all branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the proton branch having the maximum growth rate. When the O{sup +} ion abundance in the ring current is increased, a decrease in the growth rate of the proton branch and cyclotron damping of the helium branch are observed. The oxygen branch, on the other hand, experiences an increase in the maximum growth rate with an increase in the O{sup +} ion abundance. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of He{sup +} ions, only the helium and oxygen branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the helium branch having the maximum growth rate.

Henning, F. D., E-mail: farranalfonso@gmail.com; Mace, R. L., E-mail: macer@ukzn.ac.za [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

B8 Page 1 B8. Using CMS-Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B8 ­ Page 1 B8. Using CMS-Wave The most recent CMS-Wave code developed is Version 3.2. Several new capabilities and advanced features in this version include: · Full-plane wind-generation of waves · Automatic wave run-up calculation · Infra-gravity wave calculation · Nonlinear wave-wave interaction · Muddy

US Army Corps of Engineers

384

Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature and Polarization Anisotropy in Brans-Dicke Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a formalism for calculating cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies in cosmological models with Brans-Dicke gravity. We then modify publicly available Boltzmann codes to calculate numerically the temperature and polarization power spectra. Results are illustrated with a few representative models. Comparing with the general-relativistic model with the same cosmological parameters, both the amplitude and the width of the acoustic peaks are different in the Brans-Dicke models. We use a covariance-matrix calculation to investigate whether the effects of Brans-Dicke gravity are degenerate with those of variation in other cosmological parameters and to simultaneously determine whether forthcoming CMB maps might be able to distinguish Brans-Dicke and general-relativistic cosmology. Although the predicted power spectra for plausible Brans-Dicke models differ from those in general relativity only slightly, we find that MAP and/or the Planck Surveyor may in principle provide a test of Brans-Dicke theory that is competitive to solar-system tests. For example, if all other parameters except for the CMB normalization are fixed, a value of the Brans-Dicke parameter omega as large as 500 could be identified with MAP, and for Planck, values as large as omega \\simeq3000 could be identified; these sensitivities are decreased roughly by a factor of 3 if we marginalize over the baryon density, Hubble constant, spectral index, and reionization optical depth. In more general scalar-tensor theories, omega may evolve with time, and in this case, the CMB probe would be complementary to that from solar-system tests.

Xuelei Chen; Marc Kamionkowski

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

COMET 22P/KOPFF: DUST ENVIRONMENT AND GRAIN EJECTION ANISOTROPY FROM VISIBLE AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present optical observations and Monte Carlo models of the dust coma, tail, and trail structures of the comet 22P/Kopff during the 2002 and 2009 apparitions. Dust loss rates, ejection velocities, and power-law size distribution functions are derived as functions of the heliocentric distance using pre- and post-perihelion imaging observations during both apparitions. The 2009 post-perihelion images can be accurately fitted by an isotropic ejection model. On the other hand, strong dust ejection anisotropies are required to fit the near-coma regions at large heliocentric distances (both inbound at r{sub h} = 2.5 AU and outbound at r{sub h} = 2.6 AU) for the 2002 apparition. These asymmetries are compatible with a scenario where dust ejection is mostly seasonally driven, coming mainly from regions near subsolar latitudes at far heliocentric distances inbound and outbound. At intermediate to near-perihelion heliocentric distances, the outgassing would affect much more extended latitude regions, the emission becoming almost isotropic near perihelion. We derived a maximum dust production rate of 260 kg s{sup -1} at perihelion, and an averaged production rate over one orbit of 40 kg s{sup -1}. An enhanced emission rate, also accompanied by a large ejection velocity, is predicted at r{sub h} > 2.5 pre-perihelion. The model has also been extended to the thermal infrared in order to be applied to available trail observations of this comet taken with IRAS and Infrared Space Observatory spacecrafts. The modeled trail intensities are in good agreement with those observations, which is remarkable taking into account that those data are sensitive to dust ejection patterns corresponding to several orbits before the 2002 and 2009 apparitions.

Moreno, Fernando; Pozuelos, Francisco; Aceituno, Francisco; Casanova, Victor; Sota, Alfredo [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Castellano, Julio; Reina, Esteban, E-mail: fernando@iaa.es [Amateur Association Cometas-Obs (Spain)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Reaction force control implementation of a linear generator in irregular waves for a wave power system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Most designs for wave energy converters include a hydraulic (or pneumatic) interface between the wave device and the generator to smooth electricity production, but a… (more)

Li, Bin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geodesic deviation and gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of gravitational waves based on the geodesic deviation equation is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the only non-vanishing components of the wave field in the conventional traceless-transverse gauge in linearized general relativity do not enter the geodesic deviation equation, and therefore, apparently, no effect is predicted by that equation in that specific gauge. The reason is traced back to the fact that the geodesic deviation equation is written in terms of a coordinate distance, which is not a directly measurable quantity. On the other hand, in the proper Lorentz frame of the detector, the conventional result described in standard textbooks holds.

M. Leclerc

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

CX-010213: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wave Energy Technology- New Zealand Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 01/08/2013 Location(s): Hawaii, Oregon Offices(s): Golden Field Office

390

Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established.

Coutant, Antonin, E-mail: antonin.coutant@aei.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany); Parentani, Renaud, E-mail: renaud.parentani@th.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Bâtiment 210, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Bâtiment 210, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy...

392

Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter Atargis Energy (TRL 4 System) - Cycloidal Wave...

393

Identifying two steps in the internal wave energy cascade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1.1 The internal wave energy cascade . . . . . . .? ? , which contain only wave energy trav- eling upward anddistinction is made between wave energy propagating upward

Sun, Oliver Ming-Teh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable...

395

Langmuir Waves and Electron Acceleration at Heliospheric Shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results for S/WAVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . A.7 Rheometry2.4 MHD Wave Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Electron Acceleration, Plasma Waves, and Radio Emission 3.1

Pulupa, Marc Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

atmospheric gravity waves: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gravity waves (AGWs). Satellite imagery shows evidence the characteristics of these waves. The favorable wave propagation conditions in 12;this region are illustrated 5...

398

Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

Yoo, S. J. Ben

399

Laser-ultrasound spectroscopy apparatus and method with detection of shear resonances for measuring anisotropy, thickness, and other properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for detecting shear resonances includes structure and steps for applying a radiation pulse from a pulsed source of radiation to an object to generate elastic waves therein, optically detecting the elastic waves generated in the object, and analyzing the elastic waves optically detected in the object. These shear resonances, alone or in combination with other information, may be used in the present invention to improve thickness measurement accuracy and to determine geometrical, microstructural, and physical properties of the object. At least one shear resonance in the object is detected with the elastic waves optically detected in the object. Preferably, laser-ultrasound spectroscopy is utilized to detect the shear resonances.

Levesque, Daniel (Terrebonne, CA); Moreau, Andre (St-Bruno-de-Montarville, CA); Dubois, Marc (Montreal, CA); Monchalin, Jean-Pierre (Montreal, CA); Bussiere, Jean (St-Bruno, CA); Lord, Martin (Beloeil, CA); Padioleau, Christian (Montreal, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Wave Energy challenges and possibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a reservoir, with low head turbines as power take off. Articulating tubes with hydraulic power take off. Point or fixed coastal installation. Air based Wells turbines as power take off. Over topping waves absorber, with either water pumps, linear generators or hydraulic power take off systems. Multi point

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Wave functions of linear systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complete analysis of quantum wave functions of linear systems in an arbitrary number of dimensions is given. It is shown how one can construct a complete set of stationary quantum states of an arbitrary linear system from purely classical arguments. This construction is possible because for linear systems classical dynamics carries the whole information about quantum dynamics.

Tomasz Sowinski

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We investigate with nonreactive molecular dynamics simulations the dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube (CNT) composites to shock wave compression. For phenolic resin, our simulations yield shock states in agreement with experiments on similar polymers except the “phase change” observed in experiments, indicating that such phase change is chemical in nature. The elastic–plastic transition is characterized by shear stress relaxation and atomic-level slip, and phenolic resin shows strong strain hardening. Shock loading of the CNT-resin composites is applied parallel or perpendicular to the CNT axis, and the composites demonstrate anisotropy in wave propagation, yield and CNT deformation. The CNTs induce stress concentrations in the composites and may increase the yield strength. Our simulations suggest that the bulk shock response of the composites depends on the volume fraction, length ratio, impact cross-section, and geometry of the CNT components; the short CNTs in current simulations have insignificant effect on the bulk response of resin polymer.

Arman, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) and Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); An, Q. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) and California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States); Luo, S. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Desai, T. G. [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States); Tonks, D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cagin, T. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Goddard III, W. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

403

WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

case, the electrons have negative wave energy for 2w ne w wave energy for 2w .w > 0 nl Hence, unstable waves with negative phase velocity,

Cary, John R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

On quantization of nondispersive wave packets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nondispersive wave packets are widely used in optics and acoustics. We found it interesting that such packets could be also a subject of quantum field theory. Canonical commutation relations for the nondispersive wave packets are constructed.

Altaisky, M. V. [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)] [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Kaputkina, N. E. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)] [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Wave Mechanics and General Relativity: A Rapprochement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using exact solutions, we show that it is in principle possible to regard waves and particles as representations of the same underlying geometry, thereby resolving the problem of wave-particle duality.

Paul S. Wesson

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

Wind Wave Float | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(TRL 1 2 3 Component) Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale PowerBuoy Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...

407

Stratified Shear Flow: Instability and Wave Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratified Shear Flow: Instability and Wave Radiation B. R. Sutherland Dept. Mathematical of internal waves in the atmosphere and ocean, but the evolution of the shear layer itself is significantly

Sutherland, Bruce

408

Wave Patterns and Southern Hemisphere Convergence Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-rate days, a wave pattern is identified that is characteristic of high rain events. This wave pattern is then compared to the patterns of variability of brightness temperature using empirical orthogonal functions. A linear regression technique is used...

Ramotowski, Michelle R.

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

Analysis of optimum Lamb wave tuning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guided waves are of enormous interest in the nondestructive evaluation of thin-walled structures and layered media. Due to their dispersive and multi-modal nature, it is desirable to tune the waves by discriminating one ...

Shi, Yijun, 1970-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Strings in plane-fronted gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brinkmann's plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel rays --~shortly pp-waves~-- are shown to provide, under suitable conditions, exact string vacua at all orders of the sigma-model perturbation expansion.

C. Duval; Z. Horvath; P. A. Horvathy

2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

Symmetries and Interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We considered symmetry restriction on the interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves and demonstrated that linear in small wave vector asymptotic is not forbidden, as one can expect by naive reasoning.

Vladimir V. Lebedev; Victor S. L'vov

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

413

Nonlinear Saturation of Vertically Propagating Rossby Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interaction between vertical Rossby wave propagation and wave breaking is studied in the idealized context of a beta-plane channel model. Considering the problem of propagation through a uniform zonal flow in an ...

Giannitsis, Constantine

414

Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

Hughes, Scott A.

415

Non-expanding impulsive gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a class of impulsive gravitational waves which propagate either in Minkowski or in the (anti-)de Sitter background. These waves are constructed as impulsive members of the Kundt class $P(\\Lambda)$ of non-twisting, non-expanding type N solutions of vacuum Einstein equations with a cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. We show that the only non-trivial waves of this type in Minkowski spacetime are impulsive pp-waves. For $\\Lambda\

J. Podolsky

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

416

Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the ? channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Electromagnetic wave scattering by Schwarzschild black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the scattering of a planar monochromatic electromagnetic wave incident upon a Schwarzschild black hole. We obtain accurate numerical results from the partial wave method for the electromagnetic scattering cross section, and show that they are in excellent agreement with analytical approximations. The scattering of electromagnetic waves is compared with the scattering of scalar, spinor and gravitational waves. We present a unified picture of the scattering of all massless fields for the first time.

Luís C. B. Crispino; Sam R. Dolan; Ednilton S. Oliveira

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic wave propagation through fractures and cracks is an important subject in exploration and production geophysics, earthquake seismology and mining.

419

Multi-reflective acoustic wave device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

Andle, Jeffrey C.

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

Wave guides: vacuum w/ tube of conductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave guides: vacuum w/ tube of conductor boundary conditions for conductor Properties: non-transverse waves except TEM mode in coaxial cable speed normal modes (from Liouville problem) TE or TM TEM for coaxial cable cuto frequency otherwise evanescent waves separation into and components with 1 #12;B

Hart, Gus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

Stewart, Sarah T.

422

Wave Packets and Turbulent Peter Jordan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Packets and Turbulent Jet Noise Peter Jordan1 and Tim Colonius2 1 D´epartement Fluides-control efforts is incomplete. Wave packets are intermittent, advecting disturbances that are correlated over review evidence of the existence, energetics, dynamics, and acous- tic efficiency of wave packets. We

Dabiri, John O.

423

An Introduction to Wave-Current Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale wave focusing across a storm can re-direct the wind-stress? #12;1. Adiabatic interaction StartAn Introduction to Wave-Current Interactions Jerry Smith, MPL-SIO-UCSD jasmith@ucsd.edu http just want to hold up your hand. #12;Some Questions in Wave-Current Interaction Physics 1. Adiabatic

Smith, Jerome A.

424

Visualizing the kinematics of relativistic wave packets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article investigates some solutions of the time-dependent free Dirac equation. Visualizations of these solutions immediately reveal strange phenomena that are caused by the interference of positive- and negative-energy waves. The effects discussed here include the Zitterbewegung, the opposite direction of momentum and velocity in negative-energy wave packets, and the superluminal propagation of the wave packet's local maxima.

Bernd Thaller

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wave propagation Remco Hartkamp (University of Twente)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) waves Sound: 20 Hz ­ 20 kHz Gas: P Liquid: P Plasma: P Solid: P & S #12;Stretched string example 1D wave Dispersion: Waves with different wavelengths propagate at different speeds 6 k c k k Shallow water: c gh mJ K material parameter (related to the strain saturation of the material) det FJ bulk modulus

Entekhabi, Dara

426

CURRENTS DRIVEN BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURRENTS DRIVEN BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES C.F.F. KARNEY, NJ. FISCH Plasma Physics Laboratory of the generation of steady-state currents by electron cyclotron waves are explored. A numerical solution of electron cyclotron wave absorption appears to be one of the more promising schemes of providing a steady

Karney, Charles

427

SCATTERING BEHAVIOR OF TRANSITIONAL SHOCK WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCATTERING BEHAVIOR OF TRANSITIONAL SHOCK WAVES Kevin R. Zumbrun Bradley J. Plohr Dan Marchesin September, 1991 Abstract. We study the stability and asymptotic behavior of transitional shock waves as solutions of a parabolic system of conservation laws. In contrast to classical shock waves, transitional

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

428

Waves on unsteady currents Merrick C. Haller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves on unsteady currents Merrick C. Haller School of Civil and Construction Engineering, Oregon 2007; published online 3 December 2007 Models for surface gravity wave propagation in the presence of currents often assume the current field to be quasi-stationary, which implies that the absolute wave

Haller, Merrick

429

Bifurcation Theory of Meandering Spiral Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bifurcation Theory of Meandering Spiral Waves Claudia Wul Freie Universitat Berlin, Fachbereich Mathematik und Informatik, Arnimallee 2{6, 14195 Berlin, email: wul @math.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Spiral waves-Zhabotinsky reaction. We develop a mathematical theory for the Hopf bifurcation from rigidly rotating spiral waves

Wulff, Claudia

430

Autoresonance of coupled nonlinear waves L. Friedland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave train solutions of the decoupled problem. At the same time, the waves are globally phase locked, allowing the continuation of the phase locking between the waves despite the variation of system's param and sustaining this multidimensional autoresonance are the internal reso- nant excitation of one of the coupled

Friedland, Lazar

431

EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory X. 1 33 R A. RTT ir.':; WOODS instantaneously to sounds. It was con- were tested in an experimental tank and in eluded that sound waves were, Wash . sound studies conducted under the above contract are terminated. #12;EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES

432

Hybrid wave model and its applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nonlinear hybrid wave model (HWM) is developed. It uses the conventional mode-coupling method (MCM) and the phase modulation method (PMM) to address the nonlinear interactions between free-wave components in an ocean wave field. The PMM is a...

Yang, Jun

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation Kai Huang, Knut Solna and Hongkai Zhao #3; April simulation of wave propagation over long distances. The coupled parabolic equations are derived from a two algorithms are important in order to understand wave propagation in complex media. Resolving the wavelength

Zhao, Hongkai

434

Seminario de Matemtica Aplicada "Renowable wave energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Among the various renewable energy sources, ocean wave energy has been only recently investigaSeminario de Matemática Aplicada "Renowable wave energy: potencial and technical challenges will be at first to introduce the potential of wave energy, as a significant, and often neglected, contributor

Tradacete, Pedro

435

WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research a preliminary examination and analysis of a small suite of 4-D wave data to explore what new insight century. We feel it is timely to encourage further 4-D ocean wave measurement and thereby facilitate fresh

436

Wave Front Interaction Model of Stabilized Propagating Wave Segments Vladimir S. Zykov1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Front Interaction Model of Stabilized Propagating Wave Segments Vladimir S. Zykov1 and Kenneth; published 14 February 2005) A wave front interaction model is developed to describe the relationship between excitability and the size and shape of stabilized wave segments in a broad class of weakly excitable media

Showalter, Kenneth

437

Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

Fominov, Yakov

438

Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tams Bnsgi, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tamás Bánsági, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka Received 5 November 2007; accepted 26 December 2007; published online 6 March 2008 Scroll waves are three can be pinned to the wake of traveling wave pulses. This pinning is studied in experiments with the 1

Steinbock, Oliver

439

Lossless Tapers, Gaussian Beams, Free-Space Modes: Standing Waves Versus Through-Flowing Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lossless Tapers, Gaussian Beams, Free-Space Modes: Standing Waves Versus Through-Flowing Waves inconsistencies, in Marcatili's lossless tapers through-flowing waves must be drastically different from standing waves. First, we reconfirm this by means of numerical results based on an extended BPM algorithm. Next

Curtarolo, Stefano

440

Segmented Waves from a Spatiotemporal Transverse Wave Instability Lingfa Yang, Igal Berenstein, and Irving R. Epstein*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Segmented Waves from a Spatiotemporal Transverse Wave Instability Lingfa Yang, Igal Berenstein observe traveling waves emitted from Turing spots in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction. The newborn waves are continuous, but they break into segments as they propagate, and the propagation

Epstein, Irving R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )}. In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Karpen, Judith T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. Richard, E-mail: pbu3@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: judy.karpen@nasa.gov, E-mail: devore@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

442

Beauty waves: an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we present a method for computing an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves. Wave forms are loosely based on procedural wave models and are designed to emulate those found in both art and nature. The wave forms...

Faulkner, Jay Allen

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

High amplitude wave propagation in collapsible tubes. II. Forerunners and high amplitude waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

773 High amplitude wave propagation in collapsible tubes. II. Forerunners and high amplitude waves that, under certain circumstances, a pressure wave of large amplitude which propagates in a fluid feature of such a shock wave propagation inside an initially collapsed tube is the presence ofwavelets

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

444

Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation So far we have talked about wave propagation in one-dimension. For two or three spatial dimensions, we vectorize our ideas propagation. For surface waves, there is no vertical propagation, and we are only concerned with the two

Thompson, LuAnne

445

Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Paper: Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building John residential light- frame wood buildings and wave and surge loading be- cause often little is left residential structures and wave loading. To do this, one-sixth scale residen- tial building models typical

Cox, Dan

446

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms gradient technologies. This paper is focused on Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) and the need

Haller, Merrick

447

The Effects of Wave Energy Converters on a Monochromatic Wave Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Wave energy converters were converters as well as the availability of energy in the ocean. This study will examine the effects of a wave and mean wave period of wave energy fields. There is tremendous energy potential in the ocean. Solar energy

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

448

Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and idealized numerical modeling. The linear theory for ow without terrain shows that the solution depends on two parameters: a nondimensional coastal width L and a nondimensional wind speed U. For U 6= 0 the solution is composed of three distinct wave branches...

Qian, Tingting

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

Naoto Yokoyama

2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

450

ITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Acknowledgment Surface waves are phenomena that are characterised by the dynamic interplay between linear.3 Linear Dispersive wave model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Wave groupsITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves Brenny van Groesen, Applied Analysis & Mathematical

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

451

Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectra for that given region from a selected deep-water calibration station. METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING THE AVAILABLE WAVE ENERGY RESOURCE This section will describe the methodology for estimating the naturally available and technically recoverable... resource in a given region. In a recent study done by the EPRI, data was gathered from U.S. coastal waters for a 51- month Wavewatch III hindcast database that was developed specifically for the EPRI by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental...

Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Traveling wave device for combining or splitting symmetric and asymmetric waves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A traveling wave device for the combining or splitting of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy includes a feed waveguide for traveling wave energy, the feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for coupling wave energy between the feed waveguide and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of wave energy to or from the reflector. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which includes a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which includes a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

Möbius, Arnold (Eggenstein, DE); Ives, Robert Lawrence (Saratoga, CA)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

453

Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

454

Matter Wave Radiation Leading to Matter Teleportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of matter wave radiation is put forward, and its equation is established for the first time. The formalism solution shows that the probability density is a function of displacement and time. A free particle and a two-level system are reinvestigated considering the effect of matter wave radiation. Three feasible experimental designs, especially a modified Stern-Gerlach setup, are proposed to verify the existence of matter wave radiation. Matter wave radiation effect in relativity has been formulated in only a raw formulae, which offers another explanation of Lamb shift. A possible mechanics of matter teleportation is predicted due to the effect of matter wave radiation.

Yong-Yi Huang

2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ponderomotive Forces On Waves In Modulated Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear interactions of waves via instantaneous cross-phase modulation can be cast in the same way as ponderomotive wave-particle interactions in high-frequency electromagnetic fi eld. The ponderomotive effect arises when rays of a probe wave scatter off perturbations of the underlying medium produced by a second, modulation wave, much like charged particles scatter off a quasiperiodic field. Parallels with the point-particle dynamics, which itself is generalized by this theory, lead to new methods of wave manipulation, including asymmetric barriers for light.

Dodin, I.Y; Fisch, Nathaniel

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations of magnetic energy emerge at some particular wave frequencies.

Wei, Xing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Anisotropy and Spatial Variation of Relative Permeability and Lithologic Character of Tensleep Sandstone Reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multidisciplinary study is designed to provide improvements in advanced reservoir characterization techniques. This goal is to be accomplished through: (1) an examination of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability in the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs of Wyoming; (2) the placement of that variation and anisotropy into paleogeographic, depositional, and diagenetic frameworks; (3) the development of pore-system imagery techniques for the calculation of relative permeability; (4) reservoir simulations testing the impact of relative permeability anisotropy and spatial variation on Tensleep Sandstone reservoir enhanced oil recovery; and (5) a geochemical investigation of the spatial and dynamic alteration in sandstone reservoirs that is caused by rock-fluid interaction during CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery processes.

Dunn, Thomas L.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

CONSTRAINTS ON THE ORIGIN OF COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV FROM LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY SEARCHES IN DATA OF THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is reported. For the first time, these large-scale anisotropy searches are performed as a function of both the right ascension and the declination and expressed in terms of dipole and quadrupole moments. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Upper limits on dipole and quadrupole amplitudes are derived under the hypothesis that any cosmic ray anisotropy is dominated by such moments in this energy range. These upper limits provide constraints on the production of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV, since they allow us to challenge an origin from stationary galactic sources densely distributed in the galactic disk and emitting predominantly light particles in all directions.

Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, IFGW, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Measurement of the Azimuthal Anisotropy of Neutral Pions in Pb-Pb Collisions at ?sNN=2.76??TeV  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

First measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy of neutral pions produced in Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?sNN =2.76??TeV are presented. The amplitudes of the second Fourier component (v2) of the ?0 azimuthal distributions are extracted using an event-plane technique. The values of v2 are studied as a function of the neutral pion transverse momentum (pT) for different classes of collision centrality in the kinematic range 1.6T2(pT) are similar to previously reported ?0 azimuthal anisotropy results from ?sNN=200??GeV Au-Au collisions at RHIC, despite a factor of ?14 increase in the center-of-mass energy. In the momentum range 2.5T<5.0??GeV/c , the neutral pion anisotropies are found to be smaller than those observed by CMS for inclusive charged particles.

Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

High thermal stability and low Gilbert damping constant of CoFeB/MgO bilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by Al capping and rapid thermal annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that the magnetic anisotropy of the CoFeB/MgO bilayer can be manipulated by adding an aluminum capping layer. After rapid thermal annealing, we can achieve large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoFeB with a high thermal stability factor (??=?72) while the Gilbert damping constant can be reduced down to only 0.011 simultaneously. The boron and residual oxygen in the bulk CoFeB layer are properly absorbed by the Al capping layer during annealing, leading to the enhanced exchange stiffness and reduced damping. The interfacial Fe-O bonding can be optimized by tuning annealing temperature and thickness of Al, resulting in enhanced perpendicular anisotropy.

Wang, Ding-Shuo; Lai, Shu-Yu; Lin, Tzu-Ying; Wang, Liang-Wei; Liao, Jung-Wei; Lai, Chih-Huang, E-mail: chlai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chien, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Yung-Hung [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Taiwan (China); Ellsworth, David; Lu, Lei; Wu, Mingzhong [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Sky maps without anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are a better fit to WMAP's uncalibrated time ordered data than the official sky maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this reanalysis of the WMAP uncalibrated time ordered data (TOD) was two fold. The first was to reassess the reliability of the detection of the anisotropies in the official WMAP sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The second was to assess the performance of a proposed criterion in avoiding systematic error in detecting a signal of interest. The criterion was implemented by testing the null hypothesis that the uncalibrated TOD was consistent with no anisotropies when WMAP's hourly calibration parameters were allowed to vary. It was shown independently for all 20 WMAP channels that sky maps with no anisotropies were a better fit to the TOD than those from the official analysis. The recently launched Planck satellite should help sort out this perplexing result.

Keith S. Cover

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

462

Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

463

Standing waves in the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At first, a review of our knowledge on the distribution of galaxies at large-scale, leading to a foam-like large-scale structure of the Universe, is presented in the Introduction. Then, it is shown how, according to the present theory for the formation of superclusters, wave scalar perturbations of the same frequency traveling in opposite directions give rise to standing waves, which cause a motion of the cosmic material towards the nodes, resulting in the concentration of the cosmic material around the nodes. Generalizing this effect to two (three) dimensions, the cosmic material is concentrated around the node lines (node surfaces). It is proposed that the three-dimensional effect is responsible for the foam-like large-scale structure of the Universe.

Evangelos Chaliasos

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

Millimeter-wave active probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza (Sunnyvale, CA); Bloom, David M. (Portola Valley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Gravitational waves from perturbed stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

Valeria Ferrari

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

466

Free energies, vacancy concentrations and density distribution anisotropies in hard--sphere crystals: A combined density functional and simulation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a comparative study of the free energies and the density distributions in hard sphere crystals using Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory (employing Fundamental Measure functionals). Using a recently introduced technique (Schilling and Schmid, J. Chem. Phys 131, 231102 (2009)) we obtain crystal free energies to a high precision. The free energies from Fundamental Measure theory are in good agreement with the simulation results and demonstrate the applicability of these functionals to the treatment of other problems involving crystallization. The agreement between FMT and simulations on the level of the free energies is also reflected in the density distributions around single lattice sites. Overall, the peak widths and anisotropy signs for different lattice directions agree, however, it is found that Fundamental Measure theory gives slightly narrower peaks with more anisotropy than seen in the simulations. Among the three types of Fundamental Measure functionals studied, only the White Bear II functional (Hansen-Goos and Roth, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 8413 (2006)) exhibits sensible results for the equilibrium vacancy concentration and a physical behavior of the chemical potential in crystals constrained by a fixed vacancy concentration.

M. Oettel; S. Goerig; A. Haertel; H. Loewen; M. Radu; T. Schilling

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

Effects of toughness anisotropy and combined tension, torsion, and bending loads on fracture behavior of ferritic nuclear pipe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes work on angled through-wall-crack initiation and combined loading effects on ferritic nuclear pipe performed as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s research program entitled {open_quotes}Short Cracks In Piping an Piping Welds{close_quotes}. The reader is referred to Reference 1 for details of the experiments and analyses conducted as part of this program. The major impetus for this work stemmed from the observation that initially circumferentially oriented cracks in carbon steel pipes exhibited a high tendency to grow at a different angle when the cracked pipes were subjected to bending or bending plus pressure loads. This failure mode was little understood, and the effect of angled crack grown from an initially circumferential crack raised questions about how cracks in a piping system subjected to combined loading with torsional stresses would behave. There were three major efforts undertaken in this study. The first involved a literature review to assess the causes of toughness anisotropy in ferritic pipes and to develop strength and toughness data as a function of angle from the circumferential plane. The second effort was an attempt to develop a screening criterion based on toughness anisotropy and to compare this screening criterion with experimental pipe fracture data. The third and more significant effort involved finite element analyses to examine why cracks grow at an angle and what is the effect of combined loads with torsional stresses on a circumferentially cracked pipe. These three efforts are summarized.

Mohan, R.; Marshall, C.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS AT MULTIPLE ANGULAR SCALES WITH IceCube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 2009 May and 2010 May, the IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole recorded 32 billion muons generated in air showers produced by cosmic rays with a median energy of 20 TeV. With a data set of this size, it is possible to probe the southern sky for per-mil anisotropy on all angular scales in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays. Applying a power spectrum analysis to the relative intensity map of the cosmic ray flux in the southern hemisphere, we show that the arrival direction distribution is not isotropic, but shows significant structure on several angular scales. In addition to previously reported large-scale structure in the form of a strong dipole and quadrupole, the data show small-scale structure on scales between 15{sup 0} and 30{sup 0}. The skymap exhibits several localized regions of significant excess and deficit in cosmic ray intensity. The relative intensity of the smaller-scale structures is about a factor of five weaker than that of the dipole and quadrupole structure. The most significant structure, an excess localized at (right ascension {alpha} = 122.{sup 0}4 and declination {delta} = -47.{sup 0}4), extends over at least 20{sup 0} in right ascension and has a post-trials significance of 5.3{sigma}. The origin of this anisotropy is still unknown.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Alba, J. L. Bazo; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

One-way wave-equation migration of compressional and converted waves in a VTI medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exploration and production. Horizontally layered sedi- mentary rocks exhibit anisotropy that can be described are useful for processing of conventional pressure data. Numer- ical examples demonstrate that the slowness; Barkved et al., 2004), hence reducing the risk in hydrocarbon ex- ploration and production. Shear

Ursin, Bjørn

470

Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

471

Progress towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I will review the most recent and interesting results from gravitational wave detection experiments, concentrating on recent results from the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). I will outline the methodologies utilized in the searches, explain what can be said in the case of a null result, what quantities may be constrained. I will compare these results with prior expectations and discuss their significance. As I go along I will outline the prospects for future improvements.

M. Alessandra Papa

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Rabi Waves in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QED-model for the multichain qubit system with interactions of qubits and chains between themselves on the example of the system of $\\sigma$-polarons in carbon zigzag nanotubes, interacting with quantized EM-field, is considered analytically. The possibility of experimental detection of Rabi waves in conventional stationary optical experiments for any quasi-1D system with strong electron-photon interaction is predicted.

Alla Dovlatova; Dmitry Yearchuck

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

473

Corvino's construction using Brill waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For two-black-hole time-symmetric initial data we consider the Corvino construction of gluing an exact Schwarzschild end. We propose to do this by using Brill waves. We address the question of whether this method can be used to reduce the overall energy, which seems to relate to the question of whether it can reduce the amount of `spurious' gravitational radiation. We find a positive answer at first order in the inverse gluing radius.

Domenico Giulini; Gustav Holzegel

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

474

Freak waves in white dwarfs and magnetars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report properties of ion acoustic freak waves that propagate in a plasma composed of warm ions and ultrarelativistic electrons and positrons. The dynamics of the nonlinear freak waves is governed by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The possible region for the freak waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of white dwarfs and magnetars corona. It is found that for low wave number, the nonlinear ion-acoustic wave packets are structurally stable in magnetars corona than in white dwarfs. However, for large wave numbers the situation is opposite. The critical wave number threshold (k{sub c}), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, is defined for both applications. It is seen that near to k{sub c} the freak wave amplitude becomes high, but it decreases whenever we stepped away from k{sub c}. For the wave numbers close to k{sub c}, the increase of the unperturbed density ratio of positrons-to-electrons ({beta}) would lead to increase the freak wave amplitude, but for larger wave numbers the amplitude decreases with the increase of {beta}.

Sabry, R. [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Moslem, W. M. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Wave propagation in axion electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, the axion contribution to the electromagnetic wave propagation is studied. First we show how the axion electrodynamics model can be embedded into a premetric formalism of Maxwell electrodynamics. In this formalism, the axion field is not an arbitrary added Chern-Simon term of the Lagrangian, but emerges in a natural way as an irreducible part of a general constitutive tensor.We show that in order to represent the axion contribution to the wave propagation it is necessary to go beyond the geometric approximation, which is usually used in the premetric formalism. We derive a covariant dispersion relation for the axion modified electrodynamics. The wave propagation in this model is studied for an axion field with timelike, spacelike and null derivative covectors. The birefringence effect emerges in all these classes as a signal of Lorentz violation. This effect is however completely different from the ordinary birefringence appearing in classical optics and in premetric electrodynamics. The axion field does not simple double the ordinary light cone structure. In fact, it modifies the global topological structure of light cones surfaces. In CFJ-electrodynamics, such a modification results in violation of causality. In addition, the optical metrics in axion electrodynamics are not pseudo-Riemannian. In fact, for all types of the axion field, they are even non-Finslerian.

Yakov Itin

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

476

Topological Aspects of Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of wave propagation on a manifold X, the characteristic functions are real valued functions on cotangent bundle of X that specify the allowable phase velocities of the waves. For certain classes of differential operators (e.g Maxwell's Equations) the associated characteristic functions have singularities. These singularities account for phenomena like conical refraction and the transformation of longitudinal waves into transversal ones (or viceversa). For a specific class of differential operators on surface, we prove that the singularities of the characteristic functions can be accounted from purely topological considerations. We also prove that there is a natural way to desingularsize the characteristic functions, and observe that this fact and Morse Theory establishes a specific connection between singularities and critical points of these functions. The relation between characteristic functions and differential operators is obtained through what is known as the symbol of the operator. We establish a connection between these symbols and holomorphic vector fields, which will provide us with symbols whose characteristic functions have interesting singularity sets.

Carlos Valero

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

477

Controlling magnetic anisotropy in La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a chlorine based dry etching process for nanopatterning the ferromagnetic oxide La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO). Large arrays of millions of identical structures have been fabricated from thin LSMO films by electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. SQUID magnetometry demonstrates that patterned nanostructures with lateral dimensions down to 100?nm retain their full magnetization and the Curie temperature of the bulk layer. In addition, their shape anisotropy is sufficient to overcome the crystalline anisotropy of the bulk. High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy shows that crystallinity is preserved even at the edges of the nanostructures.

Wahler, M.; Büttner, B.; Blaschek, H.-H.; Homonnay, N.; Wid, O. [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, D-06099 Halle (Germany); O'Shea, K. J.; McGrouther, D.; MacLaren, D. A. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Schmidt, G., E-mail: georg.schmidt@physik.uni-halle.de [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, D-06099 Halle (Germany); IZM, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, D-06099 Halle (Germany)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

SOLAR CYCLE DEPENDENCE OF THE DIURNAL ANISOTROPY OF 0.6 TeV COSMIC-RAY INTENSITY OBSERVED WITH THE MATSUSHIRO UNDERGROUND MUON DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the temporal variation of the diurnal anisotropy of sub-TeV cosmic-ray intensity observed with the Matsushiro (Japan) underground muon detector over two full solar activity cycles in 1985-2008. We find an anisotropy component in the solar diurnal anisotropy superimposed on the Compton-Getting anisotropy due to Earth's orbital motion around the Sun. The phase of this additional anisotropy is almost constant at {approx}15:00 local solar time corresponding to the direction perpendicular to the average interplanetary magnetic field at Earth's orbit, while the amplitude varies between a maximum (0.043% +- 0.002%) and minimum ({approx}0.008% +- 0.002%) in a clear correlation with the solar activity. We find a significant time lag between the temporal variations of the amplitude and the sunspot number (SSN) and obtain the best correlation coefficient of +0.74 with the SSN delayed for 26 months. We suggest that this anisotropy might be interpreted in terms of the energy change due to the solar-wind-induced electric field expected for galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) crossing the wavy neutral sheet. The average amplitude of the sidereal diurnal variation over the entire period is 0.034% +- 0.003%, which is roughly one-third of the amplitude reported from air shower and deep-underground muon experiments monitoring multi-TeV GCR intensity suggesting a significant attenuation of the anisotropy due to the solar modulation. We find, on the other hand, only a weak positive correlation between the sidereal diurnal anisotropy and the solar activity cycle in which the amplitude in the 'active' solar activity epoch is about twice the amplitude in the 'quiet' solar activity epoch. This implies that only one-fourth of the total attenuation varies in correlation with the solar activity cycle and/or the solar magnetic cycle. We finally examine the temporal variation of the 'single-band valley depth' (SBVD) quoted by the Milagro experiment and, in contrast with recent Milagro's report, we find no steady increase in the Matsushiro observations in a seven-year period between 2000 and 2007. We suggest, therefore, that the steady increase of the SBVD reported by the Milagro experiment is not caused by the decreasing solar modulation in the declining phase of the 23rd solar activity cycle.

Munakata, K.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Mori, S. [Department of Physics, Shinshu University, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Takita, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Kota, J., E-mail: kmuna00@shinshu-u.ac.j [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 87721 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean waveOn the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry

Victoria, University of

480

SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wave anisotropy cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Wave  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition3 WaterFebruary 18, 20141 Summer 2001

482

Wave maps on a wormhole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider equivariant wave maps from a wormhole spacetime into the three-sphere. This toy-model is designed for gaining insight into the dissipation-by-dispersion phenomena, in particular the soliton resolution conjecture. We first prove that for each topological degree of the map there exists a unique static solution (harmonic map) which is linearly stable. Then, using the hyperboloidal formulation of the initial value problem, we give numerical evidence that every solution starting from smooth initial data of any topological degree evolves asymptotically to the harmonic map of the same degree. The late-time asymptotics of this relaxation process is described in detail.

Piotr Bizo?; Micha? Kahl

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

483

Elgen Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revisionWind,Soils and RocksElement Power Name:Elgen Wave

484

Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

M. Halilsoy; S. Habib Mazharimousavi; O. Gurtug

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

Lucas, Timothy S. (Glen Allen, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Wave Heating of the Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding on coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding on the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation, and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us understanding and quantifying magnetic wave heating of the sola...

Arregui, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Particle acceleration in superluminal strong waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the electron acceleration in random superluminal strong waves (SLSWs) and radiation from them by using numerical methods in the context of the termination shock of the pulsar wind nebulae. We pursue the electrons by solving the equation of motion in the analytically expressed electromagnetic turbulences. These consist of primary SLSW and isotropically distributed secondary electromagnetic waves. Under the dominance of the secondary waves, all electrons gain nearly equal energy. On the other hand, when the primary wave is dominant, selective acceleration occurs. The phase of the primary wave felt by the electrons moving nearly along the wavevector changes very slowly compared to the oscillation of the wave, which is called "phase locked", and such electrons are continuously accelerated. This acceleration by SLSWs may play a crucial role in the pre-acceleration for the shock acceleration. In general, the radiation from the phase-locked population is different from the synchro-Compton radiation. How...

Teraki, Yuto; Nagataki, Shigehiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Some Wave Equations for Electromagnetism and Gravitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper studies the inferences of wave equations for electromagnetic fields when there are gravitational fields at the same time. In the description with the algebra of octonions, the inferences of wave equations are identical with that in conventional electromagnetic theory with vector terminology. By means of the octonion exponential function, we can draw out that the electromagnetic waves are transverse waves in a vacuum, and rephrase the law of reflection, Snell's law, Fresnel formula, and total internal reflection etc. The study claims that the theoretical results of wave equations for electromagnetic strength keep unchanged in the case for coexistence of gravitational and electromagnetic fields. Meanwhile the electric and magnetic components of electromagnetic waves can not be determined simultaneously in electromagnetic fields.

Zi-Hua Weng

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

489

Speed selection for coupled wave equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss models for coupled wave equations describing interacting fields, focusing on the speed of travelling wave solutions. In particular, we propose a general mechanism for selecting and tuning the speed of the corresponding (multi-component) travelling wave solutions under certain physical conditions. A number of physical models (molecular chains, coupled Josephson junctions, propagation of kinks in chains of adsorbed atoms and domain walls) are considered as examples.

Mariano Cadoni; Giuseppe Gaeta

2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Nonlinear Essence of Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A critical review of gravitational wave theory is made. It is pointed out that the usual linear approach to the gravitational wave theory is neither conceptually consistent nor mathematically justified. Relying upon that analysis it is then argued that -- analogously to a Yang-Mills propagating field, which must be nonlinear to carry its gauge charge -- a gravitational wave must necessarily be nonlinear to transport its own charge -- that is, energy-momentum.

R. Aldrovandi; J. G. Pereira; K. H. Vu

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

491

The syn-and post-collisional evolution of the Romanian Carpathian foredeep: New constraints from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and paleostress analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and paleostress analyses Iuliana Vasiliev a,b, , Liviu Maenco b,c nappe pile, the lower plate, and the overlying sedimentary rocks, indicates that two factors of the soft, non-competent rocks where the poor preservation of traditional kinematic indicators (e.g., faults

Utrecht, Universiteit

492

Shape and strain-induced magnetization reorientation and magnetic anisotropy in thin film Ti/CoCrPt/Ti lines and rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contributions to the magnetic anisotropy of thin-film rings and lines of width 50 nm and above made from Ti(5?nm)/Co[subscript 0.66]Cr[subscript 0.22]Pt[subscript 0.12] (10 and 20 nm)/Ti (3 nm) with a perpendicular ...

Velazquez, D.

493

Simulation study of the effect of well spacing, effect of permeability anisotropy, and effect of Palmer and Mansoori model on coalbed methane production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interference for adjacent wells may be beneficial to Coalbed-Methane production. The effect is the acceleration of de-watering which should lead to earlier and higher gas rate peaks. It is inherent that permeability anisotropy exists in the coalbed...

Zulkarnain, Ismail

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

494

Measurement of the Azimuthal Anisotropy of Neutral Pions in Pb-Pb Collisions at ?s(NN)=2.76??TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy of neutral pions produced in Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?s(NN)=2.76??TeV are presented. The amplitudes of the second Fourier component (v(2)) of the ?(0) ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

495

Entanglement entropy and fidelity susceptibility in the one-dimensional spin-1 XXZ chains with alternating single-site anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the fidelity susceptibility in an antiferromagnetic spin-1 XXZ chain numerically. By using the density-matrix renormalization group method, the effects of the alternating single-site anisotropy $D$ on fidelity susceptibility are investigated. Its relation with the quantum phase transition is analyzed. It is found that the quantum phase transition from the Haldane spin liquid to periodic N\\'{e}el spin solid can be well characterized by the fidelity. Finite size scaling of fidelity susceptibility shows a power-law divergence at criticality, which indicates the quantum phase transition is of second order. The results are confirmed by the second derivative of the ground-state energy. We also study the relationship between the entanglement entropy, the Schmidt gap and quantum phase transitions. Conclusions drawn from these quantum information observables agree well with each other.

Jie Ren; Guang-Hua Liu; Wen-Long You

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

496

Observation of Small-scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on $4.9\\times 10^{10}$ events recorded between June 2013 and February 2014 shows anisotropy at the $10^{-4}$ level on angular scales of about $10^\\circ$. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to $\\ell=15$ contribute significantly to the excesses.

Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Leó, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hüntemeyer, P; Hui, C M; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Riviére, C; Rosa-González, D; Ruiz-Velasco, E; Ryan, J; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

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