National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wave anisotropy cxs

  1. Anisotropies in the gravitational-wave stochastic background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ölmez, S.; Mandic, V.; Siemens, X. E-mail: mandic@physics.umn.edu

    2012-07-01

    We consider anisotropies in the stochastic background of gravitational-waves (SBGW) arising from random fluctuations in the number of gravitational-wave sources. We first develop the general formalism which can be applied to different cosmological or astrophysical scenarios. We then apply this formalism to calculate the anisotropies of SBGW associated with the fluctuations in the number of cosmic string loops, considering both cosmic string cusps and kinks. We calculate the anisotropies as a function of angle and frequency.

  2. Normal waves in media with light-induced anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, L.I.; Gancherenok, I.I.

    1986-03-01

    The structure of normal waves for arbitrary directions of light beams is studied within the framework of standard nonlinear-polarization spectroscopy. A connection is found between the polarization of these waves and the polarization of the intense field and the mechanism for the creation of the induced anisotropy. The feasibility of the spectroscopic application of these results is considered, and a method is proposed for the use of a noncollinear pump. Analysis of the possibility of achieving dual-mode lasing with orthogonal mode polarization is made based on the formalism developed.

  3. P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    scalar. The resulting anisotropy distribution is used to estimate variations in crack density, stress distribution and permeability within the producing geothermal field. A...

  4. Statistical anisotropies in gravitational waves in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Wang, Yi E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-09-01

    Solid inflation can support a long period of anisotropic inflation. We calculate the statistical anisotropies in the scalar and tensor power spectra and their cross-correlation in anisotropic solid inflation. The tensor-scalar cross-correlation can either be positive or negative, which impacts the statistical anisotropies of the TT and TB spectra in CMB map more significantly compared with the tensor self-correlation. The tensor power spectrum contains potentially comparable contributions from quadrupole and octopole angular patterns, which is different from the power spectra of scalar, the cross-correlation or the scalar bispectrum, where the quadrupole type statistical anisotropy dominates over octopole.

  5. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  6. Optically induced spin wave dynamics in [Co/Pd]{sub 8} antidot lattices with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, S.; Das, K.; Barman, A.; Klos, J. W.; Gruszecki, P.; Krawczyk, M.; Hellwig, O.

    2014-10-20

    We present an all-optical time-resolved measurement of spin wave (SW) dynamics in a series of antidot lattices based on [Co(0.75 nm)/Pd(0.9 nm)]{sub 8} multilayer (ML) systems with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The spectra depend significantly on the areal density of the antidots. The observed SW modes are qualitatively reproduced by the plane wave method. The interesting results found in our measurements and calculations at small lattice constants can be attributed to the increase of areal density of the shells with modified magnetic properties probably due to distortion of the regular ML structure by the Ga ion bombardment and to increased coupling between localized modes. We propose and discuss the possible mechanisms for this coupling including exchange interaction, tunnelling, and dipolar interactions.

  7. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  8. CONSTRAINTS ON THE HIGH-l POWER SPECTRUM OF MILLIMETER-WAVE ANISOTROPIES FROM APEX-SZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichardt, C. L.; Zahn, O.; Ferrusca, D.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Johnson, B. R.; Lee, A. T.; Lueker, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Lanting, T.; Basu, K.; Chon, G.; Kneissl, R.; Bender, A. N.; Halverson, N. W.; Bertoldi, F.; Cho, H.-M.; Dobbs, M.; Kennedy, J.; Horellou, C.; Johansson, D.

    2009-08-20

    We present measurements of the angular power spectrum of millimeter wave anisotropies with the APEX-SZ instrument. APEX-SZ has mapped 0.8 deg{sup 2} of sky at a frequency of 150 GHz with an angular resolution of 1'. These new measurements significantly improve the constraints on anisotropy power at 150 GHz over the range of angular multipoles 3000 < l < 10, 000, limiting the total astronomical signal in a flat band power to be less than 105 {mu}K{sup 2} at 95% CL. We expect both submillimeter-bright, dusty galaxies and to a lesser extent secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) to significantly contribute to the observed power. Subtracting the SZE power spectrum expected for {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.8 and masking bright sources, the best-fit value for the remaining power is C {sub l} = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} x 10{sup -5} {mu}K{sup 2} (1.7{sup +1.4} {sub -1.3} Jy{sup 2} sr{sup -1}). This agrees well with model predictions for power due to submillimeter-bright, dusty galaxies. Comparing this power to the power detected by BLAST at 600 GHz, we find the frequency dependence of the source fluxes to be S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup 2.6+0.4}{sub -0.2}} if both experiments measure the same population of sources. Simultaneously fitting for the amplitude of the SZE power spectrum and a Poisson-distributed point source population, we place an upper limit on the matter fluctuation amplitude of {sigma}{sub 8} < 1.18 at 95% confidence.

  9. The insensitivity of reflected sh waves to anisotropy in an underlaying layered medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenberg, M.; Costa, J. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on propagation in the plane of mirror symmetry of a monoclinic medium, with displacement normal to the plane which is the most general circumstance in anisotropic media for which pure shear-wave propagation can occur at all angles. Because the pure shear mode is uncoupled from the other two modes, its slowness surface in the plane is an ellipse. When the mirror symmetry plane is vertical the pure shear waves in this plane are SH waves and the elliptical SH sheet of the slowness surface is, in general, tilted with respect to the vertical axis. Consider a half-space of such a monoclinic medium, called medium M, overlain by a halfspace of isotropic medium I with plane SH waves incident on medium M propagating in the vertical symmetry plane of M. Contrary to the appearance of a lack of symmetry about the vertical axis due to the tilt of the SH-wave slowness ellipse, the reflection and transmission coefficients are symmetrical functions of the angle of incidence, and further, there exists an isotropic medium E with uniquely determined density and shear speed which gives exactly the same reflection and transmission coefficients underlying medium I as does monoclinic medium M. This means that the underlying monoclinic medium M can be replaced by isotropic medium E without changing the reflection and transmission coefficients for all values of the angle of incidence.

  10. Wave

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Summer 2001 Heat Wave This summer has proved to be downright hot in the Southern Great ... Not only is a summer heat wave uncomfortable, but it can also be ARM Facilities Newsletter ...

  11. Symmetry-Breaking Orbital Anisotropy Observed for Detwinned Ba...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Symmetry-Breaking Orbital Anisotropy Observed for Detwinned Ba(Fe (1-X) Co (X) ) (2) As (2) Above the Spin Density Wave Transition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  12. Critical Anisotropies of a Geometrically-Frustrated Triangular-Lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, Mason R; Haraldsen, Jason T; Fishman, Randy Scott

    2009-01-01

    This work examines the critical anisotropy required for the local stability of the collinear ground states of a geometrically-frustrated triangular-lattice antiferromagnet (TLA). Using a Holstein-Primakoff expansion, we calculate the spin-wave frequencies for the 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8-sublattice (SL) ground states of a TLA with up to third neighbor interactions. Local stability requires that all spin-wave frequencies are real and positive. The 2, 4, and 8-SL phases break up into several regions where the critical anisotropy is a different function of the exchange parameters. We find that the critical anisotropy is a continuous function everywhere except across the 2-SL/3-SL and 3-SL/4-SL phase boundaries, where the 3-SL phase has the higher critical anisotropy.

  13. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency Title: Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic ...

  14. SELF-CONSISTENT ION CYCLOTRON ANISOTROPY-BETA RELATION FOR SOLAR WIND PROTONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C. E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-08-20

    We derive a set of self-consistent marginally stable states for a system of ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the large-scale magnetic field through a homogeneous proton-electron plasma. The proton distributions and the wave dispersions are related through the condition that no further ion-cyclotron resonant particle scattering or wave growth/damping may take place. The thermal anisotropy of the protons in these states therefore defines the threshold value for triggering the proton-cyclotron anisotropy instability. A number of recent papers have noted that the anisotropy of solar wind protons at 1 AU does not seem to be limited by the proton-cyclotron anisotropy threshold, even at low plasma beta. However, this puzzle seems to be due solely to the estimation of this anisotropy threshold under the assumption that the protons have a bi-Maxwellian distribution. We note that bi-Maxwellian distributions are never marginally stable to the resonant cyclotron interaction, so these estimates do not represent physically valid thresholds. The threshold anisotropies obtained from our marginally stable states are much larger, as a function of proton parallel beta, than the bi-Maxwellian estimates, and we show that the measured data remains below these more rigorous thresholds. Thus, the results of this paper resolve the apparent contradiction presented by the solar wind anisotropy observations at 1 AU: the bi-Maxwellian anisotropies are not rigorous thresholds, and so do not limit the proton distributions in the solar wind.

  15. INSTABILITIES DRIVEN BY THE DRIFT AND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY OF ALPHA PARTICLES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu

    2013-08-20

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) waves are driven unstable by the differential flow and temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind. We focus on the limit in which w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} {approx}> 0.25v{sub A}, where w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} is the parallel alpha-particle thermal speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. We derive analytic expressions for the instability thresholds of these waves, which show, e.g., how the minimum unstable alpha-particle beam speed depends upon w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}/v{sub A}, the degree of alpha-particle temperature anisotropy, and the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio. We validate our analytical results using numerical solutions to the full hot-plasma dispersion relation. Consistent with previous work, we find that temperature anisotropy allows A/IC waves and FM/W waves to become unstable at significantly lower values of the alpha-particle beam speed U{sub {alpha}} than in the isotropic-temperature case. Likewise, differential flow lowers the minimum temperature anisotropy needed to excite A/IC or FM/W waves relative to the case in which U{sub {alpha}} = 0. We discuss the relevance of our results to alpha particles in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  16. Pressure effect on elastic anisotropy of crystals from ab initio simulations: The case of silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoud, A.; Erba, A. Dovesi, R.; Doll, K.

    2014-06-21

    A general methodology has been devised and implemented into the solid-state ab initio quantum-mechanical CRYSTAL program for studying the evolution under geophysical pressure of the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. This scheme, which fully exploits both translational and point symmetry of the crystal, is developed within the formal frame of one-electron Hamiltonians and atom-centered basis functions. Six silicate garnet end-members, among the most important rock-forming minerals of the Earth's mantle, are considered, whose elastic anisotropy is fully characterized under high hydrostatic compressions, up to 60 GPa. The pressure dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and shear-wave birefringence of seismic wave velocities for these minerals are accurately simulated and compared with available single-crystal measurements.

  17. Alamos National Laboratory] 71; ANISOTROPY; CHERENKOV COUNTERS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Laboratory 71; ANISOTROPY; CHERENKOV COUNTERS; COSMIC RADIATION; EMISSION; ENERGY; MODULATION; PHYSICS; TIME DEPENDENCE; WATER The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a...

  18. Layering and temperature-dependent magnetization and anisotropy of naturally produced Ni/NiO multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pappas, S. D.; Trachylis, D.; Velgakis, M. J.; Kapaklis, V.; Joensson, P. E.; Papaioannou, E. Th.; Delimitis, A.; Poulopoulos, P.; Fumagalli, P.; Politis, C.

    2012-09-01

    Ni/NiO multilayers were grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature, with the aid of the natural oxidation procedure. That is, at the end of the deposition of each single Ni layer, air is let to flow into the vacuum chamber through a leak valve. Then, a very thin NiO layer ({approx}1.2 nm) is formed. Simulated x-ray reflectivity patterns reveal that layering is excellent for individual Ni-layer thickness larger than 2.5 nm, which is attributed to the intercalation of amorphous NiO between the polycrystalline Ni layers. The magnetization of the films, measured at temperatures 5-300 K, has almost bulk-like value, whereas the films exhibit a trend to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an unusual significant positive interface anisotropy contribution, which presents a weak temperature dependence. The power-law behavior of the multilayers indicates a non-negligible contribution of higher order anisotropies in the uniaxial anisotropy. Bloch-law fittings for the temperature dependence of the magnetization in the spin-wave regime show that the magnetization in the multilayers decreases faster as a function of temperature than the one of bulk Ni. Finally, when the individual Ni-layer thickness decreases below 2 nm, the multilayer stacking vanishes, resulting in a dramatic decrease of the interface magnetic anisotropy and consequently in a decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  19. Surface Morphology and Magnetic Anisotropy (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Surface Morphology and Magnetic Anisotropy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Surface Morphology and Magnetic Anisotropy Authors: Lukaszew, R.A. ; Zhang, Z. ;...

  20. Primordial anisotropies in gauged hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan E-mail: emami@ipm.ir

    2014-05-01

    We study primordial anisotropies generated in the model of gauged hybrid inflation in which the complex waterfall field is charged under a U(1)gauge field. Primordial anisotropies are generated either actively during inflation or from inhomogeneities modulating the surface of end of inflation during waterfall transition. We present a consistent ?N mechanism to calculate the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum. We show that the primordial anisotropies generated at the surface of end of inflation do not depend on the number of e-folds and therefore do not produce dangerously large anisotropies associated with the IR modes. Furthermore, one can find the parameter space that the anisotropies generated from the surface of end of inflation cancel the anisotropies generated during inflation, therefore relaxing the constrains on model parameters imposed from IR anisotropies. We also show that the gauge field fluctuations induce a red-tilted power spectrum so the averaged power spectrum from the gauge field can change the total power spectrum from blue to red. Therefore, hybrid inflation, once gauged under a U(1) field, can be consistent with the cosmological observations.

  1. Preliminary results of characteristic seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiyono, Samsul H.; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Determining of seismic anisotropy allowed us for understanding the deformation processes that occured in the past and present. In this study, we performed shear wave splitting to characterize seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone. For about 1,610 XKS waveforms from INATEWS-BMKG networks have been analyzed. From its measurements showed that fast polarization direction is consistent with trench-perpendicular orientation but several stations presented different orientation. We also compared between fast polarization direction with absolute plate motion in the no net rotation and hotspot frame. Its result showed that both absolute plate motion frame had strong correlation with fast polarization direction. Strong correlation between the fast polarization direction and the absolute plate motion can be interpreted as the possibility of dominant anisotropy is in the asthenosphere.

  2. Imaging CSEM data in the presence of electrical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, G.A.; Commer, M.; Carazzone, J.J.

    2009-09-10

    Formation anisotropy should be incorporated into the analysis of controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data because failure to do so can produce serious artifacts in the resulting resistivity images for certain data configurations of interest. This finding is demonstrated in model and case studies. Sensitivity to horizontal resistivity will be strongest in the broadside electric field data where detectors are offset from the tow line. Sensitivity to the vertical resistivity is strongest for over flight data where the transmitting antenna passes directly over the detecting antenna. Consequently, consistent treatment of both over flight and broadside electric field measurements requires an anisotropic modeling assumption. To produce a consistent resistivity model for such data we develop and employ a 3D CSEM imaging algorithm that treats transverse anisotropy. The algorithm is based upon non-linear conjugate gradients and full wave equation modeling. It exploits parallel computing systems to effectively treat 3D imaging problems and CSEM data volumes of industrial size. Here we use it to demonstrate the anisotropic imaging process on model and field data sets from the North Sea and offshore Brazil. We also verify that isotropic imaging of over flight data alone produces an image generally consistent with the vertical resistivity. However, superior data fits are obtained when the same over flight data are analyzed assuming an anisotropic resistivity model.

  3. Predicting stress-induced velocity anisotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.; Godfrey, N.

    1995-07-01

    A simple transformation, using measured isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S} versus hydrostatic pressure, is presented for predicting stress-induced seismic velocity anisotropy in rocks. The compliant, crack-like portions of the pore space are characterized by generalized compressional and shear compliances that are estimated form the isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S}. The physical assumption that the compliant porosity is crack-like means that the pressure dependence of the generalized compliances is governed primarily by normal tractions resolved across cracks and defects. This allows the measured pressure dependence to be mapped form the hydrostatic stress state to any applied nonhydrostatic stress. Predicted P- and S-wave velocities agree reasonably well with uniaxial stress data for Barre Granite and Massillon Sandstone. While it is mechanically similar to methods based on idealized ellipsoidal cracks, the approach is relatively independent of any assumed crack geometry and is not limited to small crack densities.

  4. Band structure anisotropy in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novotny, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The focus of this research is an investigation of energy band anisotropy in simple quantum well structures. This anisotropy results from the asymmetry of the periodic potential within the crystal lattice. For sufficiently high doping levels, band structure anisotropy is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of the electronic and optical properties of the quantum well structures. The analysis uses a model based on a 6x6 Luttinger-Kohn k.p approach for bulk material valence band structure together with the Envelope Function Approximation. The model is used to analyze Si/SiGe, AlGaAs/GaAs, and GaAs/InGaAs quantum wells for the 001 and the 110 growth directions. The resulting band structures show significant anisotropy for materials grown in both the 110 and 001 directions. In all cases the materials grown in the 110 direction show a more pronounced anisotropy than the materials grown in the 001 directions. For the 001 growth directions, the band structures were effectively isotropic for values of k-parallel less than 0.4 inverse angstrom for Si/SiGe, 0.6 inverse angstrom for GaAs/AlGaAs, and 0.5 inverse angstrom for InGaAs/GaAs.

  5. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo; Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F{sup 2} gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  6. Exact seismic velocities for VTI and HTI media and extendedThomsen Formulas for stronger anisotropies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14

    I explore a different type of approximation to the exactanisotropic wave velocities as a function of incidence angle invertically transversely isotropic (VTI) media. This method extends theThomsen weak anisotropy approach to stronger anisotropy withoutsignificantly affecting the simplicity of the formulas. One importantimprovement is that the peak of the quasi-SV-wave speed vsv(theta) islocated at the correct incidence angle theta= theta max, rather thanalways being at the position theta = 45o, which universally holds forThomsen's approximation although max theta = 45o is actually nevercorrect for any VTI anisotropic medium. The magnitudes of all the wavespeeds are also more closely approximated for all values of the incidenceangle. Furthermore, the value of theta max (which is needed in the newformulas) can be deduced from the same data that are typically used inthe weak anisotropy data analysis. The two examples presented are basedon systems having vertical fractures. The first set of model fractureshas their axes of symmetry randomly oriented in the horizontal plane.Such a system is then isotropic in the horizontal plane and, therefore,exhibits vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) symmetry. The second set offractures also has axes of symmetry in the horizontal plane, but it isassumed these axes are aligned so that the system exhibits horizontaltransverse isotropic (HTI) symmetry. Both types of systems are easilytreated with the new wave speed formulation.

  7. Reconnection and electron temperature anisotropy in sub-proton scale plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, C. T.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of turbulent behavior at sub-proton scales in magnetized plasmas is important for a full understanding of the energetics of astrophysical flows such as the solar wind. We study the formation of electron temperature anisotropy due to reconnection in the turbulent decay of sub-proton scale fluctuations using two-dimensional, particle-in-cell plasma simulations with a realistic electron-proton mass ratio and a guide field perpendicular to the simulation plane. A power spectrum fluctuation with approximately power-law form is created down to scales of the order of the electron gyroradius. We identify the signatures of collisionless reconnection at sites of X-point field geometry in the dynamic magnetic field topology, which gradually relaxes in complexity. The reconnection sites are generally associated with regions of strong parallel electron temperature anisotropy. The evolving topology of magnetic field lines connected to a reconnection site allows for the spatial mixing of electrons accelerated at multiple, spatially separated reconnection regions. This leads to the formation of multi-peaked velocity distribution functions with strong parallel temperature anisotropy. In a three-dimensional system that can support the appropriate wave vectors, the multi-peaked distribution functions would be expected to be unstable to kinetic instabilities, contributing to dissipation. The proposed mechanism of anisotropy formation is also relevant to space and astrophysical systems where the evolution of the plasma is constrained by linear temperature anisotropy instability thresholds. The presence of reconnection sites leads to electron energy gain, nonlocal velocity space mixing, and the formation of strong temperature anisotropy; this is evidence of an important role for reconnection in the dissipation of turbulent fluctuations.

  8. Anisotropy of the Topopah Spring Member Tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Haupt, R.W.; Price, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Mechanical properties of the tuffaceous rocks within Yucca Mountain are needed for near and far-field modeling of the potential nuclear waste repository. If the mechanical properties are significantly anisotropic (i.e., direction-dependent), a more complex model is required. Relevant data from tuffs tested in earlier studies indicate that elastic and strength properties are anisotropic. This scoping study confirms the elastic anisotropy and concludes some tuffs are transversely isotropic. An approach for sampling and testing the rock to determine the magnitude of the anisotropy is proposed.

  9. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-04-06

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. In conclusion, our findings open up the exciting possibilitymore » of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.« less

  10. Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO 3 Prev Next Title: Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO ...

  11. Relative sensitivity of formability to anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, R.W.; Maker, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    This work compares the relative importance of material anisotropy in sheet forming as compared to other material and process variables. The comparison is made quantitative by the use of normalized dependencies of depth to failure (forming limit is reached) on various measures of anisotropy, as well as strain and rate sensitivity, friction, and tooling. Comparisons are made for a variety of forming processes examined previously in the literature as well as two examples of complex stampings in this work. 7 The examples rover a range from nearly pure draw to nearly pure stretch situations, and show that for materials following a quadratic yield criterion, anisotropy is among the most sensitive parameters influencing formability. For materials following higher-exponent yield criteria, the dependency is milder but is still of the order of most other process parameters. However, depending on the particular forming operation, it is shown that in some cases anisotropy may be ignored, whereas in others its consideration is crucial to a good quality analysis.

  12. Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Hojvat et al.

    2003-07-02

    A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

  13. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jason

    2013-05-15

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, H{sub c2}(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was #12;tted with a power-law function {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T) = AT{sup n}. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s{sub {+-}}#6; scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s{sub {+-}}#6; gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at {lambda}#21;(T), in optimally - doped, SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (T{sub c} ~ #25;25 K) and annealed (T{sub c} ~ #25;35 K) single crystals of SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from #21;{lambda}(0) = 300 {+-}#6; 10 nm in as-grown samples to {lambda}#21;(0) = 275{+-}#6;10 nm. At low temperatures, {lambda}#21;(T) #24;~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently

  14. Short-wavelength plasma turbulence and temperature anisotropy instabilities: Recent computational progress

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gary, S. Peter

    2015-04-06

    Plasma turbulence consists of an ensemble of enhanced, broadband electromagnetic fluctuations, typically driven by multi-wave interactions which transfer energy in wavevector space via non- linear cascade processes. In addition, temperature anisotropy instabilities in collisionless plasmas are driven by quasi-linear wave–particle interactions which transfer particle kinetic energy to field fluctuation energy; the resulting enhanced fluctuations are typically narrowband in wavevector magnitude and direction. Whatever their sources, short-wavelength fluctuations are those at which charged particle kinetic, that is, velocity-space, properties are important; these are generally wavelengths of the order of or shorter than the ion inertial length or the thermal ion gyroradius.more » The purpose of this review is to summarize and interpret recent computational results concerning short-wavelength plasma turbulence, short-wavelength temperature anisotropy instabilities and relationships between the two phenomena.« less

  15. Mathematical Formalism for an Experimental Test of Space-Time Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voicu-Brinzei, Nicoleta; Siparov, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    Some specific astrophysical data collected during the last decade suggest the need of a modification of the expression for the Einstein-Hilbert action, and several attempts are known in this respect. The modification suggested in this paper stems from a possible anisotropy of space-time--which leads to a dependence on directional variables of the simplest scalar in the least action principle. In order to provide a testable support to this idea, the optic-metrical parametric resonance is regarded - an experiment on a galactic scale, based on the interaction between the electromagnetic radiation of cosmic masers and periodical gravitational waves emitted by close double systems or pulsars. Since the effect depends on the space-time metric, a possible anisotropy could be revealed through observations. We prove that if space-time is anisotropic, then the orientation of the astrophysical systems suitable for observations would show it.

  16. Voltage modulation of propagating spin waves in Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nawaoka, Kohei; Shiota, Yoichi; Miwa, Shinji; Tamura, Eiiti; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Shinjo, Teruya; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2015-05-07

    The effect of a voltage application on propagating spin waves in single-crystalline 5?nm-Fe layer was investigated. Two micro-sized antennas were employed to excite and detect the propagating spin waves. The voltage effect was characterized using AC lock-in technique. As a result, the resonant field of the magnetostatic surface wave in the Fe was clearly modulated by the voltage application. The modulation is attributed to the voltage induced magnetic anisotropy change in ferromagnetic metals.

  17. Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming e-e, and e-p plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorbanalilu, M.; Physics Department, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz ; Sadegzadeh, S.; Ghaderi, Z.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-05-15

    The existence of Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming electron-electron (e-e), and electron-positron (e-p) plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy is investigated. The temperature anisotropy is included in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the streaming direction. It is shown that the beam mean speed changes the instability mode, for a streaming electron beam, from the classic Weibel to the Weibel-like mode. The analytical and numerical solutions approved that Weibel-like modes are excited for both counterstreaming e-e and e-p plasmas. The growth rates of the instabilities in e-e and e-p plasmas are compared. The growth rate is larger for e-p plasmas if the thermal anisotropy is small and the opposite is true for large thermal anisotropies. The analytical and numerical solutions are in good agreement only in the small parallel temperature and wave number limits, when the instability growth rate increases linearly with normalized wave number kc∕ω{sub p}.

  18. Poroelastic fluid effects on shear for rocks with soft anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J G

    2004-04-13

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluid mechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2 x 2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced through the poroelastic coefficients, interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall poroelastic system. The analysis shows for example that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied, and can be quite large (on the order of 10 to 20%) for wave propagation studies in some real granites and sandstones, including Spirit River sandstone and Schuler-Cotton Valley sandstone. Some of the results quoted here are obtained by using a new product formula relating local bulk and uniaxial shear energy to the product of the two eigenvalues that are coupled to the fluid mechanics. This product formula was first derived in prior work, but is given a more intuitive derivation here. The results obtained here are observed to be useful both for explaining difficult to reconcile experimental data, and for benchmarking of poroelastic codes.

  19. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikezoe, R. Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-15

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  20. Anisotropy in Broken Cloud Fields Over Oklahoma from Ladsat Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anisotropy in Broken Cloud Fields Over Oklahoma from Landsat Data L. M. Hinkelman National Institute of Aerospace Hampton, Virginia K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction Previously, it was shown (Hinkelman et al. 2002) that anisotropy, or the existence of a preferred direction, in cumulus fields significantly affects solar radiative transfer through these fields. In this poster, we investigate the occurrence of anisotropy in broken cloud fields near the Atmospheric

  1. Concave nanomagnets with widely tunable anisotropy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambson, Brian; Gu, Zheng; Carlton, David; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    A nanomagnet having widely tunable anisotropy is disclosed. The disclosed nanomagnet is a magnetic particle with a convex shape having a first magnetically easy axis. The convex shape is modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form substantially offset from the first magnetically easy axis. In at least one embodiment, the convex shape is also modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form with a magnetic strength substantially different from the first magnetically easy axis.

  2. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  3. George Smoot, Blackbody, and Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    George Smoot, Blackbody, and Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation ... of the cosmic microwave background radiation." '1 Smoot previously won the Ernest ...

  4. Magnetic anisotropy and domain patterning of amorphous films...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANISOTROPY; BORON ALLOYS; COBALT ALLOYS; FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; HELIUM IONS; ION BEAMS; IRON ALLOYS; IRRADIATION; KERR EFFECT; ...

  5. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  6. Modification of structure and magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    films by hydrogen reduction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modification of structure and magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial CoFeO films by hydrogen reduction ...

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF INTERMITTENCY ON THE SPECTRAL ANISOTROPY OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua; Marsch, Eckart

    2014-03-01

    The relation between the intermittency and the anisotropy of the power spectrum in the solar wind turbulence is studied by applying the wavelet technique to the magnetic field and flow velocity data measured by the WIND spacecraft. It is found that when the intermittency is removed from the turbulence, the spectral indices of the power spectra of the field and velocity turn out to be independent of the angle ?{sub RB} between the direction of the local scale-dependent background magnetic field and the heliocentric direction. The spectral index becomes 1.63 0.02 for magnetic field fluctuations and 1.56 0.02 for velocity fluctuations. These results may suggest that the recently found spectral anisotropy of solar wind power spectra in the inertial range could result from turbulence intermittency. As a consequence, a new concept is here proposed of an intermittency-associated sub-range of the inertial domain adjacent to the dissipation range. Since spectral anisotropy was previously explained as evidence for the presence of a ''critical balance'' type turbulent cascade, and also for the existence of kinetic Alfvn waves, this new finding may stimulate fresh thoughts on how to analyze and interpret solar wind turbulence and the associated heating.

  8. LIMITS ON ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY AND DIFFERENTIAL FLOW FROM KINETIC INSTABILITIES: SOLAR WIND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure and anisotropy driven instabilities such as the Alfvn/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this Letter, we use a long period of in situ measurements provided by the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha proton differential flow velocity and the alpha particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of T {sub ?}/T {sub p} (T {sub ??}/T {sub ?p}) when the alpha proton differential flow velocity is small, where T {sub ?} and T {sub p} (T {sub ??} and T {sub ?p}) are the perpendicular (parallel) temperatures of alpha particles and protons. We conjecture that this observed feature might arise from preferential alpha particle heating which can drive the alpha particles beyond the instability thresholds.

  9. Seismic Waves in Rocks with Fluids and Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J G

    2006-02-06

    Seismic wave propagation through the earth is often strongly affected by the presence of fractures. When these fractures are filled with fluids (oil, gas, water, CO{sub 2}, etc.), the type and state of the fluid (liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the response of the seismic waves. This paper will summarize some early work of the author on methods of deconstructing the effects of fractures, and any fluids within these fractures, on seismic wave propagation as observed in reflection seismic data. Methods to be explored here include Thomsen's anisotropy parameters for wave moveout (since fractures often induce elastic anisotropy), and some very convenient fracture parameters introduced by Sayers and Kachanov that permit a relatively simple deconstruction of the elastic behavior in terms of fracture parameters (whenever this is appropriate).

  10. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsenseismic anisotropy parameters for polar media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-12

    Sayers and Kachanov (1991) defined crack-influence parameters that are shown to be directly related to Thomsen (1986) weak-anisotropy seismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crack/fracture density is small enough. These results are then applied to the problem of seismic wave propagation in polar (i.e., non-isotropic) reservoirs having HTI seismic wave symmetry due to the presence of aligned vertical fractures and resulting in azimuthal seismic wave symmetry at the earth's surface. The approach presented suggests one method of inverting for fracture density from wave-speed data. It is also observed that the angular location {theta}{sub ex} of the extreme value (peak or trough) of the quasi-SV-wave speed for VTI occurs at an angle determined approximately by the formula tan{sup 2} {theta}{sub ex} {approx_equal} tan {theta}{sub m} = [(c{sub 33} - c{sub 44})/(c{sub 11}-c{sub 44})]{sup 1/2}, where {theta}{sub m} is an angle determined directly (as shown) from the c{sub ij} elastic stiffnesses, whenever these are known from either quasi-static or seismic wave measurements. Alternatively, {theta}{sub ex} is given in terms of the Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters by tan {theta}{sub ex} {approx_equal} ([v{sub p}{sup 2}(0)-v{sub s}{sup 2}(0)]/[(1 + 2{epsilon})v{sub p}{sup 2}(0)-v{sub s}{sup 2}(0)]){sup 1/4}, where {epsilon} = (c{sub 11}-c{sub 33})/2c{sub 33}, v{sub p}{sup 2}(0) = c{sub 33}/{rho}, and v{sub s}{sup 2}(0) = c{sub 44}/{rho}, with {rho} being the background inertial mass density. The axis of symmetry is always treated here as the x{sub 3}-axis for either VTI symmetry (due, for example, to horizontal cracks), or HTI symmetry (due to aligned vertical cracks). Then the meaning of the stiffnesses is derived from the fracture analysis in the same way for VTI and HTI media, but for HTI the wave speeds relative to the earth's surface are shifted by 90{sup o} in the plane perpendicular to the aligned vertical fractures. Skempton's (1954) coefficient is

  11. Relationship between Anisotropy in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Saturation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is saturation-dependent. Accurate characterization of soil anisotropy is very important in simulating flow and contaminant (e.g., radioactive nuclides in Hanford) transport. A recently developed tensorial connectivity-tortuosity (TCT) concept describes the hydraulic conductivity tensor of the unsaturated anisotropic soils as the product of a scalar variable, the symmetric connectivity tortuosity tensor, and the hydraulic conductivity tensor at saturation. In this study, the TCT model is used to quantify soil anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The TCT model can describe different types of soil anisotropy; e.g., the anisotropy coefficient, C, can be monotonically increase or decrease with saturation and can vary from greater than unity to less than unity and vice versa. Soil anisotropy is independent of soil water retention properties and can be characterized by the ratio of the saturated hydraulic conductivities and the difference of the tortuosity-connectivity coefficients in two directions. ln(C) is linearly proportional to ln(Se) with Se being the effective saturation. The log-linear relationship between C and Se allows the saturation-dependent anisotropy to be determined using linear regression with the measurements of the directional hydraulic conductivities at a minimum of two water content levels, of which one may be at full saturation. The model was tested using measurements of directional hydraulic conductivities.

  12. Magnetic anisotropy and domain structure of the layered manganite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1.64Mnsub 2Osub 7 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic anisotropy and domain structure of the layered manganite Lasub 1.36Srsub 1.64Mnsub 2Osub ...

  13. Excitation of Banded Whistler Waves in the Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S. Peter; Liu, Kaijun; Winske, Dan

    2012-07-13

    Banded whistler waves can be generated by the whistler anisotropy instability driven by two bi-Maxwellian electron components with T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} > 1 at different T{sub {parallel}} For typical magnetospheric condition of 1 < {omega}{sub e}/{Omega}{sub e} < 5 in regions associated with strong chorus, upper-band waves can be excited by anisotropic electrons below {approx} 1 keV, while lower-band waves are excited by anisotropic electrons above {approx} 10 keV. Lower-band waves are generally field-aligned and substantially electromagnetic, while upper-band waves propagate obliquely and have quasi-electrostatic fluctuating electric fields. The quasi-electrostatic feature of upper-band waves suggests that they may be more easily identified in electric field observations than in magnetic field observations. Upper-band waves are liable to Landau damping and the saturation level of upperband waves is lower than lower-band waves, consistent with observations that lower-band waves are stronger than upper-band waves on average. The oblique propagation, the lower saturation level, and the more severe Landau damping together would make upper-band waves more tightly confined to the geomagnetic equator (|{lambda}{sub m}| < {approx}10{sup o}) than lower-band waves.

  14. Quenching and anisotropy of hydromagnetic turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the α effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the α effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the Ω×J effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for α. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  15. The enigma of post-perovskite anisotropy: deformation versus transformation textures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Stackhouse, Stephen; Militzer, Burkhard; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2012-01-20

    The D'' region that lies just above the core mantle boundary exhibits complex anisotropy that this is likely due to preferred orientation (texturing) of the constituent minerals. (Mg,Fe)SiO{sub 3} post-perovskite is widely thought to be the major mineral phase of the D''. Texture development has been studied in various post-perovskite phases (MgSiO{sub 3}, MgGeO{sub 3}, and CaIrO{sub 3}), and different results were obtained. To clarify this controversy, we report on transformation and deformation textures in MgGeO{sub 3} post-perovskite synthesized and deformed at room temperature in the diamond anvil cell. Transformed from the enstatite phase, MgGeO{sub 3} post-perovskite exhibits a transformation texture characterized by (100) planes at high angles to the direction of compression. Upon subsequent deformation, this texture changes and (001) lattice planes become oriented nearly perpendicular to compression, consistent with dominant (001)[100] slip. When MgGeO{sub 3} post-perovskite is synthesized from the perovskite phase, a different transformation texture is observed. This texture has (001) planes at high angle to compression and becomes slightly stronger upon compression. We also find that the yield strength of MgGeO{sub 3} post-perovskite is dependent on grain size and texture. Finer-grained samples exhibit higher yield strength and are harder to induce plastic deformation. Strong textures also affect the yield strength and can result in higher differential stresses. The inferred dominant (001) slip for pPv is significant for geophysics, because, when applied to geodynamic convection models, it predicts the observed anisotropies of S-waves as well as an anti-correlation between P- and S-waves.

  16. Anisotropy of radiation emitted from planar wire arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I. K.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A.

    2013-07-15

    The planar wire array (PWA) is a promising load for new multi-source inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums [B. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The hohlraum radiation symmetry is an important issue for ICF. It was found that extreme ultraviolet and sub-keV photon emission from PWAs may have considerable anisotropy in the load azimuthal plane. This experimental result is obtained on the UNR 1–1.7 MA Zebra generator. The time-dependent anisotropy effect is detected. This feature is studied in 2D numerical simulations and can be explained by initial anisotropy of implosion of those non-cylindrical loads radiating essentially as surface sources in sub-keV quanta and also by radiation absorption in cold magnetized plasma tails forming in the direction of magnetic compression.

  17. Magnetic alignment of block copolymer microdomains by intrinsic chain anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Yager, Kevin G.; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Zhang, Kai; O'Hern, Corey S.; Larson, Steven R.; Gopalan, Padma; Majewski, Pawel W.

    2015-12-18

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using in situ x-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, Δχ, that drives alignment and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding Δχ ≈ 2×10–8. From field-dependent scattering data, we estimate that grains of ≈ 1.2 μm are present during alignment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropy is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.

  18. Linking strain anisotropy and plasticity in copper metallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Conal E. Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Nguyen, Son

    2015-05-04

    The elastic anisotropy of copper leads to significant variation in the x-ray elastic constants (XEC), which link diffraction-based strain measurements to stress. An accurate depiction of the mechanical response in copper thin films requires a determination of an appropriate grain interaction model that lies between Voigt and Reuss limits. It is shown that the associated XEC weighting fraction, x*, between these limits provides a metric by which strain anisotropy can be quantified. Experimental values of x*, as determined by a linear regression scheme of diffraction data collected from multiple reflections, reveal the degree of strain anisotropy and its dependence on plastic deformation induced during in-situ and ex-situ thermal treatments.

  19. Finite driving rate and anisotropy effects in landslide modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piegari, E.; Cataudella, V.; Di Maio, R.; Milano, L.; Nicodemi, M.

    2006-02-15

    In order to characterize landslide frequency-size distributions and individuate hazard scenarios and their possible precursors, we investigate a cellular automaton where the effects of a finite driving rate and the anisotropy are taken into account. The model is able to reproduce observed features of landslide events, such as power-law distributions, as experimentally reported. We analyze the key role of the driving rate and show that, as it is increased, a crossover from power-law to non-power-law behaviors occurs. Finally, a systematic investigation of the model on varying its anisotropy factors is performed and the full diagram of its dynamical behaviors is presented.

  20. Seismic waves in rocks with fluids and fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14

    Seismic wave propagation through the earth is often stronglyaffected by the presence of fractures. When these fractures are filledwith fluids (oil, gas, water, CO2, etc.), the type and state of the fluid(liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the response of theseismic waves. This paper summarizes recent work on methods ofdeconstructing the effects of fractures, and any fluids within thesefractures, on seismic wave propagation as observed in reflection seismicdata. One method explored here is Thomsen's weak anisotropy approximationfor wave moveout (since fractures often induce elastic anisotropy due tononuniform crack-orientation statistics). Another method makes use ofsome very convenient fracture parameters introduced previously thatpermit a relatively simple deconstruction of the elastic and wavepropagation behavior in terms of a small number of fracture parameters(whenever this is appropriate, as is certainly the case for small crackdensities). Then, the quantitative effects of fluids on thesecrack-influence parameters are shown to be directly related to Skempton scoefficient B of undrained poroelasticity (where B typically ranges from0 to 1). In particular, the rigorous result obtained for the low crackdensity limit is that the crack-influence parameters are multiplied by afactor (1 ? B) for undrained systems. It is also shown how fractureanisotropy affects Rayleigh wave speed, and how measured Rayleigh wavespeeds can be used to infer shear wave speed of the fractured medium.Higher crack density results are also presented by incorporating recentsimulation data on such cracked systems.

  1. Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic nanocomposites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic nanocomposites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic ...

  2. Predicted impacts of proton temperature anisotropy on solar wind turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2015-03-15

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the Alfvénic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scale cascade. We find that the nonlinear dynamics of the large-scale cascade is insensitive to the proton temperature anisotropy and that the instability-driven fluctuations are unlikely to cause significant nonlinear evolution of either the instability-driven fluctuations or the turbulent fluctuations of the large-scale cascade.

  3. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  4. Realizing bright-matter-wave-soliton collisions with controlled relative phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billam, T. P.; Cornish, S. L.; Gardiner, S. A.

    2011-04-15

    We propose a method to split the ground state of an attractively interacting atomic Bose-Einstein condensate into two bright solitary waves with controlled relative phase and velocity. We analyze the stability of these waves against their subsequent recollisions at the center of a cylindrically symmetric, prolate harmonic trap as a function of relative phase, velocity, and trap anisotropy. We show that the collisional stability is strongly dependent on relative phase at low velocity, and we identify previously unobserved oscillations in the collisional stability as a function of the trap anisotropy. An experimental implementation of our method would determine the validity of the mean-field description of bright solitary waves and could prove to be an important step toward atom interferometry experiments involving bright solitary waves.

  5. ocean waves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waves - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  6. Magnetic alignment of block copolymer microdomains by intrinsic chain anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Yager, Kevin G.; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Zhang, Kai; O'Hern, Corey S.; Larson, Steven R.; Gopalan, Padma; Majewski, Pawel W.

    2015-12-18

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using in situ x-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, Δχ, that drives alignment and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding Δχ ≈ 2×10–8. From field-dependent scattering data, we estimate that grains of ≈ 1.2 μm are present during alignment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropymore » is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.« less

  7. Enhanced cosmic ray anisotropies and the extended solar magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinson, D.B.; Saito, T.; Mori, S.

    1981-10-01

    Saito's two-hemisphere model for the three-dimensional magnetic structure of the inner heliomagnetosphere is used to determine the orientation of the two solar magnetic hemispheres. This orientation, as viewed from the earth, varies throughout the year. The orientations during 1974 are presented and are confirmed by satellite data for the interplanetary magnetic field. These data suggest a role for the field component perpendicular to the ecliptic plane B/sub z/ in giving rise to cosmic ray anisotropies detected at the earth. It is shown that an enhanced solar diurnal variation in cosmic ray intensity at the earth can arise from the constructive interference of three cosmic ray anisotropies, two of which depend on the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field. This is demonstrated by using cosmic ray data from the Nagaya muon telescope and underground muon telescopes in Bolivia, Embudo (New Mexico), and Socorro (New Mexico).

  8. Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Semicrystalline polymers, such as polythiophenes, hold much promise as active layers in printable electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and thin film transistors. As organic semiconductors approach commercialization, there is a need to better understand the relationship between

  9. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Li; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    2015-03-01

    Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the spatial anisotropy of the initial density profile. A long-standing problem in the interpretation of flow data is that uncertainties in the initial anisotropy are mingled with uncertainties in the response. We argue that the non-Gaussianity of flow fluctuations in small systems with large fluctuations can be used to disentangle the initial state from the response. We apply this method to recent measurements of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC, assuming linear response to the initial anisotropy. The response coefficient is found to decreasemoreas the system becomes smaller and is consistent with a low value of the ratio of viscosity over entropy of ?/s 0.19. Deviations from linear response are studied. While they significantly change the value of the response coefficient they do not change the rate of decrease with centrality. Thus, we argue that the estimate of ?/s is robust against non-linear effects.less

  10. Electron acceleration during the decay of nonlinear Whistler waves in low-beta electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Saito, Shinji; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro E-mail: saito@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-10

    Relativistic electron acceleration through dissipation of a nonlinear, short-wavelength, and monochromatic electromagnetic whistler wave in low-beta plasma is investigated by utilizing a one-dimensional fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The nonlinear (large-amplitude) parent whistler wave decays through the parametric instability which enhances electrostatic ion acoustic waves and electromagnetic whistler waves. These waves satisfy the condition of three-wave coupling. Through the decay instability, the energy of electron bulk velocity supporting the parent wave is converted to the thermal energy perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Increase of the perpendicular temperature triggers the electron temperature anisotropy instability which generates broadband whistler waves and heats electrons in the parallel direction. The broadband whistler waves are inverse-cascaded during the relaxation of the electron temperature anisotropy. In lower-beta conditions, electrons with a pitch angle of about 90 are successively accelerated by inverse-cascaded whistler waves, and selected electrons are accelerated to over a Lorentz factor of 10. The result implies that the nonlinear dissipation of a finite-amplitude and short-wavelength whistler wave plays an important role in producing relativistic nonthermal electrons over a few MeV especially at lower beta plasmas.

  11. Plane wave method for elastic wave scattering by a heterogeneous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plane wave method for elastic wave scattering by a heterogeneous fracture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plane wave method for elastic wave scattering by a ...

  12. Estimation of anisotropy parameters in organic-rich shale: Rock physics forward modeling approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herawati, Ida Winardhi, Sonny; Priyono, Awali

    2015-09-30

    Anisotropy analysis becomes an important step in processing and interpretation of seismic data. One of the most important things in anisotropy analysis is anisotropy parameter estimation which can be estimated using well data, core data or seismic data. In seismic data, anisotropy parameter calculation is generally based on velocity moveout analysis. However, the accuracy depends on data quality, available offset, and velocity moveout picking. Anisotropy estimation using seismic data is needed to obtain wide coverage of particular layer anisotropy. In anisotropic reservoir, analysis of anisotropy parameters also helps us to better understand the reservoir characteristics. Anisotropy parameters, especially ε, are related to rock property and lithology determination. Current research aims to estimate anisotropy parameter from seismic data and integrate well data with case study in potential shale gas reservoir. Due to complexity in organic-rich shale reservoir, extensive study from different disciplines is needed to understand the reservoir. Shale itself has intrinsic anisotropy caused by lamination of their formed minerals. In order to link rock physic with seismic response, it is necessary to build forward modeling in organic-rich shale. This paper focuses on studying relationship between reservoir properties such as clay content, porosity and total organic content with anisotropy. Organic content which defines prospectivity of shale gas can be considered as solid background or solid inclusion or both. From the forward modeling result, it is shown that organic matter presence increases anisotropy in shale. The relationships between total organic content and other seismic properties such as acoustic impedance and Vp/Vs are also presented.

  13. Experimental investigation of magnetic anisotropy in spin vortex discs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garraud, N. Arnold, D. P.

    2014-05-07

    We present experimental 2D vector vibrating sample magnetometer measurements to demonstrate the shape anisotropy effects occurring in micrometer-diameter supermalloy spin vortex discs. Measurements made for different disc sizes and orientations confirm the out-of-plane susceptibility is several orders of magnitude smaller than the in-plane susceptibility. These results validate with a high certitude that spin vortices with high diameter to thickness ratio retain in-plane-only magnetization, even when subjected to fields in the out-of-plane direction. These results contribute to further computational simulations of the dynamics of spin vortex structures in colloidal suspensions where external fields may be applied in any arbitrary direction.

  14. Statistical anisotropy of the curvature perturbation from vector field perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Karciauskas, Mindaugas; Lyth, David H.; Rodriguez, Yeinzon E-mail: m.karciauskas@lancaster.ac.uk E-mail: yeinzon.rodriguez@uan.edu.co

    2009-05-15

    The {delta}N formula for the primordial curvature perturbation {zeta} is extended to include vector as well as scalar fields. Formulas for the tree-level contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum of {zeta} are given, exhibiting statistical anisotropy. The one-loop contribution to the spectrum of {zeta} is also worked out. We then consider the generation of vector field perturbations from the vacuum, including the longitudinal component that will be present if there is no gauge invariance. Finally, the {delta}N formula is applied to the vector curvaton and vector inflation models with the tensor perturbation also evaluated in the latter case.

  15. Magnetic anisotropy in Ta/CoFeB/MgO investigated by x-ray magnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANISOTROPY; BORON ALLOYS; COBALT; COBALT ALLOYS; IRON; IRON ALLOYS; MAGNESIUM OXIDES; MAGNETIC CIRCULAR...

  16. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  17. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore »Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  18. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore » Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  19. Wave Energy Scotland

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Industry outreach: DOE and Wave Energy Scotland co-sponsored WEC technology workshop News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Water Power, Workshops Industry outreach: DOE and Wave ...

  20. Heliospheric influence on the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ming; Zuo, Pingbing; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2014-07-20

    This paper provides a theory of using Liouville's theorem to map the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays seen at Earth using the particle distribution function in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The ultimate source of cosmic ray anisotropy is the energy, pitch angle, and spatial dependence of the cosmic ray distribution function in the LISM. Because young nearby cosmic ray sources can make a special contribution to the cosmic ray anisotropy, the anisotropy depends on the source age, distance and magnetic connection, and particle diffusion of these cosmic rays, all of which make the anisotropy sensitive to the particle energy. When mapped through the magnetic and electric field of a magnetohydrodynamic model heliosphere, the large-scale dipolar and bidirectional interstellar anisotropy patterns become distorted if they are seen from Earth, resulting in many small structures in the observations. Best fits to cosmic ray anisotropy measurements have allowed us to estimate the particle density gradient and pitch angle anisotropies in the LISM. It is found that the heliotail, hydrogen deflection plane, and the plane perpendicular to the LISM magnetic field play a special role in distorting cosmic ray anisotropy. These features can lead to an accurate determination of the LISM magnetic field direction and polarity. The effects of solar cycle variation, the Sun's coronal magnetic field, and turbulence in the LISM and heliospheric magnetic fields are minor but clearly visible at a level roughly equal to a fraction of the overall anisotropy amplitude. The heliospheric influence becomes stronger at lower energies. Below 1 TeV, the anisotropy is dominated by small-scale patterns produced by disturbances in the heliosphere.

  1. Scalings of Alfvén-cyclotron and ion Bernstein instabilities on temperature anisotropy of a ring-like velocity distribution in the inner magnetosphere

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Min, Kyungguk; Liu, Kaijun; Gary, S. Peter

    2016-03-18

    Here, a ring-like proton velocity distribution with ∂fp(v⊥)/∂v⊥>0 and which is sufficiently anisotropic can excite two distinct types of growing modes in the inner magnetosphere: ion Bernstein instabilities with multiple ion cyclotron harmonics and quasi-perpendicular propagation and an Alfvén-cyclotron instability at frequencies below the proton cyclotron frequency and quasi-parallel propagation. Recent particle-in-cell simulations have demonstrated that even if the maximum linear growth rate of the latter instability is smaller than the corresponding growth of the former instability, the saturation levels of the fluctuating magnetic fields can be greater for the Alfvén-cyclotron instability than for the ion Bernstein instabilities. In thismore » study, linear dispersion theory and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are used to examine scalings of the linear growth rate and saturation level of the two types of growing modes as functions of the temperature anisotropy T⊥/T|| for a general ring-like proton distribution with a fixed ring speed of 2vA, where vA is the Alfvén speed. For the proton distribution parameters chosen, the maximum linear theory growth rate of the Alfvén-cyclotron waves is smaller than that of the fastest-growing Bernstein mode for the wide range of anisotropies (1≤T⊥/T||≤7) considered here. Yet the corresponding particle-in-cell simulations yield a higher saturation level of the fluctuating magnetic fields for the Alfvén-cyclotron instability than for the Bernstein modes as long as inline image. Since fast magnetosonic waves with ion Bernstein instability properties observed in the magnetosphere are often not accompanied by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, the results of the present study indicate that the ring-like proton distributions responsible for the excitation of these fast magnetosonic waves should not be very anisotropic.« less

  2. Magnetic anisotropy in rf sputtered Tb-Fe films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, R.; Porte, M.; Tessier, M.; Vitton, J.P.; Le Cars, Y.

    1988-04-01

    We have studied sputtered amorphous Tb-Fe films by torque magnetometry in the range 10--300 K. M-H loops have also been taken with a vibration sample magnetometer. All the samples studied show uniaxial anisotropy on the order of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ erg cm/sup -3/. The rotational hysteresis is present. The torque curves for T<80 K show a strong deviation from sin 2theta behavior and makes the extraction of Ku difficult. However, in the range 80--300 K, Ku increases strongly with a decrease in temperature. A strong contribution from magnetoelastic interactions is suggested. As regards magnetization, it increases as T decreases and saturates for T<60 K. The results are discussed.

  3. Elastic anisotropy, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of U{sub 2}Ti intermetallic compound with AlB{sub 2}-type structure under high pressure up to 100 GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jinwen; Gao, Tao; Liu, Benqiong; Sun, Guangai; Chen, Bo

    2015-03-28

    Structural, elastic anisotropy, dynamical, and thermodynamic properties of U{sub 2}Ti have been studied by employing density functional theory and density functional perturbative theory. The optimized lattice parameters a, c, unit volume V, bulk modulus B, and bond lengths d{sub U-U}, d{sub U-Ti} of U{sub 2}Ti are in favorable agreement with the available experimental data and other theoretical values. The elastic constants under pressure were obtained using “energy-strain” method. The polycrystalline modulus, Poisson's ratio, brittle/ductile characteristics, Debye temperature and the integration of elastic wave velocities over different directions, and hardness under pressure are also evaluated successfully. The anisotropy of the directional bulk modulus and the Young's modulus is systematically predicted for the first time. It turns out that U{sub 2}Ti should be stabilized mechanically up to 100 GPa, this compound just possesses slightly elastic anisotropy at zero pressure; however, the anisotropy becomes more and more significant with the increasing pressure. In particular, the phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of state under pressure are reported for the first time. The Raman and infrared-active phonon modes at Γ point are further assigned. Our results indicate that U{sub 2}Ti is also stable dynamically up to 100 GPa. Additionally, within the calculated phonon density of states, the thermodynamic properties are predicted.

  4. Possible origin of the nonmonotonic doping dependence of the in-plane resistivity anisotropy of Ba(Fe1-xTx)₂As₂ (T=Co, Ni and Cu)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuo, Hsueh-Hui; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Riggs, Scott C.; Yu, Leo; McMahon, Peter L.; De Greve, Kristiaan; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Analytis, James G.; Fisher, Ian R.

    2011-08-15

    The in-plane resistivity anisotropy has been measured for detwinned single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xNix)₂As₂ and Ba(Fe1-xCux)₂As₂. The data reveal a nonmonotonic doping dependence, similar to previous observations for Ba(Fe1-xCox)₂As₂. Magnetotransport measurements of the parent compound reveal a nonlinear Hall coefficient and a large linear term in the transverse magnetoresistance. Both effects are rapidly suppressed with chemical substitution over a similar compositional range as the onset of the large in-plane resistivity anisotropy. This suggests that the relatively small in-plane anisotropy of the parent compound in the spin-density wave state is due to the presence of an isotropic, high mobility pocket of themore » reconstructed Fermi surface. Progressive suppression of the contribution to the conductivity arising from this isotropic pocket with chemical substitution eventually reveals the underlying in-plane anisotropy associated with the remaining Fermi surface pockets« less

  5. Parameter spaces for linear and nonlinear whistler-mode waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, Danny; School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi ; Tang, Rongxin; Institute of Space Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang; State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing ; Omura, Yoshiharu; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2013-07-15

    We examine the growth of magnetospheric whistler-mode waves which comprises a linear growth phase followed by a nonlinear growth phase. We construct time-profiles for the wave amplitude that smoothly match at the transition between linear and nonlinear wave growth. This matching procedure can only take place over a limited “matching region” in (N{sub h}/N{sub 0},A{sub T})-space, where A{sub T} is the electron thermal anisotropy, N{sub h} is the hot (energetic) electron number density, and N{sub 0} is the cold (background) electron number density. We construct this matching region and determine how the matching wave amplitude varies throughout the region. Further, we specify a boundary in (N{sub h}/N{sub 0},A{sub T})-space that separates a region where only linear chorus wave growth can occur from the region in which fully nonlinear chorus growth is possible. We expect that this boundary should prove of practical use in performing computationally expensive full-scale particle simulations, and in interpreting experimental wave data.

  6. Electric-field-induced spin wave generation using multiferroic magnetoelectric cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherepov, Sergiy; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Alzate, Juan G.; Wong, Kin; Lewis, Mark; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Nath, Jayshankar; Bao, Mingqiang; Wang, Kang L.; Bur, Alexandre; Wu, Tao; Carman, Gregory P.; Khitun, Alexander

    2014-02-24

    In this work, we report on the demonstration of voltage-driven spin wave excitation, where spin waves are generated by multiferroic magnetoelectric (ME) cell transducers driven by an alternating voltage, rather than an electric current. A multiferroic element consisting of a magnetostrictive Ni film and a piezoelectric [Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}]{sub (1?x)}[PbTiO{sub 3}]{sub x} substrate was used for this purpose. By applying an AC voltage to the piezoelectric, an oscillating electric field is created within the piezoelectric material, which results in an alternating strain-induced magnetic anisotropy in the magnetostrictive Ni layer. The resulting anisotropy-driven magnetization oscillations propagate in the form of spin waves along a 5??m wide Ni/NiFe waveguide. Control experiments confirm the strain-mediated origin of the spin wave excitation. The voltage-driven spin wave excitation, demonstrated in this work, can potentially be used for low-dissipation spin wave-based logic and memory elements.

  7. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian, L. K.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Klecker, B.; Omidi, N.; Isenberg, P. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Vias, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  8. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; et al

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a bandedmore » chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.« less

  9. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  10. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy in UMn2Ge2 and related Mn-based actinide ferromagnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parker, David S.; Ghimire, Nirmal; Singleton, John; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Baumbach, Ryan; Mandrus, David; Li, Ling; Singh, David J.

    2015-05-04

    We presenmore » t magnetization isotherms in pulsed magnetic fields up to 62 Tesla, supported by first principles calculations, demonstrating a huge uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy - approximately 20 MJ/m3 - in UMn2Ge2. This large anisotropy results from the extremely strong spin-orbit coupling affecting the uranium 5 f electrons, which in the calculations exhibit a substantial orbital moment exceeding 2 μB. Finally, we also find from theoretical calculations that a number of isostructural Mn-actinide compounds are expected to have similarly large anisotropy.« less

  11. Domain wall motion driven by spin Hall effect—Tuning with in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rushforth, A. W.

    2014-04-21

    This letter investigates the effects of in-plane magnetic anisotropy on the current induced motion of magnetic domain walls in systems with dominant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where accumulated spins from the spin Hall effect in an adjacent heavy metal layer are responsible for driving the domain wall motion. It is found that that the sign and magnitude of the domain wall velocity in the uniform flow regime can be tuned significantly by the in-plane magnetic anisotropy. These effects are sensitive to the ratio of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin transfer torque parameters and are robust in the presence of pinning and thermal fluctuations.

  12. Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy in UMn2Ge2 and Related Mn-based Actinide Ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, David S; Mandrus, D.; Ghimire, N J; Baumbach, Ryan; Singleton, John; Thompson, J.D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Li, Ling; Singh, David J

    2015-01-01

    We present magnetization isotherms in pulsed magnetic fields up to 62 Tesla, supported by first principles calculations, demonstrating a huge uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy - approximately 20 MJ/m3 - in UMn2Ge2. This large anisotropy results from the extremely strong spin-orbit coupling affecting the uranium 5 f electrons, which in the calculations exhibit a substantial orbital moment exceeding 2 Bohr magnetons. We also find from theoretical calculations that a number of isostructural Mn-actinide compounds are expected to have similarly large anisotropy.

  13. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsenseismic anisotropy parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-06-27

    The Sayers and Kachanov (1991) crack-influence parametersare shown to be directly related to Thomsen (1986) weak-anisotropyseismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crack density issmall enough. These results are then applied to seismic wave propagationin reservoirs having HTI symmetry due to aligned vertical fractures. Theapproach suggests a method of inverting for fracture density from wavespeed data.

  14. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  15. Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power in Hawaii Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power in Hawaii July 29, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis...

  16. Identification of crystalline elastic anisotropy in PZT ceramics from in-situ blocking stress measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, L.; Hall, D. A.; Withers, P. J.; Webber, K. G.; King, A.

    2014-05-07

    High energy x-ray diffraction measurements of lattice strains were performed on a rhombohedral Lead Zirconate Titanate ceramic (PZT 55-45) under combinations of applied electric field and compressive stress. These measurements allow the construction of blocking stress curves for different sets of crystallographic orientations which reflect the single crystal elastic anisotropy. A micro-mechanical interpretation of the results is then proposed. Assuming cubic symmetry for the crystalline elastic stiffness tensor and isotropy for the macroscopic elastic properties, the elastic properties of the single crystal are extracted from the measured data. An anisotropy ratio close to 0.3 is found (compared to 1 for isotropic materials). The high level of anisotropy found in this work suggests that crystalline elastic anisotropy should not be neglected in the modelling of ferroelectric materials.

  17. Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spin-Locked Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 ...

  18. Nano-electromechanical rotation of graphene and giant enhancement in dielectric anisotropy in a liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Rajratan Kinnamon, Daniel; Garvey, Alfred

    2015-05-18

    A nematic liquid crystal (LC) is doped with dilute concentrations of pristine monolayer graphene (GP) flakes, and the LC + GP hybrids are found to exhibit a dramatic increase in the dielectric anisotropy. Electric field-dependent conductance studies reveal that the graphene flakes follow the nematic director that mechanically rotates on increasing an applied electric field. Further studies show that the ?? electron stacking, between the graphene's honeycomb structure and the LC's benzene rings, stabilizes pseudo-nematic domains that collectively amplify the dielectric anisotropy by improving the orientational order parameter in the nematic phase. These anisotropic domains interact with the external electric field, resulting in a nonzero dielectric anisotropy in the isotropic phase as well. The enhancement in dielectric anisotropy, due to the LCgraphene coupling, is found to have subsequent positive impacts on the LC's orientational threshold field and elasticity that allows the nematic director to respond quicker on switching the electric field off.

  19. Contact and Stress Anisotropies in Start-Up Flow of Colloidal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact and Stress Anisotropies in Start-Up Flow of Colloidal Suspensions Authors: Martys, N.S., Lootens, D., George, W., and H Spatiotemporal correlations in start-up flows of...

  20. Alfvn wave solar model (AWSoM): Coronal heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I. V.; Meng, X.; Jin, M.; Manchester, W. B. IV; Tth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-02-20

    We present a new version of the Alfvn wave solar model, a global model from the upper chromosphere to the corona and the heliosphere. The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are addressed with low-frequency Alfvn wave turbulence. The injection of Alfvn wave energy at the inner boundary is such that the Poynting flux is proportional to the magnetic field strength. The three-dimensional magnetic field topology is simulated using data from photospheric magnetic field measurements. This model does not impose open-closed magnetic field boundaries; those develop self-consistently. The physics include the following. (1) The model employs three different temperatures, namely the isotropic electron temperature and the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures. The firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities due to the developing ion temperature anisotropy are accounted for. (2) The Alfvn waves are partially reflected by the Alfvn speed gradient and the vorticity along the field lines. The resulting counter-propagating waves are responsible for the nonlinear turbulent cascade. The balanced turbulence due to uncorrelated waves near the apex of the closed field lines and the resulting elevated temperatures are addressed. (3) To apportion the wave dissipation to the three temperatures, we employ the results of the theories of linear wave damping and nonlinear stochastic heating. (4) We have incorporated the collisional and collisionless electron heat conduction. We compare the simulated multi-wavelength extreme ultraviolet images of CR2107 with the observations from STEREO/EUVI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/AIA instruments. We demonstrate that the reflection due to strong magnetic fields in the proximity of active regions sufficiently intensifies the dissipation and observable emission.

  1. A robust absorbing layer method for anisotropic seismic wave modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mtivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Labb, S.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-15

    When applied to wave propagation modeling in anisotropic media, Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) exhibit instabilities. Incoming waves are amplified instead of being absorbed. Overcoming this difficulty is crucial as in many seismic imaging applications, accounting accurately for the subsurface anisotropy is mandatory. In this study, we present the SMART layer method as an alternative to PML approach. This method is based on the decomposition of the wavefield into components propagating inward and outward the domain of interest. Only outgoing components are damped. We show that for elastic and acoustic wave propagation in Transverse Isotropic media, the SMART layer is unconditionally dissipative: no amplification of the wavefield is possible. The SMART layers are not perfectly matched, therefore less accurate than conventional PML. However, a reasonable increase of the layer size yields an accuracy similar to PML. Finally, we illustrate that the selective damping strategy on which is based the SMART method can prevent the generation of spurious S-waves by embedding the source in a small zone where only S-waves are damped.

  2. Ground-Based Microwave Study of LWP Spatial Anisotropy in Winter Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ground-Based Microwave Study of LWP Spatial Anisotropy in Winter Clouds A. V. Koldaev, E. A. Miller, V. E. Kadygrov, and A. I. Gusev Central Aerological Observatory Moscow, Russia A. V. Troitsky Radio Physics Institute of Nigny Novgorod, Russia W. Strapp Meteorological Service of Canada Cloud Physics Research Division Ottawa, Canada Introduction The role of horizontal anisotropy of the cloud field in the radiation transfer is under investigation of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science

  3. Alignment of Iron Nanoparticles in a Magnetic Field Due to Shape Anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Rios, Orlando; Parish, Chad M

    2015-07-09

    During high magnetic field processing there is evidence for alignment of non-spherical metallic particles above the Curie temperature in alloys with negligible magneto-crystalline anisotropy. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with size scaling to show the conditions under which alignment is possible.

  4. Contribution of Eu 4f states to the magnetic anisotropy of EuO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenholz, E.; Schmehl, A.; Schlom, D.G.; van der Laan, G.

    2008-09-11

    Anisotropic x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (AXMLD) provides a novel element-, site-, shell-, and symmetry-selective techniques to study the magnetic anisotropy induced by a crystalline electric field. The weak Eu2+ M4,5 AXMLD observed in EuO(001) indicates that the Eu 4f states are not rotationally invariant and hence contribute weakly to the magnetic anisotropy of EuO. The results are contrasted with those obtained for 3d transition metal oxides.

  5. On the Site-Decomposition of Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy Energy Using Ome-Electron Eigenstates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aberg, Daniel; Sadigh, Babak; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2015-10-26

    We discuss two di erent schemes for decomposing the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy into atomic site-speci c contributions, and show that one of these, which uses projected single-particle states, is inherently ill-de ned in practical applications. We therefore argue that the other decomposition scheme, involving ground state matrix elements of the spin-orbit operator, is preferable for the numerical prediction of one-site contributions to the anisotropy.

  6. Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Description 2 History 3 Technology 4 Current and Possible Wave Farms 5 Pros and Cons Description Wave energy (or wave power) is...

  7. The Effect of Crack Orientation on the Nonlinear Interaction of a P-wave with an S-wave

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    TenCate, J. A.; Malcolm, A. E.; Feng, X.; Fehler, M. C.

    2016-06-06

    Cracks, joints, fluids, and other pore-scale structures have long been hypothesized to be the cause of the large elastic nonlinearity observed in rocks. It is difficult to definitively say which pore-scale features are most important, however, because of the difficulty in isolating the source of the nonlinear interaction. In this work, we focus on the influence of cracks on the recorded nonlinear signal and in particular on how the orientation of microcracks changes the strength of the nonlinear interaction. We do this by studying the effect of orientation on the measurements in a rock with anisotropy correlated with the presencemore » and alignment of microcracks. We measure the nonlinear response via the traveltime delay induced in a low-amplitude P wave probe by a high-amplitude S wave pump. We find evidence that crack orientation has a significant effect on the nonlinear signal.« less

  8. Propagation of polarized light in opals: Amplitude and phase anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baryshev, A. V. Dokukin, M. E.; Merzlikin, A. M.; Inoue, M.

    2011-03-15

    The interaction of linearly polarized light with photonic crystals based on bulk and thin-film synthetic opals is studied. Experimental transmission spectra and spectra showing the polarization state of light transmitted through opals are discussed. A change in polarization is found for waves experiencing Bragg diffraction from systems of crystallographic planes of the opal lattice. It is shown that the polarization plane of the incident linearly polarized wave at the exit from photonic crystals can be considerably rotated. In addition, incident linearly polarized light can be transformed to elliptically polarized light with the turned major axis of the polarization ellipse. Analysis of polarization states of transmitted light by using the transfer-matrix theory and homogenization theory revealed good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra.

  9. Fluctuation-driven anisotropy in effective pair interactions between nanoparticles: Thiolated gold nanoparticles in ethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabes, B. Shadrack; Yadav, Hari O. S.; Chakravarty, Charusita; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-10-21

    Fluctuations within the ligand shell of a nanoparticle give rise to a significant degree of anisotropy in effective pair interactions for low grafting densities [B. Bozorgui, D. Meng, S. K. Kumar, C. Chakravarty, and A. Cacciuto, Nano Lett. 13, 2732 (2013)]. Here, we examine the corresponding fluctuation-driven anisotropy for gold nanocrystals densely passivated with short ligands. In particular, we consider gold nanocrystals capped by alkylthiols, both in vacuum and in ethane solvent at high density. As in the preceding study, we show that the anisotropy in the nanoparticle pair potential can be quantified by an angle-dependent correction term to the isotropic potential of mean force (PMF). We find that the anisotropy of the ligand shells is distance dependent, and strongly influenced by ligand interdigitation effects as well as expulsion of ligand chains from the interparticle region at short distances. Such fluctuation-driven anisotropy can be significant for alkylthiol-coated gold nanoparticles, specially for longer chain lengths, under good solvent conditions. The consequences of such anisotropy for self-assembly, specially as a function of grafting density, solvent quality and at interfaces, should provide some interesting insights in future work. Our results clearly show that an isotropic two-body PMF cannot adequately describe the thermodynamics and assembly behavior of nanoparticles in this dense grafting regime and inclusion of anisotropic effects, as well as possibly many-body interactions, is necessary. Extensions of this approach to other passivated nanoparticle systems and implications for self-assembly are considered.

  10. Alfven waves in dusty plasmas with plasma particles described by anisotropic kappa distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galvao, R. A.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Juli, M. C. de

    2012-12-15

    We utilize a kinetic description to study the dispersion relation of Alfven waves propagating parallelly to the ambient magnetic field in a dusty plasma, taking into account the fluctuation of the charge of the dust particles, which is due to inelastic collisions with electrons and ions. We consider a plasma in which the velocity distribution functions of the plasma particles are modelled as anisotropic kappa distributions, study the dispersion relation for several combinations of the parameters {kappa}{sub Parallel-To} and {kappa}{sub Up-Tack }, and emphasize the effect of the anisotropy of the distributions on the mode coupling which occurs in a dusty plasma, between waves in the branch of circularly polarized waves and waves in the whistler branch.

  11. Phase-controllable spin wave generation in iron garnet by linearly polarized light pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimine, Isao; Iida, Ryugo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Satoh, Takuya; Stupakiewicz, Andrzej; Maziewski, Andrzej

    2014-07-28

    A phase-controlled spin wave was non-thermally generated in bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnet by linearly polarized light pulses. We controlled the initial phase of the spin wave continuously within a range of 180 by changing the polarization azimuth of the excitation light. The azimuth dependences of the initial phase and amplitude of the spin wave were attributed to a combination of the inverse Cotton-Mouton effect and photoinduced magnetic anisotropy. Temporally and spatially resolved spin wave propagation was observed with a CCD camera, and the waveform was in good agreement with calculations. A nonlinear effect of the spin excitation was observed for excitation fluences higher than 100 mJ/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  13. Structural and elastic anisotropy of crystals at high pressures and temperatures from quantum mechanical methods: The case of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} forsterite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erba, A. Dovesi, R.; Maul, J.; De La Pierre, M.

    2015-05-28

    We report accurate ab initio theoretical predictions of the elastic, seismic, and structural anisotropy of the orthorhombic Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} forsterite crystal at high pressures (up to 20 GPa) and temperatures (up to its melting point, 2163 K), which constitute earth’s upper mantle conditions. Single-crystal elastic stiffness constants are evaluated up to 20 GPa and their first- and second-order pressure derivatives reported. Christoffel’s equation is solved at several pressures: directional seismic wave velocities and related properties (azimuthal and polarization seismic anisotropies) discussed. Thermal structural and average elastic properties, as computed within the quasi-harmonic approximation of the lattice potential, are predicted at high pressures and temperatures: directional thermal expansion coefficients, first- and second-order pressure derivatives of the isothermal bulk modulus, and P-V-T equation-of-state. The effect on computed properties of five different functionals, belonging to three different classes of approximations, of the density functional theory is explicitly investigated.

  14. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  15. Monte Carlo determination of the low-energy constants of a spin-(1/2) Heisenberg model with spatial anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, F.-J.; Nyfeler, M.; Kaempfer, F.

    2009-07-15

    Motivated by the possible mechanism for the pinning of the electronic liquid crystal direction in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.45} as proposed by Pardini et al. [Phys. Rev. B 78, 024439 (2008)], we use the first-principles Monte Carlo method to study the spin-(1/2) Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic couplings J{sub 1} and J{sub 2} on the square lattice. In particular, the low-energy constants spin stiffness {rho}{sub s}, staggered magnetization M{sub s}, and spin wave velocity c are determined by fitting the Monte Carlo data to the predictions of magnon chiral perturbation theory. Further, the spin stiffnesses {rho}{sub s1} and {rho}{sub s2} as a function of the ratio J{sub 2}/J{sub 1} of the couplings are investigated in detail. Although we find a good agreement between our results with those obtained by the series expansion method in the weakly anisotropic regime, for strong anisotropy we observe discrepancies.

  16. Anisotropy of the relaxation of the electron spin caused by competition of the Rashba and Dresselhaus mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, A. M.; Oseptsova, V. A.; Platonov, A. V. Gurevich, A. S.; Kochereshko, V. P. Shkolnik, A. S.; Evtikhiev, V. P.; Petrov, V. V.; Dolgikh, Yu. K.; Efimov, Yu. P.; Eliseev, S. A.

    2009-07-15

    Anisotropy of the relaxation of electron spin in AlGaAs quantum wells with an asymmetric profile in the growth-axis direction is studied by the technique of optical orientation. It is demonstrated that the difference between the Hanle curves for [110] and [11-bar0] orientations does originate from the spin-relaxation anisotropy rather than the electron g-factor anisotropy. Contributions to the Hanle curves both from free and localized electrons, characterized by different lifetimes, are observed.

  17. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster: 2. Associated plasma conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; Andre, M.; Jordanova, Vania Koleva

    2016-07-19

    This is the second in a pair of papers discussing a statistical study of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves detected during 10 years (2001–2010) of Cluster observations. In the first paper, an analysis of EMIC wave properties (i.e., wave power, polarization, normal angle, and wave propagation angle) is presented in both the magnetic latitude (MLAT)-distance as well as magnetic local time (MLT)-L frames. In addition, this paper focuses on the distribution of EMIC wave-associated plasma conditions as well as two EMIC wave generation proxies (the electron plasma frequency to gyrofrequency ratio proxy and the linear theory proxy) in these samemore » frames. Based on the distributions of hot H+ anisotropy, electron and hot H+ density measurements, hot H+ parallel plasma beta, and the calculated wave generation proxies, three source regions of EMIC waves appear to exist: (1) the well-known overlap between cold plasmaspheric or plume populations with hot anisotropic ring current populations in the postnoon to dusk MLT region; (2) regions all along the dayside magnetosphere at high L shells related to dayside magnetospheric compression and drift shell splitting; and (3) off-equator regions possibly associated with the Shabansky orbits in the dayside magnetosphere.« less

  18. Millimeter-Wave Absorption as a Quality Control Tool for M-Type Hexaferrite Nanopowders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Korolev, Konstantin A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Afsar, Mohammed N.

    2013-01-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) absorption measurements have been conducted on commercial samples of large (micrometer-sized) and small (nanometer-sized) particles of BaFe12O19 and SrFe12O19 using a quasi-optical MMW spectrometer and a series of backwards wave oscillators encompassing the 30-120 GHz range. Effective anisotropy of the particles calculated from the resonant absorption frequency indicates lower overall anisotropy in the nano-particles. Due to their high magnetocrystalline anisotropy, both BaFe12O19 and SrFe12O19 are expected to have spin resonances in the 45-55 GHz range. Several of the sampled BaFe12O19 powders did not have MMW absorptions, so they were further investigated by DC magnetization and x-ray diffraction to assess magnetic behavior and structure. The samples with absent MMW absorption contained primarily iron oxides, suggesting that MMW absorption could be used for quality control in hexaferrite powder manufacture.

  19. In situ measurement of CuPt alloy ordering using strain anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    France, Ryan M.; McMahon, William E.; Kang, Joongoo; Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.

    2014-02-07

    The optical and electrical properties of many III-V alloys change with the degree of CuPt atomic ordering, which is very sensitive to growth conditions. The bulk ordered alloy is elongated along the normal to the ordered planes, and is asymmetrically strained when coherent to a cubic substrate. Here, we demonstrate in situ measurement of the anisotropic strain due to ordering using two-dimensional wafer curvature. The measurement is sensitive to bulk anisotropies, and so is complementary to other in situ measurements that are sensitive to surface anisotropies. Using ab initio calculations, we determine a maximum strain anisotropy of 0.27% between [110] and [1{sup ¯}10] when perfectly ordered single-variant GaInP{sub 2} is coherent to a (001) cubic substrate. We relate the in situ measurement of strain anisotropy on various GaInP{sub 2} samples to ex situ measurements of the order parameter to validate the measurement and confirm the capability to predict material properties. The measurement monitors change in ordering during growth, useful for quickly determining the growth condition dependence of ordering or monitoring order-disorder transitions. More generally, this measurement technique could, in principle, be used to monitor phase changes in any epitaxial system for which the strain anisotropy of the two phases differs.

  20. Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminzadeh, Fred; Sammis, Charles; Sahimi, Mohammad; Okaya, David

    2015-04-30

    The ultimate objective of the project was to develop new methodologies to characterize the northwestern part of The Geysers geothermal reservoir (Sonoma County, California). The goal is to gain a better knowledge of the reservoir porosity, permeability, fracture size, fracture spacing, reservoir discontinuities (leaky barriers) and impermeable boundaries.

  1. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  2. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, C. Miles, J. J.; Thomson, T.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  3. Structural controlled magnetic anisotropy in Heusler L1{sub 0}-MnGa epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Kangkang; Lu Erdong; Smith, Arthur R.; Knepper, Jacob W.; Yang Fengyuan

    2011-04-18

    Ferromagnetic L1{sub 0}-MnGa thin films have been epitaxially grown on GaN, sapphire, and MgO substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. Using diffraction techniques, the epitaxial relationships are determined. It is found that the crystalline orientation of the films differ due to the influence of the substrate. By comparing the magnetic anisotropy to the structural properties, a clear correlation could be established indicating that the in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy is directly determined by the crystal orientation of the film and could be controlled via selection of the substrates. This result could be helpful in tailoring magnetic anisotropy in thin films for spintronic applications.

  4. Tensile behavior and flow stress anisotropy of accumulative roll bonded Cu-Nb nanolaminates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nizolek, Thomas; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Mara, Nathan A.; Avallone, Jaclyn T.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2016-02-01

    The flow stress, ductility, and in-plane anisotropy are evaluated for bulk accumulative roll bonded copper-niobium nanolaminates with layer thicknesses ranging from 1.8 μm to 15 nm. Uniaxial tensile tests conducted parallel to the rolling direction and transverse direction demonstrate that ductility generally decreases with decreasing layer thickness; however, at 30 nm, both high strengths (1200 MPa) and significant ductility (8%) are achieved. The yield strength increases monotonically with decreasing layer thickness, consistent with the Hall-Petch relationship, and significant in-plane flow stress anisotropy is observed. As a result, Taylor polycrystal modeling is used to demonstrate that crystallographic texture is responsible formore » the in-plane anisotropy and that the effects of texture dominate even at nanoscale layer thicknesses.« less

  5. Magnetic anisotropy, damping, and interfacial spin transport in Pt/LSMO bilayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, H. K.; Barsukov, I.; Swartz, A. G.; Kim, B.; Yang, L.; Hwang, H. Y.; Krivorotov, I. N.

    2016-05-16

    In this paper, we report ferromagnetic resonance measurements of magnetic anisotropy and damping in epitaxial La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and Pt capped LSMO thin films on SrTiO3 (001) substrates. The measurements reveal large negative perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a weaker uniaxial in-plane anisotropy that are unaffected by the Pt cap. The Gilbert damping of the bare LSMO films is found to be low α = 1.9(1) × 10-3, and two-magnon scattering is determined to be significant and strongly anisotropic. The Pt cap increases the damping by 50% due to spin pumping, which is also directly detected via inverse spin Hall effect inmore » Pt. Our research demonstrates efficient spin transport across the Pt/LSMO interface.« less

  6. Electric field controlled reversible magnetic anisotropy switching studied by spin rectification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Xue, Desheng; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2014-03-10

    In this letter, spin rectification was used to study the electric field controlled dynamic magnetic properties of the multiferroic composite which is a Co stripe with induced in-plane anisotropy deposited onto a Pb(Mg{sub 1∕3}Nb{sub 2∕3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} substrate. Due to the coupling between piezoelectric and magnetoelastic effects, a reversible in-plane anisotropy switching has been realized by varying the history of the applied electric field. This merit results from the electric hysteresis of the polarization in the nonlinear piezoelectric regime, which has been proved by a butterfly type electric field dependence of the in-plane anisotropy field. Moreover, the electric field dependent effective demagnetization field and linewidth have been observed at the same time.

  7. Cosmic strings as the source of small-scale microwave background anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pogosian, Levon; Tye, S.-H. Henry; Wasserman, Ira; Wyman, Mark E-mail: tye@lepp.cornell.edu E-mail: mwyman@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2009-02-15

    Cosmic string networks generate cosmological perturbations actively throughout the history of the universe. Thus, the string sourced anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background is not affected by Silk damping as much as the anisotropy seeded by inflation. The spectrum of perturbations generated by strings does not match the observed CMB spectrum on large angular scales (l < 1000) and is bounded to contribute no more than 10% of the total power on those scales. However, when this bound is marginally saturated, the anisotropy created by cosmic strings on small angular scales l {approx}> 2000 will dominate over that created by the primary inflationary perturbations. This range of angular scales in the CMB is presently being measured by a number of experiments; their results will test this prediction of cosmic string networks soon.

  8. Measuring the Alfvénic nature of the interstellar medium: Velocity anisotropy revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Leão, I. C.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Esquivel, A.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) are strongly affected by turbulence, which shows increased anisotropy in the presence of a magnetic field. We expand upon the Esquivel and Lazarian method to estimate the Alfvén Mach number using the structure function anisotropy in velocity centroid data from Position-Position-Velocity maps. We utilize three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of fully developed turbulence, with a large range of sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers, to produce synthetic observations of velocity centroids with observational characteristics such as thermal broadening, cloud boundaries, noise, and radiative transfer effects of carbon monoxide. In addition, we investigate how the resulting anisotropy-Alfvén Mach number dependency found in Esquivel and Lazarian might change when taking the second moment of the Position-Position-Velocity cube or when using different expressions to calculate the velocity centroids. We find that the degree of anisotropy is related primarily to the magnetic field strength (i.e., Alfvén Mach number) and the line-of-sight orientation, with a secondary effect on sonic Mach number. If the line of sight is parallel to up to ≈45 deg off of the mean field direction, the velocity centroid anisotropy is not prominent enough to distinguish different Alfvénic regimes. The observed anisotropy is not strongly affected by including radiative transfer, although future studies should include additional tests for opacity effects. These results open up the possibility of studying the magnetic nature of the ISM using statistical methods in addition to existing observational techniques.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy engineering: Single-crystalline Fe films on ion eroded ripple surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liedke, M. O.; Koerner, M.; Lenz, K.; Grossmann, F.; Facsko, S.; Fassbender, J.

    2012-06-11

    We present a method to preselect the direction of an induced in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) in thin single-crystalline Fe films on MgO(001). Ion beam irradiation is used to modulate the MgO(001) surface with periodic ripples on the nanoscale. The ripple direction determines the orientation of the UMA, whereas the intrinsic cubic anisotropy of the Fe film is not affected. Thus, it is possible to superimpose an in-plane UMA with a precision of a few degrees - a level of control not reported so far that can be relevant for example in spintronics.

  10. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-24

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  11. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-24

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences – preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order – which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  12. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  13. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  14. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  15. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  16. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  17. Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leary, A. M. Keylin, V.; McHenry, M. E.; Ohodnicki, P. R.

    2015-05-07

    The use of processing techniques to create magnetic anisotropy in soft magnetic materials is a well-known method to control permeability and losses. In nanocomposite materials, field annealing below the Curie temperature results in uniaxial anisotropy energies up to ?2?kJ/m{sup 3}. Higher anisotropies up to ?10?kJ/m{sup 3} result after annealing Fe-Si compositions under stress due to residual stress in the amorphous matrix acting on body centered cubic crystals. This work describes near zero magnetostriction Co{sub 80?x?y}Fe{sub x}Mn{sub y}Nb{sub 4}B{sub 14}Si{sub 2} soft magnetic nanocomposites, where x and y?anisotropies up to ?50?kJ/m{sup 3} and improved mechanical properties with respect to Fe-Si compositions. Difference patterns measured using transmission X-ray diffraction show evidence of affine strain with respect to the stress axis.

  18. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic BackgroundRadiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorenstein, M.V.; Smoot, G.F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (0.89 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup -1/2}. The measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360 {+-} 50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2 {+-} 0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+-} 8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypothesis of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  19. Cross-correlation studies between CMB temperature anisotropies and 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooray, Asantha

    2004-09-15

    During the transition from a neutral to a fully reionized universe, scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons via free electrons leads to a new anisotropy contribution to the temperature distribution. If the reionization process is inhomogeneous and patchy, the era of reionization is also visible via brightness temperature fluctuations in the redshifted 21 cm line emission from neutral hydrogen. Since regions containing electrons and neutral hydrogen are expected to trace the same underlying density field, the two are (anti)correlated and this is expected to be reflected in the anisotropy maps via a correlation between arcminute-scale CMB temperature and the 21 cm background. In terms of the angular cross-power spectrum, unfortunately, this correlation is insignificant due to a geometric cancellation associated with second-order CMB anisotropies. The same cross correlation between ionized and neutral regions, however, can be studied using a bispectrum involving large-scale velocity field of ionized regions from the Doppler effect, arcminute-scale CMB anisotropies during reionization, and the 21 cm background. While the geometric cancellation is partly avoided, the signal-to-noise ratio related to this bispectrum is reduced due to the large cosmic variance related to velocity fluctuations traced by the Doppler effect. Unless the velocity field during reionization can be independently established, it is unlikely that the correlation information related to the relative distribution of ionized electrons and regions containing neutral hydrogen can be obtained with a combined study involving CMB and 21 cm fluctuations.

  20. Modification of structure and magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial CoFe₂O₄ films by hydrogen reduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Aiping; Poudyal, Narayan; Xiong, Jie; Liu, J. Ping; Jia, Quanxi

    2015-03-16

    Heteroepitaxial CoFe₂O₄ (CFO) thin films with different thicknesses were deposited on MgO (001) substrates. The as-deposited CFO films show a clear switching of magnetic anisotropy with increasing film thickness. The thinner films (<100 nm) show a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to the out-of-plane compressive strain. The thicker films exhibit an in-plane easy axis owing to the dominating shape anisotropy effect. The magnetostriction coefficient of CFO films is estimated to be λ[001] =-188 × 10⁻⁶. Metallic CoFe₂ films were obtained by annealing the as-deposited CFO films in forming gas (Ar 93% + H₂ 7%) at 450 °C. XRD shows that CoFe₂more » films are textured out-of-plane and aligned in-plane, owing to lattice matching between CoFe₂ and MgO substrate. TEM results indicate that as-deposited films are continuous while the annealed films exhibit a nanopore mushroom structure. The magnetic anisotropy of CoFe₂ films is dominated by the shape effect. The results demonstrate that hydrogen reduction can be effectively used to modify microstructures and physical properties of complex metal oxide materials.« less

  1. Gravitational Waves Community Lecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gravitational Waves Community Lecture Gravitational Waves Community Lecture WHEN: Sep 19, 2016 7:30 PM - 8:30 PM WHERE: Grand Ballroom at the Eldorado Hotel 309 W San Francisco St Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 USA (505) 988-4455 SPEAKER: Gabriela Gonzalez CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of New Mexico, St. John's College and Santa Fe Community College The Los Alamos National

  2. Wave Propagation Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  3. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  4. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  5. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  6. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  7. MAXIMA-1: A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy on Angular Scales of 10' to 5 degrees

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Bock, J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Ferreira, P. G.; Hanany, S.; Hristov, V. V.; Jaffe, A. H.; Lange, A. E.; Lee, A. T.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Netterfield, C. B.; Oh, S.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Stompor, R.; Winant,C. D.; Wu, J. H. P.

    2005-06-04

    We present a map and an angular power spectrum of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the first flight of MAXIMA. MAXIMA is a balloon-borne experiment with an array of 16 bolometric photometers operated at 100 mK. MAXIMA observed a 124 deg{sup 2} region of the sky with 10' resolution at frequencies of 150, 240 and 410 GHz. The data were calibrated using in-flight measurements of the CMB dipole anisotropy. A map of the CMB anisotropy was produced from three 150 and one 240 GHz photometer without need for foreground subtractions.

  8. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  9. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  10. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  11. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  13. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  14. Three-terminal magnetic tunneling junction device with perpendicular anisotropy CoFeB sensing layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honjo, H. Nebashi, R.; Tokutome, K.; Miura, S.; Sakimura, N.; Sugibayashi, T.; Fukami, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Murahata, M.; Kasai, N.; Ishihara, K.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrated read and write characteristics of a three terminal memory device with a perpendicular anisotropy-free layer of a strip of [Co/Ni] and a low-switching perpendicular-anisotropy CoFeB/MgO sensing layer. This new design of the cell results in a small cell area. The switching magnetic field of the sensing layer can be decreased by changing sputtering gas for the Ta-cap from Ar to Kr. An electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of the cross-section of the magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) revealed that the boron content in CoFeB with a Kr-sputtered Ta-cap was smaller than that with an Ar-sputtered one. A change in resistance for the MTJ was observed that corresponded to the magnetic switching of the Co/Ni wire and its magnetoresistance ratio and critical current were 90% and 0.8 mA, respectively.

  15. Impact of the modulation doping layer on the ν = 5/2 anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, X.; Pan, W.; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Tsui, D. C.

    2015-03-30

    We have carried out a systematic study of the tilted magnetic field induced anisotropy at the Landau level filling factor ν = 5/2 in a series of high quality GaAs quantum wells, where the setback distance (d) between the modulation doping layer and the GaAs quantum well is varied from 33 to 164 nm. We have observed that in the sample of the smallest d, electronic transport is anisotropic when the in-plane magnetic field (Bip) is parallel to the [1–10] crystallographic direction, but remains more or less isotropic when Bip // [110]. In contrast, in the sample of largest d,more » electronic transport is anisotropic in both crystallographic directions. Lastly, our results clearly show that the modulation doping layer plays an important role in the tilted field induced ν = 5/2 anisotropy.« less

  16. Diffusion anisotropy of poor metal solute atoms in hcp-Ti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scotti, Lucia Mottura, Alessandro

    2015-05-28

    Atom migration mechanisms influence a wide range of phenomena: solidification kinetics, phase equilibria, oxidation kinetics, precipitation of phases, and high-temperature deformation. In particular, solute diffusion mechanisms in α-Ti alloys can help explain their excellent high-temperature behaviour. The purpose of this work is to study self- and solute diffusion in hexagonal close-packed (hcp)-Ti, and its anisotropy, from first-principles using the 8-frequency model. The calculated diffusion coefficients show that diffusion energy barriers depend more on bonding characteristics of the solute rather than the size misfit with the host, while the extreme diffusion anisotropy of some solute elements in hcp-Ti is a result of the bond angle distortion.

  17. Sputtering of cobalt film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on disorder-free graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamali, Mahdi; Lv, Yang; Zhao, Zhengyang; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-10-15

    Growth of thin cobalt film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has been investigated on pristine graphene for spin logic and memory applications. By reduction of the kinetic energy of the sputtered atoms using indirect sputtered deposition, deposition induced defects in the graphene layer have been controlled. Cobalt film on graphene with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has been developed. Raman spectroscopy of the graphene surface shows very little disorder induced in the graphene by the sputtering process. In addition, upon increasing the cobalt film thickness, the disorder density increases on the graphene and saturates for thicknesses of Co layers above 1 nm. The AFM image indicates a surface roughness of about 0.86 nm. In addition, the deposited film forms a granular structure with a grain size of about 40 nm.

  18. Impact of the modulation doping layer on the ? = 5/2 anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, X.; Pan, W.; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Tsui, D. C.

    2015-03-30

    We have carried out a systematic study of the tilted magnetic field induced anisotropy at the Landau level filling factor ? = 5/2 in a series of high quality GaAs quantum wells, where the setback distance (d) between the modulation doping layer and the GaAs quantum well is varied from 33 to 164 nm. We have observed that in the sample of the smallest d, electronic transport is anisotropic when the in-plane magnetic field (Bip) is parallel to the [110] crystallographic direction, but remains more or less isotropic when Bip // [110]. In contrast, in the sample of largest d, electronic transport is anisotropic in both crystallographic directions. Lastly, our results clearly show that the modulation doping layer plays an important role in the tilted field induced ? = 5/2 anisotropy.

  19. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Ofman, L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  20. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  1. THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND INTENSITY AND ANISOTROPIES DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooray, Asantha; Gong Yan; Smidt, Joseph; Santos, Mario G.

    2012-09-01

    A fraction of the extragalactic near-infrared (near-IR) background light involves redshifted photons from the ultraviolet (UV) emission from galaxies present during reionization at redshifts above 6. The absolute intensity and the anisotropies of the near-IR background provide an observational probe of the first-light galaxies and their spatial distribution. We estimate the extragalactic background light intensity during reionization by accounting for the stellar and nebular emission from first-light galaxies. We require the UV photon density from these galaxies to generate a reionization history that is consistent with the optical depth to electron scattering from cosmic microwave background measurements. We also require the bright-end luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in our models to reproduce the measured Lyman-dropout LFs at redshifts of 6-8. The absolute intensity is about 0.1-0.4 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at the peak of its spectrum at {approx}1.1 {mu}m. We also discuss the anisotropy power spectrum of the near-IR background using a halo model to describe the galaxy distribution. We compare our predictions for the anisotropy power spectrum to existing measurements from deep near-IR imaging data from Spitzer/IRAC, Hubble/NICMOS, and AKARI. The predicted rms fluctuations at tens of arcminute angular scales are roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the existing measurements. While strong arguments have been made that the measured fluctuations do not have an origin involving faint low-redshift galaxies, we find that measurements in the literature are also incompatible with galaxies present during the era of reionization. The measured near-IR background anisotropies remain unexplained with an unknown origin.

  2. Process and apparatus for preparing textured crystalline materials using anisotropy in the paramagnetic susceptibility

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holloway, A.

    1992-01-07

    The present invention discloses a process and apparatus for forming textures in materials. The process comprises heating a material having an anisotropy in the paramagnetic or diamagnetic susceptibility within a magnetic field. The material is heated to a temperature approaching its melting point while a magnetic field of at least 10[sup 4]Oe is simultaneously applied. The process and apparatus produce highly textured bulk and elongated materials with high current densities below critical superconducting temperatures. 6 figs.

  3. Non-Gaussianity in the cosmic microwave background anisotropies at recombination in the squeezed limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolo, N.; Matarrese, S.; Riotto, A. E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2012-02-01

    We estimate analytically the second-order cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies at the recombination epoch in the squeezed limit and we deduce the contamination of the primordial local non-Gaussianity. We find that the level of contamination corresponds to f{sub NL}{sup con} = O(1) which is below the sensitivity of present experiments and smaller than the value O(5) recently claimed in the literature.

  4. Process and apparatus for preparing textured crystalline materials using anisotropy in the paramagnetic susceptibility

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holloway, Aleksey

    1992-01-07

    The present invention discloses a process and apparatus for forming textures in materials. The process comprises heating a material having an anisotropy in the paramagnetic or diamagnetic susceptibility within a magnetic field. The material is heated to a temperature approaching its melting point while a magnetic field of at least 10.sup.4 Oe is simultaneously applied. The process and apparatus produce highly textured bulk and elongated materials with high current densities below critical superconducting temperatures.

  5. Contact and Stress Anisotropies in Start-Up Flow of Colloidal Suspensions |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Contact and Stress Anisotropies in Start-Up Flow of Colloidal Suspensions Authors: Martys, N.S., Lootens, D., George, W., and H Spatiotemporal correlations in start-up flows of attractive colloids are explored by numerical simulations as a function of their volume fraction and shear rate. The suspension is first allowed to flocculate during a time tw, then the stress necessary to induce its flow is computed. We find that, at low volume fractions, the

  6. MAXIMA-1: A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave BackgroundAnisotropy on angular scales of 10' to 5 degrees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Bock, J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; deBernardis, P.; Ferreira, P.G.; Hanany, S.; Hristov, V.V.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Lee, A.T.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Netterfield, C.B.; Oh, S.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Stompor, R.; Winant,C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

    2000-10-02

    We present a map and an angular power spectrum of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the first flight of MAXIMA. MAXIMA is a balloon-borne experiment with an array of 16 bolometric photometers operated at 100 mK. MAXIMA observed a 124 deg region of the sky with 10' resolution at frequencies of 150, 240 and 410 GHz. The data were calibrated using in-flight measurements of the CMB dipole anisotropy. A map of the CMB anisotropy was produced from three 150 and one 240 GHz photometer without need for foreground subtractions. Analysis of this CMB map yields a power spectrum for the CMB anisotropy over the range 36 {le} {ell} {le} 785. The spectrum shows a peak with an amplitude of 78 {+-} 6 {mu}K at {ell} {approx_equal} 220 and an amplitude varying between {approx} 40 {mu}K and {approx} 50 {mu}K for 400 {approx}< {ell} {approx}< 785.

  7. Interfacial oxygen migration and its effect on the magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi; Feng, Chun E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Shaolong; Hua Li, Ming; Hua Yu, Guang E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Long Wu, Zheng; Yang, Feng

    2014-02-03

    This paper reports the interfacial oxygen migration effect and its induced magnetic anisotropy evolution in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt films. During depositing the MgO layer, oxygen atoms from the MgO combine with the neighboring Co atoms, leading to the formation of CoO at the Co/MgO interface. Meanwhile, the films show in-plane magnetic anisotropy (IMA). After annealing, most of the oxygen atoms in CoO migrate back to the MgO layer, resulting in obvious improvement of Co/MgO interface and the enhancement of effective Co-O orbital hybridization. These favor the evolution of magnetic anisotropy from IMA to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). The oxygen migration effect is achieved by the redox reaction at the Co/MgO interface. On the contrary, the transfer from IMA to PMA cannot be observed in Pt/Co/Pt films due to the lack of interfacial oxygen migration.

  8. Most spin-1/2 transition-metal ions do have single ion anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jia; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Xiang, Hongjun E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu; Kremer, Reinhard K.

    2014-09-28

    The cause for the preferred spin orientation in magnetic systems containing spin-1/2 transition-metal ions was explored by studying the origin of the easy-plane anisotropy of the spin-1/2 Cu{sup 2+} ions in CuCl{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, LiCuVO{sub 4}, CuCl{sub 2}, and CuBr{sub 2} on the basis of density functional theory and magnetic dipole-dipole energy calculations as well as a perturbation theory treatment of the spin-orbit coupling. We find that the spin orientation observed for these spin-1/2 ions is not caused by their anisotropic spin exchange interactions, nor by their magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, but by the spin-orbit coupling associated with their crystal-field split d-states. Our study also predicts in-plane anisotropy for the Cu{sup 2+} ions of Bi{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}. The results of our investigations dispel the mistaken belief that magnetic systems with spin-1/2 ions have no magnetic anisotropy induced by spin-orbit coupling.

  9. Manipulation of magnetic state in nanostructures by perpendicular anisotropy and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. P.; Xie, Y. L.; Chu, P.; Wang, Y. L.; Wang, Z. Q.; Gao, X. S.; Liu, J.-M.

    2014-06-28

    We investigate the transitions of spin configurations in ultrathin nanostructures by tuning the perpendicular anisotropy (K{sub z}) and out-of-plane magnetic field (H), using the Monte Carlo simulation. It is revealed that enhancing the anisotropy K{sub z} can drive the evolution of in-plane vortex state into intriguing saturated magnetization states under various H, such as the bubble domain state and quadruple-block-domain state etc. The spin configurations of these states exhibit remarkable H-dependence. In addition, the strong effects of geometry and size on the spin configurations of nanostructures are observed. In particular, a series of edged states occur in the circular disk-shaped lattices, and rich intricate saturated magnetization patterns appear in big lattices. It is suggested that the magnetic states can be manipulated by varying the perpendicular anisotropy, magnetic field, and geometry/size of the nanostructures. Furthermore, the stability (retention capacity) of the saturated magnetization states upon varying magnetic field is predicted, suggesting the potential applications of these saturated magnetization states in magnetic field-controlled data storages.

  10. Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin...

  11. Wave Star Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Star Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Star Energy Place: Denmark Zip: DK-2920 Product: Denmark-based private wave device developer. References: Wave Star Energy1...

  12. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device Title: Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic ...

  13. Analysis of stress-induced Burgers vector anisotropy in pressurized tube specimens of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steel: JLF-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.; Shibayama, T.

    1998-09-01

    A procedure for determining the Burgers vector anisotropy in irradiated ferritic steels allowing identification of all a<100> and all a/2<111> dislocations in a region of interest is applied to a pressurized tube specimen of JLF-1 irradiated at 430 C to 14.3 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) or 61 dpa. Analysis of micrographs indicates large anisotropy in Burgers vector populations develop during irradiation creep.

  14. Elgen Wave | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elgen Wave Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elgen Wave Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.elgenwave.com This company is listed in the Marine and...

  15. Magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin Fe films on GaAs, ZnSe, and Ge (001) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tivakornsasithorn, K.; Liu, X.; Li, X.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J. K.

    2014-07-28

    We discuss magnetic anisotropy parameters of ferromagnetic body-centered cubic (bcc) Fe films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on (001) substrates of face-centered cubic (fcc) GaAs, ZnSe, and Ge. High-quality MBE growth of these metal/semiconductor combinations is made possible by the fortuitous atomic relationship between the bcc Fe and the underlying fcc semiconductor surfaces, resulting in excellent lattice match. Magnetization measurements by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) indicate that the Fe films grown on (001) GaAs surfaces are characterized by a very strong uniaxial in-plane anisotropy; those grown on (001) Ge surfaces have a fully cubic anisotropy; and Fe films grown on ZnSe represent an intermediate case between the preceding two combinations. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements carried out on these three systems provide a strikingly clear quantitative picture of the anisotropy parameters, in excellent agreement with the SQUID results. Based on these results, we propose that the observed anisotropy of cubic Fe films grown in this way results from the surface reconstruction of the specific semiconductor substrate on which the Fe film is deposited. These results suggest that, by controlling surface reconstruction of the substrate during the MBE growth, one may be able to engineer the magnetic anisotropy in Fe, and possibly also in other MBE-grown ferromagnetic films.

  16. Fermi-LAT γ-ray anisotropy and intensity explained by unresolved radio-loud active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauro, Mattia Di; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M. E-mail: alessandro.cuoco@to.infn.it E-mail: jsg@tapir.caltech.edu

    2014-11-01

    Radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) are expected to contribute substantially to both the intensity and anisotropy of the isotropic γ-ray background (IGRB). In turn, the measured properties of the IGRB can be used to constrain the characteristics of proposed contributing source classes. We consider individual subclasses of radio-loud AGN, including low-, intermediate-, and high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and misaligned AGN. Using updated models of the γ-ray luminosity functions of these populations, we evaluate the energy-dependent contribution of each source class to the intensity and anisotropy of the IGRB. We find that collectively radio-loud AGN can account for the entirety of the IGRB intensity and anisotropy as measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Misaligned AGN provide the bulk of the measured intensity but a negligible contribution to the anisotropy, while high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects provide the dominant contribution to the anisotropy. In anticipation of upcoming measurements with the Fermi-LAT and the forthcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array, we predict the anisotropy in the broader energy range that will be accessible to future observations.

  17. Formation of electron kappa distributions due to interactions with parallel propagating whistler waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, X. Lu, Q.; Mengcheng National Geophysical Observatory, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026

    2014-02-15

    In space plasmas, charged particles are frequently observed to possess a high-energy tail, which is often modeled by a kappa-type distribution function. In this work, the formation of the electron kappa distribution in generation of parallel propagating whistler waves is investigated using fully nonlinear particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A previous research concluded that the bi-Maxwellian character of electron distributions is preserved in PIC simulations. We now demonstrate that for interactions between electrons and parallel propagating whistler waves, a non-Maxwellian high-energy tail can be formed, and a kappa distribution can be used to fit the electron distribution in time-asymptotic limit. The ?-parameter is found to decrease with increasing initial temperature anisotropy or decreasing ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency. The results might be helpful to understanding the origin of electron kappa distributions observed in space plasmas.

  18. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  19. Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave...

  20. ocean wave energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wave energy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  1. Charge Density Wave Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The

  2. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of data from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.

  3. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of datamore » from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.« less

  4. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; Andr, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (20012010) of data from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.

  5. Ocean current wave interaction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.G.

    1980-09-20

    A numerical model has been developed to incorporate refraction of ocean surface gravity waves by major ocean currents. The model is initialized with directional wave spectra and verified with aircraft synthetic aperture radar X band spectra, laser profilometer spectra, and pitch and roll buoy data. Data collected during the Marineland test experiment are used as surface truth observations for the wave-current study. Evidence of Gulf Stream refraction and trapping of surface waves as well as caustics in the current is shown and modeled assuming a nonuniform Gulf Stream distribution. Frequency and directional resolution of the wave spectral distribution and the current refraction patterns illustrates the need for further study of ocean current-wave interaction in wave refraction studies.

  6. Wave-function functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan Xiaoyin; Slamet, Marlina; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-15

    We extend our prior work on the construction of variational wave functions {psi} that are functionals of functions {chi}:{psi}={psi}[{chi}] rather than simply being functions. In this manner, the space of variations is expanded over those of traditional variational wave functions. In this article we perform the constrained search over the functions {chi} chosen such that the functional {psi}[{chi}] satisfies simultaneously the constraints of normalization and the exact expectation value of an arbitrary single- or two-particle Hermitian operator, while also leading to a rigorous upper bound to the energy. As such the wave function functional is accurate not only in the region of space in which the principal contributions to the energy arise but also in the other region of the space represented by the Hermitian operator. To demonstrate the efficacy of these ideas, we apply such a constrained search to the ground state of the negative ion of atomic hydrogen H{sup -}, the helium atom He, and its positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+}. The operators W whose expectations are obtained exactly are the sum of the single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i{delta}}(r{sub i}), W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i{nabla}i}{sup 2}, and the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|. Comparisons with the method of Lagrangian multipliers and of other constructions of wave-function functionals are made. Finally, we present further insights into the construction of wave-function functionals by studying a previously proposed construction of functionals {psi}[{chi}] that lead to the exact expectation of arbitrary Hermitian operators. We discover that analogous to the solutions of the Schroedinger equation, there exist {psi}[{chi}] that are unphysical in that they lead to singular values for the expectations. We also explain the origin of the singularity.

  7. WAVE DELAYING STRUCTURE FOR RECTANGULAR WAVE-GUIDES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Dain, J.

    1956-11-13

    This patent relates to wave-guides and in particular describes wave delaying structure located within a wave-guide. The disclosed wave-guide has an elongated fiat metal sheet arranged in a central plane of the guide and formed with a series of transverse inductive slots such that each face presents an inductive impedance to the guide. The sheet is thickened in the area between slots to increase the self capacity of the slots. Experimental results indicate that in a wave-guide loaded in accordance with the invention the guided wavelength changes more slowly as the air wavelength is changed than the guided wavelength does in wave-guides loaded by means of corrugations.

  8. ON THE ANISOTROPY OF NUCLEI MID-INFRARED RADIATION IN NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Huan; Wang, JunXian; Liu, Teng E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-01-20

    In the center of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the dusty torus absorbs the radiation from the central engine and reemits in mid-infrared (MIR). Observations have detected moderate anisotropy in the dust MIR emission, in the way that type 1 AGNs (type1s) are mildly brighter in MIR comparing with type 2 sources (type2s). However, type1s and type2s were found to follow statistically the same tight MIR-hard X-ray correlation, suggesting that the MIR emission is highly isotropic assuming that the hard X-ray radiation is inclination independent. We argue that this discrepancy could be solved considering that the hard X-ray emission in AGNs is also mildly anisotropic, as we recently discovered. To verify this diagram, we compare the subarcsecond 12 μm flux densities of type1s and type2s using the [O IV] λ25.89 μm emission line as an isotropic luminosity indicator. We find that on average type1s are brighter in nuclei 12 μm radiation by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 than type2s at given [O IV] λ25.89 μm luminosities, confirming the mild anisotropy of the nuclei 12 μm emission. We show that the anisotropy of the 12 μm emission we detected is in good agreement with radiative transfer models of clumpy tori. The fact that type1s and type2s follow the same tight MIR-hard X-ray correlation instead supports that both the MIR emission and hard X-ray emission in AGNs are mildly anisotropic.

  9. Dipole anisotropy of galaxy distribution: Does the CMB rest frame exist in the local universe?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Yousuke; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Takada, Masahiro

    2010-08-15

    The peculiar motion of the Earth causes a dipole anisotropy modulation in the distant galaxy distribution due to the aberration effect. However, the amplitude and angular direction of the effect is not necessarily the same as those of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole anisotropy due to the growth of cosmic structures. In other words exploring the aberration effect may give us a clue to the horizon-scale physics perhaps related to the cosmic acceleration. In this paper we develop a method to explore the dipole angular modulation from the pixelized galaxy data on the sky, properly taking into account the covariances due to the shot noise and the intrinsic galaxy clustering contamination as well as the partial sky coverage. We applied the method to the galaxy catalogs constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 data. After constructing the four galaxy catalogs that are different in the ranges of magnitudes and photometric redshifts to study possible systematics, we found that the most robust sample against systematics indicates no dipole anisotropy in the galaxy distribution. This finding is consistent with the expectation from the concordance {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model. Finally, we argue that an almost full-sky galaxy survey such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope may allow for a significant detection of the aberration effect of the CMB dipole having the precision of constraining the angular direction to {approx}20 deg in radius. Assuming a hypothetical Large Synoptic Survey Telescope galaxy survey, we find that this method can confirm or reject the result implied from a stacked analysis of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect of X-ray luminous clusters in Kashlinsky et al. (2008, 2009) if the implied cosmic bulk flow is not extended out to the horizon.

  10. Cosmological and astrophysical parameter measurements with 21-cm anisotropies during the era of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Mario G.; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-10-15

    We study the prospects for extracting cosmological and astrophysical parameters from the low radio frequency 21-cm background due to the spin-flip transition of neutral hydrogen during and prior to the reionization of the Universe. We make use of the angular power spectrum of 21-cm anisotropies, which exists due to inhomogeneities in the neutral hydrogen density field, the gas temperature field, the gas velocity field, and the spatial distribution of the Lyman-{alpha} intensity field associated with first luminous sources that emit UV photons. We extract parameters that describe both the underlying mass power spectrum and the global cosmology, as well as a set of simplified astrophysical parameters that connect fluctuations in the dark matter to those that govern 21-cm fluctuations. We also marginalize over a model for the foregrounds at low radio frequencies. In this general description, we find large degeneracies between cosmological parameters and the astrophysical parameters, though such degeneracies are reduced when strong assumptions are made with respect to the spin temperature relative to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature or when complicated sources of anisotropy in the brightness temperature are ignored. Some of the degeneracies between cosmological and astrophysical parameters are broken when 21-cm anisotropy measurements are combined with information from the CMB, such as the temperature and the polarization measurements with Planck. While the overall improvement on the cosmological parameter estimates is not significant when measurements from first-generation interferometers are combined with Planck, such a combination can measure astrophysical parameters such as the ionization fraction in several redshift bins with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Tunable giant magnetic anisotropy in amorphous SmCo thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnus, F.; Moubah, R.; Roos, A. H.; Kapaklis, V.; Hjoervarsson, B.; Andersson, G.; Kruk, A.; Hase, T.

    2013-04-22

    SmCo thin films have been grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature with a composition of 2-35 at. % Sm. Films with 5 at. % or higher Sm are amorphous and smooth. A giant tunable uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy is induced in the films which peaks in the composition range 11-22 at. % Sm. This cross-over behavior is not due to changes in the atomic moments but rather the local configuration changes. The excellent layer perfection combined with highly tunable magnetic properties make these films important for spintronics applications.

  12. CoxC nanorod magnets: Highly magnetocrystalline anisotropy with lower Curie temperature for potential applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Gendy, AA; Almugaiteeb, T; Carpenter, EE

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic CoxC nanorods with larger magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 5 x 10(5) J/m(3) as well as larger coercivity and lower Curie temperature are introduced. The particles have an average diameter of 8 nm and shows three different magnetic behaviors. The sample shows ferromagnetism up to 400 K, superparamagnetism at temperature > 400 K and

  13. Stabilization of the filamentation instability and the anisotropy of the background plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bret, A.; Deutsch, C.

    2006-02-15

    The interaction of a relativistic electron beam with an anisotropic Maxwellian plasma is investigated, with a focus on the stabilization condition for the filamentation instability. It is found that this condition is very sensitive to the anisotropy degree of the background plasma so that the investigation of the beam instability may not be easily decoupled from the state of the background plasma in typical fusion conditions. Furthermore, regardless of the plasma isotropy, filamentation can no longer be suppressed when the beam density exceeds a threshold value that is determined.

  14. Magnetic soliton transport over topological spin texture in chiral helimagnet with strong easy-plane anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, A. B.; Kishine, Jun-ichiro; Bostrem, I. G.; Ovchinnikov, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    We show the existence of an isolated soliton excitation over the topological ground-state configuration in chiral helimagnet with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moryia exchange and the strong easy-plane anisotropy. The magnetic field perpendicular to the helical axis stabilizes the kink crystal state which plays a role of ''topological protectorate'' for the traveling soliton with a definite handedness. To find new soliton solution, we use the Baecklund transformation technique. It is pointed out that the traveling soliton carries the magnon density and a magnetic soliton transport may be realized.

  15. Unidirectional anisotropy in the spin pumping voltage in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilela-Leao, L. H.; Salvador, C.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2011-09-05

    Detailed measurements of the dc voltage generated in a thin Pt layer deposited on films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) have been carried out to study the spin pumping effect produced by magnetostatic (MS) modes excited by a microwave field. In relatively thick YIG films the modes are far apart so that one can identify clearly the spin pumping voltage in V{sub SP} produced by each MS mode. We have discovered that when the sputter deposition of the thin Pt layer is made on the YIG film magnetized by a static magnetic field, V{sub SP} exhibits a strong unidirectional anisotropy.

  16. Current induced perpendicular-magnetic-anisotropy racetrack memory with magnetic field assistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Klein, J.-O.; Chappert, C.; Ravelosona, D.; Zhao, W. S.

    2014-01-20

    High current density is indispensable to shift domain walls (DWs) in magnetic nanowires, which limits the using of racetrack memory (RM) for low power and high density purposes. In this paper, we present perpendicular-magnetic-anisotropy (PMA) Co/Ni RM with global magnetic field assistance, which lowers the current density for DW motion. By using a compact model of PMA RM and 40 nm design kit, we perform mixed simulation to validate the functionality of this structure and analyze its density potential. Stochastic DW motion behavior has been taken into account and statistical Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out to evaluate its reliability performance.

  17. Azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation in grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Gangadhar Tiwari, M. K.; Singh, A. K.; Ghosh, Haranath

    2015-06-24

    The Compton and elastic scattering radiations are the major contributor to the spectral background of an x-ray fluorescence spectrum, which eventually limits the element detection sensitivities of the technique to µg/g (ppm) range. In the present work, we provide a detail mathematical descriptions and show that how polarization properties of the synchrotron radiation influence the spectral background in the x-ray fluorescence technique. We demonstrate our theoretical understandings through experimental observations using total x-ray fluorescence measurements on standard reference materials. Interestingly, the azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation is shown to have a vital role on the significance of the x-ray fluorescence detection sensitivities.

  18. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  19. Spin Wave Genie

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce themore » time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.« less

  20. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Nearshore Wave Propagation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Converter Effects on Nearshore Wave Propagation Jesse Roberts 1 , Grace Chang *2 , Craig Jones *3 Sandia National Laboratories 1515 Eubank SE, Albuquerque, NM 87123 USA 1...

  1. Conversion of borehole Stoneley waves to channel waves in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the mode conversion of borehole Stoneley waves to stratigraphically guided channel waves was discovered in data from a crosswell acoustic experiment conducted between wells penetrating thin coal strata located near Rifle, Colorado. Traveltime moveout observations show that borehole Stoneley waves, excited by a transmitter positioned at substantial distances in one well above and below a coal stratum at 2025 m depth, underwent partial conversion to a channel wave propagating away from the well through the coal. In an adjacent well the channel wave was detected at receiver locations within the coal, and borehole Stoneley waves, arising from a second partial conversion of channel waves, were detected at locations above and below the coal. The observed channel wave is inferred to be the third-higher Rayleigh mode based on comparison of the measured group velocity with theoretically derived dispersion curves. The identification of the mode conversion between borehole and stratigraphically guided waves is significant because coal penetrated by multiple wells may be detected without placing an acoustic transmitter or receiver within the waveguide. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Contribution of individual interfaces in the MgO/Co/Pd trilayer to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy upon annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Minseok; Kim, Sanghoon; Ko, Jungho; Hong, Jongill

    2015-03-09

    The contribution of each interface of the MgO/Co/Pd trilayer to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) was studied by changing chemical and crystalline structures through annealing. We found that volumetric anisotropy in the MgO/Co/Pd trilayer was significantly increased due to enhanced magnetoelastic anisotropy caused by stress built up most likely at the MgO/Co interface during annealing. When the trilayer was annealed at 400 °C, the alloy formation at the Co/Pd interface additionally increased the volumetric anisotropy. Our x-ray magnetic circular dichroism study supported that those structural modifications led to an increase in the orbital moment through spin-orbit coupling (SOC) along the film normal two times larger than that of the as-deposited trilayer, thereby enhancing PMA greatly. Our experimental results prove that the Co/Pd interface, rather than the MgO/Co interface, plays an essential role in inducing strong PMA in the trilayer. The precise investigation of annealing effect on both volumetric and interfacial anisotropies can provide a methodological solution to improve the SOC of the trilayer that can serve as the core unit of spintronic devices.

  3. Experimental evidence for the formation of CoFe2C phase with colossal magnetocrystalline-anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Gendy, AA; Bertino, M; Clifford, D; Qian, MC; Khanna, SN; Carpenter, EE

    2015-05-25

    Attainment of magnetic order in nanoparticles at room temperature is an issue of critical importance for many different technologies. For ordinary ferromagnetic materials, a reduction in size leads to decreased magnetic anisotropy and results in superparamagnetic relaxations. If, instead, anisotropy could be enhanced at reduced particle sizes, then it would be possible to attain stable magnetic order at room temperature. Herein, we provide experimental evidence substantiating the synthesis of a cobalt iron carbide phase (CoFe2C) of nanoparticles. Structural characterization of the CoFe2C carbide phase was performed by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy electron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction was also performed as a complimentary analysis. Magnetic characterization of the carbide phase revealed a blocking temperature, TB, of 790K for particles with a domain size as small as 5 +/- 1 nm. The particles have magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 4.662 +/- 10 6 J/m(3), which is ten times larger than that of Co nanoparticles. Such colossal anisotropy leads to thermally stable long range magnetic order. Moreover, the thermal stability constant is much larger than that of the commonly used FePt nanoparticles. With thermal stability and colossal anisotropy, the CoFe2C nanoparticles have huge potential for enhanced magnetic data storage devices. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  4. Experimental evidence for the formation of CoFe{sub 2}C phase with colossal magnetocrystalline-anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Gendy, Ahmed A. E-mail: ecarpenter2@vcu.edu; Bertino, Massimo; Qian, Meichun; Khanna, Shiv N. E-mail: ecarpenter2@vcu.edu; Clifford, Dustin; Carpenter, Everett E. E-mail: ecarpenter2@vcu.edu

    2015-05-25

    Attainment of magnetic order in nanoparticles at room temperature is an issue of critical importance for many different technologies. For ordinary ferromagnetic materials, a reduction in size leads to decreased magnetic anisotropy and results in superparamagnetic relaxations. If, instead, anisotropy could be enhanced at reduced particle sizes, then it would be possible to attain stable magnetic order at room temperature. Herein, we provide experimental evidence substantiating the synthesis of a cobalt iron carbide phase (CoFe{sub 2}C) of nanoparticles. Structural characterization of the CoFe{sub 2}C carbide phase was performed by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy electron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction was also performed as a complimentary analysis. Magnetic characterization of the carbide phase revealed a blocking temperature, T{sub B}, of 790?K for particles with a domain size as small as 5??1?nm. The particles have magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 4.6??2 10{sup 6?}J/m{sup 3}, which is ten times larger than that of Co nanoparticles. Such colossal anisotropy leads to thermally stable long range magnetic order. Moreover, the thermal stability constant is much larger than that of the commonly used FePt nanoparticles. With thermal stability and colossal anisotropy, the CoFe{sub 2}C nanoparticles have huge potential for enhanced magnetic data storage devices.

  5. Harnessing Energy from Ocean Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmann, Marcus

    2015-05-06

    Berkeley Lab scientist Marcus Lehmann, a member of the Lab's Cyclotron Road cohort, discusses his research on harnessing energy from ocean waves.

  6. Wave energy and intertidal productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, E.G. Jr.; Paine, R.T.; Quinn, J.F.; Suchanek, T.H.

    1987-03-01

    In the northern Pacific, intertidal zones of the most wave-beaten shores receive more energy from breaking waves than from the sun. Despite severe mortality from winter storms, communities at some wave-beaten sites produce an extraordinary quantity of dry matter per unit area of shore per year. At wave-beaten sites of Tatoosh Island, WA, sea palms, Postelsia palmaeformis, can produce > 10 kg of dry matter, or 1.5 x 10/sup 8/ J, per m/sup 2/ in a good year. Extraordinarily productive organisms such as Postelsia are restricted to wave-beaten sites. Intertidal organisms cannot transform wave energy into chemical energy, as photosynthetic plants transform solar energy, nor can intertidal organisms harness wave energy. Nonetheless, wave energy enhances the productivity of intertidal organisms. On exposed shores, waves increase the capacity of resident algae to acquire nutrients and use sunlight, augment the competitive ability of productive organism, and protect intertidal residents by knocking away their enemies or preventing them from feeding.

  7. Wave | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing...

  8. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  9. Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveBasin&oldid596392" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  10. Increased magnetocrystalline anisotropy in epitaxial Fe-Co-C thin films with spontaneous strain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichel, L. Kauffmann-Weiss, S.; Schultz, L.; Giannopoulos, G.; Niarchos, D.; Hoffmann, M.; Pohl, D.; Oswald, S.; Fähler, S.; Edström, A.; Rusz, J.

    2014-12-07

    Rare earth free alloys are in focus of permanent magnet research since the accessibility of the elements needed for nowadays conventional magnets is limited. Tetragonally strained iron-cobalt (Fe-Co) has attracted large interest as promising candidate due to theoretical calculations. In experiments, however, the applied strain quickly relaxes with increasing film thickness and hampers stabilization of a strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy. In our study, we show that already 2 at. % of carbon substantially reduces the lattice relaxation leading to the formation of a spontaneously strained phase with 3% tetragonal distortion. In these strained (Fe{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}){sub 0.98}C{sub 0.02} films, a magnetocrystalline anisotropy above 0.4 MJ/m{sup 3} is observed while the large polarization of 2.1 T is maintained. Compared to binary Fe-Co, this is a remarkable improvement of the intrinsic magnetic properties. In this paper, we relate our experimental work to theoretical studies of strained Fe-Co-C and find a very good agreement.

  11. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoica, Grigoreta M [ORNL; Stoica, Alexandru Dan [ORNL; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Ma, Dong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  12. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization ofmore » anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.« less

  13. Joint perpendicular anisotropy and strong interlayer exchange coupling in systems with thin vanadium spacers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devolder, T. Le Goff, A.; Eimer, S.; Adam, J.-P.

    2015-04-28

    We study the influence of the insertion of a vanadium spacer layer between an FeCoB layer and a [Co/Ni] multilayer in an MgO substrate-based system mimicking the reference system of a perpendicular anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction. The anisotropy of the [Co/Ni] multilayer gradually improves with the vanadium thicknesses t, up to an optimized state for t = 8 Å, with little influence of the thermal annealing. The interlayer exchange coupling is ferromagnetic and very strong for t≤6 Å. It can be adjusted by thermal treatment at t = 8 Å from no coupling in the as-grown state to more than 2 mJ/m{sup 2} after 250 °C annealing. For this spacer thickness, the magnetic properties are consistent with the occurrence of a bcc (001) to an fcc (111) crystalline structure transition at the vanadium spacer. The remaining interlayer exchange coupling at t = 8 Å is still substantially higher than the one formerly obtained with a Tantalum spacer, which holds promise for further optimization of the reference layers of tunnel junctions meant for magnetic random access memories.

  14. Magnetic anisotropies in epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GaAs(100) patterned structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, W. Zhang, D.; Yuan, S. J.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Wong, P. K. J.; Wu, J.; Xu, Y. B.

    2014-10-15

    Previous studies on epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} rings in the context of spin-transfer torque effect have revealed complicated and undesirable domain structures, attributed to the intrinsic fourfold magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the ferrite. In this Letter, we report a viable solution to this problem, utilizing a 6-nm-thick epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin film on GaAs(100), where the fourfold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is negligible. We demonstrate that in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} planar wires patterned from our thin film, such a unique magnetic anisotropy system has been preserved, and relatively simple magnetic domain configurations compared to those previous reports can be obtained.

  15. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1–xTx)N (T = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1–xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane→easy axis→easy plane→easy axis when progressing from T = Mn → Fe → Co → Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.more » As a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.« less

  16. Tunable exchange bias-like effect in patterned hard-soft two-dimensional lateral composites with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hierro-Rodriguez, A. Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Martín, J. I.; Alameda, J. M.; Teixeira, J. M.; Vélez, M.

    2014-09-08

    Patterned hard-soft 2D magnetic lateral composites have been fabricated by e-beam lithography plus dry etching techniques on sputter-deposited NdCo{sub 5} thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Their magnetic behavior is strongly thickness dependent due to the interplay between out-of-plane anisotropy and magnetostatic energy. Thus, the spatial modulation of thicknesses leads to an exchange coupled system with hard/soft magnetic regions in which rotatable anisotropy of the thicker elements provides an extra tool to design the global magnetic behavior of the patterned lateral composite. Kerr microscopy studies (domain imaging and magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry) reveal that the resulting hysteresis loops exhibit a tunable exchange bias-like shift that can be switched on/off by the applied magnetic field.

  17. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P

    2011-06-17

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrativemore » values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.« less

  18. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li 2 ( Li 1 - x T x ) N ( T = Mn , Fe , Co , and Ni )

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-01

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li?(Li1-xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane?easy axis?easy plane?easy axis when progressing from T = Mn ? Fe ? Co ? Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.moreThe calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.less

  19. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1xTx)N(T=Mn,Fe,Co,andNi)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane?easy axis?easy plane?easy axis when progressing from T = Mn ? Fe ? Co ? Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.moreAs a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.less

  20. ION HEATING IN INHOMOGENEOUS EXPANDING SOLAR WIND PLASMA: THE ROLE OF PARALLEL AND OBLIQUE ION-CYCLOTRON WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozak, N.; Ofman, L.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-01-20

    Remote sensing observations of coronal holes show that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic. In-situ observations of fast solar wind streams provide direct evidence for turbulent Alfvén wave spectrum, left-hand polarized ion-cyclotron waves, and He{sup ++} - proton drift in the solar wind plasma, which can produce temperature anisotropies by resonant absorption and perpendicular heating of the ions. Furthermore, the solar wind is expected to be inhomogeneous on decreasing scales approaching the Sun. We study the heating of solar wind ions in inhomogeneous plasma with a 2.5D hybrid code. We include the expansion of the solar wind in an inhomogeneous plasma background, combined with the effects of a turbulent wave spectrum of Alfvénic fluctuations and initial ion-proton drifts. We study the influence of these effects on the perpendicular ion heating and cooling and on the spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations in the inhomogeneous background wind. We find that inhomogeneities in the plasma lead to enhanced heating compared to the homogenous solar wind, and the generation of significant power of oblique waves in the solar wind plasma. The cooling effect due to the expansion is not significant for super-Alfvénic drifts, and is diminished further when we include an inhomogeneous background density. We reproduce the ion temperature anisotropy seen in observations and previous models, which is present regardless of the perpendicular cooling due to solar wind expansion. We conclude that small scale inhomogeneities in the inner heliosphere can significantly affect resonant wave ion heating.

  1. Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yi-Chiuan; Chen, Shyan-Shiou; Yuan, Juan-Ming

    2014-04-15

    Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

  2. Wave energy absorber mountable on wave-facing structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, H.

    1983-09-13

    A wave energy absorber comprising a caisson mountable on the seaside surface of an existing breakwater or coastal embankment, which caisson has a water chamber with an open side and a rear wall facing the open side. The distance from the open side to the rear wall is longer than one quarter of a wavelength L /SUB c/ in the water chamber so as to generate a standing wave in the water chamber with a node of the standing wave at a distance L /SUB c/ /4 from the rear wall toward the open side. A wave power turbine impeller is pivotally supported in the caisson at the node position, the impeller rotating in only one direction, whereby wave energy is absorbed by the impeller for further conversion into electric or thermal energy. The caisson itself can also be utilized as a breakwater or an embankment.

  3. Marine pipeline dynamic response to waves from directional wave spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambrakos, K.F.

    1982-07-01

    A methodology has been developed to calculate the dynamic probabilistic movement and resulting stresses for marine pipelines subjected to storm waves. A directional wave spectrum is used with a Fourier series expansion to simulate short-crested waves and calculate their loads on the pipeline. The pipeline displacements resulting from these loads are solutions to the time-dependent beam-column equation which also includes the soil resistance as external loading. The statistics of the displacements for individual waves are combined with the wave statistics for a given period of time, e.g. pipeline lifetime, to generate probabilistic estimates for net pipeline movement. On the basis of displacements for specified probability levels the pipeline configuration is obtained from which pipeline stresses can be estimated using structural considerations, e.g. pipeline stiffness, end restraints, etc.

  4. Relativistic electron scattering by magnetosonic waves: Effects of discrete wave emission and high wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we study relativistic electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We compare results of test particle simulations and the quasi-linear theory for different spectra of waves to investigate how a fine structure of the wave emission can influence electron resonant scattering. We show that for a realistically wide distribution of wave normal angles θ (i.e., when the dispersion δθ≥0.5{sup °}), relativistic electron scattering is similar for a wide wave spectrum and for a spectrum consisting in well-separated ion cyclotron harmonics. Comparisons of test particle simulations with quasi-linear theory show that for δθ>0.5{sup °}, the quasi-linear approximation describes resonant scattering correctly for a large enough plasma frequency. For a very narrow θ distribution (when δθ∼0.05{sup °}), however, the effect of a fine structure in the wave spectrum becomes important. In this case, quasi-linear theory clearly fails in describing accurately electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We also study the effect of high wave amplitudes on relativistic electron scattering. For typical conditions in the earth's radiation belts, the quasi-linear approximation cannot accurately describe electron scattering for waves with averaged amplitudes >300 pT. We discuss various applications of the obtained results for modeling electron dynamics in the radiation belts and in the Earth's magnetotail.

  5. Shear wave transducer for boreholes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, N.H.

    1984-08-23

    A technique and apparatus is provided for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data are used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  6. Compressive passive millimeter wave imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Liao, Shaolin; Elmer, Thomas W; Koehl, Eugene R; Heifetz, Alexander; Raptis, Apostolos C

    2015-01-27

    A compressive scanning approach for millimeter wave imaging and sensing. A Hadamard mask is positioned to receive millimeter waves from an object to be imaged. A subset of the full set of Hadamard acquisitions is sampled. The subset is used to reconstruct an image representing the object.

  7. Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape-off layer of NSTX and NSTX-U Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full wave simulations of fast wave heating...

  8. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  9. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Bakulin, Andrey

    2009-10-13

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  10. Integrated coherent matter wave circuits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryu, C.; Boshier, M. G.

    2015-09-21

    An integrated coherent matter wave circuit is a single device, analogous to an integrated optical circuit, in which coherent de Broglie waves are created and then launched into waveguides where they can be switched, divided, recombined, and detected as they propagate. Applications of such circuits include guided atom interferometers, atomtronic circuits, and precisely controlled delivery of atoms. We report experiments demonstrating integrated circuits for guided coherent matter waves. The circuit elements are created with the painted potential technique, a form of time-averaged optical dipole potential in which a rapidly moving, tightly focused laser beam exerts forces on atoms through theirmoreelectric polarizability. Moreover, the source of coherent matter waves is a BoseEinstein condensate (BEC). Finally, we launch BECs into painted waveguides that guide them around bends and form switches, phase coherent beamsplitters, and closed circuits. These are the basic elements that are needed to engineer arbitrarily complex matter wave circuitry.less

  11. Anisotropy in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films as observed using polarized FTIR-ATR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, J.D.; Gedvilas, L.M.; Crandall, R.S.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B.P.; Mahan, A.H.; Reedy, R.; Matson, R.J.

    1999-07-01

    The authors used polarized attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements together with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational spectra of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-SiH{sub x}) films 0.5--1.0 microns in thickness. They deposited the films using hot-wire or plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods (HWCVD or PECVD, respectively) on crystalline silicon and cadmium telluride substrates. The ATR technique gave a spectral range from 2,100--400 cm{sup {minus}1}, although the Si-H wagging mode absorption band at 640 cm{sup {minus}1} was somewhat distorted in the a-SiH{sub x}/Si samples by impurity and lattice absorption in the silicon ATR substrates. They report the identification of a Si-O-C impurity band with maximum intensity at 1,240--1,230 cm{sup {minus}1}. The assignment of this band to a Si-O-C vibration is supported by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. The polarized FTIR-ATR spectra of HWCVD and PECVD a-SiH{sub x} films on <111> Si ATR substrates show that the impurity dipoles are oriented strongly parallel to the film growth direction. The wagging mode absorbance band is more intense in the film plane. This trend is less pronounced for the Si-H stretching vibrations. These observations are consistent with some degree of anisotropy or medium-range order in the films. The anisotropy in the Si-H bands may be related to residual stress in the films. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses of the samples offer additional evidence of bulk structural anisotropy in the a-SiH{sub x}/Si films. However, the Si-O-C impurity band was not observed in the polarized ATR-FTIR spectra of the a-SiH{sub x}/CdTe samples, thus indicating that the Si substrates influence formation of the impurity in the a-SiH{sub x}/Si films.

  12. Anisotropy in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films as Observed Using Polarized FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, J. D.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Crandall, R. S.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Reedy, R.; Matson, R. J.

    1999-05-14

    We used polarized attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements together with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational spectra of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-SiH{sub x}) films 0.5-1.0 microns in thickness. We deposited the films using hot-wire or plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods (HWCVD or PECVD, respectively) on crystalline silicon and cadmium telluride substrates. Our ATR technique gave a spectral range from 2100-400 cm{sup -1}, although the Si-H wagging mode absorption band at 640 cm{sup -1} was somewhat distorted in the a-SiHx/Si samples by impurity and lattice absorption in the silicon ATR substrates. We report the identification of a Si-O-C impurity band with maximum intensity at 1240-1230 cm{sup -1}. The assignment of this band to a Si-O-C vibration is supported by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. Our polarized FTIR-ATR spectra of HWCVD and PECVD a-SiH{sub x} films on <111> Si ATR substrates show that the impurity dipoles ar e oriented strongly parallel to the film growth direction. The wagging mode absorbance band is more intense in the film plane. This trend is less pronounced for the Si-H stretching vibrations. These observations are consistent with some degree of anisotropy or medium-range order in the films. The anisotropy in the Si-H bands may be related to residual stress in the films. Our scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses of the samples offer additional evidence of bulk structural anisotropy in the a-SiH{sub x}/Si films. However, the Si-O-C impurity band was not observed in the polarized ATR-FTIR spectra of the a-SiH{sub x}/CdTe samples, thus indicating that the Si substrates influence formation of the impurity in the a-SiH{sub x}/Si films.

  13. MHK Technologies/C Wave | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    homepage C Wave.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization C Wave Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Description The C Wave...

  14. C Wave Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: C-Wave Ltd Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: SO17 1BJ Product: C-Wave is developing an innovative wave power technology using a unique...

  15. Mechanism of tailored magnetic anisotropy in amorphous Co{sub 68}Fe{sub 24}Zr{sub 8} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Yu E-mail: cangcangzhulin@gmail.com; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.; Barsukov, I.; Lindner, J.; Raanaei, H.; Hjörvarsson, B.

    2014-02-17

    The mechanism of tailored magnetic anisotropy in amorphous Co{sub 68}Fe{sub 24}Zr{sub 8} thin films was investigated by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) on samples deposited without an applied magnetic field, with an out-of-plane field and an in-plane field. Analysis of FMR spectra profiles, high frequency susceptibility calculations, and statistical simulations using a distribution of local uniaxial magnetic anisotropy reveal the presence of atomic configurations with local uniaxial anisotropy, of which the direction can be tailored while the magnitude remains at an intrinsically constant value of 3.0(2) kJ/m{sup 3}. The in-plane growth field remarkably sharpens the anisotropy distribution and increases the sample homogeneity. The results benefit designing multilayer spintronic devices based on highly homogeneous amorphous layers with tailored magnetic anisotropy.

  16. Determination of the Fe magnetic anisotropies and the CoO frozen spins in epitaxial CoO/Fe/Ag(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, J. Li, Y.; Park, J. S.; Jenkins, C. A.; Arenholz, E.; Scholl, A.; Tan, A.; Son, H.; Zhao, H. W.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2011-04-28

    CoO/Fe/Ag(001) films were grown epitaxially and studied by X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) and X-ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism (XMLD). After field cooling along the Fe[100] axis to 80 K, exchange bias, uniaxial anisotropy, and 4-fold anisotropy of the films were determined by hysteresis loop and XMCD measurements by rotating the Fe magnetization within the film plane. The CoO frozen spins were determined by XMLD measurement as a function of CoO thickness.We find that among the exchange bias, uniaxial anisotropy, and 4-fold anisotropy, only the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy follows thickness dependence of the CoO frozen spins.

  17. Band-filling effect on magnetic anisotropy using a Green's function method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ke, Liqin; van Schilfgaarde, Mark

    2015-07-28

    We use an analytical model to describe the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) in solids as a function of band filling. The MAE is evaluated in second-order perturbation theory, which makes it possible to decompose the MAE into a sum of transitions between occupied and unoccupied pairs. The model enables us to characterize the MAE as a sum of contributions from different, often competing terms. The nitridometalates Li2[(Li1–xTx)N], with T= Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, provide a system where the model is very effective because atomiclike orbital characters are preserved and the decomposition is fairly clean. The model results are also comparedmore » against MAE evaluated directly from first-principles calculations for this system. Good qualitative agreement is found.« less

  18. THIRD MOMENTS AND THE ROLE OF ANISOTROPY FROM VELOCITY SHEAR IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stawarz, Joshua E.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Smith, Charles W.; Forman, Miriam A.; Klewicki, Joseph E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu E-mail: Miriam.Forman@sunysb.edu

    2011-07-20

    We have extended the recent analyses of magnetohydrodynamic third moments as they relate to the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind to consider the effects of large-scale shear flows. Moments from a large set of Advanced Composition Explorer data have been taken, and chosen data intervals are characterized by the rate of change in the solar wind speed. Mean dissipation rates are obtained in accordance with the predictions of homogeneous shear-driven turbulence. Agreement with predictions is best made for rarefaction intervals where the solar wind speed is decreasing with time. For decreasing speed intervals, we find that the dissipation rates increase with increasing shear magnitude and that the shear-induced fluctuation anisotropy is consistent with a relatively small amount.

  19. Density functional theory calculations of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies for (Fe1-xCox)2B

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Daene, Markus; Kim, Soo Kyung; Surh, Michael P.; Aberg, Daniel; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2015-06-15

    We present and discuss density functional theory calculations of magnetic properties of the family of ferromagnetic compounds, (Fe1-xCox)2B, focusing specifically on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE). Using periodic supercells of various sizes (up to 96 atoms), it is shown that the general qualitative features of the composition dependence of the MAE is in agreement with experimental findings, while our predicted magnitudes are larger than those of experiment. We find that the use of small supercells (6 and 12-atom) favors larger MAE values relative to a statistical sample of configurations constructed with 96-atom supercells. As a result, the effect of latticemore » relaxations is shown to be small. Calculations of the Curie temperature for this alloy are also presented.« less

  20. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables.

  1. Dome – like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prozorov, R.; Cho, K.; Kim, H.; Tanatar, M. A.

    2013-07-17

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''.more » As a result, this trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.« less

  2. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus for Sandstones with Soft Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J G

    2004-04-15

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluidmechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2x2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced through the poroelastic coefficients, interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall mechanical system. The analysis shows, for example, that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied, and can be quite large (up to a definite maximum increase of 20 per cent) in some rocks--including Spirit River sandstone and Schuler-Cotton Valley sandstone.

  3. Band-filling effect on magnetic anisotropy using a Green's function method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Liqin; van Schilfgaarde, Mark

    2015-07-28

    We use an analytical model to describe the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) in solids as a function of band filling. The MAE is evaluated in second-order perturbation theory, which makes it possible to decompose the MAE into a sum of transitions between occupied and unoccupied pairs. The model enables us to characterize the MAE as a sum of contributions from different, often competing terms. The nitridometalates Li2[(Li1–xTx)N], with T= Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, provide a system where the model is very effective because atomiclike orbital characters are preserved and the decomposition is fairly clean. The model results are also compared against MAE evaluated directly from first-principles calculations for this system. Good qualitative agreement is found.

  4. Anisotropy studies around the Galactic Centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; Aramo, C.; ,

    2006-07-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ''hybrid'' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  5. Benefits of Carrier-Pocket Anisotropy to Thermoelectric Performance: The Case of p -Type AgBiSe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parker, David S.; May, Andrew F.; Singh, David J.

    2015-06-05

    Here we study theoretically the effects of anisotropy on the thermoelectric performance of p-type AgBiSe2. We present an apparent realization of the thermoelectric benefits of one-dimensional plate-like carrier pocket anisotropy in the valence band of this material. Based on first principles calculations we find a substantial anisotropy in the electronic structure, likely favorable for thermoelectric performance, in the valence bands of the hexagonal phase of the silver chalcogenide thermoelectric AgBiSe2, while the conduction bands are more isotropic, and in our experiments do not attain high performance. AgBiSe2 has already exhibited a ZT value of 1.5 in a high-temperature disordered fccmore » phase, but room-temperature performance has not been demonstrated. We develop a theory for the ability of anisotropy to decouple the density-of-states and conductivity effective masses, pointing out the influence of this effect in the high performance thermoelectrics Bi2Te3 and PbTe. From our first principles and Boltzmann transport calculations we find that p-type AgBiSe2 has substantial promise as a room temperature thermoelectric, and estimate its performance.« less

  6. Benefits of Carrier Pocket Anisotropy to Thermoelectric Performance: The case of p-type AgBiSe2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, David S; May, Andrew F; Singh, David J

    2015-01-01

    We study theoretically the effects of anisotropy on the thermoelectric performance of p-type AgBiSe2. We present an apparent realization of the thermoelectric benefits of one-dimensional plate-like carrier pocket anisotropy in the valence band of this material. Based on first principles calculations we find a substantial anisotropy in the electronic structure, likely favorable for thermoelectric performance, in the valence bands of the hexagonal phase of the silver chalcogenide thermoelectric AgBiSe2, while the conduction bands are more isotropic, and in our experiments do not attain high performance. AgBiSe2 has already exhibited a ZT value of 1.5 in a high-temperature disordered fcc phase, but room-temperature performance has not been demonstrated. We develop a theory for the ability of anisotropy to decouple the density-of-states and conductivity effective masses, pointing out the influence of this effect in the high performance thermoelectrics Bi2Te3 and PbTe. From our first principles and Boltzmann transport calculations we find that p-type AgBiSe2 has substantial promise as a room temperature thermoelectric, and estimate its performance.

  7. Euro Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Euro Wave Energy Region: Norway Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.eurowaveenergy.com This company is listed in the Marine...

  8. Dartmouth Wave Energy Searaser | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Searaser Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dartmouth Wave Energy (Searaser) Place: United Kingdom Product: British firm developing the wave energy converter, Searaser....

  9. Leancon Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Leancon Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Leancon Wave Energy Address: Alpedalsvej 37 Place: Kolding Zip: 6000 Region: Denmark Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

  10. Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Ocean Wave Energy Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the...