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1

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...

2

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

3

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor to produce tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

4

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Summary report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir (which is considered part of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir System), and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Results of this study indicated that the levels of contamination in the samples from the Watts Bar and Melton Hill Reservoir sites did not pose a threat to human health. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. Eleven of the sampling sites were selected based on existence of pollutant discharge permits, known locations of hazardous waste sites, and knowledge of past practices. The twelfth sample site was selected as a relatively less contaminated reference site for comparison purposes.

Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Task 5: TVA sediment-disturbing activities within the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of Task 5 of the Interagency Agreement No. DE-AI05-91OR22007 were to review: (1) the extent of dredging, construction, and other sediment-disturbing activities conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in potentially contaminated areas of Watts Bar Reservoir, and (2) the disposition of the materials from these activities. This memorandum is the final report for Task 5. This memorandum describes major activities in the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River that possibly resulted in significant disturbance of potentially contaminated sediments. TVA records from the construction of Watts Bar Dam, Kingston Fossil Plant, and Melton Hill Dam were reviewed to facilitate qualitative description of the effect of these activities in disturbing potentially contaminated sediments. The critical period for these activities in disturbing contaminated sediments was during or after 1956 when the peak releases of radioactive contaminants occurred from the Oak Ridge Reservation.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Part 70 License NRC Docket No. 70-07018 Subject: References: SUPPLEMENT TO APPLICATION FOR A SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LICENSE FOR WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT UNIT 2 IN ACCORDANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(TAC NO. ME0853)" As part of TVA's application for a Special Nuclear Material (SNM) License for Watts Bar Unit 2

Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant; Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supplement No. 12 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation of (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 11 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 11 was issued.

Tam, P.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), and Supplement No. 14 (December 1994) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

Tam, P.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Definition: Watt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watt Watt Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Watt A unit of measure for power, which measures the rate of energy conversion; equal to one joule per second (or 1/746 horsepower); equivalent to one ampere under a pressure of one volt.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The watt' is a derived unit of power in the International System of Units (SI), named after the Scottish engineer James Watt (1736-1819). The unit, defined as one joule per second, measures the rate of energy conversion or transfer. Also Known As W Related Terms Electricity, Power, Kilowatt References ↑ http://www.eia.gov/tools/glossary/index.cfm?id=W#watt ↑ http://needtoknow.nas.edu/energy/glossary/ Retri LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. eved from

13

PlotWatt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PlotWatt PlotWatt Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: PlotWatt Agency/Company /Organization: PlotWatt Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Mobile Device Website: plotwatt.com/ Country: United States Web Application Link: plotwatt.com/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Green Button Apps Northern America Language: English PlotWatt Screenshot References: PlotWatt[1]PlotWatt FAQ[2] Logo: PlotWatt PlotWatt helps you to save money and energy, instead of getting hit with high energy bills every month. PlotWatt shows you exactly where to save. Overview PlotWatt's algorithms analyze home energy consumption to figure out spending at the appliance level and figure out how to cost effectively save

14

WattQuiz | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WattQuiz WattQuiz Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: WattQuiz Agency/Company /Organization: Genability Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.wattquiz.com/ Country: United States Web Application Link: www.wattquiz.com/ Cost: Free Northern America Language: English WattQuiz Screenshot References: Genability[1] NYC Open Data[2] Donors Choose[3] Logo: WattQuiz A social quiz on energy usage that donates proceeds to charity via DonorsChoose.org. Questions are powered by Genability APIs. Overview WattQuiz is a simple social quiz, a la freerice.com, that asks you questions and educates you about your energy. Correct answers generate watts that are donated to worthy charities via DonorsChoose.org!

15

Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! May 17, 2012 - 2:21pm Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For years, I bought light bulbs based on watts, or energy use. Like many light bulb consumers, I looked for a traditional 40, 60, 75, or 100 watt incandescent bulb. Now that stores today carry more and more energy efficient lighting choices, I wanted to replace my old incandescents with new bulbs to save energy and money on my electricity bill. But in shopping for the right bulb, I came across a challenge in looking for bulbs based on watts. Since these newer bulbs use less energy, I found bulbs that use 8, 15, or 26 watts. The wattages are pretty close to each other, but the

16

L-Bar.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County approximately 47 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 10 miles north of Laguna Pueblo. The disposal site is located on part of the former L-Bar ranch and is about 4 miles east-southeast of the village of Seboyeta. The site was previously owned and operated by SOHIO Western Mining Company . Mining and milling at L-Bar began in 1977 and continued until 1981, when the mine closed because of economic conditions of the uranium industry. About 2.1 million tons of ore was processed at the mill. The milling operation created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. Tailings and liquid wastes were pumped in slurry form into an onsite tailings impoundment for disposal. All aboveground structures, including the mine and

17

Denver Watts to Water | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denver Watts to Water Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial...

18

MegaWatt Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name MegaWatt Solar Place North Carolina Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product North Carolina-based, technology-centric renewable energy company...

19

Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we examine some specific opportunities toreduce standby losses in electronic appliances. A review of powerconsumption levels for the major components responsible for standbyfunctions indicates that nearly all standby functions can be performedwith a total appliance standby power consumption of one watt or less. Wetherefore propose that standby losses be limited to one watt perappliance, a significant reduction from current levels for manyappliances. This target could be achieved with little or no extra cost tomanufacturers and could save over $2 billion in annual U.S. energy costs.Globally, a one-watt plan would lead to a significant reduction in carbonemissions.

Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

TerraWatt Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TerraWatt Power TerraWatt Power Jump to: navigation, search Name TerraWatt Power Place Schenectady, New York Zip 12305-1036 Product American manufacturer of micro-inverters, subsidiary of Advanced Energy Conversion. Coordinates 42.81226°, -73.941026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.81226,"lon":-73.941026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

AstroWatt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AstroWatt AstroWatt Jump to: navigation, search Name AstroWatt Place Austin, Texas Sector Solar Product Texas-based venture backed company developing a proprietary solar cell technology. Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

AlphaWatt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AlphaWatt Ltd AlphaWatt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name AlphaWatt Ltd Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC1V 4PY Sector Solar Product Solar project developer, plans to become an independent power provider. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

GlobalWatt Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GlobalWatt Inc GlobalWatt Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name GlobalWatt Inc Place Dover, Delaware Zip 19801 Product Shell company, once planned to float on AIM to raise money in order to acquire the business of semiconductor and/or PV manufacturing equipment suppliers. Coordinates 42.67954°, -88.110374° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.67954,"lon":-88.110374,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany BREFs and their BATs Next Generation of Waste Fired Power Plants: Getting the most out of your trash Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

25

Watts, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watts, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Watts, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.1092487°, -94.5702202° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.1092487,"lon":-94.5702202,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Microsoft Word - BAR 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar, New Mexico L-Bar, New Mexico Page 3-1 3.0 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site 3.1 Compliance Summary The L-Bar, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on August 22, 2012. The tailings impoundment was in excellent condition. Erosion and vegetation measurements to monitor the condition of the impoundment cover indicate that no erosion is occurring, and foliar cover of the vegetation has increased since the 2011 inspection. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 3.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the L-Bar site are specified in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy L-Bar, New Mexico, (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site, Seboyeta, New Mexico (DOE-LM/GJ709-2004,

27

Shanghai Solar Watt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Watt Ltd Solar Watt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Shanghai Solar-Watt Ltd Place Shanghai, Shanghai Municipality, China Zip 200040 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Providing photovoltaic systems, solar air heating systems, solar water pumping systems, wind energy systems (small), photovoltaic module manufacturing equipment and renewable energy system batteries. Coordinates 31.247709°, 121.472618° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.247709,"lon":121.472618,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Specification for strontium-90 500-watt(e) radioisotopic thermoelectric generator. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design for a demonstration 500-watt(e) radioisotopic thermoelectric generator has been created for the Department of Energy. The design effort was divided into two tasks, viz., create a design specification for a capsule strength member that utilizes a standard Strontium-90 fluoride-filled WESF inner liner, and create a conceptual design for a 500-watt(e) RTG. Both tasks have been accomplished. The strength-member specification was designed to survive an external pressure of 24,500 psi and meet the requirements of special-form radioisotope heat sources. Therefore the capsule can, if desired, be licensed for domestic and international transport. The design for the RTG features a radioisotopic heat source, an array of nine capsules in a tungsten biological shield, four current-technology series-connected thermoelectric-conversion modules, low-conductivity thermal insulation, and a passive finned-housing radiator for waste-heat dissipation. The preliminary RTG specification formulated previous to contract award has been met or exceeded. The power source will generate the required power for the required service period at 28 volts dc with a conversion efficiency of 8%, provided the existing in-pool capsules at WESF meet the assumed thermal-inventory requirements.

Hammel, T.; Himes, J.; Lieberman, A.; McGrew, J.; Owings, D.; Schumann, F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Trico Electric Cooperative - SunWatts Incentive Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trico Electric Cooperative - SunWatts Incentive Program Trico Electric Cooperative - SunWatts Incentive Program Trico Electric Cooperative - SunWatts Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate PV systems 10 kW or smaller: 30% of the total system cost Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV systems 10 kW or smaller: $0.10/watt DC PV greater than 10 kW up to 1 MW: Performance-Based Incentive (competitive bid process) Solar water heaters: $0.40 per expected first year kWh savings Provider Trico Electric Cooperative, Inc. Through the SunWatts Program, Trico Electric Cooperative offers residential and business customers a rebate for installing photovoltaic (PV) systems

30

Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF April 2, 2010 - 5:16pm Addthis The University of Central Florida has created an innovative way to save energy and money on campus through a new dorm-based competition called "Kill-a-Watt". Students representing campus residence halls compete against each other to achieve energy savings and can receive up to $200 in scholarships. Watch how former DOE intern and current UCF DOE Campus Ambassador, Chris Castro, is spearheading this exciting effort and learn more about energy saving tips that students find useful like proper thermostat set points and reducing plug load. Read the DoE's press release about the video. Addthis Related Articles University of Central Florida Students' Energy Saving Work Showcased in New

31

Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative- SunWatts Rebate Program (Arizona)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative is providing rebates to for the purchase of renewable energy systems through its SunWatts program. Photovoltaic (PV) and wind energy systems 10 kilowatts (kW) or...

32

One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Watt when being OFF or on standby. The challenge may appearAction to Reduce Standby Power Waste of Electricalon www.iea.org/standby/ . 18 & 19 .01.99 Siderius Hans-Paul,

Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

North Bar Lake South Bar Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traverse Lake Lime Lake Crystal River Sh alda Cr GOOD HARBOR BAY SLEEPING BEAR BAY PLATTE BA Y LAKE South Bar Lake Otter Lake Loon Lake Long Lake Rush Lake Platte Lake Little Platte Lake CRYSTAL LAKE MICHIGAN LAKE MICHIGAN Lake Elevation 580ft (177m) MANITOU PAS S A G E Ott er C reek Pl atte River Platt e

34

Barred Owl Hooting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barred Owl Hooting Barred Owl Hooting Name: ray Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: have barred owls ever been known to hoot during the daylight hours? Replies: I spent two years researching barred and horned owls when I was a graduate student and these owls are often found to call during daylight hours. I found both species fairly active at about 3pm and sometimes as late as 10am. The fledglings may be active anytime day and night. Parents are most vocal in the spring when trying to locate young and in the pre-nesting season during January-March. However, the barred owl is most active during the night and many times the calling is dependent upon the time of year [breeding season of November through April is more active for adults in particular]. Yearlings can make calls, noise anytime during the day.

35

VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts June 18, 2010 - 4:13pm Addthis Energetx Composites was able to purchase equipment such as this mold for utility-scale wind turbine blades thanks to a Recovery Act grant that matched the company’s $3.5 million investment. | Photo Courtesy of Energetx | Energetx Composites was able to purchase equipment such as this mold for utility-scale wind turbine blades thanks to a Recovery Act grant that matched the company's $3.5 million investment. | Photo Courtesy of Energetx | Joshua DeLung Near the eastern shore of Lake Michigan, there's a shift taking place. Tiara Yachts makes fiber composite structures for boats. Now the Holland, Mich.-based company is transforming part of its factory and using its 30

36

One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity  

SciTech Connect

Many domestic appliances and commercial equipment consume some electric power when they are switched off or not performing their primary purpose. The typical loss per appliance is low (from 1 to 25 W) but, when multiplied by the billions of appliances in houses and in commercial buildings, standby losses represent a significant fraction of total electricity use. Several initiatives to reduce standby losses have appeared in different parts of the world. One proposal, the 1-watt plan, seeks to harmonize these initiatives by establishing a single target for all appliances. This paper explains the background to the 1-watt plan, identifies some unresolved aspects, and gives some estimates of energy savings.

Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

1999-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Dealing with failed deregulation: what would price c. Watts do?  

SciTech Connect

There has been much thought given to ways that might fix deregulated markets, and there is still no agreement on the correct fix. The once-pseudonymous Price C. Watts thinks it is time to think seriously about ways to reregulate where deregulation has failed. Here are some steps to get us there. (author)

Rothkopf, Michael H.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

$\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masses for $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states are systematically studied in QCD sum rules. The interpolating currents representing the related molecular states are proposed. Technically, contributions of the operators up to dimension six are included in operator product expansion (OPE). Mass spectra for molecular states with $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ configurations are obtained.

Zhang, Jian-Rong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Denver Watts to Water | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denver Watts to Water Denver Watts to Water Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Earn the ENERGY STAR and other recognition Benchmark energy use ENERGY STAR in action Communicate and educate ENERGY STAR communications toolkit Bring Your Green to Work with ENERGY STAR

40

Watts Community, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watts Community, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Watts Community, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.035006°, -94.5727598° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.035006,"lon":-94.5727598,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bahasa Indonesia Kfir Bar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bahasa Indonesia Kfir Bar #12;Malay Archipelago · During Islam era: Malay) · Dutch and Portuguese traders arrived during the 15th century · Indonesia became a Dutch colony · Indonesia independent - 1945 #12;#12;Indonesian · Formed ­ 15th

Dershowitz, Nachum

42

Development testing of the two-watt RTG heat source and Hastelloy-S/T-111 alloy compatibility studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source capsules were tested to determine their survivability under extreme environmental conditions: high external pressure, high impact, and high internal pressure. Test results showed that the capsules could withstand external pressures of 1,000 bars and impacts at velocities near 150 meters per second. However, the results of the internal pressure tests (stress-rupture) were not so favorable, possibly because of copper contamination, leading to a recommendation for additional testing. A material compatibility study examined the use of Hastelloy-S as a material to clad the tantalum strength member of the two-watt radioisotopic heat source. Test capsules were subjected to high temperatures for various lengths of time, then cross sectioned and examined with a scanning electron microscope. Results of the study indicate that Hastelloy-S would be compatible with the underlying alloy, not only at the normal operating temperatures of the heat source, but also when exposed to the much higher temperatures of a credible accident scenario.

Howell, E.I.; Teaney, P.E.

1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

BaBar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Kollaboration gebaut. Er dient dazu, Paare von elektrisch neutralen B und anti-B Mesonen zu erzeugen. Das neutrale B enthält ein anti-b Quark und ein d Quark, während das neutrale anti-B ein b Quark und ein anti-d Quark enthält. Die Teilchenstrahlen werden so eingestellt, dass bei ihrer Kollision gerade die richtige Menge an Energie frei wird, um diese zwei Mesonen zu erzeugen. Weil Elektronen und Positronen mit verschiedenen Energien umlaufen, werden die so entstandenen B und anti-B Mesonen mit grosser Geschwindigkeit in derselben Richtung laufen. Dabei bewegen sie sich in gleicher Richtung wie die schneller laufenden Elektronen. Das macht es möglich, ihre Lebensdauer durch die Wegstrecke, die sie bis zu ihrem

44

Design of a 50-watt air supplied turbogenerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the design of a high-pressure-ratio, low-flow turbogenerator with 50 W electrical power output, designed to operate from a 5-bar air supply. The research shows that a MEMS-based silicon turbine in ...

Jovanovic, Stevan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Glassy Aging with Modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report we address the question whether aging in the non equilibrium glassy state is controlled by the equilibrium alpha-relaxation process which occur at temperatures above Tg. Recently Lunkenheimer et. al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 055702 (2005)] proposed a model for the glassy aging data of dielectric relaxation using a modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) form. The aging time dependence of the relaxation time is defined by these authors through a functional relation involving the corresponding frequency but the stretching exponent is same as the alpha-relaxation stretching exponent. We present here an alternative functional form directly involving the relaxation time itself. The proposed model fits the data of Lunkenheimer et. al. perfectly with a stretching exponent different from the alpha-relaxation stretching exponent.

Bhaskar Sen Gupta; Shankar P. Das

2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Bar-code automated waste tracking system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bar-Code Automated Waste Tracking System was designed to be a site-Specific program with a general purpose application for transportability to other facilities. The system is user-friendly, totally automated, and incorporates the use of a drive-up window that is close to the areas dealing in container preparation, delivery, pickup, and disposal. The system features ``stop-and-go`` operation rather than a long, tedious, error-prone manual entry. The system is designed for automation but allows operators to concentrate on proper handling of waste while maintaining manual entry of data as a backup. A large wall plaque filled with bar-code labels is used to input specific details about any movement of waste.

Hull, T.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2012 Prepared for: Forest City Military Communities Hawaii Prepared By: UH Watt Watcher Team Hawaii. In its first project, the UH Watt Watcher program teamed with Forest City Military Communities-Hawaii 69% of the monthly consumption. OBJECTIVES The objective of Phase I was to inform Forest City of key

48

One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory - Leaking Electricity Web Site http://Effort to Reduce Leaking Electricity Alan MEIER* & Benotfraction of total electricity use. Several initiatives to

Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Generation of sand bars under surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Experiments were performed in a large wave flume to validate the theory and to study additional aspects of sand bar evolution. The wave envelope and bar profile were recorded for low and high beach reflection, ...

Hancock, Matthew James, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Watch the Watts: Tips for Buying a New Television | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watch the Watts: Tips for Buying a New Television Watch the Watts: Tips for Buying a New Television Watch the Watts: Tips for Buying a New Television March 8, 2011 - 6:30am Addthis Jeannie Saur Senior Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Buying a new television in a complex and feature-rich market can be a daunting experience. Sure there are lots of great choices with stunning picture quality and amazing features. And with so much competition, TV prices have fallen dramatically from even a year ago. But when my 1990-era television finally died, I was overwhelmed with choices for a flat screen TV. There are plasmas, liquid crystal displays (LCDs), and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). TVs can be Internet enabled so they can stream programming. And now there are a number of choices for 3D viewing. With so many things to consider, I decided the most important

51

The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida Addthis Description At the University of Central Florida, students have taken it upon themselves to create a culture of energy efficiency. Each year, different dorm buildings compete to see who can save the most. In 2009, the school saw a total savings of $27,000. As of March 2010, they've saved over $24,000 this year alone. Speakers Chris Castro, Alexandra Kennedy, Margaret Lo, David Norvell, Keith Coelho, John Hitt PhD Duration 5:40 Topic Energy Efficiency Commercial Heating & Cooling Consumption Credit Energy Department Video CHRIS CASTRO: Last summer, I was an intern at the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and I got a chance to

52

High intensity discharge 400-watt sodium ballast. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of a research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid State 400-Watt Ballast lighting system are reported. Phase I of the project which was designed to modify the existing Datapower ballast to LBL configuration, measure performance characteristics, and compare efficiency with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis is covered. In addition, Datapower was tasked to build six (6) prototype 400-Watt High Pressure Sodium Ballasts for verification tests by an independent test facility and follow-on performance and life tests at LBL.

Felper, G.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A 5-WATT, 37-GHz MONOLITHIC GRID AMPLIFIER Blythe Deckman1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the fabricated active grid. Thermal Management Previous grid amplifiers lacked a heat spreader, so Figure 1A 5-WATT, 37-GHz MONOLITHIC GRID AMPLIFIER Blythe Deckman1 , Donald S. Deakin, Jr.2 , Emilio Sovero has been demonstrated. The area of the grid am- plifier is 1 cm2, and there are 512 transistors

Rutledge, David B.

54

DIESEL AEROSOL SAMPLING IN THE David Kittelson, Jason Johnson, and Winthrop Watts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemical composition of diesel particulate matter collected in laboratory and in wind tunnel #12;In OrderDIESEL AEROSOL SAMPLING IN THE ATMOSPHERE David Kittelson, Jason Johnson, and Winthrop Watts Center for Diesel Research University of Minnesota 10th CRC ON-ROAD VEHICLE EMISSIONS WORKSHOP San Diego, California

Minnesota, University of

55

University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consumption Data Analysis Phase I Interim Report March 30, 2011 Prepared for: Forest City Military RECOMMENDATIONS TO FOREST CITY 12 ITEMS TO ADD TO FOREST CITY TURNOVER PUNCH LIST 17 APPENDIXUniversity of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis Phase I Interim Report

56

400-Watt Electronic High-Bay Fixture for Metal-Halide High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The product under assessment is an advanced lighting technology8212a 400-watt, metal-halide, electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballast technology designed to be operated as a stand-alone ballast or integrated as a fixture where the ballast becomes part of the fixture mechanical support system.

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

57

Using Complete Machine Simulation for Software Power Estimation: The SoftWatt Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Complete Machine Simulation for Software Power Estimation: The SoftWatt Approach Sudhanva,anand,mji,vijay,kandemirg@cse.psu.edu Tao Li Lizy Kurian John Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Texas at Austin of the SimOS infrastructure, uses validated analytical energy models to identify the power hotspots

John, Lizy Kurian

58

WattApp: an application aware power meter for shared data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing heterogeneity between applications in emerging virtualized data centers like clouds introduce significant challenges in estimating the power drawn by the data center. In this work, we presentWattApp: an application-aware power meter for ... Keywords: power modeling

Ricardo Koller; Akshat Verma; Anindya Neogi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Bank Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara December 2010 Keywords: Wind Wind speed Energy Capacity factor Electricity Chile a b s t r a c t Bearing role in any future national energy generation matrix. With a view to understanding the local wind

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

60

P{bar P} collider physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief introduction to {bar p}p collider physics is given. Selected results from the collider experiments at the CERN S{bar p}pS and the Tevatron collider are described. The emphasis is on experimental aspects of {bar p}p collisions. Minimum bias physics and the production of jets, Intermediate Vector Bosons and heavy flavors is reviewed. The outlook for physics at hadron colliders for the near future is briefly discussed.

Demarteau, M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nucleon pole contributions in $J/?\\to N \\bar{N} ?$, $p \\bar{p} ?$, $p \\bar{p} ?^{\\prime}$ and $p \\bar{p} ?$ decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucleon pole contributions in $J/\\psi \\to N \\bar N \\pi$, $p \\bar p \\eta$, $p \\bar p \\eta^{\\prime}$ and $p \\bar{p} \\omega$ decays are re-studied. Different contributions due to PS-PS and PS-PV couplings in the $\\pi$-N interaction and the effects of $NN\\pi$ form factors are investigated in the $J/\\psi \\to N \\bar N \\pi$ decay channel. It is found that when the ratio of $|F_0| /|F_M|$ takes small value, without considering the $NN\\pi$ form factor, the difference between PS-PS and PS-PV couplings are negligible. However, when the $NN\\pi$ form factor is included, this difference is greatly enlarged. The resultant decay widths are sensitive to the form factors. As a conclusion, the nucleon-pole contribution as a background is important in the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\pi$ decay and must be accounted. In the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\eta$ and $N\\bar{N}\\eta'$ decays, its contribution is less than 0.1% of the data. In the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\omega$ decay, it provides rather important contribution without considering form factors. But the contribution is suppressed greatly when adding the off-shell form factors. Comparing these results with data would help us to select a proper form factor for such kind of decay.

Wei-Hong Liang; Peng-Nian Shen; Bing-Song Zou; Amand Faessler

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Bar Gadda LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Bar-Gadda LLC Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94306 Sector Geothermal energy, Hydro, Hydrogen Product Has developed a new technology to produce hydrogen from...

63

EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland,...

64

Tennessee | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland,...

65

EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland,...

66

The distribution of the electric current in a watt-balance coil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the watt balance experiment, separate measurements of the Lorentz and electromotive forces in a coil in a radial magnetic field enable a virtual comparison between mechanical and electric powers to be carried out, which lead to an accurate measurement of the Planck constant. This paper investigates the effect of a spatially inhomogeneous distribution of the electric current in the coil due to the higher or lower resistance of the outer or inner paths.

Sasso, Carlo Paolo; Mana, Giovanni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

New Corrosion Resistance Bar in Sandwich Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandwich masonry wall is an energy-saving composite wall with good mechanical properties and durability. But the adhesion strength to its tie bar affects its permanence. In order to simple the traditional production processes, a new method was proposed. ... Keywords: energy-saving, durability, steel bar, insulation

Li Yancang; Ge Xiaohua; Wang Fengxin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

William Watts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for David Lorenzetti, and Tracy Thatcher. This Speaker's Seminars GE Nucleus for Residential Energy Use Education, Home Energy ManagementControl, Residential Energy Integration...

69

Cam-controlled boring bar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing from ...

71

Lumen Maintenance Testing of the Philips 60-Watt Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes testing conducted to evaluate the Philips' L Prize award winning 60-watt LED replacement product's ability to meet the lifetime/lumen maintenance requirement of the competition, which was: "having 70 percent of the lumen value under subparagraph (A) [producing a luminous flux greater than 900 lumens] exceeding 25,000 hours under typical conditions expected in residential use." A custom test apparatus was designed and constructed for this testing and a statistical approach was developed for use in evaluating the test results. This will be the only publicly available, third-party data set of long-term LED product operation.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Hathaway, John E.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment: (Phase 2, The 34-watt F40 rapid start T-12 fluorescent lamp): Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamp systems are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the systems efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Narrow linewidth picosecond pulsed laser with mega-watt peak power at UV wavelength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) burst mode laser system to generate 66 ps/402.5 MHz pulses with mega-watt peak power at 355 nm. The seed laser is based on a direct electro-optic modulation of a fiber laser output. A very high extinction ratio (45 dB) has been achieved by using an adaptive bias control. The multi-stage Nd:YAG amplifier system allows a uniformly temporal shaping of macropulses with tunable pulse duration. The light output form the amplifier is converted to 355 nm and over 1 MW UV peak power is obtained when the laser is operating in a 5- s/10-Hz macropulse mode. The laser output has a transform limited spectrum bandwidth with a very narrow linewidth of individual laser mode. The immediate application of the laser system is the laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

Liu, Yun [ORNL; Huang, Chunning [ORNL; Deibele, Craig Edmond [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Spontaneous formation of double bars in dark matter dominated galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although nearly one-third of barred galaxies host an inner, secondary bar, the formation and evolution of double barred galaxies remain unclear. We show here an example model of a galaxy, dominated by a live dark matter halo, in which double bars form naturally, without requiring gas, and we follow its evolution for a Hubble time. The inner bar in our model galaxy rotates almost as slowly as the outer bar, and it can reach up to half of its length. The route to the formation of a double bar may be different from that of a single strong bar. Massive dark matter halo or dynamically hot stellar disc may play an important role in the formation of double bars and their subsequent evolution.

Saha, Kanak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The BaBar Drift Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central drift chamber for the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory at SLAC is a cylindrical chamber with a length of 280 cm and outer radius of 81 cm. It consists of 40 layers of small hexagonal cells arranged in 10 axial and stereo super-layers. In order to minimize multiple scattering, light materials are used for the mechanical structure, and the gas mixture is Helium based. The pulse-height and timing electronics are mounted directly on the chamber rear end-plate. A full length prototype of the BaBar drift chamber has been built. The analysis of cosmic ray events measures the spatial resolution averaged in the cell to be 130 m and the dE/dx resolution to be 6.8%, meeting the performance goals for the BaBar central tracker. The mechanical assembly and stringing of the chamber was completed in December 1997 and the detector will be integrated into BaBar during summer 1998. 1

G. Sciolla

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Data Preserved in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to keep the BaBar virtual world safe and unchanging, isolated not only from the SLAC network, but from the rest of the World Wide Web. BaBar collaboration members can...

78

American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Association Section on Environment Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name American Bar Association Section on Environment Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60610 Product The Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources is the premier forum for lawyers working in areas related to environment law, natural resources law, and energy law. References American Bar Association Section on Environment[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Bar Association Section on Environment is a company located in Chicago, Illinois . References ↑ "American Bar Association Section on Environment" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Bar_Association_Section_on_Environment&oldid=342108

79

Energy-efficient H. I. D. solid-state ballast: Phase II final report. [150 watt high pressure sodium lamp  

SciTech Connect

The following report presents the results of Phase II, Development of Solid State 150 watt High Pressure Sodium Ballasts. Basically, the objectives of the development program were accomplished, i.e., greater than 90% efficiency, greater than 90% power factor, regulation equivalent to ferro-magnetic ballasts, and energy savings sufficient to warrant the further development of the solid-state HPS ballast for commercial production and marketing. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow?_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}?^{+}?^{-}$ and its intermediate states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sigma_{c}(2455)$ or $\\Sigma_{c}(2520)$ resonances, we measure ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{non-\\Sigma_{c}}}=(79 \\pm 4 \\pm 4 \\pm 20)\\times10^{-5}$. The total branching fraction is determined to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{total}}=(123 \\pm 5 \\pm 7 \\pm 32)\\times10^{-5}$. We examine multibody mass combinations in the resonant three-particle $\\Sigma_{c}\\bar{p}\\pi$ final states and in the four-particle $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ final state, and observe different characteristics for the $\\bar{p}\\pi$ combination in neutral versus doubly-charged $\\Sigma_{c}$ decays.

The Babar Collaboration; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; E. Grauges; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; D. N. Brown; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. So; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; C. A. West; A. M. Eisner; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. S. Chao; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; K. T. Flood; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; Z. Huard; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; L. Sun; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; B. Spaan; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; I. Garzia; E. Luppi; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; B. Bhuyan; V. Prasad; M. Morii; A. Adametz; U. Uwer; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; P. D. Dauncey; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; D. N. Brown; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; K. Griessinger; A. Hafner; E. Prencipe; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; E. Behn; R. Cenci; B. Hamilton; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; C. Dallapiccola; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; G. Sciolla; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; P. Biassoni; N. Neri; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. De Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; M. Martinelli; G. Raven; C. P. Jessop; J. M. LoSecco; W. F. Wang; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. Brau; R. Frey; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; S. Akar; E. Ben-Haim; M. Bomben; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; S. Pacetti; A. Rossi; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; A. Perez; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; F. Anulli; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; C. Bnger; O. Grnberg; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schrder; C. Vo; R. Waldi; T. Adye; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Y\\`; D. Aston; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; M. Ebert; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; P. Lewis; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. MacFarlane; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; R. H. Schindler; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; A. P. Wagner; W. J. Wisniewski; M. Wittgen; D. H. Wright; H. W. Wulsin; C. C. Young; V. Ziegler; W. Park; M. V. Purohit; R. M. White; J. R. Wilson; A. Randle-Conde; S. J. Sekula; M. Bellis; P. R. Burchat; T. S. Miyashita; E. M. T. Puccio; M. S. Alam; J. A. Ernst; R. Gorodeisky; N. Guttman; D. R. Peimer; A. Soffer; S. M. Spanier; J. L. Ritchie; A. M. Ruland; R. F. Schwitters; B. C. Wray; J. M. Izen; X. C. Lou; F. Bianchi; D. Gamba; S. Zambito; L. Lanceri; L. Vitale; F. Martinez-Vidal; A. Oyanguren; P. Villanueva-Perez; H. Ahmed; J. Albert; Sw. Banerjee; F. U. Bernlochner; H. H. F. Choi; G. J. King; R. Kowalewski; M. J. Lewczuk; I. M. Nugent; J. M. Roney; R. J. Sobie; N. Tasneem; T. J. Gershon; P. F. Harrison; T. E. Latham; H. R. Band; S. Dasu; Y. Pan; R. Prepost; S. L. Wu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the frequently observed peanut/boxy-shaped isophotes. We also find that the bar buckling is responsible for a mass injection above the plane, which is subsequently trapped by specific 3-D families of periodic orbits of particular shapes explaining the observed isophotes, in line with previous work. Using a 3-D orbit analysis and surfaces of sections, we infer that the outer part of the bar is dissolved by a rapidly widening stochastic region around its corotation radius -- a process related to the bar growth. This leads to a dramatic decrease in the bar size, decrease in the overall bar strength and a mild increase in its pattern speed, but is not expected to lead to a complete bar dissolution. The buckling instability appears primarily responsible for shortening the secular diffusion timescale to a dynamical one when building the boxy isophotes. The sufficiently long timescale of described evolution, ~1 Gyr, can affect the observed bar fraction in local universe and at higher redshifts, both through reduced bar strength and the absence of dust offset lanes in the bar.

Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Isaac Shlosman

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

82

Minimally flavored colored scalar in $\\bar B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar \  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of a colored scalar that is a weak doublet with fractional electric charges of $|Q|=2/3$ and $|Q|=5/3$ with mass below 1\\,TeV can provide an explanation of the observed branching ratios in $B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar \

Dorsner, Ilja; Kosnik, Nejc; Nisandzic, Ivan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Kolkata Restaurant Problem as a generalised El Farol Bar Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalisation of the El Farol bar problem to that of many bars here leads to the Kolkata restaurant problem, where the decision to go to any restaurant or not is much simpler (depending on the previous experience of course, as in the El Farol bar problem). This generalised problem can be exactly analysed in some limiting cases discussed here. The fluctuation in the restaurant service can be shown to have precisely an inverse cubic behavior, as widely seen in the stock market fluctuations.

Chakrabarti, Bikas K

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Preheating Collector Bars and Cathode Blocks Prior to Rodding with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrically heating collector bar/cathode block assemblies uses less than 15% of the energy required for propane gas burner heating. The method is quiet,...

85

Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts WW Casing Connection on 7" Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his ''WW'' threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This work was a continuation of testing performed by SES as reported in August of 1999. The connection design tested was identified as ''WW''. The samples were all integral (no coupled connections) and contained a wedge thread form with 90{sup o} flank angles relative to the pipe centerline. The wedge thread form is a variable width thread that primarily engages on the flanks. This thread form provides very high torque capacity and good stabbing ability and makeup. The test procedure selected for one of the samples was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections, which is currently going through the ISO acceptance process. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test procedure was performed with one sample. Four samples were tested to failure. Table 1 contains a summary of the tasks performed by SES. The project started with the delivery of test samples by Mr. Watts. Pipe from the previous round of tests was used for the new samples. Figure 1 shows the structural and sealing results relative to the pipe body. Sample 1 was used to determine the torque capacity of the connection. Torque was applied to the capacity of SES's equipment which was 28,424 ft-lbs. From this, an initial recommended torque range of 7,200 to 8,800 ft-lbs. was selected. The sample was disassembled and while there was no galling observed in the threads, the end of the pin had collapsed inward. Sample 2 received three makeups. Breakouts 1 and 2 also had collapsing of the pin end, with no thread galling. From these make/breaks, it was decided to reduce the amount of lubricant applied to the connection by applying it to the box or pin only and reducing the amount applied. Samples 3 and 4 received one makeup only. Sample 5 initially received two make/breaks to test for galling resistance before final makeup, No galling was observed. Later, three additional make/breaks were performed with no pin end collapse and galling over 1/2 a thread occurring on one of the breakouts. During the make/break tests, the stabbing and hand tight makeup of the WW connection was found to be very easy and trouble free. There was no tendency to crossthread, even when stabbed at an angle, and it screwed together very smoothly up to hand tight. During power tight makeup, there was no heat generated in the box (as checked by hand contact) and no jerkiness associated with any of the makeups or breakouts. Sample 2 was tested in pure compression. The maximum load obtained was 1,051 kips and the connection was beginning to significantly deform as the sample buckled. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 3 was capped-end pressure tested to failure. The capped-end yield pressure of the pipe was 16,572 psi and the sample began to leak at 12,000 psi. Sample 4 was tested in pure tension. The maximum load obtained was 978 kips and the connection failed by fracture at the pin critical section. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 5 was tested in combined tension/compression and internal gas pressure. The sample was assembled, setup and tested four times. The first time was with a torque of 7,298 ft-lbs and the connection leaked halfway to ISO Load Point 2 with loads of 693 kips and 4,312 psi. The second time the torque was increased to 14,488 ft-lbs and a leak occurred at 849 kips and 9,400 psi, which was ISO Load Point 2. The third time the makeup torque was again increased, to 20,456 ft-lbs, and a leak occurred at 716 kips and 11,342 psi, ISO Load Point 4. The fourth test was with the same torque as before, 20,617 ft-lbs, and the connection successfully tested up to load step 56, ISO Load Point 6 (second round) before leaking at 354 kips and 11,876 psi. At this point,

John D. Watts

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system  

SciTech Connect

A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluating aeroshell materials for the MJS/multi-hundred watt heat source. [Reentry survival from an aborted launch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the possibility of improving upon an existing aeroshell design for the Multi-Hundred Watt power source, a trade-off study was conducted on a variety of candidate aeroshell materials. Mariner Jupiter/Saturn mission requirements and aeroshell material criteria were established to form a basis for the evaluation. Material data searches and reentry analyses were made to permit preparation of a quantitative comparison matrix. Depending upon the designer's constraints, either the well-known polycrystalline graphites (POCO-AXF-5Q, ATJS) or the more complex composite materials (AVCO 3D C/C, Pyrocarb-406) may be chosen.

Bennett, G.L.; Hagan, J.C.; Tantino, D.C.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Liverpool, New York Site Description Commercial-Restaurant Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Aisin Seiki G60 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer ECO Technical Solutions System Enclosure Outdoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 6 kW0.006 MW 6,000 W 6,000,000 mW 6.0e-6 GW 6.0e-9 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 240 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 46105 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller Manufacturer-Integrated Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2005/07/10 Monitoring Termination Date 2005/07/21

89

ORKPROCESSINSELECTIVNEURON BAR99 WIC69 WIL81 FIN79 AND81 HIN84 AND81 BAR81 KOH81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BAR99 WIC69 WIL81 FIN79 AND81 HIN84 AND81 BAR81 KOH81 CATEGORIZ Figure 5: A sketch of the AIR system 3D interactive animation. Communications of the ACM 39.56{71. Rose, Daniel E., & Richard K. Belew of the 16th Annual Inter- national ACM/SIGIR Conference, 49{58, Pittsburgh, PA. ||, & Chris Buckley. 1992

Hearst, Marti

90

Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the frequently observed peanut/boxy-shaped isophotes. We also find that the bar buckling is responsible for a mass injection above the plane, which is subsequently trapped by specific 3-D families of periodic orbits of particular shapes explaining the observed isophotes, in line with previous work. Using a 3-D orbit analysis and surfaces of sections, we infer that the outer part of the bar is dissolved by a rapidly widening stochastic region around its corotation radius -- a process related to the bar growth. This leads to a...

Martinez-Valpuesta, I

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

BARS REJUVENATING BULGES? EVIDENCE FROM STELLAR POPULATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We obtained stellar ages and metallicities via spectrum fitting for a sample of 575 bulges with spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The structural properties of the galaxies have been studied in detail in 2009 by Gadotti and the sample contains 251 bulges in galaxies with bars. Using the whole sample, where galaxy stellar mass distributions for barred and unbarred galaxies are similar, we find that bulges in barred and unbarred galaxies occupy similar loci in the age versus metallicity plane. However, the distribution of bulge ages in barred galaxies shows an excess of populations younger than {approx}4 Gyr, when compared to bulges in unbarred galaxies. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics confirm that the age distributions are different with a significance of 99.94%. If we select sub-samples for which the bulge stellar mass distributions are similar for barred and unbarred galaxies, this excess vanishes for galaxies with bulge mass log M < 10.1 M{sub Sun }, while for more massive galaxies we find a bimodal bulge age distribution for barred galaxies only, corresponding to two normal distributions with mean ages of 10.4 and 4.7 Gyr. We also find twice as much active galactic nuclei among barred galaxies, as compared to unbarred galaxies, for low-mass bulges. By combining a large sample of high-quality data with sophisticated image and spectral analysis, we are able to find evidence that the presence of bars affects the mean stellar ages of bulges. This lends strong support to models in which bars trigger star formation activity in the centers of galaxies.

Coelho, P. [Nucleo de Astrofisica Teorica, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, R. Galvao Bueno 868, Liberdade 01506-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gadotti, D. A., E-mail: paula.coelho@cruzeirodosul.edu.br, E-mail: dgadotti@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Production of htt_bar and htT_bar in littlest Higgs model with T-parity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity, which predicts a pair of T-even and T-odd partners for the top quark, the top quark interactions are altered with respect to the Standard Model predictions and deviation will manifest in various top quark processes. In this work we examine the effects in htt_bar productions at the ILC and LHC. We find that in the allowed parameter space, the cross sections can be significantly deviated from the Standard Model predictions and thus provide a good test for the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. We also examine the new production channel, the htT_bar or hTt_bar production, at the LHC, which give the same final states as htt_bar production due to the dominant decay T->Wb. We find that, compared with htt_bar production, this new production channel can have a sizable production rate for a T-quark below TeV scale. Such a production will be counted into htt_bar events or possibly extracted from htt_bar events, depending on if we can distinguish the T-quark from the top quark from mass reconstructions.

Lei Wang; Wenyu Wang; Jin Min Yang; Huanjun Zhang

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

Study of $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decays $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$ have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 million $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. The branching fractions are determined to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p})=(2.112\\pm0.004\\pm0.031)\\times10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n})=(2.07\\pm0.01\\pm0.17)\\times10^{-3}$. Distributions of the angle $\\theta$ between the proton or anti-neutron and the beam direction are well described by the form $1+\\alpha\\cos^2\\theta$, and we find $\\alpha=0.595\\pm0.012\\pm0.015$ for $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $\\alpha=0.50\\pm0.04\\pm0.21$ for $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}$ decay.

Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R B; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M B; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Calcaterra, A C; Cao, G F; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, Kun; Liu, Kai; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S P; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Thorndike, E H; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Ulrich, M U; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M W; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A Z; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J G; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A quark model of {bar {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions  

SciTech Connect

A quark model which includes both scalar and vector contributions to the reaction mechanism (SV quark model) is used in a DWBA calculation of {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions. Total and differential cross-sections, polarizations, depolarizations, and spin-correlation coefficients are computed for laboratory momenta from threshold to 1695 MeV/c. The free parameters of the calculation are the scalar and vector strengths, a quark cluster size parameter, and the parameters of the unknown {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials. Good agreement with experiment is found for constructive interference of the scalar and vector terms, and for {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials which differ from those suggested by several authors on the basis of SU(3) arguments. The fit to the data is better than that obtained by other quark models, which use only scalar or vector annihilation terms. The agreement with experiment is also better than that found in meson-exchange models. The recent suggestion [1] that measurement of the depolarization parameter D{sub nn} can be used to discriminate between meson-exchange and quark models is examined in detail. We conclude that a measurement of D{sub nn} will provide a test of which of these models, as presently constructed, is the more appropriate description of strangeness production in the {bar p}p {yields} {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} reaction.

Alberg, M.A. [Seattle Univ., WA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Henley, E.M.; Wilets, L. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kunz, P.D. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Nuclear Physics Lab.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

Englebretson, Steven Carl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Searches for New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 31, 2013 Scientists analyzing data from the BaBar experiment, which operated at SLAC between 1999 and 2008, recently published the results of a search for signs of...

97

A Cautionary Note on the Use of Error Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate studies often involve comparisons between estimates of some parameter derived from different observed and/or model-generated datasets. It is common practice to present estimates of two or more statistical quantities with error bars about ...

John R. Lanzante

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The distribution of stellar population age in galactic bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analysis of stellar populations in barred galaxies have focused on the spatial distribution of stellar population ages and metallicities. However, barred galaxies are complex objects where dynamical instabilities play a leading role in shaping any spatial distribution. The age distribution of stellar populations should thus be analyzed from the two points of view of stellar population evolution and dynamical secular evolution. Chemodynamical simulations of single barred galaxies with simple but realistic star formation and feedback recipes are used to produce face-on mass-weighted maps of stellar population ages. Luminosity-weighted maps in V-band are also displayed after calibrating the simulation with mass-to-light ratios provided by a synthesis population model. It is shown that inside a stellar bar two persistent diametrically opposed regions display a mean age lower than the surrounding average. These two low-age regions are due to the accumulation of young stellar populations trapped on elliptica...

Wozniak, H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

100-WATT CURIUM-242 FUELED THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR--CONCEPTUAL DESIGN. SNAP Subtask 5.7 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A thermoelectric generator which produces 100 watts of electrical power continuously over a six-month operational life in a space environment was designed. It employs the heat produced by the decay of Cm/sup 24/ as the source of power. Uniform output over the operational life of the generator is accomplished by means of a thermally actuated shutter which maintains the hot junction temperature of the thermoelectric conventer at a constunt figure by varying the amount of surplus heat which is radiated directly to space from the heat source. The isotopic heat source is designed to safely contain the Cm/sup 242/ under conditions of launch pad abont and rocket failure, but to burn up upon re-entry to the earth's atmosphere from orbital velocity. (W.L.H.)

Weddell, J.B.; Bloom, J.

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Redesigned ORNL DAAC Web Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

released a major revision to its Web site on Thursday, released a major revision to its Web site on Thursday, May 27, 2010. The new site includes many enhancements aimed at helping users locate and obtain data products and services. The simplified menu bar allows users to navigate quickly to products and services of interest and to access data through a variety of tools. The DAAC's Web site address remains unchanged (http://daac.ornl.gov), and as always, our products and services are available free of charge. Please note that your user account information will work on the new Web site. The Sign-in and Registration pages have a different look and will accept your email address as the User Name and retain your current password. If you have any problems accessing, signing-in, or registering with our new Web site, please contact our User Services Office, at +1 (865) 241-3952, or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Exclusive initial-state-radiation production of the DD[over-bar], D[superscript *]D[over-bar] , and D[superscript *]D[over-bar][superscript * ] systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a study of the exclusive production of DD[over-bar], D[superscript *]D[over-bar], and D[superscript *]D[over-bar][superscript *] in initial-state-radiation events, from e[superscript +]e[superscript -] annihilations ...

Zhao, M.

102

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo...

103

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students January 7, 2010 - 2:58pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For 13 years, Tony Grahame has inspired students to pursue careers building sustainable, energy-efficient houses or to find other niches in the green-building industry. His Residential Building Technology program at Yavapai College in Prescott, Ariz., gets students out of the classroom and constructing real homes in a nearby subdivision. On the jobsite, they learn the skills and knowledge essential to launch their careers as the next generation of energy-efficient builders. Tony's expertise draws from technologies and strategies in residential efficiency and renewable energy developed through

104

~~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I --------------------------------------- NAME: 333 Iv. Mkhi qr) Aw. thka o ~~~---~~~--~~~_-----__ C I TV : 8 Morim 'Love 82 10 bhh &Q Ir -+----------- STATE- fL I - ------ l OWNER(S) -__----_ past: Current: I --------------------____ Owner contacted q yes p no; _____--_____-____------~~~l if yes, data contacted -_--------__- TYPE OF OPERATION ---_------------- 0 Research & Development q Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis Facility Type p Manufacturing I ! fJ University 0 Research Organization ! 0 Government Sponsored F+ci li ty 0 Other ----~~-~~~----~------ 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CUNTRKT ----~---~__----_ / w Prime

105

The Fueling of Nuclear Activity: II. The Bar Properties of Seyfert and Normal Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a recent near-infrared imaging survey of samples of Seyfert and normal galaxies to study the role of bars in the fueling of nuclear activity. The active galaxy sample includes Seyfert galaxies in the Revised Shapely-Ames (RSA) and Sandage & Tammann's (1987) extension to this catalog. The normal galaxies were selected to match the Seyfert sample in Hubble type, redshift, inclination and blue luminosity. All the galaxies in both samples classified as barred in the RSA catalog are also barred in the near-infrared. In addition, ~55% of the galaxies classified as non-barred in the RSA show evidence for bars at 2.1 microns. Overall, ~70% of the galaxies observed show evidence for bar structures. The incidence of bars in the Seyfert and normal galaxies is similar, suggesting Seyfert nuclei do not occur preferentially in barred systems. Furthermore, a slightly higher percentage of normal galaxies have multiple-bar structures.

John S. Mulchaey; Michael W. Regan

1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

Antihydrogen $(\\bar{\\rm{H}})$ and muonic antihydrogen $(\\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu})$ formation in low energy three-charge-particle collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A few-body formalism is applied for computation of two different three-charge-particle systems. The first system is a collision of a slow antiproton, $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$, with a positronium atom: Ps$=(e^+e^-)$ $-$ a bound state of an electron and a positron. The second problem is a collision of $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ with a muonic muonium atom, i.e. true muonium $-$ a bound state of two muons one positive and one negative: Ps$_{\\mu}=(\\mu^+\\mu^-)$. The total cross section of the following two reactions: $\\bar{\\rm p}+(e^+e^-) \\rightarrow \\bar{\\rm{H}} + e^-$ and $\\bar{\\rm p}+(\\mu^+\\mu^-) \\rightarrow \\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu} + \\mu^-$, where $\\bar{\\rm{H}}=(\\bar{\\rm p}e^+)$ is antihydrogen and $\\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu}=(\\bar{\\rm p}\\mu^+)$ is a muonic antihydrogen atom, i.e. a bound state of $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ and $\\mu^+$, are computed in the framework of a set of coupled two-component Faddeev-Hahn-type (FH-type) equations. Unlike the original Faddeev approach the FH-type equations are formulated in terms of only two but relevant components: $\\...

Sultanov, Renat A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Some aspects of $?^+$ parity determination in the reaction $? N\\to ?^+ \\bar{K}\\to N K \\bar{K}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the problem of how to determine the parity of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark in the reaction $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta\\to NK\\bar{K}$, where $N=n,p$. Our model calculations indicate that the contribution of the non-resonant background of the reaction $\\gamma N\\to NK\\bar{K}$ cannot be neglected, and that suggestions to determine the parity based solely on the initial-stage process $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta$ cannot be implemented cleanly. We discuss the various mechanisms that contribute to the background, and we identify some spin observables which are sensitive.

A. I. Titov; H. Ejiri; H. Haberzettl; K. Nakayama

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Interactive SIGHT: textual access to simple bar charts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information graphics, such as bar charts and line graphs, are an important component of many articles from popular media. The majority of such graphics have an intention (a high-level message) to communicate to the graph viewer. Since the intended message ... Keywords: Accessibility, Assistive technology, Graph summarization, Information graphics, Visual impairments

Seniz Demir; David Oliver; Edward Schwartz; Stephanie Elzer; Sandra Carberry; Kathleen F. Mccoy; Daniel Chester

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Manhattan Project: How to Navigate this Site  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

HOW TO NAVIGATE THIS SITE HOW TO NAVIGATE THIS SITE Resources > Navigation There are five main topical areas on this web site: Events, People, Places, Processes, and Science. These are further divided into sub-sections, each with its own introduction. The main topical areas can be accessed by clicking on a button on the horizontal bar above. Sub-sections can be accessed by clicking on a topic in the vertical column to your left. If you would like to begin with a quick survey of the Manhattan Project, try reading, in order, the eight Event sub-section pages, beginning with Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939. In addition to the main topical areas, the Resources section on the above button bar provides access to a variety of resource materials, including photos, documents, maps, and published histories.

110

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF BARRED GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Barred galaxies are known to possess magnetic fields that may affect the properties of bar substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. We use two-dimensional high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the formation and evolution of such substructures, as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center. The gaseous medium is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, non-self-gravitating, and threaded by initially uniform, azimuthal magnetic fields. We find that there exists an outermost x{sub 1}-orbit relative to which gaseous responses to an imposed stellar bar potential are completely different between inside and outside. Inside this orbit, gas is shocked into dust lanes and infalls to form a nuclear ring. Magnetic fields are compressed in dust lanes, reducing their peak density. Magnetic stress removes further angular momentum of the gas at the shocks, temporarily causing the dust lanes to bend into an 'L' shape and eventually leading to a smaller and more centrally distributed ring than in unmagnetized models. The mass inflow rates in magnetized models correspondingly become larger, by more than two orders of magnitude when the initial fields have an equipartition value with thermal energy, than in the unmagnetized counterparts. Outside the outermost x{sub 1}-orbit, on the other hand, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates near the corotation and bar-end regions, efficiently amplifying magnetic fields. The amplified fields shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms has a thin layer in which magnetic fields with opposite polarity reconnect via a tearing-mode instability. This produces numerous magnetic islands with large density that propagate along the arms to turn the outer disk into a highly chaotic state.

Kim, Woong-Tae [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Stone, James M., E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessing the Exposure and Health Risks of Secondhand Smoke in Restaurants and Bars by Workers and Patrons & Evaluating the Efficacy of Different Smoking Policies in Beijing Restaurants and Bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ban in Minnesota Bars and Restaurants." American Journal ofof second-hand smoke in restaurants and bars in five citiesof second-hand smoke in restaurants and bars in five cities

Liu, Ruiling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Pantex Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Site Pantex Site The primary mission of the Pantex Plant is the assembly, disassembly, testing, and evaluation of nuclear wespons in support of the NNSA stockpile...

113

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users...

114

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Data Hint at Cracks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Release Archive BaBar Data Hint at Cracks in the Standard Model June 18, 2012 Menlo Park, Calif. - Recently analyzed data from the BaBar experiment may suggest possible flaws...

115

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation Methods Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation

116

Spreader-Bar Radiation Detection System Enhancements: A Modeling and Simulation Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the modeling and simulation results of the investigation of enhanced spreader bar radiation detection systems.

Ely, James H.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Baciak, James E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Schweppe, John E.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Field Bend Bar Field Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8967,"lon":-89.6897,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Diamond Bar, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar, California: Energy Resources Bar, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0286226°, -117.8103367° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0286226,"lon":-117.8103367,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

Analysis of B ? ?l? Decays With BaBar  

SciTech Connect

As part of the BaBar project at SLAC to study the properties of B mesons, we have carried out a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decay mode B ? ?l?, which can be used to determine the magnitude of the Cabbibo- Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element Vub. Using simulated event samples, this study focuses on determining criteria on variables for selection of B ? ?l? signal and suppression of background from other types of BB events and continuum processes. In addition, we determine optimal cuts on variables to ensure a good neutrino reconstruction. With these selection cuts, we were able to achieve a signal-to-background ratio of 0.68 and a signal efficiency of the order of 1%. Applying these cuts to a sample of 83 million BB events recorded by BaBar in e+e collisions at the (4S) resonance, we obtain a yield of 115 19 B ? ?l? decays.

Chu, Y.; Littlejohn, B.; Binfelder, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Site Inspection and Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites November 2012 LMS/S09415 ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

122

Semileptonic decays $B/B_s \\to (?,\\etar, G)(l^+l^-,l\\bar?,?\\bar?)$ in the perturbative QCD approach beyond the leading order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we make a systematic study of the semileptonic decays $B/B_s \\to (\\eta,\\etar, G)(l^+l^-,l\\bar{\

Wen-Fei Wang; Ying-Ying Fan; Min Liu; Zhen-Jun Xiao

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Measurements of Charged Current Lepton Universality and $|V_{us}|$ using Tau Lepton Decays to $e^- \\bar{\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using 467 $fb^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ annihilation data collected with the BaBar detector, we measure $\\frac{{\\cal{B}}(\\tau^- \\to \\mu^- \\bar{\

Aubert, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ interaction in nuclear medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the $\\bar{K}N$ system is submerged in nuclear medium the $\\bar{K}N$ scattering amplitude and the final state branching ratios exhibit a strong energy dependence when going to energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. A sharp increase of $\\bar{K}N$ attraction below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold provides a link between shallow $\\bar{K}$-nuclear potentials based on the chiral $\\bar{K}N$ amplitude evaluated at threshold and the deep phenomenological optical potentials obtained in fits to kaonic atoms data. We show the energy dependence of the in-medium $K^{-}p$ amplitude and demonstrate the impact of energy dependent branching ratios on the $\\Lambda$-hypernuclear production rates. \\keywords{kaon-nucleon amplitude \\and nuclear medium \\and hypernuclei

A. Cieply

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

125

Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical striker set inside the gun barrel is launched to impact on the end cap that is threaded into the open end of the gun barrel, producing a tension on the gun barrel and the incident bar.

Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical striker set inside the gun barrel is launched to impact on the end cap that is threaded into the open end of the gun barrel, producing a tension on the gun barrel and the incident bar.

Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Thermal and environmental effects on fiber-reinforced polymer reinforcing bars and reinforced concrete elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel reinforcement in bridge decks results in high repair costs, unwanted traffic disruption, and unsafe structures. To help alleviate this problem, non-metallic fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars are being studied as an alternate type of reinforcement in bridge decks. In order to determine the suitability of the use of FRP bars, a number of tests have been performed on FRP bars to evaluate their long-term performance. These tests include uniaxial tension tests under a variety of environmental conditions and thermal expansion of the bars embedded in concrete. In an effort to characterize the FRP bars and to gain insight into their long-term performance, batteries of tests have been carried out. Samples from three different manufacturers were exposed under different environmental conditions and tested in uniaxial tension. For one of the bar types, the strength increased, while the other two bar types lost strength. In all cases, the modulus of the bars increased with exposure time. In addition, FRP reinforced concrete specimens were evaluated for thermal expansion. The results indicate that thermal cracking of the concrete by FRP bar expansion is not a significant problem.

Schaefer, Benjamin Carl

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Measurement of \\mathcal{B}(\\tau^{-}\\-->\\bar{K^{0}}\\pi^{-}\  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 384.6 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II collider, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. From this they measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.840 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.023(syst))%. This result is the most precise measurement to date and is consistent with the world average.

Wren, A

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

X-ray nuclear activity in S4G barred galaxies: No link between bar strength and co-occurrent supermassive black hole fueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d nuclear 2--10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6um imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q_b, taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing th...

Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H; Kim, Taehyun; Daz-Garca, Simn; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Gonzlez-Martn, Omaira; Ho, Luis C; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Zaritsky, Dennis; Sheth, Kartik; Athanassoula, E; Bosma, Albert; Comern, Sbastien; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; De Paz, Armando Gil; Hinz, Joannah L; Holwerda, Benne W; Laine, Jarkko; Meidt, Sharon; Menndez-Delmestre, Karn; Mizusawa, Trisha; Muoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Regan, Michael; Seibert, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS Forecast for the Tri-Cities NWS...

131

Medical Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Sites Name: Jenielle Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I started itching Aug. 1999. Diagnosed with ITP Oct.1999. I am in remission With a platelet count in...

132

On-site demonstration procedure for solid-state fluorescent ballast  

SciTech Connect

The report was presented to plant engineers and managers who were involved in an on-site demonstration of EETech solid-state ballasts for two 40-watt T12 fluorescent lamps. The report includes a brief review of the operating principles of solid-state fluorescent ballasts and the status of development achieved during the LBL program. The remainder of the test describes the techniques of managing and instrumenting a test area for assessing the performance of solid-state fluorescent ballasts at an occupied site.

Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Search for low-mass Higgs and dark bosons at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present BaBar latest results for the direct search of a light CP-odd Higgs boson using radiative decays of the Y(nS) (n=1,2,3) resonances in different final states. I also present the results for the search of a hidden sector gauge and Higgs bosons using the full BaBar datasample.

Oberhof, Benjamin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Research on Vortex Unstablity Caused by Bending Deformation of Drilling Bar in BTA Deep Hole Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex and unstability of bending boring bar caused by cutting fluid force are researched, with Timoshenko beam model and mated vibration model, based on which machining quality of BTA deep hole drilling and tools life can be promoted in practice. Linear ... Keywords: deep hole boring, boring bar, Timoshenko beam, mating vibration, vortex motion stability

Zhanqi Hu; Wu Zhao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Using Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Nuclear Dust Morphology to Rule Out Bars Fueling Seyfert Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If AGN are powered by the accretion of matter onto massive black holes, how does the gas in the host galaxy lose the required angular momentum to approach the black hole? Gas easily transfers angular momentum to stars in strong bars, making them likely candidates. Although ground-based searches for bars in active galaxies using both optical and near infrared surface brightness have not found any excess of bars relative to quiescent galaxies, the searches have not been able to rule out small-scale nuclear bars. To look for these nuclear bars we use HST WFPC2-NICMOS color maps to search for the straight dust lane signature of strong bars. Of the twelve Seyfert galaxies in our sample, only three have dust lanes consistent with a strong nuclear bar. Therefore, strong nuclear bars cannot be the primary fueling mechanism for Seyfert nuclei. We do find that a majority of the galaxies show an spiral morphology in their dust lanes. These spiral arms may be a possible fueling mechanism.

Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

136

Unsteady State Hardness Prediction of Industrial Quenched Steel Bar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Abdlmanam S. A. E Elmaryami, Sulaiman Bin Haji Hasan, Khalid Hasnan, Mohamed Elshayeb. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Sulaiman Bin Haji Hasan.

137

Unsteady State Hardness Prediction of Industrial Quenched Steel Bar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Abdlmanam S. A. E Elmaryami, Sulaiman Bin Haji Hasan, Haji Badrul Bin Omar, Prof. Dr. Mohamed Elshayeb. On-Site Speaker (Planned)...

138

Observation of ?_{cJ} decaying into the p\\bar{p}K^{+}K^{-} final state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First measurements of the decays of the three $\\chi_{cJ}$ states to $p\\bar{p}K^{+}K^{-}$ final states are presented. Intermediate $\\phi\\to K^{+}K^{-}$ and $\\Lambda(1520)\\to pK^{-}$ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for $\\chi_{cJ}\\to \\bar{p}K^{+}\\Lambda(1520)$, $\\Lambda(1520) \\bar{\\Lambda}(1520)$, and $\\phi p\\bar{p}$ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{p} K^{+}K^{-}$ decays. These are first observations of $\\chi_{cJ}$ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the $\\chi_{cJ}$ states. The experiment uses samples of $\\chi_{cJ}$ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106 million $\\psi^{\\prime}$ mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider.

BESIII Collaboration

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

140

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

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141

Evidence for Spin Correlation in t(t)over-bar Production  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and {bar t} spins to the total number of t{bar t} events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 t{bar t} candidate events with a single lepton {ell} (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed p{bar p} collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement with the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in t{bar t} events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; la Cruz, I. Heredia-De; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

SQA(TM): Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar Program  

SciTech Connect

OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT) has led this SQA (Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar) program to solve the major surface quality problems plaguing the US special quality steel bars and rods industry and their customers, based on crosscutting sensors and controls technologies. Surface defects in steel formed in a hot rolling process are one of the most common quality issues faced by the American steel industry, accounting for roughly 50% of the rejects or 2.5% of the total shipment. Unlike other problems such as the mechanical properties of the steel product, most surface defects are sporadic and cannot be addressed based on sampling techniques. This issue hurts the rolling industry and their customers in their process efficiency and operational costs. The goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate an SQA prototype, with synergy of HotEye and other innovations, that enables effective rolling process control and efficient quality control. HotEye, OGTs invention, delivers high definition images of workpieces at or exceeding 1,450?C while the workpieces travel at 100 m/s. The elimination of surface defect rejects will be achieved through the integration of imaging-based quality assessment, advanced signal processing, predictive process controls and the integration with other quality control tools. The SQA program team, composed of entities capable of and experienced in (1) research, (2) technology manufacturing, (3) technology sales and marketing, and (4) technology end users, is very strong. There were 5 core participants: OGT, Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), University of Wisconsin (UW), Charter Steel (Charter) and ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor (Inland). OGT served as the project coordinator. OGT participated in both research and commercialization. GIT and UW provided significant technical inputs to this SQA project. The steel mills provided access to their rolling lines for data collection, design of experiments, host of technology test and verification, and first-hand knowledge of the most advanced rolling line operation in the US. This project lasted 5 years with 5 major tasks. The team successfully worked through the tasks with deliverables in detection, data analysis and process control. Technologies developed in this project were commercialized as soon as they were ready. For instance, the advanced surface defect detection algorithms were integrated into OGTs HotEye RSB systems late 2005, resulting in a more matured product serving the steel industry. In addition to the commercialization results, the SQA team delivered 7 papers and 1 patent. OGT was also recognized by two prestigious awards, including the R&D100 Award in 2006. To date, this SQA project has started to make an impact in the special bar quality industry. The resulted product, HotEye RSB systems have been accepted by quality steel mills worldwide. Over 16 installations were completed, including 1 in Argentina, 2 in Canada, 2 in China, 2 in Germany, 2 in Japan, and 7 in the U.S. Documented savings in reduced internal rejects, improved customer satisfaction and simplified processes were reported from various mills. In one case, the mill reported over 50% reduction in its scrap, reflecting a significant saving in energy and reduction in emission. There exist additional applications in the steel industry where the developed technologies can be used. OGT is working toward bringing the developed technologies to more applications. Examples are: in-line inspection and process control for continuous casting, steel rails, and seamless tube manufacturing.

Tzyy-Shuh Chang; Jianjun Shi; Shiyu Zhou

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

143

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

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144

Freedom Field Site Data: June 14, 2011 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freedom Field Site Data: June 14, 2011 Freedom Field Site Data: June 14, 2011 Dataset Summary Description Freedom Field is a not-for-profit organization formed to facilitate development and commercialization of renewable energy solutions. The organization has installed a variety of renewable energy generating technologies at their facility (located at Rock River Water Reclamation in Rockford, IL), with the intention of serving as a demonstration facility. The facility monitors data (at 5-minute intervals) from a weather station, 12.4 kW of PV panels (56 220-watt panels), a 10kW wind turbine (HAWT), a 1.2 kW wind turbine (VAWT), an absorption cooling system, and biogas burners. Included here is all of the 5-minute monitoring data for the the entire facility during a single 24-hour period (June 14, 2011).During the first year of operation, the facility generated 30,000 kWh.

145

Nonlinear Development of the Secular Bar-mode Instability in Rotating Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have modelled the nonlinear development of the secular bar-mode instability that is driven by gravitational radiation-reaction (GRR) forces in rotating neutron stars. In the absence of any competing viscous effects, an initially uniformly rotating, axisymmetric $n=1/2$ polytropic star with a ratio of rotational to gravitational potential energy $T/|W| = 0.181$ is driven by GRR forces to a bar-like structure, as predicted by linear theory. The pattern frequency of the bar slows to nearly zero, that is, the bar becomes almost stationary as viewed from an inertial frame of reference as GRR removes energy and angular momentum from the star. In this ``Dedekind-like'' state, rotational energy is stored as motion of the fluid in highly noncircular orbits inside the bar. However, in less than 10 dynamical times after its formation, the bar loses its initially coherent structure as the ordered flow inside the bar is disrupted by what appears to be a purely hydrodynamical, short-wavelength, ``shearing'' type instability. The gravitational waveforms generated by such an event are determined, and an estimate of the detectability of these waves is presented.

Shangli Ou; Joel E. Tohline; Lee Lindblom

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Bar-Halo Interaction - II. Secular evolution and the religion of N-body simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores resonance-driven secular evolution between a bar and dark-matter halo using N-body simulations. We make direct comparisons to our analytic theory (Weinberg & Katz 2005) to demonstrate the great difficulty that an N-body simulation has representing these dynamics for realistic astronomical interactions. In a dark-matter halo, the bar's angular momentum is coupled to the central density cusp (if present) by the Inner Lindblad Resonance. Owing to this angular momentum transfer and self-consistent re-equilibration, strong realistic bars WILL modify the cusp profile, lowering the central densities within about 30% of the bar radius in a few bar orbits. Past results to the contrary (Sellwood 2006, McMillan & Dehnen 2005) may be the result of weak bars or numerical artifacts. The magnitude depends on many factors and we illustrate the sensitivity of the response to the dark-matter profile, the bar shape and mass, and the galaxy's evolutionary history. For example, if the bar length is comparable to the size of a central dark-matter core, the bar may exchange angular momentum without changing its pattern speed significantly. We emphasise that this apparently simple example of secular evolution is remarkably subtle in detail and conclude that an N-body exploration of any astronomical scenario requires a deep investigation into the underlying dynamical mechanisms for that particular problem to set the necessary requirements for the simulation parameters and method (e.g. particle number and Poisson solver). Simply put, N-body simulations do not divinely reveal truth and hence their results are not infallible. They are unlikely to provide useful insight on their own, particularly for the study of even more complex secular processes such as the production of pseudo-bulges and disk heating.

Martin D. Weinberg; Neal Katz

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

147

BaBar Results on E+ E- ---> P Anti-P By Means of ISR  

SciTech Connect

BaBar has measured with unprecedented accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} cross section from the threshold up to Q{sub p{bar p}}{sup 2} {approx} 20 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, finding out an unexpected cross section, with plateaux and negative steps. Evidence for a ratio |G{sub E}/G{sub M}| > 1 has also been found as well as a sudden variation in |G{sub M}| just above the threshold.

Ferroli, Rinaldo Baldini; /Enrico Fermi Ctr., Rome /Frascati

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Site C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' u. s. A r my Corps or Engineers Kurfal.. Ilisfr ifl om« 1776 N1 . ~lI rll Sfred , lIu fflll" , New v ur k. 14207 Site C loseout Report for th e Ashland I (Includlng Seaway Arca D), Ashland 2 and Rattlesnake Creek FUS RAP Sites To nawanda . New Yor k F ina l - Octo ber 2006 Formerl y Ut ilized Sites Remedi al Actiun Program Dt:CLAlUlfiO lO OF RF ~ I'O""" A <:n o .. ('oMnLflOI'O '" 1 S-~1 1 A "n· nvnn: S Ill: C'lO'iU 'U l RtrUlIT f OR A SlIu x u l (I "ICLU I ING S t:A" ·,H A RU D j, AS H I .A ~O 2 A."n RAnU:M'AKf eRU" ~ rn~ I!d'on at A.hland 1 (Ind udonl Seaway Area DJ. Ashland 2 and kan~snak c Creek is Wi,...... 1c in acwr.hnu willi ~ Rcconl or Oecisim (ROD) . igned 00> April 20. 1998 and l'.1pbIWlOII <;If

149

Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Robinson Bar Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Clayton, Idaho Coordinates 44.2593623°, -114.4017296° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

151

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baker's Bar M Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Adams, Oregon Coordinates 45.767354°, -118.5624734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

152

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets 5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 4, 2011 - 7:15am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Rational System Architect. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: IBM Rational System 11.4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect. reference LINKS: IBM Advisory: 21497689 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025464 CVE-2011-1207 Secunia Advisory: SA43399 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the

153

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application December 28, 2009 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application submitted by Areva Enrichment Services LLC to help fund a uranium enrichment facility in Idaho. The simple answer is no. The Act, as passed by Congress, applies only to government procurements. It does not apply to financial assistance programs or loan guarantee programs. The Act, as passed by Congress, also applies only to the investments of the actual offerors (or contractors) for

154

Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel, with subsequent decay of the $W^+W^-$ pair into $\\ell \

Papaefstathiou, Andreas; Zurita, Jos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

High strain rate mechanical characterization of trabecular bone utilizing the split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique has been in use in one form or another for more than fifty years and has recently gained a great deal of attention for its ability to characterize materials such as metals, ...

Johnson, Timothy Paul Mahal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Experimental Use as a Potential Bar to Patentability in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a number of activities that, by statute, prevent an inventor from obtaining a valid U.S. patent on an invention. Two of the most common statutory bars to...

157

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 5 Chemistry, Formulation, and Performance of Syndet and Combo Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 5 Chemistry, Formulation, and Performance of Syndet and Combo Bars Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 5 Chemistry

158

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Animation of a Telecommunications Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animation of a Telecommunications Site Example Layout Animation of a Telecommunications Site Example Layout The animation below provides an example of a telecommunications site layout that uses hydrogen fuel cells for backup power along with some of the codes and standards that apply to such a site. Roll over each of the colored bars below to reveal individual setback requirements, which identify the mandatory separation distances of the site's various components, or select the "Go to Setback Details" button for a chart that summarizes these requirements as defined by the 2006 International Fire Code. Select the "Construction Approval" button for a detailed list of codes and standards related to the construction of a site, or select the "Operation Approval" button for codes and standards related to ongoing operation and

159

eclipsePower : Watt daylightPower : Watt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly Scalable Distributed Dataflow Analysis Joseph L. Greathouse, Chelsea LeBlanc, Todd Austin- visor's page fault handler then checks the page number against a list of pages that contain shadowed timekeeping code in the timer interrupt handler and the scheduler code of dom0 and the hypervisor. We

de Weck, Olivier L.

160

Heat-source specification 500 watt(e) RTG  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This specification establishes the requirements for a /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat source and its fuel capsule for application in a 500 W(e) thermoelectric generator. The specification covers: fuel composition and quantity; the Hastelloy S fuel capsule material and fabrication; and the quality assurance requirements for the assembled heat source. (LCL)

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called ``hi-pot`` (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven`s Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the ``double source`` method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called hi-pot'' (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven's Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the double source'' method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Division Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Our research program is directed toward developing and understanding metal complexes that catalyze reactions relevant to renewable energy, particularly those that reduce carbon dioxide to fuels or fuel precursors. Carbon dioxide reduction catalysts are important targets because they could enable "recycling" of hydrocarbon fuels, thus lowering their carbon footprint. Our research addresses two key challenges in this area. First, we aim to improve the lifetimes, activity, and selectivity of homogeneous catalysts by incorporating them into porous heterogeneous frameworks derived from structurally persistent organic polymers. These frameworks allow isolation of the catalytic centers, which inhibits reaction pathways that lead to catalyst decomposition, and enable the spatially controlled deployment of ancillary functional groups that bind and concentrate substrate near the active site and/or assist with its activation. Second, we are developing homogeneous dual-catalyst systems and assemblies that couple CO2 reduction catalysis to a parallel catalytic reaction that provides the reducing equivalents. We are especially interested in proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions involving activation of H2 and of organic dehydrogenation substrates, wherein the proton pathway also participates in the conversion of CO2 to CO. In both of these research thrusts we are studying catalysts that may be activated under thermal, electrochemical, or photochemical conditions.

164

NIST Pico-Watt ACR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ACR the equivalence between the electrical and optical ... ACR cavity has significantly lower heat capacity ... Low frequency temperature noise of a TES ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hydrogen Storage in a Microporous Metal-Organic Framework with Exposed Mn2+ Coordination Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage in a Microporous Metal-Organic Framework with Exposed Mn2+ Coordination Sites and 90 bar, which at 60 g H2/L provides a storage density 85% of that of liquid hydrogen. The material-358. (2) EERE: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program Homepage, www.eere.energy

166

AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF GRAVEL BARS IN A RIVER CHANNEL FROM AIRBORNE LIDAR-DERIVED DTM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airborne Laser Scanning or LiDAR data are widely used nowadays in river valleys for topography and hydro-morphology. However, the large data sets of unprocessed 3D point clouds require some challenging treatment and end-users may prefer to deal with DTMs (Digital Terrain Models) derived from LiDAR surveys. Without any complementary data (such as field survey or photographs) detecting position and shape of gravel bars in a river is a demanding task, especially if done manually. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of a river channel into distinct hydro- morphological entities: water, gravel bars, banks,... This method is based on image processing algorithms (region growing segmentation combined with morphological closing and altitude thresholding) in order to separate water from other elements present in the channel, based on the altitude information. This method is applied to a reach of the Arcen-Maurienne River, France, with alternate gravel bars. The only data source is the 0.25 m resolution DTM, derived from an airborne LiDAR survey. Results show that the developed method succeeds in automatically delimiting the main channel and in detecting gravel bars. It is then possible to get global information on the gravel bars such as location along the river or emerged surface area and topography.

Lionel Pnard; Maxime Morel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

CERCLA - Site Selector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(LEHR) Fernald Preserve Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov...

169

ORNL DAAC Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map ORNL DAAC Site Map About Us About ORNL DAAC Who We Are User Working Group Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Citation Policy News Newsletters Workshops Site Map Products...

170

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

171

CERCLA - Site Selector  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov Information Quality FOIA...

172

Search for a narrow t(t)over-bar resonance in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report a search for a narrow t{bar t} resonance that decays into a lepton+jets final state based on an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits on the production cross section of such a resonance multiplied by its branching fraction to t{bar t}. We exclude a leptophobic topcolor Z' at the 95% confidence level for masses below 835 GeV (940 GeV) if its width is 1.2% (3%) of its mass. We also exclude color octet vector bosons (colorons) with masses below 775 GeV.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Search for D0 - D0bar Mixing and Rare Charm Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a dataset acquired by the BaBar experiment running on and near the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance from 1999-2002, limits are set on the rate of $D^0$-- $\\kern 0.2em\\bar{\\kern -0.2em D}{}^0$ mixing using the decay mode $D^{*+} \\to D^0 \\pi^{+}$, followed by a semi-leptonic decay of the $D^0$. Results are compared to previous BaBar analysis using hadronic decays. We also report on a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decays $D^0 \\to e^{+} e^{-}$ ($\\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$) and the lepton-flavor violation decays $D^0 \\to e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}$.

U. Egede; for the BABAR Collaboration

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion U.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy Calibration of the BaBar EMC Using the Pi0 Invariant Mass Method  

SciTech Connect

The BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter energy calibration method was compared with the local and global peak iteration procedures, of Crystal Barrel and CLEO-II. An investigation was made of the possibility of {Upsilon}(4S) background reduction which could lead to increased statistics over a shorter time interval, for efficient calibration runs. The BaBar software package was used with unreconstructed data to study the energy response of the calorimeter, by utilizing the {pi}{sup 0} mass constraint on pairs of photon clusters.

Tanner, David J.; /Manchester U.

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

176

3D Hopkinson bar: new experiments for dynamic testing on soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct analysis of the dynamic response of materials is possible using Split Hopkinson pressure bar method. For soils, it has to be adapted since the specimen has generally poor mechanical properties. An original experimental arrangement called "Three-Dimensional Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar" (3D SHPB) is proposed. It allows the measurement of the complete three-dimensional dynamic response of soils. Different types of confinement systems are used. The results on different loading paths are compared with other works on sand and clay. The analysis at grain-size level gives further elements on the comminution process.

Semblat, J F; Gary, G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Designs of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities for Deflecting/Crabbing Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is currently being considered for a number of applications. The new parallel-bar design with curved loading elements and circular or elliptical outer conductors have improved properties compared to the designs with rectangular outer conductors. We present the designs proposed as deflecting cavities for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for Project-X and as crabbing cavities for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade and electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab.

J.R. Delayen, S.U. De Silva

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Regularization of singular terms in $N\\bar{N}$ potential model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a method of singular terms regularization in potential model of $N\\bar{N}$ interaction. This method is free from any uncertainties, related to the usual cut-off procedure and based on the fact, that in the presence of sufficiently strong short-range annihilation $N$ and $\\bar{N}$ never approach close enough to each other. The effect of mentioned singular terms of OBE potential, modified by annihilation is shown to be repulsive. The obtained results for S- and P-wave scattering lengths are in agreement with existing theoretical models.

O. D. Dalkarov A. Yu. Voronin

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

SSA Young Aspen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site (SSA-YA) The pole-tower at the YA site Closer look at the pole-tower at the YA site Solar panels powering the site, mounted on a folding ladder The young aspen canopy...

180

Chapter 3: Building Siting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Building Siting : Building Siting Site Issues at LANL Site Inventory and Analysis Site Design Transportation and Parking LANL | Chapter 3 Site Issues at LANL Definitions and related documents Building Siting Laboratory site-wide issues include transportation and travel distances for building occupants, impacts on wildlife corridors and hydrology, and energy supply and distribution limitations. Decisions made during site selec- tion and planning impact the surrounding natural habitat, architectural design integration, building energy con- sumption, occupant comfort, and occupant productivity. Significant opportunities for creating greener facilities arise during the site selection and site planning stages of design. Because LANL development zones are pre- determined, identify the various factors affecting devel-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Indiana Web Sites  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana Web Sites Other Links : Indiana Electricity Profile: Indiana Energy Profile: Indiana Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

182

Florida Web Sites  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Web Sites Other Links : Florida Electricity Profile: Florida Energy Profile: Florida Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

183

MIDC: Web Site Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDC Web Site Search Enter words or phrases: Search Clear Help Also see the site directory. NREL MIDC...

184

The Visibility of Galactic Bars and Spiral Structure At High Redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the visibility of galactic bars and spiral structure in the distant Universe by artificially redshifting 101 B-band CCD images of local spiral galaxies from the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey. Our artificially redshifted images correspond to Hubble Space Telescope I-band observations of the local galaxy sample seen at z=0.7, with integration times matching those of both the very deep Northern Hubble Deep Field data, and the much shallower Flanking Field observations. The expected visibility of galactic bars is probed in two ways: (1) using traditional visual classification, and (2) by charting the changing shape of the galaxy distribution in "Hubble space", a quantitative two-parameter description of galactic structure that maps closely on to Hubble's original tuning fork. Both analyses suggest that over 2/3 of strongly barred luminous local spirals i.e. objects classified as SB in the Third Reference Catalog) would still be classified as strongly barred at z=0.7 in the Hubbl...

Van den Bergh, S; Whyte, L F; Merrifield, M R; Eskridge, P B; Frogel, J A; Pogge, R W; Bergh, Sidney van den; Abraham, Roberto G.; Whyte, Laura F.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Eskridge, Paul; Frogel, Jay A.; Pogge, Richard

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model at BaBar and Belle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results on the search for new physics at BaBar and Belle B-factories are presented. The search for a light Higgs boson produced in the decay of different Y resonances is shown. In addition, recent measurements aimed to discover invisible final states produced by new physics mechanisms beyond the standard model are presented.

Calderini, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS Press 31AE8E3D42D3E14DDBA41DE5FCD66625 AOCS Press

187

Bar-driven fueling of galactic nuclei: a 2D view  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss evidences for bar-driven gas fueling in the central regions of galaxies, focusing on scales down to about 10 pc. I thus mention the building of inner disks, and the link with resonances, as well as the corresponding kinematic signatures such as sigma-drops and counter-rotating nuclear disks as probed via integral-field spectroscopy.

Emsellem, E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Improved grating and bar cell models in cortical area V1 and texture coding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents improved models of cortical neurons in V1 that act like grating and bar detectors. Both models use the same frontend, which consists of a contrast normalisation in combination with isotropic DOG filtering, followed by anisotropic ... Keywords: Computational models, Cortical cells, Diatoms, Groupings, Symmetry order, Texture analysis

J. M. H. du Buf

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

THE TWO-PHASE FORMATION HISTORY OF SPIRAL GALAXIES TRACED BY THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE BAR FRACTION  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of galactic bars and the link with disk and spheroid formation in a sample of zoom-in cosmological simulations. Our simulation sample focuses on galaxies with present-day stellar masses in the 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} range, in field and loose group environments, with a broad variety of mass growth histories. In our models, bars are almost absent from the progenitors of present-day spirals at z > 1.5, and they remain rare and generally too weak to be observable down to z Almost-Equal-To 1. After this characteristic epoch, the fractions of observable and strong bars rise rapidly, bars being present in 80% of spiral galaxies and easily observable in two thirds of these at z {<=} 0.5. This is quantitatively consistent with the redshift evolution of the observed bar fraction, although the latter is presently known up to z Almost-Equal-To 0.8 because of band-shifting and resolution effects. Our models hence predict that the decrease in the bar fraction with increasing redshift should continue with a fraction of observable bars not larger than 10%-15% in disk galaxies at z > 1. Our models also predict later bar formation in lower-mass galaxies, in agreement with existing data. We find that the characteristic epoch of bar formation, namely redshift z Almost-Equal-To 0.8-1 in the studied mass range, corresponds to the epoch at which today's spirals acquire their disk-dominated morphology. At higher redshift, disks tend to be rapidly destroyed by mergers and gravitational instabilities and rarely develop significant bars. We hence suggest that the bar formation epoch corresponds to the transition between an early 'violent' phase of spiral galaxy formation at z {>=} 1 and a late 'secular' phase at z {<=} 0.8. In the secular phase, the presence of bars substantially contributes to the growth of the (pseudo-)bulge, but the bulge mass budget remains statistically dominated by the contribution of mergers, interactions, and disk instabilities at high redshift. Early bars at z > 1 are often short-lived, while most of the bars formed at z {<=} 1 persist down to z = 0, late cosmological gas infall being necessary to maintain some of them.

Kraljic, Katarina; Bournaud, Frederic [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp, CNRS/INSU, Universite Paris Diderot, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Martig, Marie [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Geothermal: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

192

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web site A web site is now available for the Land Validation project. It was created with the purpose of facilitating communication among MODIS Land Validation Principal...

193

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of specific site safety functions. C. Must have the ability to provide an overall systematic assessment of site safety performance and to characterize the major issues and...

194

Plug & Play Sensors Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Documents. Plug & Play Sensors Sites. ... Plug & Play Sensors Sites. By selecting some of the links below, you will be leaving NIST webspace. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Career Site FAQs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Careers Working at ORNL Diversity Postdocs Internships and Postgrad Opportunities Fellowships Career Site FAQs Events and Conferences Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Career Site...

196

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Particle Physics Education Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Physics Education Sites quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites -...

198

NREL: News Feature - NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use December 7, 2009 Photo of a truck delivering materials to an office building under construction. Enlarge image Designers met NREL's aggressive energy use requirement for the Research Support Facility by taking advantage Colorado's sunny climate. Large windows for daylighting and thermally sophisticated wall systems for solar heating are crucial to the net-zero energy design. Credit: Pat Corkery Technology - from sophisticated computer modeling to advanced windows that actually open! - will help the newest building at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory be one of the world's most energy efficient offices. But making NREL's new Research Support Facility into a showcase for engineering net zero energy office design didn't begin with rooftop solar

199

Polarization Observables in $?N\\to K\\bar{K}N$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore some of the rich structure of the polarization observables recently developed for processes like $\\gamma N\\to\\pi\\pi N$ and $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$ in the framework of a specific model for the latter process. Emphasis is placed on observables that may be accesible at existing facilities in the near future. The sensitivity of the observables to the details of the model indicate that they will be a very useful tool in differentiating between different models for reactions like these. In the framework of a model for $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$, we examine the sensitivity of the observables to coupling constants of the $\\phi$, to the properties of the $\\Lambda(1405)$, and to the existence of the $\\Theta^+$.

W. Roberts

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fundamental and HOM Coupler Design for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered as a deflecting system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and as a crabbing cavity for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. Currently the designs are optimized to achieve lower surface fields within the dimensional constraints for the above applications. A detailed analysis of the fundamental input power coupler design for the parallel-bar cavity is performed considering beam loading and the effects of microphonics. For higher beam loading the damping of the HOMs is vital to reduce beam instabilities generated due to the wake fields. An analysis of threshold impedances for each application and impedances of the modes that requires damping are presented in this paper with the design of HOM couplers.

S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Water Velocity Measurement on an Extended-Length Submerged Bar Screen at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study of water velocity around an extended-length submerged bar screen (ESBS) at John Day Dam. The study was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by AScI Corporation and MEVATEC Corporation in March of 2000. This report was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ESBS are being studied as one method for diverting juvenile migrating fish from the dam's turbine intakes into the gate well and through the juvenile fish bypass channels.

Weiland, Mark A

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

202

Design and Development of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties that is being considered for a number of applications. We present the designs of a 499 MHz deflecting cavity developed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade and a 400 MHz crabbing cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. Prototypes of these two cavities are now under development and fabrication.

Payagalage Subashini Uddi De Silva, Jean Delayen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Results on Charmonium(?like) and Bottomonium(?like) States from Belle and BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopy results for Belle and BaBar are reported. A particular focus is put on new results of the X(3872) state with its radiative decays to J/?? and ??? its decay into J/?3? and the search for production in radiative Upsilon decays. Another focus is L?=?2 mesons in particlar a possible D?wave assignment to the X(3872) and the confirmation of an Upsilon D?wave state.

Jens Sren; The Belle Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nuclear Bar, Star Formation and Gas Fueling in the Active Galaxy NGC 4303  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 and NICMOS images are used to investigate the gas/dust and stellar structure inside the central 300 pc of the nearby active galaxy NGC 4303. The NICMOS H-band (F160W) image reveals a bright core and a nuclear elongated bar-like structure of 250 pc in diameter. The bar is centered on the bright core, and its major axis is oriented in proyection along the spin axis of the nuclear gaseous rotating disk recently detected (Colina & Arribas 1999). The V-H (F606W - F160W) image reveals a complex gas/dust distribution with a two-arm spiral structure of about 225 pc in radius. The southwestern arm is traced by young star-forming knots while the northeastern arm is detected by the presence of dust lanes. These spirals do not have a smooth structure but rather they are made of smaller flocculent spirals or filament-like structures. The magnitudes and colors of the star-forming knots are typical of clusters of young stars with masses of 0.5 to 1 x $10^5 M_{solar}, and ages of 5 to 25 million years. The overall structure of the nuclear spirals as well as the size, number and masses of the star-forming knots are explained in the context of a massive gaseous nuclear disk subject to self-gravitational instabilities and to the gravitational field created by the nuclear bar. According to the model, the gaseous disk has a mass of about 5 x 10^7 M_{solar} inside a radius of 400 pc, the bar has a radius of 150 pc and a pattern speed of about 0.5 Myr^{-1}, and the average mass accretion rate into the core (R < 8 pc) is about 0.01 M_{solar}$ yr^{-1} for about 80 Myr.

L. Colina; K. Wada

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

STAR FORMATION HISTORY IN TWO FIELDS OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD BAR  

SciTech Connect

The Bar is the most productive region of the Small Magellanic Cloud in terms of star formation but also the least studied one. In this paper, we investigate the star formation history of two fields located in the SW and in the NE portion of the Bar using two independent and well-tested procedures applied to the color-magnitude diagrams of their stellar populations resolved by means of deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry. We find that the Bar experienced a negligible star formation activity in the first few Gyr, followed by a dramatic enhancement from 6 to 4 Gyr ago and a nearly constant activity since then. The two examined fields differ both in the rate of star formation and in the ratio of recent over past activity, but share the very low level of initial activity and its sudden increase around 5 Gyr ago. The striking similarity between the timing of the enhancement and the timing of the major episode in the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of a close encounter triggering star formation.

Cignoni, M. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Cole, A. A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Tosi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Gallagher, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Nota, A. [STScI, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grebel, E. K., E-mail: michele.cignoni@unibo.it [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH{sub 2} blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

Villa, Andrea; Mussi, Valerio [Laboratorio MUSP-via Turotti 9, 29122 Piacenza (Italy); Strano, Matteo [Politecnico di Milano-Dipartimento di Meccanica, via La Masa 1, 20156, Milan (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

207

Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 To operate the Hanford Site (Site),...

208

Retrieval Group Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information Retrieval Tools and Systems: ... currently unavailable. Other sites with extensive information retrieval (IR) links: ...

209

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

210

HERSCHEL SEARCH FOR O{sub 2} TOWARD THE ORION BAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of a search for molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) toward the Orion Bar, a prominent photodissociation region at the southern edge of the H II region created by the luminous Trapezium stars. We observed the spectral region around the frequency of the O{sub 2} N{sub J} = 3{sub 3}-1{sub 2} transition at 487 GHz and the 5{sub 4}-3{sub 4} transition at 774 GHz using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory. Neither line was detected, but the 3{sigma} upper limits established here translate to a total line-of-sight O{sub 2} column density <1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} for an emitting region whose temperature is between 30 K and 250 K, or <1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} if the O{sub 2} emitting region is primarily at a temperature of {approx}<100 K. Because the Orion Bar is oriented nearly edge-on relative to our line of sight, the observed column density is enhanced by a factor estimated to be between 4 and 20 relative to the face-on value. Our upper limits imply that the face-on O{sub 2} column density is less than 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, a value that is below, and possibly well below, model predictions for gas with a density of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} exposed to a far-ultraviolet flux 10{sup 4} times the local value, conditions inferred from previous observations of the Orion Bar. The discrepancy might be resolved if (1) the adsorption energy of O atoms to ice is greater than 800 K; (2) the total face-on A{sub V} of the Bar is less than required for O{sub 2} to reach peak abundance; (3) the O{sub 2} emission arises within dense clumps with a small beam filling factor; or (4) the face-on depth into the Bar where O{sub 2} reaches its peak abundance, which is density dependent, corresponds to a sky position different from that sampled by our Herschel beams.

Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kaufman, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Hollenbach, David J. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Black, John H.; Hjalmarson, Ake; Liseau, Rene [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Encrenaz, Pierre; Pagani, Laurent [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Falgarone, Edith; Gerin, Maryvonne [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Li, Di [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neufeld, David A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Snell, Ronald L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Van der Tak, Floris [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, and Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sensitivity of LHC experiments to the $t\\bar{t}H$ final state, with $H \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$, at center of mass energy of 14 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the discovery of a Higgs-like particle in 2012, attention has now turned to measuring its properties, e.g., coupling to various bosonic and fermionic final states, its spin and parity, etc. In this note, we study the sensitivity of experiments at the LHC to its coupling to the top quark, by searching for the process pp $\\rightarrow t\\bar{t}H$, where the primary decay mode of the $H$ is $\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$. In this paper, the $t\\bar{t}$ system is detected in the dilepton final state. This study is performed assuming a center of mass energy of 14 TeV and integrated luminosities of 300 fb$^{-1}$ (with an average pileup ($\\mu$) of 50 additional collisions per bunch crossing) and 3000 fb$^{-1}$ (with $\\mu=140$). We include systematic uncertainties in production cross-sections as well as the more important experimental uncertainties. Preliminary studies indicate that we will observe the $t\\bar{t}H$ final state with a significance of 2.4 and $\\ge 5.3$ for the two luminosity scenarios, respectively; addition of other $t\\bar{t}$ final states should increase the overall significance for observing $t\\bar{t}H$.

Ricardo Goncalo; Stefan Guindon; Vivek Jain

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

16th International Conference in Quantum ChromoDynamics: Charmonium-like states at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new results on charmonium-like states from the BaBar experiment located at the PEP-II asymmetric energy $e^+e^-$ collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Elisa Fioravanti

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

Search for New Bottomlike Quark Pair Decays Q Q-Bar to (T W- ) (T-Bar W -) in Same-Charge Dilepton Events  

SciTech Connect

We report the most restrictive direct limits on masses of fourth-generation down-type quarks b{prime}, and quark-like composite fermions (B or T{sub 5/3}), decaying promptly to tW{sup {-+}}. We search for a significant excess of events with two same-charge leptons (e, {mu}), several hadronic jets, and missing transverse energy. An analysis of data from p{bar p} collisions with an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab yields no evidence for such a signal, setting mass limits m{sub b{prime}}, m{sub B} > 338 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub T{sub 5/3}} > 365 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR; Asaadi, J.; /Texas A-M; Ashmanskas, W.; /Fermilab; Attal, A.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Aurisano, A.; /Texas A-M; Azfar, F.; /Oxford U.; Badgett, W.; /Fermilab; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Barnes, V.E.; /Purdue U.; Barnett, B.A.; /Johns Hopkins U. /INFN, Pisa /Comenius U. /MIT /TRIUMF /INFN, Pisa /University Coll. London /Johns Hopkins U. /INFN, Pisa /Wisconsin U., Madison /Duke U. /Fermilab /CERN /Rockefeller U. /Fermilab /INFN, Padua /University Coll. London /Argonne, HEP /Brandeis U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Duke U. /Rochester U. /Rochester U. /Purdue U. /Pittsburgh U. /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Barbara /Illinois U., Urbana /INFN, Bologna /Michigan State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR; /more authors..

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan: Site planning  

SciTech Connect

This plan revises the Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan submitted by Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988. It separates the Hanford Site facilities into two categories: ''strategically required'' facilities and ''marginal'' facilities. It provides a comparison of future facility requirements against existing capacities and proposed projects to eliminate or consolidate marginal facilities (i.e., those facilities that are not fully utilized or are no longer required to accomplish programmatic missions). The objective is to enhance the operating efficiency of the Hanford Site by maximizing facility use and minimizing unnecessary facility operating and maintenance costs. 11 refs.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Site Manager Kansas City Site Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kansas City Site Office (KCSO) Workforce Diversity FY 2010 NNSA Service Center EEO and Diversity Program Office PO Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 (505) 845-5517 TTY (800)...

216

SSA Fen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-Fen site. A general view of the Fen The flux tower at the Fen The huts at the Fen Pink flamingos, fen hens at the SSA-Fen site. Aerial...

217

Redesigned Web Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Redesigned Web Sites In an ongoing effort to improve services to our customers, the ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce that it has released a major revision to its Web site. The new...

218

Web Site Metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International World Wide Web Conference, pages 11231124,Erik Wilde. Site Metadata on the Web. In Proceedings of theUCB ISchool Report 2009-028 Web Site Metadata [4] David R.

Wilde, Erik; Roy, Anuradha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Towoomba Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Image TWM-1: General view of the Towoomba savanna grassland site, South Africa. (Photograph by Dr. R.J. Scholes, Forestek, CSIR, Pretoria, South Africa). Go to Site...

220

2012 Site Visit Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... before the first day on-site, all team members meet at their hotel to finalize ... All of the prework done above will save you much time and energy on-site ...

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ORNL Site Ofice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORNL Site Ofice ORNL Site Ofice P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6269 January 28, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR GREGORY H. WOODS GENERAL COUNSEL GC-1 FROM: SUBJECT: ��MK = MOORE, MANAGER lF �NL SITE OFFICE ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY FOR 2013- OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ORNL) SITE OFFICE (OSO) This correspondence transmits the Annual NEPA Planning Summary for 2013 for OSO.

222

Completed Sites Listing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As of fiscal year 2012, EM (and its predecessor organization UMTRA) completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 24 states.

223

Idaho Site Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Nuclear Facilities Idaho Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Idaho Closure Project (ICP) This page was last updated on May 16...

224

The Secular Bar-Mode Instability in Rapidly Rotating Stars Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uniformly rotating, homogeneous, incompressible Maclaurin spheroids that spin sufficiently rapidly are secularly unstable to nonaxisymmetric, bar-mode perturbations when viscosity is present. The intuitive explanation is that energy dissipation by viscosity can drive an unstable spheroid to a stable, triaxial configuration of lower energy - a Jacobi ellipsoid. But what about rapidly rotating compressible stars? Unlike incompressible stars, which contain no internal energy and therefore immediately liberate all the energy dissipated by viscosity, compressible stars have internal energy and can retain the dissipated energy as internal heat. Now compressible stars that rotate sufficiently rapidly and also manage to liberate this dissipated energy very quickly are known to be unstable to bar-mode perturbations, like their incompressible counterparts. But what is the situation for rapidly rotating compressible stars that have very long cooling timescales, so that all the energy dissipated by viscosity is retained as heat, whereby the total energy of the star remains constant on a secular (viscous) evolution timescale? Are such stars also unstable to the nonlinear growth of bar modes, or is the viscous heating sufficient to cause them to expand, drive down the ratio of rotational kinetic to gravitational potential energy T/|W| ~ 1/R, where R is the equatorial radius, and turn off the instability before it gets underway? If the instability still arises in such stars, at what rotation rate do they become unstable, and to what final state do they evolve? We provide answers to these questions in the context of the compressible ellipsoid model for rotating stars. The results should serve as useful guides for numerical simulations in 3+1 dimensions for rotating stars containing viscosity.

Stuart L. Shapiro

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effect of couple-stress on the pure bending of a prismatic bar  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the applicability of the couple-stress theory to the stress analysis of graphite structures is performed by solving a pure bending problem. The differences between solutions from the couple-stress theory and from the classical theory of elasticity are compared. It is found that the differences are sufficient to account for the inconsistencies which have often been observed between the classical elasticity theory and actual behavior of graphite under bend and tensile loadings. An experimental procedure to measure the material constants in the couple-stress theory is also suggested. The linear couple-stress theory, the origins of which go back to the turn of the last century, adds linear relations between couple-stresses and rotation gradients to the classical stress-strain law. By adopting the classical assumption that the plane cross section remains plane after deformation, the pure-bending problem is reduced to a plane couple-stress problem with traction-free boundary conditions. A general solution for an isotropic elastic prismatic bar under pure bending is then obtained using the Airy stress function and another stress function wich accounts for the couple-stresss. For a cylindrical bar, it reduces to a simple series solution. The moment-curvature and stress-curvature relations derived for a cylindrical bar from the general solution are used to examine the effect of couple-stresses. Numerical compilation of relations indicates that the couple stress parameters can be practically determined by measuring the moment-curvature ratio of various diametered specimens under bending. Although there is not sufficient data for such evaluation at present, it appears that the theory is consistent with the limited bend and tensile strength data of cylindrical specimens for H-451 graphite.

Tzung, F.; Kao, B.; Ho, F.; Tang, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Broken Bar Detection in Synchronous Machines Based Wind Energy Conversion System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical machines are subject to different types of failures. Early detection of the incipient faults and fast maintenance may prevent costly consequences. Fault diagnosis of wind turbine is especially important because they are situated at extremely high towers and therefore inaccessible. For offshore plants, bad weather can prevent any repair actions for several weeks. In some of the new wind turbines synchronous generators are used and directly connected to the grid without the need of power converters. Despite intensive research efforts directed at rotor fault diagnosis in induction machines, the research work pertinent to damper winding failure of synchronous machines is very limited. This dissertation is concerned with the in-depth study of damper winding failure and its traceable symptoms in different machine signals and parameters. First, a model of a synchronous machine with damper winding based on the winding function approach is presented. Next, simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed. A specially designed inside-out synchronous machine with a damper winding is employed for the experimental setup. Finally, a novel analytical method is developed to predict the behavior of the left sideband amplitude for different numbers and locations of the broken bars. This analysis is based on the magnetic field theory and the unbalanced multiphase circuits. It is found that due to the asymmetrical structure of damper winding, the left sideband component in the stator current spectrum of the synchronous machine during steady state asynchronous operation is not similar to that of the induction machine with broken bars. As a result, the motor current signature analysis (MCSA) for detection rotor failures in the induction machine is usable to detect broken damper bars in synchronous machines. However, a novel intelligent-systems based approach is developed that can identify the severity of the damper winding failure. This approach potentially can be used in a non-invasive condition monitoring system to monitor the deterioration of a synchronous motor damper winding as the number of broken bars increase over time. Some other informative features such as speed spectrum, transient time, torque-speed curve and rotor slip are also found for damper winding diagnosis.

Rahimian, Mina Mashhadi

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

BaBar technical design report: Chapter 9, Magnet coil and flux return  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar magnet is a thin, 1.5 T superconducting solenoid with a hexagonal flux return. This chapter discusses the physics requirements and performance goals for the magnet, describes key interfaces, and summarizes the projected magnet performance. It also presents the design of the superconducting solenoid, including magnetic design, cold mass design, quench protection and stability, cold mass cooling, cryostat design, and coil assembly and transportation. The cryogenic supply system and instrumentation are described briefly, and the flux return is described.

O`Connor, T.; The BaBar Collaboration

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Stochastic Gravitational Wave Measurements with Bar Detectors: Dependence of Response on Detector Orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of a cross-correlation measurement to an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background depends on the observing geometry via the overlap reduction function. If one of the detectors being correlated is a resonant bar whose orientation can be changed, the response to stochastic gravitational waves can be modulated. I derive the general form of this modulation as a function of azimuth, both in the zero-frequency limit and at arbitrary frequencies. Comparisons are made between pairs of nearby detectors, such as LIGO Livingston-ALLEGRO, Virgo-AURIGA, Virgo-NAUTILUS, and EXPLORER-AURIGA, with which stochastic cross-correlation measurements are currently being performed, planned, or considered.

John T Whelan

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Radiation monitoring with CVD Diamonds and PIN Diodes at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has been using two polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds and 12 silicon PIN diodes for radiation monitoring and protection of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT). We have used the pCVD diamonds for more than 3 years, and the PIN diodes for 7 years. We will describe the SVT and SVT radiation monitoring system as well as the operational difficulties and radiation damage effects on the PIN diodes and pCVD diamonds in a high-energy physics environment.

Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Curry, S.; Edwards, A.J.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Majewski, S.; Petersen, B.A.; /UC, Irvine /SLAC /Ohio State U.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

231

Site Environmental Report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

DOE Site List  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Links Links Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner DOE Site List Site Geo Site Code State Operations Office1 DOE Programs Generating Streams at Site DOE Programs Managing Facilities Associated Data2 Acid/Pueblo Canyons ACPC NM Oak Ridge Waste/Media, Facilities Airport Substation CA Western Area Power Administration Facilities Akron Hill Communication Site CO Western Area Power Administration Facilities Akron Substation CO Western Area Power Administration Facilities AL Complex NM Albuquerque DP Facilities Alba Craft ALCL OH Oak Ridge Facilities Albany Research Center AMRC OR Oak Ridge Facilities Alcova Switchyard WY Western Area Power Administration Facilities Aliquippa Forge ALFO PA Oak Ridge Facilities

233

Potential Release Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

234

Observation of D0-D0bar Mixing using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0 -> K+ pi- to the Cabibbo-favored decay D0 -> K- pi+. The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3 x 10^4 D*+ -> pi+ D0, D0 -> K+ pi- decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb-1 for p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D0bar mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R_D = (3.51 +/- 0.35) x 10^{-3}, y' = (4.3 +/- 4.3) x 10^{-3}, and x'^2 = (0.08 +/- 0.18) x 10^{-3}. We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'^2 - y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D0bar mixing from a single experiment.

Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernndez; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Lpez, O Gonzlez; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kulkarni, N; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Luc, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martnez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Fernndez, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vzquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizn, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Observation of D0-D0bar Mixing using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0 -> K+ pi- to the Cabibbo-favored decay D0 -> K- pi+. The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3 x 10^4 D*+ -> pi+ D0, D0 -> K+ pi- decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb-1 for p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D0bar mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R_D = (3.51 +/- 0.35) x 10^{-3}, y' = (4.3 +/- 4.3) x 10^{-3}, and x'^2 = (0.08 +/- 0.18) x 10^{-3}. We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'^2 - y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D0bar mixing from a single experiment.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernndez Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. Gonzlez Lpez; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; N. Kulkarni; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Luc; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martnez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernndez; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vzquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizn; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

236

Near-threshold production of a0(980) mesons in the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an effective Lagrangian approach as well as the Quark-Gluon Strings Model we analyze near-threshold production of a0(980)-mesons in the reaction NN -> d K \\bar{K} as well as the background of non-resonant K\\bar{K}-pair production. We argue that the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0 at an energy release Qproduction of the a0(980)-resonance. At larger energies the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K}^0-pair production - where the kaons are produced in a relative P-wave - becomes important. Then effects of final-state interactions are evaluated in a unitarized scattering-length approach and found to be in the order of a 20% suppression close to threshold. Thus in present experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY-J\\"ulich for Q<=107 MeV the a_0^+ signal can reliably be separated from the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K^0} background.

V. Yu. Grishina; L. A. Kondratyuk; M. Buescher; W. Cassing

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

237

Dark Matter Halos and Evolution of Bars in Disk Galaxies: Varying Gas Fraction and Gas Spatial Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conduct numerical experiments by evolving gaseous/stellar disks embedded in live dark matter halos aiming at quantifying the effect of gas spatial resolution and gas content on the bar evolution. Model sequences have been constructed using different resolution, and gas fraction has been varied along each sequence within fgas=0%-50%, keeping the disk and halo properties unchanged. We find that the spatial resolution becomes important with an increase in `fgas'. For the higher resolution model sequences, we observe a bimodal behavior in the bar evolution with respect to the gas fraction, especially during the secular phase of this evolution. The switch from the gas-poor to gas-rich behavior is abrupt and depends on the resolution used. The diverging evolution has been observed in nearly all basic parameters characterizing bars, such as the bar strength, central mass concentration, vertical buckling amplitude, size, etc. We find that the presence of the gas component severely limits the bar growth and affects...

Villa-Vargas, Jorge; Heller, Clayton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Observation of the Baryonic B decay B0bar to Lambda_c^+ anti-Lambda K-  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the observation of the baryonic B decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} with a significance larger than 7 standard deviations based on 471 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC. They measure the branching fraction for the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} to be (3.8 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub sys} {+-} 1.0 {sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}) x 10{sup -5}. The uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} branching fraction. They find that the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} invariant mass distribution shows an enhancement above 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Sassari U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

Molecular Gas in NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA): IX. The decoupled bars and gas inflow in NGC 2782  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) maps of the starburst/Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 2782, obtained with the IRAM interferometer. The CO emission is aligned along the stellar nuclear bar of radius 1 kpc, configured in an elongated structure with two spiral arms at high pitch angle. At the extremity of the nuclear bar, the CO changes direction to trace two more extended spiral features at a lower pitch angle. These are the beginning of two straight dust lanes, which are aligned parallel to an oval distortion, reminiscent of a primary bar, almost perpendicular to the nuclear one. The two embedded bars appear in Spitzer IRAC near-infrared images, and HST color images, although highly obscured by dust in the latter. We compute the torques exerted by the stellar bars on the gas, and find systematically negative average torques down to the resolution limit of the images, providing evidence of gas inflow tantalizingly close to the nucleus of NGC 2782. The observations are well reproduced by numerical simulations, including gas...

Hunt, L K; Garca-Burillo, S; Schinnerer, E; Krips, M; Baker, A J; Boone, F; Eckart, A; Lon, S; Neri, R; Tacconi, L J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Uncertainty in site inspection and tracking database estimates of savings  

SciTech Connect

The authors systematically analyze impact evaluation results of three commercial lighting rebate DSM programs. The research includes (1) analysis of ex ante and ex post estimates of program performance, broken down into critical program parameters: hours of operation, watts saved per measure, and measures installed per site; (2) construction of probability distributions of program performance, both in the aggregate and for these critical program parameters; and (3) use of these analyses and distributions to draw conclusions about the accuracy of savings estimates from a variety of evaluation methods. The analysis suggests that realization rates (a ratio of metered savings estimates to tracking database savings estimates) for the sample of participants they examine are subject to tremendous variability, calling into question the usefulness of a point estimate of the realization rate. Discrepancies in estimates of hours of operation are responsible for most of the uncertainty in the realization rate. Finally, the impact of shorter measure lifetimes on savings estimates suggest that persistence studies should be an evaluation priority.

Sonnenblick, R.; Eto, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Siting Handbook WIND ENERGY SITING HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Wind Energy Siting Handbook (the "Handbook") presents general information about regulatory and environmental issues associated with the development and siting of wind energy projects in the United States. It is intended to be a general guidance document providing technical information and tools for identifying potential issues that may arise with wind energy projects. The Handbook contains links to resources on the Internet. Those links are provided solely as aids to assist you in locating other Internet resources that may be of interest. They are not intended to state or imply that AWEA or the Contributors endorse, approve, sponsor, or are affiliated or associated with those linked sites. The Handbook is not intended as a comprehensive discussion of all wind energy project issues and should be used in conjunction with other available resources. The Handbook also is not intended as legal or environmental advice or as a best practices manual, nor should it be considered as such. Because the Handbook is only a general guidance document, independent legal counsel and/or environmental consulting services should be obtained to further explore any wind energy siting issue, matter, or project. In reviewing all or any part of the Handbook, you acknowledge and understand that the Handbook is only a general guidance document and does not constitute a best practices manual, legal or environmental advice, or a legal or other relationship with the American Wind Energy Association ("AWEA") or any of the persons or entities

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ColumbusSites.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Columbus, Ohio, Sites consist of two geographically Columbus, Ohio, Sites consist of two geographically separate properties owned by the Battelle Memorial Institute: the King Avenue site, located in the city of Columbus, and the West Jefferson site, located approx- imately 15 miles west of Columbus. Battelle conducted extensive nuclear research at both locations for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies between 1943 and 1986. The research resulted in contamination of soil, buildings, and equipment with radioactive and mixed waste materials. Environmental cleanup of the sites began in 1986. The 6-acre King Avenue site, which was historically a part of the federal government's fuel and target fab- rication program, consisted of 9 buildings and the surrounding grounds. Nuclear research conducted at the

243

NETL: Site Environmental Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Quality Site Environmental Quality About NETL Site Environmental Quality - Certified to ISO 14001:2004 Questions about NETL's Environment, Safety and Health Management System may be directed to Michael Monahan, 304-285-4408, michael.monahan@netl.doe.gov. NETL has implemented an Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Management System, based on DOE's Integrated Safety Management System, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14000 series, and the Occupational Health and Safety Assessment (OHSAS) 18000 series. While the original scope of the ES&H Management System included the Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites, in fiscal year 2010, the Albany site was incorporated into the existing ES&H Management System. In addition, all three sites underwent ISO 14001:2004 recertification audits and Morgantown and

244

WCI | Site 300 CORS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CORS : CORS Weather Site Access Contained Firing Facility (CFF) Continuosly Operating Reference Station (CORS) CORS logo How to access GPS satellite data The National Geodetic Survey(NGS) Home Page for the S300 CORS base station is: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/CORS/ Type S300 into "enter SiteID" To get user-friendly data: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/UFCORS/ The GPS data will be in "receiver independent exchange" (RINEX) format, version 2.10. CORS Proxy Data Availability Details: NGS Reference Position Information Site 300 CORS Reference Position RTK Transmission Frequency NGS s300 Site Log NGS s300 Site Map Links to other GPS sites Last modified: July 27, 2011 UCRL-MI-134143 | Privacy & Legal Notice Contact: wci-webteam@llnl.gov NNSA Logo DOE Logo

245

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.. ' \ MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 -December 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Dayvault JR 7CJ7 This report summarizes current project status and activities implemented during October tiU'ough December 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities for the Monticello MIII Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection repmis, site meteorological data, and monitoring summary for tlw ex situ ground water treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 · * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities (see attached repmis). .

246

Measurement of $e^+ e^- \\to ??^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ near 10.6 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data samples of 89 fb$^{-1}$, 703 fb$^{-1}$, and 121 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider at center-of-mass energies 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, we study the exclusive reactions $e^+e^- \\to \\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ (Charge-conjugate modes are included implicitly). Significant signals of $\\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar{K}^0$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+$ are observed for the first time at these energies, and the energy dependencies of the cross sections are presented. On the other hand, no significant excesses for $K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0 \\bar{K}^0$ are found, and we set limits on the cross section ratios $R_{\\rm VP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+)}>$ 4.3, 20.0, and 5.4, and $R_{\\rm TP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+)}<$ 1.1, 0.4, and 0.6, for center-of-mass energies of 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, at the 90% C.L.

Belle Collaboration; C. P. Shen; C. Z. Yuan; A. Sibidanov; P. Wang; K. Hayasaka; X. L. Wang; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; M. -C. Chang; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Doleal; Z. Drsal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; B. R. Ko; P. Kody; S. Korpar; P. Krian; P. Krokovny; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; A. Moll; T. Mori; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; Y. Nagasaka; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; C. Ng; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; Y. Onuki; G. Pakhlova; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Rhrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. Shapkin; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

247

Site environmental report summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Nairobi Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRB-1: Canopy reflectance measurement within the Nairobi grassland site, Kenya. (Prof. Jenesio Kinyamario, University of Nairobi, is using a rednear-infrared spectral ratio meter....

249

CPER Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CPR-1: Weather stationexclosure within the CPER grassland site, Colorado, USA. (Mark Lindquist, Colorado State University, is checking a wetdry deposition gauge. Photograph taken...

250

SITE LIGHTING FOUNDATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Site Lighting. This analysis is in support of design drawing BABBDF000-01717-2100-23016.

M. Gomez

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

251

Site Lead TQP Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and...

252

1994 Site environmental report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Site Transition Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Transition Guidance March 2010 Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington D. C. 20585 Standard Review Plan (SRP) Technical Framework for EM...

254

Badkhyz Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BDK-1: Experiment to study the effect of UV-b solar radiation on litter decomposition at the Badkhyz grassland site, Turkmenistan. (Prof. Leonid Rodin, Komarov Botanical Institute,...

255

historic site award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Honors 'Historic Site' of NBS Physics Discovery. ... The American Physical Society (APS) has named ... revealed that in certain nuclear processes pairs ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

SRS Site Needs  

SRS Site Needs Neil R. Davis Program Manager Technology Development and Tank Closure Projects Washington Savannah River Company Aluminum/Chromium Leaching Technical ...

257

Calabozo Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLB-1: General view of the Trachypogon savanna at the Calabozo grassland site, Venezuela. (Trees include Curatella americana, Bowdichia virgilioides and Byrsonima crassifolia....

258

1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Historical Photographs: Idaho Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Sites Small Image 1. Measuring intentional radiation release at the Idaho experimental dairy farm (1964). (195Kbytes) Small Image 2. Measuring intentional radiation...

260

Pantex Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Pantex Site Activity Reports 2013 Pantex Plant Operational Awareness Oversight, May 2013 Review Reports 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RMOTC RMOTC -Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Home About Us About Us Staff Field Info History Photo Gallery Awards & Testimonials Safety Initiatives Outreach & Community News Latest News Newsletters Press Releases...

262

2004 Environmental Site Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

phenolic compounds. Tests of underground coal gasification and tests of in-situ oil shale retorting resulted in contamination at these sites. The largest cleanup activity...

263

2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2003. However, seven SWMUs could not be remediated to No Further Action (NFA) status. The long- term monitoring of these inactive waste sites has been incorporated into...

265

Kursk Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Image KRS-1: Clipping above-ground biomass at the Kursk grassland site, Russia. (Dr. Kira Khodashova and student Nina N., Moscow State University, are estimating monthly...

266

Measurement of the top quark mass in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions using events with two leptons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top quark mass (m{sub t}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using t{bar t} events with two leptons (ee, e{mu} or {mu}{mu}) in the final state in 4.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We analyze the kinematically underconstrained dilepton events by integrating over the neutrino rapidity distributions. We reduce the dominant systematic uncertainties from jet energy calibration using a correction obtained from t{bar t} {yields} {ell} + jets events. We also correct jets in simulated events to replicate the quark flavor dependence of the jet response in data. In combination with our previous analysis, we measure m{sub t} = 174.0 {+-} 2.4(stat) {+-} 1.4(syst) GeV.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Aoki, Masato; /Fermilab; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

LM Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LM Sites LM Sites Alaska Puerto Rico Continental US Search Search Legacy Management Site Documents > Additional Information Guidance and Reports InspectionSampling Schedule...

268

Hanford Site Video Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Video Library currently makes 30 videos related to the sites history and the clean-up available for online viewing. The Video Library (also referred to as the Broadcast Archive) can be searched by keywords in the title or description. They can also be browsed in a complete list.

269

Site characterization handbook  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Decommissioning Handbook for Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook lays out the steps necessary to fully decommission a coal-fired power plant. The handbook includes ways to handle permitting, environmental cleanup, site dismantlement, and site remediation, and discusses overall decommissioning costs. It is based on three actual case studies of coal plants recently decommissioned: the Arkwright coal-fired plant of Georgia Power, the Watts Bar coal-fired plant of TVA, and the Port Washington coal-fired plant of Wisconsin Electric Power.

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

271

Site decommissioning management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April 1 - June 30, 2008 April 1 - June 30, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during April through June 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities. * Shrub seedlings planted last fall had a poor survival rate. * New damage to shrubs and vole infestation is not evident. * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no abnormalities.

273

site_transition.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legacy Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF This fact sheet explains the process for transferring a site to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Introduction Transition Process After environmental remediation is completed at a site and there is no continuing mission, responsibility for the site and the associated records are transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management for post-closure management. Where residual hazards (e.g., disposal cells, ground water contamination) remain, active long-term surveillance and maintenance will be required to ensure protection of human health and the environment. The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) established transition guidance for remediated sites that will transfer to LM for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The

274

Related Data Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Data Sites Related Data Sites CDIAC has listed the following Web sites because these sites offer high-quality data sets (not available through CDIAC) from a variety of global-change themes. These links will take you outside of CDIAC, therefore, we are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. This list is not intended to be comprehensive, but we do hope you find it useful if you cannot find what you are looking for here at CDIAC. Multi-Agency Sites Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS) GCDIS is a collection of distributed information systems operated by government agencies involved in global change research. GCDIS provides global change data to scientists and researchers, policy makers, educators, industry, and the public at large and includes multidisciplinary data from

275

Web Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help » Web Site Map Help » Web Site Map Web Site Map The links listed below include all pages on the site except document topic pages. Home Privacy/Security Help Web Site Map Mailing Services Remove me from the List Contact Us About Us News and Events News Archives News/Media FAQs Internet Resources Documents DUF6 EIS Historical Context What is an EIS? Why EIS is Needed Who is Responsible? EIS Process EIS Topics EIS Alternatives EIS Schedule Public Involvement Opportunities Public Comment Form For More Info DUF6 Management and Uses Management Responsibilities DUF6 Storage How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored Cylinder Leakage DUF6 Storage Safety DUF6 PEIS Cylinder Surveillance and Maintenance Conversion Potential DU Uses "Business Case" for R&D on Beneficial Uses of DU Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants

276

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January 1 - March 31, 2008 January 1 - March 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during January through March 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. The first semi-annual FFA meeting of 2008 was held at UDEQ in Salt Lake City, Utah, March 26 and 27, 2008. Minutes and action items resulting from that meeting will be prepared under separate cover pending review and concurrence by EPA and UDEQ. Draft minutes and action items are scheduled for submittal by May 1, 2008.

277

The d-bar approach to approximate inverse scattering at fixed energy in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop the d-bar approach to inverse scattering at fixed energy in dimensions $d\\ge 3$ of [Beals, Coifman 1985] and [Henkin, Novikov 1987]. As a result we propose a stable method for nonlinear approximate finding a potential $v$ from its scattering amplitude $f$ at fixed energy $E>0$ in dimension $d=3$. In particular, in three dimensions we stably reconstruct n-times smooth potential $v$ with sufficient decay at infinity, $n>3$, from its scattering amplitude $f$ at fixed energy $E$ up to $O(E^{-(n-3-\\epsilon)/2})$ in the uniform norm as $E\\to +\\infty$ for any fixed arbitrary small $\\epsilon >0$ (that is with almost the same decay rate of the error for $E\\to +\\infty$ as in the linearized case near zero potential).

Roman Novikov

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

278

Investigation of novel decay B _____ ____(2S)____K at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the undocumented B meson decay, B{sup +} {yields} {Psi}(2S){omega}K{sup +}. The data were collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collier operating at the {gamma}(4S) resonance, a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV/c{sup 2}. The {gamma}(4S) resonance primarily decays to pairs of B-mesons. The BaBar collaboration at the PEP-II ring was located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and was designed to study the collisions of positrons and electrons. The e{sup -}e{sup +} pairs collide at asymmetric energies, resulting in a center of mass which is traveling at relativistic speeds. The resulting time dilation allows the decaying particles to travel large distances through the detector before undergoing their rapid decays, a process that occurs in the in the center of mass frame over extremely small distances. As they travel through silicon vertex trackers, a drift chamber, a Cerenkov radiation detector and finally an electromagnetic calorimeter, we measure the charge, energy, momentum, and particle identification in order to reconstruct the decays that have occurred. While all well understood mesons currently fall into the qq model, the quark model has no a priori exclusion of higher configuration states such as qqqq which has led experimentalists and theorists alike to seek evidence supporting the existence of such states. Currently, there are hundreds of known decay modes of the B mesons cataloged by the Particle Data Group, but collectively they only account for approximately 60% of the B branching fraction and it is possible that many more exist.

Schalch, Jacob; /Oberlin Coll. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Other Sites Summary Other Sites Summary Search Other Sites Considered Sites Other Sites All LM Quick Search All Other Sites 11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037 ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 Argonne National Laboratory - West - 014 Bodo Canyon Cell - 006 Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 Chevron Panna Maria Site - 030 Clive Disposal Cell - 036 Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 Conoco Conquista Site - 031 Cotter Canon City Site - 009 Dawn Ford Site - 038 EFB White Mesa Site - 033 Energy Technology Engineering Center - 044 Estes Gulch Disposal Cell - 010 Exxon Ray Point Site - 032 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory - 016 Fernald Environmental Management Project - 027 Fort St Vrain - 011 Geothermal Test Facility - 001 Hecla Durita Site - 012

280

The DOD Siting Clearinghouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The DoD Siting Clearinghouse The DoD Siting Clearinghouse Dave Belote Director, Siting Clearinghouse Office of the Secretary of Defense The Nexus of National Security & Renewable Energy * Unintended Consequences - Rapid development of renewable technologies - Rapidly changing military technology research & development * Existing Policy and Processes - Not up to date with changing technologies - Land use decision-making authorities fragmented across all levels of government 2 From Nellis to Shepherds Flat: Congressional Push for Action 3 Congressional Response - FY2011 NDAA, Section 358 * Section 358 "Study Of Effects Of New Construction Of Obstructions On Military Installations And Operations" - Integrated review process - 180-day backlog assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Princeton Site Ofice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Site Ofice Princeton Site Ofice P.O. Box 102 Princeton, New Jersey 08542-0102 TO: Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel JA N Z Q= LMN N= SUBJECT: PRINCETON SITE OFFICE (PSO) 2013 ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451.1B Change 3, NEPA Compliance Program, requires each Secretarial Oficer and Head of Field Organization to submit an Annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Coun. s el. We have reviewed

282

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MONTICELLO NPL SITES MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 - December 31, 2007 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no problems that have not been addressed. (inspection checklists attached). * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no unacceptable conditions. * Pond 4 leachate detection and removal systems continue to operate at normal levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Repository leachate collection and removal system (LCRS) and leachate collection system (LDS) continue to operate at normal and acceptable levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Portions of repository cover were planted with rabbitbrush seedlings to repair areas

283

Site Map - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Site Map Page Content Pantex.com Mission & Strategies Mission National Security Nuclear Explosive Operations Nuclear Material Operations HE Operations Strategies Advance HE Center of Excellence Exemplify a High Reliability Organization Health & Safety Safety Training Occupational Medicine Contractor Safety Environment Environmental Projects & Operations Regulatory Compliance Waste Operations Environmental Management System Environmental Document Library Public Meetings Doing Business With Pantex Procurement How We Buy Subcontracting Opportunities Supplier Information Profile Suspect/Counterfiet Items Business Definitions Documents and Forms Accounts Payable Work for Others Our Capabilities How to do Business with the Pantex eXMC Employee Information Benefits

284

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin SiteInstruments Darwin SiteInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility, Darwin, Australia [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] CSPHOT Cimel Sunphotometer Aerosols, Radiometric Browse Data [ Single installation ] DISDROMETER Impact Disdrometer Surface Meteorology Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] DL Doppler Lidar Cloud Properties Browse Data [ Single installation ] GNDRAD Ground Radiometers on Stand for Upwelling Radiation Radiometric Browse Plots

285

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 3400 of 28,560 results. 91 - 3400 of 28,560 results. Page Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial... http://energy.gov/nepa/lead-test-assembly-irradiation-and-analysis-watts-bar-nuclear-plant-tennessee-and-hanford-site Page EA-1340: Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site, Carlsbad, New Mexico This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to make maximum use of existing U.S. Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facilities to further the scientific...

286

2274 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS, VOL. 9, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2013 Rotor Bar Fault Monitoring Method Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizes the data analysis of the air-gap torque profile in conjunction with a Bayesian classifier, and abrupt load changes, which can produce bearing faults and rotor bar breakages. Meanwhile, electrical Monitoring Method Based on Analysis of Air-Gap Torques of Induction Motors Aderiano M. da Silva, Member, IEEE

Povinelli, Richard J.

287

TWP Darwin Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin Site Darwin Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Darwin Site Location: 12° 25' 28.56" S, 130° 53' 29.75" E Altitude: 29.9 meters The third TWP climate research facility was established in April 2002 in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The facility is situated adjacent to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Meteorological Office near Darwin International Airport. Darwin was chosen because it meets the scientific goal of the ARM Program, providing a unique set of climate regimes that are not seen at the other TWP facilities. Annually, Darwin

288

TWP Nauru Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Site Nauru Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Nauru Site Location: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Altitude: 7.1 meters The Nauru facility was established in November 1998 as the second TWP climate research station. It is situated in the Denigomodu district on Nauru Island, the Republic of Nauru, which is located in the western South Pacific, approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea. The ARM Program selected this location because it is on the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool under La Niña conditions, which affect weather patterns

289

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard for the Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy 1 Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program A Site Lead is an individual, normally at a senior General Schedule (GS) level or Excepted Service, who is assigned the responsibility to assess and evaluate management systems, safety and health programs, and technical activities associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. Typically, a Site Lead has previously qualified as a Nuclear Safety Specialist or a Senior Technical Safety Manager. For exceptionally qualified individuals,

290

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

291

ARM - TWP Nauru Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Site Nauru Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Nauru Site Location: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Altitude: 7.1 meters The Nauru facility was established in November 1998 as the second TWP climate research station. It is situated in the Denigomodu district on Nauru Island, the Republic of Nauru, which is located in the western South Pacific, approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea. The ARM Program selected this location because it is on the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool under La Niña conditions, which affect weather patterns

292

Dzhanybek Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DZH-1: Termite mound at the Dzhanybek grassland site, Kazakhstan. (Prof. Roman Zlotin is demonstrating the internal structure of the mound, which has been cut open with a shovel....

293

EERE: Web Site Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for Federal Public Web Sites. To learn more about EERE, visit...

294

Maryland Web Site Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Website M a r y l a n d Web site Introduction The University Of Maryland 2005 Solar Decathlon Team has created a website to inform the public about solar living, establish an...

295

Moss Web Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moss Web Sites Name: Barbara Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I would like some on-line information about using various mosses in gardens - or pointers to other...

296

Site Energy Reduction Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DuPonts Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU/LB basis. By 2004, overall progress had slowed, energy consumption increased slightly, and area results were mixed. It was time to shake things up with a new perspective. A coordinated site energy program was launched. In 2005, the first full year of the unified program, the site saved $6.9 MM from energy reduction projects. The rate of improvement is accelerating in 2006 with $3.6 MM in energy projects being implemented in the first four months.

Jagen, P. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

EERE: Web Site Policies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Web Site Policies The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for...

298

Nylsvley Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image NLS-1: Typical view of fine-leaved savanna at the Nylsvley study site, South Africa. (Dominant trees are Acacia tortilis. Photograph taken 1997 by Dr. R.J. Scholes, CSIR,...

299

Kade Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

growth at the Kade tropical forest site, Ghana. (typically, the area would now be ready for burning and planting. Photograph taken 1958 by Dr. P.H. Nye, Beckley, Oxon., UK...

300

Matador Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTD-1: Field work in progress at the Matador grassland site, Saskatchewan, Canada. (The sample plots were located between 1.0 and 2.4 km from this point, on flat topography....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ParaSITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paraSITE proposes the appropriation of exterior ventilation systems on existing architecture to inflate pneumatic shelters that are designed for homeless people. This project involves the production of a series of inflatable ...

Rakowitz, Michael

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

SSA Old Aspen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSA-OA) SSA-OA) View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-OA site The two huts and boardwalk The scaffold flux tower The base of the scaffold flux tower One of the canopy access towers The SRC meteorology tower The truss tower and cables from the flux tower Cabled tethersonde above the SSA Old Aspen (SSA-OA) site The tethersonde about to be launched (tethered balloon and radiosonde) Picture of the SRC meteorological tower at the SSA-OA site taken from the flux tower. Improved road into the SSA-OA site within the Prince Albert National Park. Aerial of SSA-OA tower during the winter IFC. SSA-OA flux tower about 40 meters in height, approximately 20 meters above canopy. Photograph of investigator hut and boardwalk at the SSA-OA site. Andy Black and associate within the hut at the SSA-OA site showing the various recording and data display instruments from the tower.

303

Circumnuclear Dust in Nearby Active and Inactive Galaxies. II. Bars, Nuclear Spirals, and the Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We present a detailed study of the relation between circumnuclear dust morphology, host galaxy properties, and nuclear activity in nearby galaxies. We use our sample of 123 nearby galaxies with visible--near-infrared colormaps from the Hubble Space Telescope to create well-matched, "paired" samples of 28 active and 28 inactive galaxies, as well as 19 barred and 19 unbarred galaxies, that have the same host galaxy properties. Comparison of the barred and unbarred galaxies shows that grand design nuclear dust spirals are only found in galaxies with a large-scale bar. Tightly wound nuclear dust spirals, in contrast, show a strong tendency to avoid galaxies with large-scale bars. Comparison of the AGN and inactive samples shows that nuclear dust spirals, which may trace shocks and angular momentum dissipation in the ISM, occur with comparable frequency in both active and inactive galaxies. The only difference between the active and inactive galaxies is that several inactive galaxies appear to completely lack dust structure in their circumnuclear region, while none of the AGN lack this structure. The comparable frequency of nuclear spirals in active and inactive galaxies, combined with previous work that finds no significant differences in the frequency of bars or interactions between well-matched active and inactive galaxies, suggests that no universal fueling mechanism for low-luminosity AGN operates at spatial scales greater than ~100 pc radius from the galactic nuclei. The similarities instead suggest that the lifetime of nuclear activity is less than the characteristic inflow time from these spatial scales. An order-of-magnitude estimate of this inflow time is the dynamical timescale. This sets an upper limit of several million years to the lifetime of an individual episode of nuclear activity.

Paul Martini; Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey; Richard W. Pogge

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Considered Sites | Department of Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sites » Considered Sites Sites » Considered Sites Considered Sites View Considered Sites View Other Sites DOE maintains the Considered Sites Database to provide information to the public about sites that were formerly used in the nation's nuclear weapons and early atomic energy programs and that had the potential for residual radioactive contamination on site. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in March 1974 under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to identify, investigate, and take appropriate cleanup action at sites where work was performed in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and early AEC programs. Site activities included uranium ore storage and processing, uranium metal

305

NSA-Fen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSA-Fen) NSA-Fen) The Fen from the air, looking North. You can see the boardwalk, the hut, and the size of the bog. The road (Highway 391) is visible at the top. The round "crater" near the base of the boardwalk on the right is a collapsed palsa. View an aerial photo-map of the NSA-Fen site. The ground cover on the Fen itself The hut and flux tower The Fen site from the shore looking toward the hut The Fen site flux tower The boardwalk in the Fen, looking back at the shore The generator shed and the storage tent The NSA-Fen site from the air during IFC-2. Top of image is to Southeast. The NSA-Fen site in September (IFC-3) 1994 looking to the southeast. The tower is at the end of the boardwalk in right center of image with the hut near the center. The boardwalk connects to the far border at left center of the slide. Note that the tamarack (deciduous evergreen) within the fen has its fall colors.

306

SSA Mixed Canopy Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Canopy Site (SSA-Mix) Mixed Canopy Site (SSA-Mix) The TE canopy tower The mixed trees Terrestrial Ecology canopy access tower at the SSA mixed coniferous/deciduous site. A picture taken looking down from the TE canopy access tower at the SSA mixed auxiliary site, showing the aspen and spruce canopies. Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos SSA Photos || SSA-Airport Photos | SSA-Fen Photos | SSA-Mix Photos | SSA-OA Photos | SSA-OBS Photos | SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help | User Services - Tel: +1 (865) 241-3952 or E-mail: uso@daac.ornl.gov

307

IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 7, 2008 IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES Plan won't impact DOE commitment to removing all stored waste from Idaho Site Idaho's Advanced Mixed Waste...

308

ARM - Site Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govSite Index govSite Index Expand | Collapse Site Index Videos Image Library About ARM About ARM (home) ARM and the Recovery Act ARM and the Recovery Act (home) ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Instruments ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) (home) ARM Education and Outreach Efforts Support IPY Research Support for International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Organization ARM Organization (home) Laboratory Partners ARM Safety Policy ARM Science Board ARM Science Board (home) Board Business Become a User Comments and Questions Contacts Contacts (home) ARM Engineering and Operations Contacts Facility Statistics Facility Statistics (home) Historical Field Campaign Statistics

309

Princeton Site Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Site Office Princeton Site Office P.O. Box 102 Princeton, New Jersey 08542-0102 JAN 18 2012 To: Timothy G. Lynch , Acting General Counsel Subject: Princeton Site Office (PSO) 2012 Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451 .1 B Change 2, NEPA Compliance Program , requires each Secretarial Officer and Head of Field Organization to submit an annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Counsel. We have reviewed your associated December 5, 2011 , memorandum and in consultation with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) staff determined that we have no Environmental Impacts Statements or Environmental Assessments either ongoing or forecast for the next 12 to 24 months. If you have any questions or need additional information

310

Former Sites Restoration. Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

@j&s* **$r* :. .+:., @j&s* **$r* :. .+:., II' .,.. I .&i. , :"': T.1 . i *&+t&&., @i i -:.+; L I. * . . .p.isit-!'..r'ir~i _, +.&.., . I. :?I,?.* .L,! j?' aa&* pi 4 L', ..b,- ., .e /w.1( ,v_.c ~A&$?>*:, ,..:.' .1 > . . . . . *. ,.. .I., .( j .~.~:,;;,.".,Certificafion ,Dockef for The ;,il' t:i~>$:+-.. ~~y:Remeciial Action. Performed "' . ::;:cxcgt the @+zb Gate Site in . ;' ! ,Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 7.99 7- 7 992 -.. Department .of Energy Former Sites Restoration. Division . ,Oak Ridge Operations .Office _. February 7 994 @ Printed on recycledhcy&ble paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ELZA GAP SITE IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE, 1991-1992 FEBRUARY 1994 I Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

311

Manhattan Project: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SITE MAP SITE MAP Resources > Site Map THE MANHATTAN PROJECT Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 1939-1942: Early Government Support Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 1942: Difficult Choices More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 1942-1944: The Uranium Path to the Bomb Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943

312

Particle Physics Education Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

쭺-¶ 쭺-¶ Particle Physics Education Sites ¡]¥H¤U¬°¥~¤åºô¯¸¡^ quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites - Physics Alliance - Accelerators at National Laboratories icon Particle Physics Education and Information sites: top Introduction: The Particle Adventure - an interactive tour of particle physics for everyone: the basics of theory and experiment. Virtual Visitor Center of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Guided Tour of Fermilab, - overviews of several aspects of Particle Physics. Also check out Particle Physics concepts. Probing Particles - a comprehensive and straight-forward introduction to particle physics. Big Bang Science - approaches particle physics starting from the theoretical origin of the universe.

313

Microsoft Word - Site Selection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection Selection One of the very first tasks of General Leslie Groves and the Manhattan Project in early 1943 was to locate and acquire sites in the United States where uranium and plutonium could be produced, as well as a site where the atomic bomb actually would be constructed. Production of uranium and plutonium required vast amounts of power. Thus, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington, were chosen because of proximity to major rivers. Oak Ridge could draw on the power of the hydroelectric plants on the Tennessee River. Hanford could use the power from the Columbia River. The cold waters of the Columbia also could be used to cool the plutonium production reactors at Hanford. A third site, with

314

Site Energy Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating improvements and selected investments have already improved US refining and petrochemical energy utilization efficiency by about 20%, compared to 1972 operating efficiencies. This is equivalent to saving well over 250,000 B/D of crude; which is equal to the output of several major synthetic fuels projects! Site Energy Surveys can be an important technique for achieving the next major increment (1520%) in energy savings, even when using existing technology. These surveys encompass the total site, all associated plants, and investigate all aspects of energy requirements, heat integration configurations, steam/power cogeneration possibilities and inefficient practices. After potential energy conservation opportunities have been identified, screening is conducted to develop their economic attractiveness. This presentation reviews factors leading to the need for Site Energy Surveys, the objectives for conducting surveys, the approach utilized, considerations given to values of energy and concludes with overall improvements achieved.

Lockett, W., Jr.; Guide, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

Summary Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Report Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011 ANL-12/02 (Summary) Environment, Safety, and Quality Assurance Division Argonne National Laboratory Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

318

Berkeley Lab: Educational Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Sites Educational Sites The Center for Science & Engineering Education (CSEE) Berkeley Lab's Center for Science & Engineering Education (CSEE) carries out the Department of Energy's education mission to train the next generation of scientists, as well as helping them to gain an understanding of the relationships among frontier science, technology, and society. CSEE supports science literacy in the community and nationally through a broad range of programs from elementary school to undergraduate and graduate education, including internships, mentoring, school workshops and summer research programs for teachers. Through its broad range of programs, CSEE serves as the center for Berkeley Lab's science education efforts, developing partnerships with schools, government agencies, and non-profit

319

PPPL Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratorys Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on?site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non?radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protections Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non?radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011, are documented and certified to be correct.

Virginia Finley, Robeert Sheneman and Jerry Levine

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Benchmarking the Bayesian reconstruction of the non-perturbative heavy $Q\\bar{Q}$ potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extraction of the finite temperature heavy quark potential from lattice QCD relies on a spectral analysis of the real-time Wilson loop. Through its position and shape, the lowest lying spectral peak encodes the real and imaginary part of this complex potential. We benchmark this extraction strategy using leading order hard-thermal loop (HTL) calculations. I.e. we analytically calculate the Wilson loop and determine the corresponding spectrum. By fitting its lowest lying peak we obtain the real- and imaginary part and confirm that the knowledge of the lowest peak alone is sufficient for obtaining the potential. We deploy a novel Bayesian approach to the reconstruction of spectral functions to HTL correlators in Euclidean time and observe how well the known spectral function and values for the real and imaginary part are reproduced. Finally we apply the method to quenched lattice QCD data and perform an improved estimate of both real and imaginary part of the non-perturbative heavy $Q\\bar{Q}$ potential.

Yannis Burnier; Alexander Rothkopf

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Observation of the bottomonium ground state, eta_b, at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state eta_b(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of 109+/-1 million of Upsilon(3S) events recorded at the Upsilon(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E_gamma = 921.2 {+2.1}{-2.8}(stat) +/- 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpretated as being due to the radiative transition Upsilon(3S) -> gamma eta_b(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an eta_b(1S) mass of 9388.9 {+3.1}{-2.3}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The hyperfine Upsilon(1S)-eta_b(1S) mass splitting is 71.4 {+2.3}{-3.1}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for this radiative \\Upsilon(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 +/- 0.5(stat) +/- 1.2 (syst)) x 10^(-4).

Grenier, Philippe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Observation of the Bottomonium Ground State, eta_b, at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state {eta}{sub b}(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of (109 {+-} 1) million of {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded at the {Upsilon}(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E{sub {gamma}} = 921.2{sub -2.8}{sup +2.1}(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpreted as being due to the radiative transition {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma} {eta}{sub b}(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9388.9{sub -2.3}{sup +3.1}(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The hyperfine {Upsilon}(1S)-{eta}{sub b}(1S) mass splitting is 71.4{sub -3.1}{sup +2.3}(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for this radiative {Upsilon}(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.2(syst)) x 10{sup -4}.

Grenier, Philippe; Collaboration, for the BABAR

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Observation of the bottomonium ground state, eta_b, at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state eta_b(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of 109+/-1 million of Upsilon(3S) events recorded at the Upsilon(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E_gamma = 921.2 {+2.1}{-2.8}(stat) +/- 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpretated as being due to the radiative transition Upsilon(3S) -> gamma eta_b(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an eta_b(1S) mass of 9388.9 {+3.1}{-2.3}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The hyperfine Upsilon(1S)-eta_b(1S) mass splitting is 71.4 {+2.3}{-3.1}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for this radiative \\Upsilon(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 +/- 0.5(stat) +/- 1.2 (syst)) x 10^(-4).

Philippe Grenier; for the BABAR Collaboration

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy savings, combined with the absence of incentives and information on both sides of the market,

Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

England. Huber, W. 1997. "Standby Power Consumption in U.S.1997. "Study on miscellaneous standby power consumption ofC. Murakoshi. 1997. " Standby Electricity Consumption in

Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

NIST Primary optical watt radiometer (POWR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... better optimized for specific transfer wavelengths and power levels. Major Accomplishments: POWR impacts total solar irradiance measurements. ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as refrigerators, dishwashers, and ranges. Ranging fromappliances, from VCRs to dishwashers, from remote-controlledSpeakers Receiver Tuner Dishwasher Microwave Oven Range

Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Considered Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considered Sites Considered Sites Considered Sites View Considered Sites View Other Sites DOE maintains the Considered Sites Database to provide information to the public about sites that were formerly used in the nation's nuclear weapons and early atomic energy programs and that had the potential for residual radioactive contamination on site. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in March 1974 under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to identify, investigate, and take appropriate cleanup action at sites where work was performed in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and early AEC programs. Site activities included uranium ore storage and processing, uranium metal

329

SSA Young Jack Pine Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-YJP site. Beginning of the "flagged path" to the tower, from the road The "new trail" to the YJP site, looking towards the site The hut and...

330

WCI | Cutting-Edge Facilities | Site 300 Experimental Test Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site 300 Site Access Contained Firing Facility (CFF) Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) What is Site 300? Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 is an experimental test site operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. It is situated on 7,000 acres in rural foothills approximately six miles southwest of downtown Tracy and 15 miles southeast of Livermore. Site 300 was established in 1955 as a non-nuclear explosives test facility to support Livermore Laboratory's national security mission. The site gets its name from the early days of Lawrence Livermore, when the main laboratory was called Site 200 and the test facility was Site 300 (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was Site 100). Today, work at Site 300

331

Indoor Sampler Siting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Sampler Siting Indoor Sampler Siting Title Indoor Sampler Siting Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Sohn, Michael D., and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 11th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms Conference Location Busan, Korea Abstract Contaminant releases in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response is taken. U.S. Federal and local agencies are implementing programs to place air-monitoring samplers in buildings to quickly detect biological agents. We describe a probabilistic algorithm for siting samplers in order to detect accidental or intentional releases of biological material. The algorithm maximizes the probability of detecting a release from among a suite of realistic scenarios. The scenarios may differ in any unknown, for example the release size or location, weather, mode of building operation, etc. The algorithm also can optimize sampler placement in the face of modeling uncertainties, for example the airflow leakage characteristics of the building, and the detection capabilities of the samplers. In anillustrative example, we apply the algorithm to a hypothetical 24-room commercial building, finding optimal networks for a variety of assumed sampler types and performance characteristics. We also discuss extensions of this work for detecting ambient pollutants in buildings, and for understanding building-wide airflow, pollutant dispersion, and exposures

332

NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS). ... The URL for the NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS) is: https://www-s.nist.gov/niwsapp. ...

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

333

2012 BNL Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Reports Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, Environment,...

334

Method and an apparatus to control the lateral motion of a long metal bar being formed by a mechanical process such as rolling or drawing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adjustable guide, includes two or more mechanisms each having a rotatable retaining element containing a retaining groove with a variable radius in its perimeter surface. The grooves form a guidance path to control the lateral, i.e. non-axial, motion of a long bar moving along a longitudinal axis during a production process.The diameter of the guidance path varies according to the variable radii of the grooves. The guidance path increases in size at a predetermined rate, from a point of origin to an end point on the retaining groove. Rotating the retaining elements causes the diameter of the retaining grooves to change so that the size of the guidance path can be changed to match the diameter of the bar being rolled, size of the guidance path can be changed to fit the diameter of a new bar rolled without having to exchange the guide for a different sized guide, reduce fiction between the bar and the guide, a media, such as compressed air, can be injected between the retaining elements via orifices.Each retaining element is attached to a mounting apparatus. The mounting apparatus can be fixed or flexible. The flexible mounting apparatus includes one or more springs and one or more shock absorbers. A force neutral position of the flexible mounting apparatus is designed to be located on the predetermined ideal bar path line. The flexible mounting apparatus dissipates kinetic energy from the bar thereby reducing the bar's lateral motion relative to the ideal bar path line.The damping ratio of the mounting apparatus can be adjustable to alter the product's vibration mode to enable better control of the bar's lateral motion.

Chang, Tzyy-Shuh (Ann Arbor, MI); Huang, Hsun-Hau (Ann Arbor, MI); Lin, Chang-Hung (Ann Arbor, MI)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Road to the Higgs in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

Presented is a series of analyses which are central to the search for a low-mass Higgs boson. A search for ZZ production in the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} channel is introduced then the successful combination of this analysis with with the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}'{sup +}{ell}'{sup -} search to produce the first observation of the ZZ process at a hadron collider is then detailed. The final analysis presented is the search for the Higgs in the ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} channel and the interpretation as a ZZ {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search in order to validate the techniques. Common themes are discussed, such as multivariate techniques and instrumental backgrounds from energy measurement fluctuations and the tools used to combat them. The formalism of the statistical analysis of the final selected sample is introduced generally and demonstrated in the context of the above mentioned searches. The optimization of the selection through the identification of poorly reconstructed leptons is included as well as the utilization of b-quark identifying tools. Some space is given to jet reconstruction/identification and the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger. The efficient identification and calibration of jets is central to many physics analysis especially in the low mass higgs search. Another key component of the ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search is the proficient identification of jets and an imbalance of transverse energy in the first level of the triggering system. Therefore, the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger, designed to achieve this, is a necessary component for a sensitive ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search.

Facini, Gabriel; /Northeastern U.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Environmental Assessment LEAD TEST ASSEMBLY IRRADIATION AND ANALYSIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Environmental Assessment LEAD TEST ASSEMBLY IRRADIATION AND ANALYSIS WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT, TENNESSEE AND HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE COOPERATING AGENCY: TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY July 1997 ~~~~ Portions o f this dorunrat may be iIlegiile in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original doaxnenL DOE/EA-12 10 Environmental Assessment LEAD TEST ASSEMBLY IRRADIATION AND ANALYSIS WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT, TENNESSEE AND HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE COOPERATING AGENCY: TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY July 1997 U.S. Department of Energy ALARA ANL-W BWR CFR CEDE CEQ Ci CLWR DOE DOT EA EDE EFPD EIS FFTF

337

$W$ boson polarization measurement in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton channel using the CDF II Detector  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of W boson polarization in top-quark decays in t{bar t} events with decays to dilepton final states using 5.1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. A simultaneous measurement of the fractions of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the results f{sub 0} = 0.71{sub -0.17}{sup +0.18}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.07 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst). Combining this measurement with our previous result based on single lepton final states, we obtain f{sub 0} = 0.84 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.16 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst). The results are consistent with standard model expectation.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

An analysis of monojet data in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TEV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of events with a single jet and significant missing transverse energy selected from 4.7 pb{sup {minus}1} of data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF detector. The goal is to identify events of the type p{bar p} {yields} Z{sup 0} + jet; Z{sup 0} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}. Event selection and backgrounds are discussed. The number of observed monojet events is compared to the number of observed Z{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{sup {minus}} events in which the Z{sup 0} is accompanied by a jet. We measure the number of light neutrino species to be N{sub {nu}} = 2.2{plus_minus}1.5 and we place an upper limit on the number of neutrino species at N{sub {nu}} < 5 (90% C.L.).

Markeloff, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Web Sites about Infectious Disease Web Sites about Infectious Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Sites about Infectious Disease Web Sites about Infectious Disease Stanford Center for Tuberculosis Research-Site Links http://molepi.stanford.edu/tblinks.html Virology on the World Wide Web http://www.idsociety.org/ file:///C|/Program%20Files/Adobe/Adobe%20Dreamweav...nks/Web%20Sites%20about%20Infectious%20Disease

de Lijser, Peter

340

Siting Guide: Site Selection and Evaluation Criteria for an Early Site Permit Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program, the "Siting Guide: Site Selection and Evaluation Criteria for an Early Site Permit Application" was initially published in March 1993. It served as a roadmap and tool for applicant use in developing detailed siting plans to support an ESP application. This revision has been prepared to update the site selection process and criteria to reflect current regulatory requirements. The updated Guide also addresses the impact of significant changes in...

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 February 2011 Livermore Site Office Safety Basis Self-Assessment This site visit report documents the collective results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) assessment of National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) Livermore Site Office (LSO) safety basis processes and discusses its scope, objective, results and conclusions. Appendix A provides lists of the documents, interviews, and observations and Appendix B includes the plan for the review. The assessment was sponsored by LSO as a self-assessment and conducted jointly by HSS and LSO staff. It was completed in late 2010 and included site visits from November 29 - December

342

A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 {micro}{var_epsilon} peak) amplitude and a 100 {micro}s duration (measured at 10% amplitude).

Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An Analysis of a Spreader Bar Crane Mounted Gamma-Ray Radiation Detection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 95% of imports entering the United States from outside North America arrive via cargo containers by sea at 329 ports of entry. The current layered approach for the detection only scans 5% of cargo bound for the United States. This is inadequate to protect our country. This research involved the building of a gamma-ray radiation detection system used for cargo scanning. The system was mounted on a spreader bar crane (SBC) at the Port of Tacoma (PoT) and the applicability and capabilities of the system were analyzed. The detection system provided continuous count rate and spectroscopic data among three detectors while operating in an extreme environment. In a separate set of experiments, 60Co and 137Cs sources were positioned inside a cargo container and data were recorded for several count times. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to simulate a radioactive source inside an empty cargo container and the results were compared to experimentally recorded data. The detection system demonstrated the ability to detect 60Co, 137Cs, 192Ir, highly-enriched uranium (HEU), and weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) with minimum detectable activities (MDA) of 5.9 0.4 microcuries (?Ci), 19.3 1.1 ?Ci, 11.7 0.6 ?Ci, 3.5 0.3 kilograms (kg), and 30.6 1.3 grams (g), respectively. This system proved strong gamma-ray detection capabilities, but was limited in the detection of fissile materials Additional details of this system are presented and advantages of this approach to cargo scanning over current approaches are discussed.

Grypp, Matthew D

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Technology Transfer: Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map About Us About Technology Transfer Contact Us Available Technologies Advanced Materials Biofuels Biotechnology and Medicine Developing World Energy Environmental Technologies Imaging and Lasers Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Nanotechnology and Microtechnology Software and Information Technology For Industry Licensing Overview Frequently Asked Questions Partnering with Berkeley Lab Licensing Interest Form Receive New Tech Alerts For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Forms Record of Invention (Word doc -- please do not use earlier PDF version of the form) Software Disclosure and Abstract (PDF, use Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader 9 and up ONLY to complete the form) Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Empolyment Export Control FAQs for Researchers

345

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SITE SITE NAME: /+%&'&&c /-i-QS~,~~-L ALTERNATE ------------ -------------------------- NAME: - -------------------___ C 1 T-f: -~~~~~L--~-----_--___,TATE: '"' y-/ OWNER ('=I B-----Z- Past: L?!lc~i&~~~~-~-~ Cut-rent: - Owner cnntacted q yes q:no; i,f yes, dats-c~~Fact,d------------- TYPE OF OPESATION ---------m-L----- @Research & Develapment & Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale a bnch scale ~~~~~~~ 0 Theoretical Studies G Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production G Disposal/Storage Manufacturing University Research Organization Government Sponsored Facility llther +r.PfTzK-- --------------------- TYPZ OF CONTRACT ~~__----__------ q Prime E SubccntractkrT u&lv.$Ch,ck>b 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information

346

NDB Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site map NDB Home Search Structures Search DNA Search RNA Advanced Search Nucleic acid tools RNA 3D motif atlas Non-redundant lists RNA base triples atlas WebFR3D R3D Align Contact NDB Mailing Address About NDB NDB Members Goal References Publications Site map Tools Software Standards Standard Reference Supplementary Information Ideal Geometries X-PLOR Parameters Valence Geometries RNA Ontology Consortium mmCIF Resources PDBML Resources Education Introduction to Nucleic Acids: DNA Definition of terms RNA Base Pair Families RNA Base-Phosphate Families Base Stacking Interactions Non Redundant list Equivalence classes RNA 3D Motifs Relative Frequency Introduction to Nucleic Acids: RNA Nucleic Acid Highlight (PDB): DNA DNA Polymerase Nucleosome Transfer RNA RNA Polymerase Self-splicing RNA

347

AshtabulaSite.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ashtabula, Ohio, Site comprises 42.5 acres of Ashtabula, Ohio, Site comprises 42.5 acres of privately owned land adjacent to the city of Ashtabula, about 55 miles east of Cleveland. From 1962 to 1988 Reactive Metals Inc. (RMI) operated a facility on the property that manufactured metallic uranium tubes and rods and experimental quantities of thorium metal for use in the Hanford, Washington; and Savannah River, Georgia, weapons program reactors. The facility operated under contract to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agency the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). RMI also extruded depleted uranium under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and extruded nonradioactive materials, primarily copper-based, for the private sector. RMI once operated a small wastewater evaporation pond near the northern boundary of the plant area for

348

Transmission Siting_071508.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coordinating Interstate Electric Coordinating Interstate Electric Transmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate The National Council on Electricity Policy 2 DISCLAIMER: The National Council on Electricity Policy is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The views and opinions expressed herein are strictly those of the authors and may not necessarily agree with the positions of the National Council on Electricity Policy, its committ ee members or the organizations they represent, the National Council funders, or those who commented on the paper during its draft ing. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Coordinating Interstate Electric Transmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate was prepared with the fi nancial assistance of a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Electricity Delivery

349

PNNL: Site index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Index Site Index # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # # 3-D Body Holographic Scanner # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Alerts - PNNL Staff Information Applied Geology and Geochemistry Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Asymmetric Resilient Cybersecurity (External website) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change Division Available Technologies Awards Awards - Science and Engineering External Recognition (SEER) Program # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z B Battelle Corporate Contributions Battelle Memorial Institute Battelle Offices (addresses) Benefits (Insurance Forms, Savings Plan) Bio-Based Product Research at PNNL Biological & Environmental Research-Proteomics

350

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

graphs and more worldwide NPP datasets graphs and more worldwide NPP datasets Graphs of biomass dyanmics and climate data for grassland sites have been added to the global terrestrial Net Primary Production (NPP) reference database at the ORNL DAAC. The NPP database has been compiled by Dick Olson and Jonathan Scurlock under the auspices of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme and funding from the Terrestrial Ecology Program of NASA's Office of Earth Science. Browsing through the graphs will help users to select data of interest, and to see relationships between grassland biomass changes and driving climate variables such as rainfall. Graphs are presently available for 14 of the 31 grassland sites. In addition, two more well-known worldwide datasets are available for browsing and downloading from the ORNL DAAC's NPP Web pages. The Osnabruck

351

NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

:i" :i" _,, ' _~" ORISE 95/C-70 :E : i:; :' l,J : i.: RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY Op BUILDINGS 401, ' 403, AND ' m HITTMAN BUILDING $ <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I .~~ ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? j:,:i I ,.J- ;b f" /: Li _e.*. ~,, I ,,~, ,:,,;:, Prepared by T. .I. Vitkus i,c Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division ;>::; Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education .,:, "Oak Ridge, Temressee 37831-0117 .F P ., ? :_ &,d ,,,, ;<:x,, Prepared for the 3 I. Office of Environmental Restoration I, U.S. Department of Energy i gy i. ~: ,,, "! ? ' :' : "' ,//, FINAL REPORT ".$ :,a ,,, MARCH 1995 ; m L ,, ,, ,,,. ., ,,. ' 1 jq ,Ij:,., .,~ _,I_ 1 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the

352

Site Operator Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

Warren, J.F.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Site Operator Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

Warren, J.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Site Sustainability Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management December 2013 LMS/S07225 This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Site Sustainability Plan December 2013 Doc. No. S07225 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii I. Executive Summary ...............................................................................................................1 II. Performance Review and Plan Narrative ...............................................................................9 1 GHG Reduction and Comprehensive GHG Inventory ...........................................................9

355

1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Site Map - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Innovation Portal. Home. Site Map; ... Solar Thermal; Startup America; ... National Aeronautics and Space Administration;

357

EERE: Clean Cities Mobile Sites  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Cities Mobile Sites Alternative Fueling Station Locator FuelEconomy.gov Truck Stop Electrification Locator...

358

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office  

Quick Links. Energy Innovation Portal; Site Map Commercialization Home Page. About. Success Stories; Legacy Initiatives

359

Nevada National Security Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Nevada National Security Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Targeted Review of the Safety Significant Blast Door and Special Door Interlock Systems and Review of Federal Assurance Capability at the Nevada National Security Site, December 2013 Review of the Nevada National Security Site Criticality Safety Program Corrective Action Plan Closure, May 2013 Review Reports 2012 Review of the Nevada National Security Site Implementation Verification Review Processes, March 2012 Activity Reports 2012 Nevada National Security Site Operational Awareness Visit, December 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Nevada National Security Site, August 2012 Review Reports 2011 Review of Nevada Site Office and National Security Technologies, LLC, Line Oversight and Contractor Assurance Systems

360

Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Center Map As the largest environmental cleanup program in the world, EM has been charged with the responsibility of cleaning up 107 sites across the country whose area is equal to the combined area of Rhode Island and Delaware. EM has made substantial progress in nearly every area of nuclear waste cleanup and as of September 2012, completed cleanup at 90 of these sites. The "active" sites continue to have ongoing cleanup projects under EM's purview. Use the interactive map above to see states that still have cleanup activities associated with them. The tooltip in the upper-right corner shows site data for each state, and each marker gives site information as well as links to the site fact sheets here on the EM website and each site's full website.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Grand Junction Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

362

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oxford OH Site - OH 22  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

363

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

364

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seymour CT Site - CT 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

365

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

366

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS OF THE PEACE-ATHABASCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS-7th Ave. SW, Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB, T2P 3P7, Canada ABSTRACT: Previously termed concave bank

367

Measurement of W and Z production cross-sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cross sections for W and Z production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV are measured using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The detected final states are W {yields} ev{sub e}, Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, W {yields} {mu}v{sub {mu}}, and Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}. In the ratio of these measurements, many common sources of systematic error cancel and we measure R = {sigma},(p{bar p} {yields} W) {center_dot} Br(W {yields} lv)/ {sigma},(p{bar p} {yields} Z) {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}). Assuming standard model couplings, this result is used to determine the width of the W bosom and to set a limit on the decay W{sup +} {yields} t{bar b}.

Quintas, P.Z.; D0 Collaboration

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Search for the Higgs boson produced with $Z \\to \\ell^+\\ell^-$ in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a search for the Higgs boson in the process q{bar q} {yields} ZN {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} b{bar b}. The analysis uses an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions produced at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV and accumulated by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II). They employ artificial neural networks both to correct jets mismeasured in the calorimeter, and to distinguish the signal kinematic distributions from those of the background. They see no evidence for Higgs boson production, and set 95% CL upper limits on {sigma}{sub ZH} {center_dot} {Beta}(H {yields} b{bar b}), ranging from 1.5 pb to 1.2 pb for a Higgs mass (m{sub H}) of 110 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Tennessee Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tennessee Quick Facts. The newest nuclear reactor in the United States, the single unit at the Watts Bar nuclear power plant, began operating in 1996; ...

370

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kansas: Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland ... City Gate : $ 5.32 /thousand cu ... Sequoyah (Tennessee Valley Authority), Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (Tennessee Valley ...

371

Search for a heavy particle decaying to a top quark and a light quark in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for a new heavy particle M produced in association with a top quark, p{bar p} {yields} t(M {yields} {bar t}q) or p{bar p} {yields} {bar t}({bar M} {yields} t{bar q}), where q stands for up quarks and down quarks. Such a particle may explain the recent anomalous measurements of top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. If the light-flavor quark (q) is reconstructed as a jet (j), this gives a {bar t}+j or t+j resonance in t{bar t}+jet events, a previously unexplored experimental signature. In a sample of events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set cross-section upper limits on the production (p{bar p} {yields} Mt or {bar M} {bar t}) at 95% confidence level from 0.61 pb to 0.02 pb for M masses ranging from 200 GeV/c{sup 2} to 800 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Yale U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

373

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Brookhaven Site Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Brookhaven Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Brookhaven Site Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR...

374

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PacificInstruments PacificInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Tropical Western Pacific [ Installed at 3 facilities ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Installed at 2 facilities ] CSAPR C-Band ARM Precipitation Radar Cloud Properties Browse Data [ Installed at 3 facilities ] CSPHOT Cimel Sunphotometer Aerosols, Radiometric Browse Data [ Single installation ] DISDROMETER Impact Disdrometer Surface Meteorology Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] DL Doppler Lidar Cloud Properties Browse Data [ Installed at 3 facilities ]

375

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oliktok Point, Oliktok Point, AlaskaInstruments Oliktok Deployment AMF Home Oliktok Home Deployment Operations Baseline Instruments and Data Plots at the Archive Outreach News & Press New Sites Fact Sheet (PDF, 1.6MB) Images Contacts Fred Helsel, AMF Operations Lynne Roeder, Media Contact Hans Verlinde, Principal Investigator Instruments : Oliktok Point, Alaska [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Not Online [ Single installation ] CSAPR C-Band ARM Precipitation Radar Cloud Properties Not Online [ Single installation ] CSPHOT Cimel Sunphotometer Aerosols Browse Data [ Single installation ] DL Doppler Lidar Cloud Properties Not Online [ Single installation ] ECOR Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Surface/Subsurface Properties Not Online [ Single installation ]

376

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central FacilityInstruments Central FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility [ Single installation ] ACSM Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Aerosols Browse Data [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] AOS Aerosol Observing System Aerosols Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BRS Broadband Radiometer Station Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BSRN Baseline Solar Radiation Network

377

Argonne Transportation Site Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Site Index General Information About TTRDC Media Center Current News News Archive Photo Archive Transportation Links Awards Contact Us Interesting Links Working with Argonne Research Resources Experts Batteries Engines & Fuels Fuel Cells Management Materials Systems Assessment Technology Analysis Tribology Vehicle Recycling Vehicle Systems Facilities Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Powertrain Test Cell 4-Wheel Drive Chassis Dynamometer Battery Test Facility Engine Research Facility Fuel Cell Test Facility Tribology Laboratory Tribology Laboratory Photo Tour Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plant Publications Searchable Database: patents, technical papers, presentations

378

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AlaskaInstruments AlaskaInstruments NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : North Slope Alaska [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] AMC Ameriflux Measurement Component Radiometric, Surface/Subsurface Properties Browse Data [ Single installation ] AOS Aerosol Observing System Aerosols Browse Data [ Single installation ] CCN Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter Aerosols Browse Data [ Single installation ] CLAP Continuous Light Absorption Photometer Aerosols Browse Data [ Single installation ] CPC Condensation Particle Counter Aerosols Browse Data

379

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PlainsInstruments PlainsInstruments SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Southern Great Plains [ Single installation ] ACSM Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Aerosols Browse Data [ Installed at 5 facilities ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] AOS Aerosol Observing System Aerosols Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BRS Broadband Radiometer Station Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BSRN Baseline Solar Radiation Network

380

Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Environmental for the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington September 1992 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington 99352 Contents 1 . 0 Summary . . 2.0 Purpose of and Need for the Proposed Action . . . . . . 3.0 Proposed Action and Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 Proposed Action 3.2 Onsite Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 Offsite Alternatives . . . . . . . . . 3.4 No Action Alternative ~ ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 Affected Environment . . . . . . . . . . . 5.0 Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Atmospheric Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1.2 Terrestrial Impacts . 5.1.3 Impacts on CERCLA Remedial Actions . 5.1.4 Construction Accidents .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

1994 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Site Management Guide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here Home Site Management Guide Site Management Guide Site Management Guide (Blue Book) (Revision 14, December 2012) Site Management Guide More Documents & Publications...

383

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup...

384

Nevada National Security Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada National Security Site Nevada National Security Site Nevada National Security Site | October 2011 Control Point Nevada National Security Site | October 2011 Control Point...

385

Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Calendar Year 2013 October 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-2nd...

386

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

NACP Site Data Set Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Data Set Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a data set from the North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP Site: Tower Meteorology, Flux...

388

Redesigned ORNL DAAC Web Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will be releasing a major revision to its Web site on Thursday, May 27, 2010. To implement this revision, the ORNL DAAC Web Site will be unavialable on May 27, from 10:00 a.m. EDT...

389

Historical Photographs: Nevada Test Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Test Site Small Image 1. A nuclear reactor sitting on a test cell pad prior to preliminary tests at the Nevada Test Site (circa 1968). This Phoebus 2 design was part of...

390

Completed Sites Listing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, NE Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, NE 1969 1998 2. Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, OH 1969 1998 3. Bayo Canyon, NM 1982 1998 4. Kellex/Pierpont, NJ 1982 1998 5. University of California, CA 1982 1998 6. Acid/Pueblo Canyons, NM 1984 1999 7. Chupadera Mesa, NM 1984 1999 8. Canonsburg, PA 1986 1999 9.Shiprock, NM 1987 2000 10. Middlesex Municipal Landfill, NJ 1987 2000 11. Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties, NY 1987 2001 12. Salt Lake City, UT 1989 2001 13. Spook, WY 1989 2001 14. National Guard Armory, IL 1989 2002 15. University of Chicago, IL 1989 2005 16. Green River, UT 1990 2005 17. Lakeview, OR 1990 2006 18. Riverton, WY 1990 2006 19. Tuba City, AZ 1990 2006 20 Durango, CO 1991 2007 21. Lowman, ID 1992 2007 22. Pagano Salvage Yard, NM 1992 2007 23. Elza Gate, TN 1992 2007 24. Albany Research Center, OR

391

Site Manager Enclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This radiological release survey for the west property at the Canonsburg UMTRCA Title I disposal site is a precursor for selling the approximately 2.5 acres of land that lie west and outside of the disposal cell fence line. The basic design philosophy underlying this plan was agreed to a conference call with your office in July. We are planning to conduct the survey in late October or early November to allow effective use of a GPS unit after the leaves have fallen in the wooded area of the property. It is requested that you review the attached document and provide your concurrence, or comments, within time for us to meet this schedule. If you have any questions, please contact me at (412) 386-4754 or email me at

Mr. Paul Michalak; Cc W/o Enclosure; R. Ransbottom

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

2009 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Atmospheric Corrosion Test Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 27   Some marine-atmospheric corrosion test sites around the world...Zealand Phia Marine 0.2 0.12 15.8 2.4 ? ? ? ? Greece Rafina Marine 0.2 0.12 13.6 1.0 ? ? ? ? Rhodes Marine 0.2 0.12 14.3 1.5 ? ? ? ? Netherlands Schagen Marine 2.4 1.5 17.0 2.0 ? ? ? ? Spain Almeria ? 0.035 0.022 22.4 1.6 ? ? ? ? Cartagena ? 0.050 0.031 5.2 1.9 ? ? ? ? La Coruña ? 0.160 0.1 26.2 1.4...

397

Site Map - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Home. Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. About; Search; Categories (15) Advanced Materials; Biomass and ...

398

DOE Patents Database - Site Index  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Site Index Home Advanced Search About Patent News Recent Inventions Technology Transfer Resources DOE Innovations FAQ Help RSS Contact Us...

399

Real-time rotor bar current measurements using bluetooth technology for a brushless doubly-fed machine (BDFM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brushless Doubly Fed Machine (BDFM) shows economic promise as a variable speed drive or generator. The optimization of the machine and model-based control strategies both rely on machine models, and the experimental verification of these models. To date, dynamic measurements of rotor quantities have not been possible. The authors present a system of measuring rotor bar currents in real time using a Rogowski coil to detect the current and recently developed Bluetooth wireless technology to transmit the data from the moving rotor to a computer. Experimental data collected from the system are included. 1.

P. C. Roberts; E. Abdi Jalebi; R. A. Mcmahon; T. J. Flack

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

(BARS) -- Bibliographic Retrieval System Sandia shock compression (SSC) database shock physics index (SPHINX) database. Volume 3, UNIX version Systems Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Bibliographic Retrieval System (BARS) is a database management system specially designed to store and retrieve bibliographic references and track documents. The system uses INGRES to manage this database and user interface. It uses forms for journal articles, books, conference proceedings, theses, technical reports, letters, memos, visual aids, as well as a miscellaneous form which can be used for data sets or any other material which can be assigned an access or file number. Sorted output resulting from flexible BOOLEAN searches can be printed or saved in files which can be inserted in reference lists for use with word processors.

von Laven, G.M. [Advanced Software Engineering, Madison, AL (United States); Herrmann, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

Mutual transformation of light waves by reflection holograms in photorefractive crystals of the 4-bar 3m symmetry  

SciTech Connect

The mutual transformation of light waves in the case of their simultaneous diffraction from a bulk reflection phase hologram, which was formed in a cubic photorefractive crystal of the 4-bar 3m symmetry class, has been studied. The indicator surfaces of the polarization-optimized values of the relative intensity of the object wave, which make it possible to determine the amplification of this wave for any crystal cut, are constructed. The linear polarization azimuths at which the energy exchange between the light waves reaches a maximum are found numerically for crystals of different cuts.

Naunyka, V. N.; Shepelevich, V. V., E-mail: vasshep@inbox.ru [Mozyr State Pedagogical University (Belarus)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORR Offsite: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ORR Offsite: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concering that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Animal Burial Site I Animal Burial Site II Animal Burial Site III Atomic City Auto Parts - Contaminated Creek Sediments Atomic City Auto Parts - Contaminated Soils Atomic City Auto Parts - Surface Debris Clinch River/Poplar Creek CSX Railroad David Witherspoon, Inc., 1630 Site David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF) Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - Bruner Site Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - NOAA Site Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Oak Ridge Tool Engineering, Inc. Solway Drums Site Swine Waste Lagoons

404

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Small Modular Reactor Technologies Small modular reactors can also be made in factories and transported to sites where they would be ready to "plug and play" upon arrival, reducing both capital costs and construction times. The smaller size also makes these reactors ideal for small electric grids and for locations that

405

Branching Fraction for B0 -> pi- l+ nu and Determination of |Vub| in Upsilon(4S) -> B0 B0bar Events Tagged by B0bar -> D(*)+ l- nubar  

SciTech Connect

We report preliminary results from a study of the charmless exclusive semileptonic decay B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} based on the data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance using the BABAR detector at SLAC. The analysis uses events in which the signal B meson recoils against a B meson that has been reconstructed in a semileptonic decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)+}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}. We extract the total branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.03 {+-} 0.25{sub stat.} {+-} 0.13{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -4} and the partial branching fractions in three bins of q{sup 2}, the invariant mass squared of the lepton-neutrino system. From the partial branching fractions and theoretical predictions for the form factors, we determine the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}|. We find |V{sub ub}| = (3.3 {+-} 0.4{sub stat.} {+-} 0.2{sub syst.} {sub -0.4}{sup +0.8}FF) x 10{sup -3}, where the last error is due to normalization of the form factor.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Measurement of CP-violation Parameters in B0B0barMixing using Partially Reconstructed D^{*-}l^+ nu_l Events at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

CP violation in B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} mixing is characterized by the value of the parameter |q/p| being different from 1, and the Standard Model predicts this difference to be smaller than 10{sup -3}. We present a measurement of this parameter using a partial reconstruction of one of the B mesons in the semileptonic channel D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where only the hard lepton and the soft pion from the D*{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} decay are reconstructed. The flavor of the other B is determined by means of lepton tagging. The determination of |q/p| is then performed with a fit to the proper time difference of the two B decays. We use a luminosity of 200.8 fb{sup -1}, collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetrical-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, in the period 1999-2004. We obtain the preliminary result: |q/p| - 1 = (6.5 {+-} 3.4(stat.) {+-} 2.0(syst.)) {center_dot} 10{sup -3}.

Aubert, B.

2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

407

NNSA Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA Sites NNSA Sites NNSA Sites Compliance agreements for National Nuclear Security Administration sites are listed here with accompanying summaries. Los Alamos National Laboratory Consent Agreement, December 10, 1993 Los Alamos National Laboratory Consent Agreement, December 10, 1993 Summary Los Alamos National Laboratory Compliance Order, October 4, 1995 Los Alamos National Laboratory Compliance Order, October 4, 1995 Summary South Valley Compliance Agreement South Valley Compliance Agreement Summary Mutual Consent Agreement for Storage of LDR, January 6, 1994 Mutual Consent Agreement for Storage of LDR, January 6, 1994 Summary Nevada Test Site FFCA Consent Order, March 27, 1996 Nevada Test Site FFCA Consent Order, March 27, 1996 Summary Nevada Test Site FFCA Consent Order, May 10, 1996

408

Building & Site Services Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQs FAQs Conference Center and APS Site Activity Coordination Management and/or Coordination of APS Site Work/Services Safety & Emergency Management Database Maintenance Personnel Building and Site Services Coordination "We're at the End of our Pagers" The mission of the Building & Site Services Coordination is to efficiently manage and minimize the impact of APS building and site activities and to provide optimal support to APS staff and users in all 400 buildings and areas. FAQs Conference Center and APS Site Activity Coordination Locations Reservations Setups Visits & Tours Management and/or Coordination of APS Site Work/Services Work Entry Clearances Utility Shutdowns Telephone System Rigging Stockroom Office Furniture Installation Safety & Emergency Management

409

OFF-SITE S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S S e T B ~ I L L ~ C E ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L R E S E A R C H CENTER from July through December 197C / t i o n a l Environmental Research Centeq U. S. ~ ~ I R O N M E L S T P ~ TR~ECTIQN AGENCY e Unders tancling No. 23 (26-1)-539 for the U. S o ATOMIC ENERGY COlQ4ISSION OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L RESEARCH CENTER from July through December 197C by Monitoring Operations Laboratory National Environmental Research Center U. S. ENVIRONMENTAL P R O T E C T I O N AGENCY Las Vegas , Nevada Published February 1974 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT (26-1)-539 for the U . S. A T O M I C ENERGY C O M M I S S I O N ABSTRACT During t h e period J u l y through December 1970, s i x announced underground n u c l e a r tests were conducted a t t h e Nevada T

410

Field Research Challenge Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform the public, regulators, Laboratory employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The report summarizes BNL's environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The SER is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/esd/SER.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD version of the full report. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; SER TEAM; ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES GROUP; ENVIROMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION FIELD SAMPLING TEAM; (MANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORS)

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

2007 Site Environmental Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

Ratel,K.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy efficient control for power management circuits operating from nano-watts to watts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency and form factor are the key driving forces in today's power electronics. All power delivery circuits, irrespective of the magnitude of power, basically consists of power trains, gate drivers and control ...

Bandyopadhyay, Saurav

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado field, South Texas; Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. Within the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity. The purpose of this report is (1) to describe and analyze the sand-body architecture, depositional facies variations, and structure of Prado field, (2) to determine controls on distribution of hydrocarbons pertinent to reexploration for bypassed hydrocarbons, (3) to describe reservoir models at Prado field, and (4) to develop new data affecting the suitability of Jackson oil fields as possible candidates for thermally enhanced recovery of medium to heavy oil.

Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Study of Higgs boson production and its b-b(bar) decay in gamma-gamma processes in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC  

SciTech Connect

We explore for the first time the possibilities to measure an intermediate-mass (m{sub H} = 115-140 GeV/c{sup 2}) Standard-Model Higgs boson in electromagnetic proton-lead (p Pb) interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) via its b{bar b} decay. Using equivalent Weizsacker-Williams photon fluxes and Higgs effective field theory for the coupling {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H, we obtain a leading-order cross section of the order of 0.3 pb for exclusive Higgs production in elastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} p H Pb) and semielastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} X H Pb) processes at {radical}S{sub NN} = 8.8 TeV. After applying various kinematics cuts to remove the main backgrounds ({gamma}{gamma} {yields} b{bar b} and misidentified {gamma}{gamma} {yields} q{bar q} events), we find that a Higgs boson with m{sub H} = 120 GeV/c{sup 2} could be observed in the b{bar b} channel with a 3{sigma}-significance integrating 300 pb{sup -1} with an upgraded pA luminosity of 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. We also provide for the first time semielastic Higgs cross sections, along with elastic t{bar t} cross sections, for electromagnetic pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC.

d' Enterria, David; /ICC, Barcelona U. /ICREA, Barcelona; Lansberg, Jean-Philippe; /Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT /SLAC

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Montgomery, James M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the sites geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the sites environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix Investing in Clean, Safe Nuclear Energy Secretary Chu Speaks at the 2010...

420

Moab Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Site Moab Site Moab Site Two scrapers work together to excavate Mancos Shale at the Crescent Junction site to create the second portion of a disposal cell for uranium mill tailings Two scrapers work together to excavate Mancos Shale at the Crescent Junction site to create the second portion of a disposal cell for uranium mill tailings One of two gantry cranes that load and unload tailings containers from the railcars is pictured on the hillside rail bench west of Moab One of two gantry cranes that load and unload tailings containers from the railcars is pictured on the hillside rail bench west of Moab Two scrapers work together to excavate Mancos Shale at the Crescent Junction site to create the second portion of a disposal cell for uranium mill tailings One of two gantry cranes that load and unload tailings containers from the railcars is pictured on the hillside rail bench west of Moab

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421

SSA Old Jack Pine Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSA-OJP) SSA-OJP) View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-OJP site. The road to the OJP site The flux tower and the hut The truss tower connected to the flux tower by cables The flux tower< The canopy access tower The SRC meteorology tower The under-canopy flux station The moss-covered jack pine tree The ground cover at the OJP site Aerial view of the SSA-Old Jack Pine site looking to the northeast. The Flux Tower at SSA-Old Jack Pine site. The Sodar site. The NOAA sodar located near the Old Jack Pine in the SSA. The under-canopy radiation track This is a 14 meter-long metal track in the forest with a mobile radiometer out on an arm on a small motorized cart (visible at the center of the picture) that travels through the forest taking measurements of PAR and net radiation.

422

Closure Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Closure Sites Closure Sites Closure Sites View a list of the compliance agreements for the many EM closure sites, such as Mound and Rocky Flats, below. Associated summaries are also included. Pinellas Remediation Agreement Pinellas Remediation Agreement Summary Maxey Flats Consent Decree -Part 1, April 18, 1996 Maxey Flats Consent Decree -Part 2, April 18, 1996 Maxey Flats Consent Decree April 18, 1996 Summary Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Summary Battelle Columbus Laboratories Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Battelle Columbus Laboratories Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary Fernald Environmental Management Project Consent Agreement and Final Order,

423

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES The Hanford Site provides the opportunity for long-term sustainable energy and industry development. The area boasts a specialized workforce that is highly educated and well-established; is rich in resources including land, infrastructure, low-cost energy, and available workforce; more scientists and engineers per capita than any other area in the Pacific Northwest; and is an optimum location for the development of sustainable energy solutions. Land The Hanford Site is one of the largest remaining land mega-sites available in the United States. * The 586-square-mile Hanford Site includes 39,000 acres designated for industrial use (9,000 acres for R&D). * The Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement allows for a planning process

424

2010 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection, of this volume. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report. BNL is operated and managed for DOE's Office of Science by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), a partnership formed by Stony Brook University and Battelle Memorial Institute. For more than 60 years, the Laboratory has played a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission and continues to contribute to the DOE missions in energy resources, environmental quality, and national security. BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental issues and community concerns. The Laboratory's motto, 'Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future,' and its Environmental, Safety, Security and Health Policy reflect the commitment of BNL's management to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its mission and operations.

Ratel, K.; Lee, R; Remien, J; Hooda, B; Green, T; Williams, J; Pohlot, P; Dorsch, W; Paquette, D; Burke, J

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measurement of the differential cross section d?/dt in elastic $p\\bar{p}$ scattering at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the elastic differential cross section $d\\sigma(p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow p\\bar{p})/dt$ as a function of the four-momentum-transfer squared t. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $\\approx 31 nb^{-1}$ collected with the D0 detector using dedicated Tevatron $p\\bar{p} $ Collider operating conditions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV and covers the range $0.26 <|t|< 1.2 GeV^2$. For $|t|<0.6 GeV^2$, d\\sigma/dt is described by an exponential function of the form $Ae^{-b|t|}$ with a slope parameter $ b = 16.86 \\pm 0.10(stat) \\pm 0.20(syst) GeV^{-2}$. A change in slope is observed at $|t| \\approx 0.6 GeV^2$, followed by a more gradual |t| dependence with increasing values of |t|.

D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; M. Aoki; A. Askew; S. Atkins; K. Augsten; C. Avila; F. Badaud; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Baringer; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; V. Bazterra; A. Bean; M. Begalli; L. Bellantoni; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besanon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; S. Bhatia; V. Bhatnagar; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; K. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; D. Boline; E. E. Boos; G. Borissov; T. Bose; A. Brandt; O. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; J. Brown; X. B. Bu; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; V. Bunichev; S. Burdin; C. P. Buszello; E. Camacho-Prez; W. Carvalho; B. C. K. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Caughron; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; E. Chapon; G. Chen; S. Chevalier-Thry; D. K. Cho; S. W. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; S. Cihangir; D. Claes; J. Clutter; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; F. Couderc; M. -C. Cousinou; A. Croc; D. Cutts; A. Das; G. Davies; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; C. De Oliveira Martins; F. Dliot; R. Demina; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; C. Deterre; K. DeVaughan; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; P. F. Ding; A. Dominguez; A. Dubey; L. V. Dudko; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; S. Dutt; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; Y. Enari; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; G. Facini; L. Feng; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fuess; A. Garcia-Bellido; J. A. Garca-Gonzlez; G. A. Garca-Guerra; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; W. Geng; D. Gerbaudo; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; G. Golovanov; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J. -F. Grivaz; A. Grohsjean; S. Grnendahl; M. W. Grnewald; T. Guillemin; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; L. Han; K. Harder; A. Harel; J. M. Hauptman; J. Hays; T. Head; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; H. Hegab; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; I. Heredia-De La Cruz; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; T. Hoang; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; I. Howley; Z. Hubacek; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; Y. Ilchenko; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffr; A. Jayasinghe; R. Jesik; K. Johns; E. Johnson; M. Johnson; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; J. Joshi; A. W. Jung; A. Juste; K. Kaadze; E. Kajfasz; D. Karmanov; P. A. Kasper; I. Katsanos; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. N. Kharzheev; I. Kiselevich; J. M. Kohli; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kraus; S. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. Kupco; T. Kur?a; V. A. Kuzmin; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; P. Lebrun; H. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; J. Lellouch; H. Li; L. Li; Q. Z. Li; J. K. Lim; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; H. Liu; Y. Liu; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; R. Lopes de Sa; H. J. Lubatti; R. Luna-Garcia; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; R. Madar; R. Magaa-Villalba; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; Y. Maravin; J. Martnez-Ortega; R. McCarthy; C. L. McGivern; M. M. Meijer; A. Melnitchouk; L. Mendoza; D. Menezes; P. G. Mercadante; M. Merkin; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; F. Miconi; J. Molina; N. K. Mondal; H. da Motta; M. Mulhearn; L. Mundim; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; R. Nayyar; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; G. Obrant; V. Oguri; J. Orduna; N. Osman; J. Osta; M. Padilla; A. Pal; N. Parashar; V. Parihar; S. K. Park; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; B. Penning; M. Perfilov; Y. Peters; K. Petridis; G. Petrillo; P. Ptroff; M. -A. Pleier; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; M. -E. Pol; A. V. Popov; W. L. Prado da Silva; M. Prewitt; D. Price; N. Prokopenko; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; M. S. Rangel; K. Ranjan; P. N. Ratoff; I. Razumov; P. Renkel; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; M. Rominsky; A. Ross; C. Royon; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; G. Sajot; P. Salcido; A. Snchez-Hernndez; M. P. Sanders; B. Sanghi; A. Santoro; A. S. Santos; G. Savage; L. Sawyer; T. Scanlon; R. D. Schamberger; Y. Scheglov; H. Schellman; S. Schlobohm; C. Schwanenberger; R. Schwienhorst; J. Sekaric; H. Severini; E. Shabalina; V. Shary; S. Shaw; A. A. Shchukin; R. K. Shivpuri; V. Simak; P. Skubic; P. Slattery; D. Smirnov; K. J. Smith; G. R. Snow; J. Snow; S. Snyder; S. Sldner-Rembold; L. Sonnenschein; K. Soustruznik; J. Stark; D. A. Stoyanova; M. A. Strang; M. Strauss; L. Stutte; L. Suter; P. Svoisky; M. Takahashi; M. Titov; V. V. Tokmenin; Y. -T. Tsai; K. Tschann-Grimm; D. Tsybychev; B. Tuchming; C. Tully; L. Uvarov; S. Uvarov; S. Uzunyan; R. Van Kooten; W. M. van Leeuwen; N. Varelas; E. W. Varnes; I. A. Vasilyev; P. Verdier; A. Y. Verkheev; L. S. Vertogradov; M. Verzocchi; M. Vesterinen; D. Vilanova; P. Vokac; H. D. Wahl; M. H. L. S. Wang; J. Warchol

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Site Environmental Report for 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory, Mixed Waste Site Treatment Plan, Wastehazardous portion of mixed waste) and underground storageof certain hazardous and mixed wastes at the HWHF. Allowed

Pauer, Ron

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Site environmental report for 2002.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE, Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2002 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2002. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chernobyls waste site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the prospects for using the Chernobyl exclusion zone for development of a spent fuel store, waste disposal site and other nuclear facilities.

Schmieman, Eric A.; Paskevych, Sergiy; Sizov, Andrey; Batiy, Valeriy

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Site Map: Artificial Retina Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Index Home About the Project Overview How the Artificial Retina Works Implant Patient Stories Terry Byland Linda M. Kathy B. How to Participate Project Collaborators CRADA...

430

Site Environmental Report for 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identify site contribution to the DOE sustainability goals defined in its agency-level Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. 10 In December 2011, Berkeley Lab prepared the...

431

Barro Colorado Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BRR-1: Discussion of how to measure buttressed trees at the Barro Colorado tropical forest site, Panama. (Dr. Robin Foster with arm raised is showing Bolivian student Marielos...

432

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description  

SciTech Connect

This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Site Characterization Awards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Site Characterization Awards Site Characterization Awards A description of...

434

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Mound, Ohio, Site A CERCLA andor RCRA Site MoundMap DOE has completed all remediation activities at the Mound site in accordance with applicable Comprehensive Environmental...

435

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion More...

436

Legacy Management Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legacy Management Sites Legacy Management Sites Alaska Puerto Rico Continental US Click on a site for more information. The Energy Department is committed to managing its...

437

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: SLAC Site Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SLAC Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: SLAC Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by SLAC Site Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 2,...

438

M & O Contract Recompete Site -- Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Information Pantex Home Page (weblink) Ten Year Site Plan (weblink) Site Fact Sheet (weblink) Pantex Finance Benchmark Redacted Presentation (pdf, 634 KB) Pantex HR Benchmark...

439

Transition of Sites from Environmental Management Memorandum...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transition of Sites from Environmental Management Memorandum of Understanding Transition of Sites from Environmental Management Memorandum of Understanding Transition of Sites from...

440

Site Selection Process | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Selection Process Site Selection Process SiteSelectionProcess.pdf More Documents & Publications dgappendices.pdf REAL ESTATE PROCESS OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Site environmental report for 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status, with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1996 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. 37 figs., 12 tabs.

Holland, R.C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Measurements of D0-D0bar Mixing and Searches for CP Violation: HFAG Combination of all Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present world average values for D0-D0bar mixing parameters x and y, CP violation parameters |q/p| and Arg(q/p), and strong phase differences \\delta and \\delta_{K\\pi\\pi}. These values are calculated by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) by performing a global fit to relevant experimental measurements. The results for x and y differ significantly from zero and are inconsistent with no mixing at the level of 6.7 sigma. The results for |q/p| and Arg(q/p) are consistent with no CP violation. The strong phase difference \\delta is less than 45 degrees at 95% C.L.

Schwartz, A J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Search for Long-Lived Massive Charged Particles in 1.96 TeV $\\bar{p}p}$ Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a signature-based search for long-lived charged massive particles (CHAMPs) produced in 1.0 $\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ of $\\bar{p}p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV, collected with the CDF II detector using a high transverse-momentum ($p_T$) muon trigger. The search used time-of-flight to isolate slowly moving, high-$p_T$ particles. One event passed our selection cuts with an expected background of $1.9 \\pm 0.2$ events. We set an upper bound on the production cross section, and, interpreting this result within the context of a stable scalar top quark model, set a lower limit on the particle mass of 249 GeV/$c^2$ at 95% C.L.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

2009-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect

This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy Wills

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega  

SciTech Connect

We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

447

NSA-Beaver Pond Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) The storage tent and gas collectors NSA-BP site looking to the east. Visible is the investigator hut on drier land to the west and the boardwalk leading out to the tower site in the right portion of the image with the mounded beaver lodge visible in the middle of the image. The bridge and the 3 meter flux tower The beaver lodge The bridge from the flux tower This is the floating bridge leading from the flux tower back to the shore. The large tent for holding equipment is clearly visible on the shore. The TGB gas collectors on the beaver pond Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos

448

Savannah River Site - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Savannah River Site Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Puncture Wound Injury resulting in a Radiological Uptake at the Savannah River Site, July 22, 2011 (NEA-2011-02) Consent Order issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Facility Construction Deficiencies and Subcontractor Oversight at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Amer Industrial Technologies, Inc. related to Weld Deficiencies at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010

449

Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Hanford Site Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations The Pretreatment Facility control room building pad (foreground) and the Low-Activity Waste Facility (background)

450

Piketon Site Partnering Agreement 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluor-B&W I Fluor-B&W I Portsmouth" Restoration Services. Inc. B:W conversion serVices, Ie ~~WEMS Wastren-EnergX Mission Support, LLC Piketon Site Partnering Agreement 2011 O n behalf of the taxpayers of this nation and the communities of the four counties surrounding the former Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site in Piketon, Ohio, we, the U.S. Department of Energy and its Prime Contractors, stand together as One Site Team. We enter into this Partnering Agreement with the conviction and shared responsibility to operate and clean up the Piketon Site safely and efficiently -- while protecting the public health and the environment. We believe that - only together - can we return the Site to the community as a platform for sustainable regional growth and new jobs.

451

Hanford Site sustainable development initiatives  

SciTech Connect

Since the days of the Manhattan Project of World War II, the economic well being of the Tri-Cities (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland) of Washington State has been tied to the US Department of Energy missions at the nearby Hanford Site. As missions at the Site changed, so did the economic vitality of the region. The Hanford Site is now poised to complete its final mission, that of environmental restoration. When restoration is completed, the Site may be closed and the effect on the local economy will be devastating if action is not taken now. To that end, economic diversification and transition are being planned. To facilitate the process, the Hanford Site will become a sustainable development demonstration project.

Sullivan, C.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tatum Salt Dome Test Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tatum Salt Dome Test Site - MS 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Tatum Salt Dome Test Site (MS.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

453

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Exxon Ray Point Site - 032  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Exxon Ray Point Site - 032 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Exxon Ray Point Site (032) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition:...

454

Inspection Requirements for Reactor Pressure Vessel Heads at Pressurized Water Reactors- Request for Relief"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) NRC letter to TVA dated January 27, 2006, 'Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 1- Request for Relaxation from the First Revised NRC Order EA-03-009, Dated February 20, 2004, Deferral of Non-visual Nondestructive Examinations (TAC No. MC8543)" 3) TVA letter to NRC dated March 3, 2008, 'Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN)

Mike Skaggs; U. S. Nuclear; Regulatory Commission; Tennessee Valley Authority

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ten Year Site Plans Ten Year Site Plans A Ten Year Site Plan (TYSP) is the essential planning document linking a site's real property requirements to its mission in support of the...

456

EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Google Bookmark EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Delicious Rank EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Digg Find More places to share EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on AddThis.com... Site Map About Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program Weatherization Services

457

Arizona Web Sites - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Arizona Web Sites . Other Links : Arizona Electricity Profile: Arizona Energy Profile: Arizona Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites:

458

Texas Web Sites - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Web Sites Other Links : Texas Electricity Profile: Texas Energy Profile: Texas Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

459

1992 Fernald Site Environmental Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the Fernald site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. This report covers the reporting period from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 1992, with the exception of Chapter Three, which provides information from the first quarter of 1993 as well as calendar year 1992 information. This 1992 report provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Use included in this report are summary data of the sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. Finally, this report provides general information on the major waste management and environmental restoration activities during 1992.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Analysis of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects from central and eastern United States earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results from three studies of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects of central and eastern United States earthquakes. In the first study source parameter estimates taken from 27 previous studies were combined to test the assumption that the earthquake stress drop is roughly a constant, independent of earthquake size. 200 estimates of stress drop and seismic moment from eastern North American earthquakes were combined. It was found that the estimated stress drop from the 27 studies increases approximately as the square-root of the seismic moment, from about 3 bars at 10{sup 20} dyne-cm to 690 bars at 10{sup 25} dyne-cm. These results do not support the assumption of a constant stress drop when estimating ground motion parameters from eastern North American earthquakes. In the second study, broadband seismograms recorded by the United States National Seismograph Network and cooperating stations have been analysed to determine Q{sub Lg} as a function of frequency in five regions: the northeastern US, southeastern US, central US, northern Basin and Range, and California and western Nevada. In the third study, using spectral analysis, estimates have been made for the anelastic attenuation of four regional phases, and estimates have been made for the source parameters of 27 earthquakes, including the M{sub b} 5.6, 14 April, 1995, West Texas earthquake.

Lindley, G.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watts bar site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Idaho Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Idaho Site Idaho Site Idaho National Laboratory Advance Training Reactor | September 2009 Aerial View Idaho National Laboratory Advance Training Reactor | September 2009 Aerial View Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) mission is to ensure the nation's energy security with safe, competitive, and sustainable energy systems and unique national and homeland security capabilities. To support these activities, INL operates numerous laboratories, reactors, test facilities, waste storage facilities, and support facilities. Idaho Closure Project The Idaho Closure Project (ICP) is a multi-year cleanup effort involving decommissioning and dismantlement of over 200 excess environmental management facilities. The scope includes D&D of three reactors, management

462

Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact 1 ______________________________________________________________________________ 2 ARTICLE I 3 PURPOSE 4 5 Siting electric transmission lines across state borders and federal lands is an issue for states, the 6 federal government, transmission utilities, consumers, environmentalists, and other stakeholders. 7 The current, multi-year application review process by separate and equal jurisdictions constitutes 8 a sometimes inefficient and redundant process for transmission companies and complicates the 9 efforts of state and federal policy-makers and other stakeholders to develop more robust 10 economic opportunities, increase grid reliability and security, and ensure the consumers have the 11 lowest cost electricity possible. 12

463

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Restaurant and Bar Owners Exposure to Secondhand Smoke and Attitudes Regarding Smoking Bans in Five Chinese Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Despite the great progress made towards smoke-free environments, only 9 % of countries worldwide mandate smoke-free restaurants and bars. Smoking was generally not regulated in restaurants and bars in China before 2008. This study was designed to examine the public attitudes towards banning smoking in these places in China. A convenience sample of 814 restaurants and bars was selected in five Chinese cities and all owners of these venues were interviewed in person by questionnaire in 2007. Eighty six percent of current nonsmoking subjects had at least one-day exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) at work in the past week. Only 51 % of subjects knew SHS could cause heart disease. Only 17 % and 11 % of subjects supported prohibiting smoking completely in restaurants and in bars, respectively, while their support for restricting smoking to designated areas was much higher. Fifty three percent of subjects were willing to prohibit or restrict smoking in their own venues. Of those unwilling to do so, 82 % thought smokingInt. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8 1521

Ruiling Liu; S. Katharine Hammond; Andrew Hyl; Mark J. Travers; Yan Yang; Yi Nan; Guoze Feng; Qiang Li; Yuan Jiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Measurement of W-Boson Polarization in Top-Quark Decay in pp[over-bar] Collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report measurements of the polarization of W bosons from top-quark decays using 2.7 fb[superscript -1] of pp[over-bar] collisions collected by the CDF II detector. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175??GeV/c[superscript 2], ...

Bauer, Gerry P.

465

Measurement of D-D-bar mixing using the ratio of lifetimes for the decays D-->K- pi + and K+K-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the rate of D0-D[over-bar] 0 mixing with the observable yCP=(?Kpi/?KK)-1, where ?KK and ?Kpi are, respectively, the mean lifetimes of CP-even D0-->K+K- and CP-mixed D0-->K-pi+ decays, using a data sample of ...

Fisher, Peter H.

466

Figure 2. Above ground woody biomass across a gradient of forest degradation in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Mean and one standard error given by connected bars, one standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Indonesia. Mean and one standard error given by connected bars, one standard deviation given by outer in 51 subsampled plots at 17 locations in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia in July and August 2009 across, Indonesia . From left to right intact forest , advanced regrowth, degraded area with some regrowth

467

Information Request Yucca Mountain Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2008 , 2008 TO: Sue Tierney, Phil Niedzielski-Eichner, Skila Harris FROM: Chris Kouts SUBJECT: Information Request As requested, enclosed is the additional information you requested last week regarding use of engineered barriers. Please let me know if you need additional information or have any questions. A,4- -/0 7 The Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site and the Issue of Natural Barriers as the Principal Barriers for Demonstrating Safety This paper addresses two issues that are frequently raised concerning the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for development as a repository. The first issue is that the Yucca Mountain site is technically unsound and that an engineered barrier system is required because the site is not capable of protecting public health and safety. The second issue is

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