Sample records for watt cobra head

  1. Cobra Judy II Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor, Jeffrey

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strategic community relies heavily on the Cobra Judy (CJ1) instrumentation to provide high-quality radar and telemetry data for ballistic missile system testing and development. The current CJ1 platform, USNS Observation ...

  2. Development of an in vitro model for migration inhibitory factor utilizing a component of cobra venom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmack, Lee James

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee~ Head of Depar me j'7 c Member Membe May 1976 ABSTRACT Development of an In Vitro Model for Migration Inhibitory Factor Utilizing a Component of Cobra Venon. May (1976) Lee James Carmack, B. S. , Texas ASM University; Chairman of Advisory... of fractions eluted from the ion exchange column 2 Effects of whole cobra venom (CV), dialyzed cobra venom (OCV), Arvin, and Venacil on migration of normal mouse peritoneal exudate cells in cell culture 3 Effects on migration of normal mouse peritoneal...

  3. Grupo Cobra | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard" form. ToGestionSolar IncGreenvestAlfonsoCobra

  4. GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD EHRINGHAUS BOSHAMER BASEBALL STADIUM

  5. Forging Attacks on two Authenticated Encryptions COBRA and POET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forging Attacks on two Authenticated Encryptions COBRA and POET Mridul Nandi Indian Statistical COBRA [4], based on pseudorandom per- mutation (PRP) blockcipher, and POET [3], based on Almost XOR and a simple vari- ant of the original proposal of POET (due to a forging attack [13] on the original proposal

  6. Assessment of the computer code COBRA/CFTL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxi, C. B.; Burhop, C. J.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COBRA/CFTL code has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for thermal-hydraulic analysis of simulated gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) core assemblies to be tested in the core flow test loop (CFTL). The COBRA/CFTL code was obtained by modifying the General Atomic code COBRA*GCFR. This report discusses these modifications, compares the two code results for three cases which represent conditions from fully rough turbulent flow to laminar flow. Case 1 represented fully rough turbulent flow in the bundle. Cases 2 and 3 represented laminar and transition flow regimes. The required input for the COBRA/CFTL code, a sample problem input/output and the code listing are included in the Appendices.

  7. INGEN: A COBRA-NC input generator user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, C.L.; Dodge, R.E.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INGEN (INput GENerator) computer program has been developed as a preprocessor to simplify input generation for the COBRA-NC computer program. INGEN uses several empirical correlations and geometric assumptions to simplify the data input requirements for the COBRA-NC computer code. The simplified input scheme is obtained at the expense of much flexibility provided by COBRA-NC. For more complex problems requiring additional flexibility however, INGEN may be used to provide a skeletal input file to which the more detailed input may be added. This report describes the input requirements for INGEN and describes the algorithms and correlations used to generate the COBRA-NC input. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  9. COBRA-WC: a version of COBRA for single-phase multiassembly thermal hydraulic transient analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Wheeler, C.L.; Prather, W.A.; Masterson, R.E.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide the user of the COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code a basic understanding of the code operation and capabilities. Included in this manual are the equations solved and the assumptions made in their derivations, a general description of the code capabilities, an explanation of the numerical algorithms used to solve the equations, and input instructions for using the code. Also, the auxiliary programs GEOM and SPECSET are described and input instructions for each are given. Input for COBRA-WC sample problems and the corresponding output are given in the appendices. The COBRA-WC code has been developed from the COBRA-IV-I code to analyze liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) assembly transients. It was specifically developed to analyze a core flow coastdown to natural circulation cooling.

  10. Verification and validation of COBRA-SFS transient analysis capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rector, D.R.; Michener, T.E.; Cuta, J.M.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides documentation of the verification and validation testing of the transient capability in the COBRA-SFS code, and is organized into three main sections. The primary documentation of the code was published in September 1995, with the release of COBRA-SFS, Cycle 2. The validation and verification supporting the release and licensing of COBRA-SFS was based solely on steady-state applications, even though the appropriate transient terms have been included in the conservation equations from the first cycle. Section 2.0, COBRA-SFS Code Description, presents a capsule description of the code, and a summary of the conservation equations solved to obtain the flow and temperature fields within a cask or assembly model. This section repeats in abbreviated form the code description presented in the primary documentation (Michener et al. 1995), and is meant to serve as a quick reference, rather than independent documentation of all code features and capabilities. Section 3.0, Transient Capability Verification, presents a set of comparisons between code calculations and analytical solutions for selected heat transfer and fluid flow problems. Section 4.0, Transient Capability Validation, presents comparisons between code calculations and experimental data obtained in spent fuel storage cask tests. Based on the comparisons presented in Sections 2.0 and 3.0, conclusions and recommendations for application of COBRA-SFS to transient analysis are presented in Section 5.0.

  11. COBRA-PI: an extension of the COBRA-3M code dynamically dimensioned to accept pin bundles of any size. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froehle, P.H.; Bauer, T.H.

    1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA, in general, performs a thermal-hydraulic analysis of an actual pin bundle by subdividing the bundle cross-section into coolant subchannels, pin sectors, duct wall sectors. Its calculation includes heat convected axially upward through coolant mass flow, heat flow between pin sectors and adjoining subchannels, and heat and mass flow between coolant subchannels. COBRA-3M is a version of COBRA built for LMFBR applications, that includes a sophisticated thermal model of fuel pins and duct wall. COBRA-3M that can explicitly model a wider variety of pin bundle configurations than 3M would allow and includes significant improvements to its thermal modeling. COBRA-PI is currently being used for thermal-hydraulic analysis of hypothetical LMFBR accident transients in both power and flow. Pin bundles currently being analyzed explicitly range from 7 to 37 pins of axial lengths ranging from approx. 0.3-2.0 meters.

  12. Sensitivity studies of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors for the COBRA experiment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köttig, Tobias

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The COBRA Experiment searches for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay. The observation of this decay would provide the absolute mass of the neutrino and clarify the… (more)

  13. WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

  14. COBRA-IV PC: A personal computer version of COBRA-IV-I for thermal-hydraulic analysis of rod bundle nuclear fuel elements and cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, B.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA-IV PC is a modified version of COBRA-IV-I, adapted for use with most IBM PC and PC-compatible desktop computers. Like COBRA-IV-I, COBRA-IV PC uses the subchannel analysis approach to determine the enthalpy and flow distribution in rod bundles for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state and transient solution schemes used in COBRA-IIIC are still available in COBRA-IV PC as the implicit solution scheme option. An explicit solution scheme is also available, allowing the calculation of severe transients involving flow reversals, recirculations, expulsions, and reentry flows, with a pressure or flow boundary condition specified. In addition, several modifications have been incorporated into COBRA-IV PC to allow the code to run on the PC. These include a reduction in the array dimensions, the removal of the dump and restart options, and the inclusion of several code modifications by Oregon State University, most notably, a critical heat flux correlation for boiling water reactor fuel and a new solution scheme for cross-flow distribution calculations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briand, Lionel C.

    COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment approaches (referred to as COBRA, COst estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment). We find through a case accurate and reliable cost estimates to allocate and control project resources, and to make realistic bids

  16. GlobalWatt Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEFEnergyGlobalWatt Inc

  17. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program Automotive Waste Heat...

  18. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generator Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Test results for low and high temperature thermoelectric generators (TEG) those for a...

  19. AstroWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewableAstroWatt Jump to:

  20. Watt Does It Cost To Use It?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartment of Energy Watch itEnergyOptimizationWatt

  1. Reactor core thermal-hydraulic analysis ; improvement and application of the code COBRA-IIICMIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loomis, James N.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several improvements have been made to COBRA-IIIC/MIT. All of the improvements, except for one, have been made in response to the recommendations of past research. The improvements are included in a new version of the code ...

  2. Watch the Watts: Tips for Buying a New Television | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LED TV that uses 79 watts. The good news for consumers is the process of comparing energy consumption is about to get easier. Televisions manufactured after May 10, 2011 are...

  3. Trico Electric Cooperative- SunWatts Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the SunWatts Program, Trico Electric Cooperative offers residential and business customers a rebate for installing photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heaters. The up-front rebate for...

  4. Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative- SunWatts Rebate Program (Arizona)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative is providing rebates to for the purchase of renewable energy systems through its SunWatts program. Photovoltaic (PV) and wind energy systems 10 kilowatts (kW) or...

  5. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- SunWatts Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SunWatts Program offers home and business owners two different incentive options. Customers installing a photovoltaic (PV) system up to 10 kW and/or a system that costs less than $75,000 have...

  6. COBRA-SFS predictions of single assembly spent fuel heat transfer data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Rector, D.R.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study reported here is one of several efforts to evaluate and qualify the COBRA-SFS computer code for use in spent fuel storage system thermal analysis. The ability of COBRA-SFS to predict the thermal response of two single assembly spent fuel heat transfer tests was investigated through comparisons of predictions with experimental test data. From these comparisons, conclusions regarding the computational treatment of the physical phenomena occurring within a storage system can be made. This objective was successfully accomplished as reasonable agreement between predictions and data were obtained for the 21 individual test cases of the two experiments.

  7. COBRA-WC model and predictions for a fast-reactor natural-circulation transient. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Prather, W.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code has been used to predict the core-wide coolant and rod temperature distribution in a liquid metal fast reactor during the early part (first 220 seconds) of a natural circulation transient. Approximately one-sixth of the core was modeled including bypass flows and the pressure losses above and below the core region. Detailed temperature and flow distributions were obtained for the two test fuel assemblies. The COBRA-WC model, the approach, and predictions of core-wide transient coolant and rod temperatures during a natural circulation transient are presented in this paper.

  8. A Practical Approach to Dynamic Load Balancing Jerrell Watts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transfer Vector Calculation ¢ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ £ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ £ ¢ ¤ £ ¢ 8 2.3.1 Heat DiffusionA Practical Approach to Dynamic Load Balancing Jerrell Watts Scalable Concurrent Programming versions of the node adaption and movement routines which were used by the load balancing code; he also

  9. Stray capacitances in the watt balance operation: electrostatic forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quagliotti, Danilo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a watt balance, stray capacitances exist between the coil and the magnet. Since the electric current flowing in the coil originates a difference between the coil and magnet electric-potentials, their electrostatic interactions must be taken into account. This paper reports the results of a finite element analysis of the forces acting on the coil.

  10. White LED Benchmark of 65 Lumens Per Watt Achieved

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel chip design and the balance of multiple interrelated design parameters have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with efficacies greater than 65 lumens per watt at 350 mA. The results are particularly significant because they were achieved with a pre-production prototype chip using the same package used in Cree's commercially available XLamp® 7090 high power LED, rather than a laboratory device.

  11. Watts Community, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:CoopWaspa|Wattner and Scheuten JV Jump to:Watts

  12. Cobra-IE Evaluation by Simulation of the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Test (BFBT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, C. J. and Aumiler, D. L.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The COBRA-IE computer code is a thermal-hydraulic subchannel analysis program capable of simulating phenomena present in both PWRs and BWRs. As part of ongoing COBRA-IE assessment efforts, the code has been evaluated against experimental data from the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Tests (BFBT). The BFBT experiments utilized an 8 x 8 rod bundle to simulate BWR operating conditions and power profiles, providing an excellent database for investigation of the capabilities of the code. Benchmarks performed included steady-state and transient void distribution, single-phase and two-phase pressure drop, and steady-state and transient critical power measurements. COBRA-IE effectively captured the trends seen in the experimental data with acceptable prediction error. Future sensitivity studies are planned to investigate the effects of enabling and/or modifying optional code models dealing with void drift, turbulent mixing, rewetting, and CHF.

  13. COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations; however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume contains the input instructions for COBRA-SFS and an auxiliary radiation exchange factor code, RADX-1. It is intended to aid the user in becoming familiar with the capabilities and modeling conventions of the code.

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA HSPP/PSPP INSTALLATION; COOLING COIL AIRFLOW & FAN WATT DRAW TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA HSPP/PSPP INSTALLATION; COOLING COIL AIRFLOW & FAN WATT DRAW TEST CEC- CF-4R TESTING CF-4R-MECH-22 HSPP/PSPP Installation; Cooling Coil Airflow & Fan Watt Draw Test (Page 1 of 3) Site of a Static Pressure Probe (HSPP), and Permanently installed Static Pressure Probe (PSPP) in the supply plenum

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA HSPP/PSPP INSTALLATION; COOLING COIL AIRFLOW & FAN WATT DRAW TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA HSPP/PSPP INSTALLATION; COOLING COIL AIRFLOW & FAN WATT DRAW TEST CEC-CF-6R/PSPP Installation; Cooling Coil Airflow & Fan Watt Draw Test (Page 1 of 3) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit), and Permanently installed Static Pressure Probe (PSPP) in the supply plenum When the Certificate of Compliance (CF

  16. COBRA-SFS: A thermal-hydraulic analysis code for spent fuel storage and transportation casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michener, T.E.; Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Dodge, R.E.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA-SFS is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code for prediction of material temperatures and fluid conditions in a wide variety of systems. The code has been validated for analysis of spent fuel storage systems, as part of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program of the US Department of Energy. The code solves finite volume equations representing the conservation equations for mass, moment, and energy for an incompressible single-phase heat transfer fluid. The fluid solution is coupled to a finite volume solution of the conduction equation in the solid structure of the system. This document presents a complete description of Cycle 2 of COBRA-SFS, and consists of three main parts. Part 1 describes the conservation equations, constitutive models, and solution methods used in the code. Part 2 presents the User Manual, with guidance on code applications, and complete input instructions. This part also includes a detailed description of the auxiliary code RADGEN, used to generate grey body view factors required as input for radiative heat transfer modeling in the code. Part 3 describes the code structure, platform dependent coding, and program hierarchy. Installation instructions are also given for the various platform versions of the code that are available.

  17. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

  18. Further testing and development of an 11-watt Stirling converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, B.A.; Montgomery, W.L. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three previous IECEC papers describe the development of an 11-watt Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) intended for remote power applications. This paper describes more recent testing and development activities. Testing of the engineering model (EM) was performed to determine the effect of heat rejection temperature, thermal input and initial charge pressure on thermal efficiency. Shock testing of the generator included a drop test and 3 hours of testing in a random vibration environment where g{sup 2}/Hz = 0.04. Endurance testing of a complete Stirling converter continues, with over 15,000 maintenance-free operating hours. Endurance testing of critical subsystems and components has achieved 14,000 to 26,000 hours of operation without failure. Minor changes to the RSG prototype design, based on the development of the EM, are described.

  19. Is the hourly data I get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted for daylight savings time. Home I take the hourly AC output numbers and apply them to a program I built that assigns a dollar value to the...

  20. The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with the clean-energy economy. My first link was actually was actually to work with UCF Sustainability in a - in a large energy competition called Kill-a-Watt. ALEXANDRA KENNEDY:...

  1. COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 1, Mathematical models and solution method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations: however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the method used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of these methods.

  2. COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 3, Validation assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, N.J.; Cuta, J.M.; Michener, T.E.; Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code validation effort. COBRA-SFS, while refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses, is a lumped-volume thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code that predicts temperature and velocity distributions in a wide variety of systems. Through comparisons of code predictions with spent fuel storage system test data, the code's mathematical, physical, and mechanistic models are assessed, and empirical relations defined. The six test cases used to validate the code and code models include single-assembly and multiassembly storage systems under a variety of fill media and system orientations and include unconsolidated and consolidated spent fuel. In its entirety, the test matrix investigates the contributions of convection, conduction, and radiation heat transfer in spent fuel storage systems. To demonstrate the code's performance for a wide variety of storage systems and conditions, comparisons of code predictions with data are made for 14 runs from the experimental data base. The cases selected exercise the important code models and code logic pathways and are representative of the types of simulations required for spent fuel storage system design and licensing safety analyses. For each test, a test description, a summary of the COBRA-SFS computational model, assumptions, and correlations employed are presented. For the cases selected, axial and radial temperature profile comparisons of code predictions with test data are provided, and conclusions drawn concerning the code models and the ability to predict the data and data trends. Comparisons of code predictions with test data demonstrate the ability of COBRA-SFS to successfully predict temperature distributions in unconsolidated or consolidated single and multiassembly spent fuel storage systems.

  3. Third generation development of an 11-watt Stirling converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, W.L.; Ross, B.A.; Penswick, L.B. [Stirling Technology Co., Kennewick, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes recent design enhancements, performance results, and development of an artificial neural network (ANN) model related to the Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG), an 11-watt converter designed for remote power applications. Design enhancements include minor changes to improve performance, increase reliability, facilitate fabrication and assembly for limited production, and reduce mass. Innovative modifications were effected to increase performance and improve reliability of the vacuum foil insulation (VFI) package and linear alternator. High and low operating temperature acceptance testing of the Engineering Model (EM) demonstrated the robust system characteristics. These tests were conducted for 1 week of operation each, with rejector temperatures of 95 C and 20 C, respectively. Endurance testing continues for a complete Stirling converter, the Development Model (DM), with over 25,000 hours of maintenance-free operation. Endurance testing of flexures has attained over 540 flexure-years and endurance testing of linear motors/alternators has achieved nearly 27,000 hours of operation without failure. An ANN model was developed and tested successfully on the DM. Rejection temperatures were varied between 3 C and 75 C while load voltages ranged between engine stall and displacer overstroke. The trained ANN model, based solely on externally measured parameters, predicted values of piston amplitude, displacer amplitude, and piston-displacer phase angle within {+-}2% of the measured values over the entire operating regime. The ANN model demonstrated its effectiveness in the long-term evaluation of free-piston Stirling machines without adding the complexity, reduced reliability, and increased cost of sophisticated diagnostic instrumentation.

  4. Pulse-shape discrimination of surface events in CdZnTe detectors for the COBRA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Fritts; Jan Tebrügge; Jürgen Durst; Joachim Ebert; Claus Gößling; Thomas Göpfert; Daniel Gehre; Caren Hagner; Nadine Heidrich; Michael Homann; Tobias Köttig; Till Neddermann; Christian Oldorf; Thomas Quante; Silke Rajek; Oscar Reinecke; Oliver Schulz; Jan Timm; Björn Wonsak; Kai Zuber

    2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Events near the cathode and anode surfaces of a coplanar grid CdZnTe detector are identifiable by means of the interaction depth information encoded in the signal amplitudes. However, the amplitudes cannot be used to identify events near the lateral surfaces. In this paper a method is described to identify lateral surface events by means of their pulse shapes. Such identification allows for discrimination of surface alpha particle interactions from more penetrating forms of radiation, which is particularly important for rare event searches. The effectiveness of the presented technique in suppressing backgrounds due to alpha contamination in the search for neutrinoless double beta decay with the COBRA experiment is demonstrated.

  5. INVERTED ECHO SOUNDER DEVELOPMENT G. F. Chaplin and D. Randolph Watts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    INVERTED ECHO SOUNDER DEVELOPMENT G. F. Chaplin and D. Randolph Watts Graduate School of Oceanography University of Rhode Island Narragansett, RI 02882 ABSTRACT The Inverted Echo Sounder (IES and, consequently, the acoustic travel time through the water column change. The inverted echo sounder

  6. La question du privilge en France pour la machine de Watt Paul Naegel,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ;2 The steam engine, invented and patented in 1769 by James Watt, then marketed by him in association of very large diameter. Started in England, matters related to the new steam engines were obtained opportunities were based in France on already known applications, made with Newcomen fire engines

  7. University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis Phase I Interim Report Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any

  8. University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis Phase I Final Report Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither

  9. Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Data Bank Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara December 2010 Keywords: Wind Wind speed Energy Capacity factor Electricity Chile a b s t r a c t Bearing role in any future national energy generation matrix. With a view to understanding the local wind

  10. A 5-WATT, 37-GHz MONOLITHIC GRID AMPLIFIER Blythe Deckman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the fabricated active grid. Thermal Management Previous grid amplifiers lacked a heat spreader, so Figure 1A 5-WATT, 37-GHz MONOLITHIC GRID AMPLIFIER Blythe Deckman1 , Donald S. Deakin, Jr.2 , Emilio Sovero has been demonstrated. The area of the grid am- plifier is 1 cm2, and there are 512 transistors

  11. Rigid Deployable Solar Array A.M. Watt and S. Pellegrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    with the design of low-cost rigid-panel deployable solar arrays with self- locking tape-spring hinges. The reportRigid Deployable Solar Array A.M. Watt and S. Pellegrino CUED/D-STRUCT/TR214 Department on the deployment of a solar array wing are evaluated experimentally. #12;#12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Layout

  12. MULTI-WATT ELECTRIC POWER FROM A MICROFABRICATED PERMANENT-MAGNET GENERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MULTI-WATT ELECTRIC POWER FROM A MICROFABRICATED PERMANENT-MAGNET GENERATOR S. Das1 , D. P. Arnold2 presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of permanent-magnet (PM) generators for use, coupled to a transformer and rectifier, delivers 1.1 W of DC electrical power to a resistive load

  13. HMM adaptation and voice conversion for the synthesis of child speech: a Oliver Watts1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    , Junichi Yamagishi1 , Simon King1 , Kay Berkling2 1 Centre for Speech Technology Research, University of Edinburgh, UK 2 Inline Internet Online Dienste GmbH, Germany O.S.Watts@sms.ed.ac.uk jyamagis- netically balanced, consistently read, and cleanly recorded. The type of child speech typically available

  14. COBRA-SFS thermal analysis of a sealed storage cask for the Monitored Retrievable Storage of spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code was used to predict temperature distributions in a concrete Sealed Storage Cask (SSC). This cask was designed for the Department of Energy in the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) program for storage of spent fuel from commercial power operations. Analytical results were obtained for nominal operation of the SSC with spent fuel from 36 PWR fuel assemblies consolidated in 12 cylindrical canisters. Each canister generates 1650 W of thermal power. A parametric study was performed to assess the effects on cask thermal performance of thermal conductivity of the concrete, the fin material, and the amount of radial reinforcing steel bars (rebar). Seven different cases were modeled. The results of the COBRA-SFS analysis of the current cask design predict that the peak fuel cladding temperature in the SSC will not exceed the 37/sup 0/C design limit for the maximum spent fuel load of 19.8 kW and a maximum expected ambient temperature of 37.8/sup 0/C (100/sup 0/F). The results of the parametric analyses illustrate the importance of material selection and design optimization with regard to the SSC thermal performance.

  15. COBRA-WC pretest predictions and post-test analysis of the FOTA temperature distribution during FFTF natural-circulation transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, E.U.; George, T.L.; Rector, D.R.

    1982-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural circulation tests of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) demonstrated a safe and stable transition from forced convection to natural convection and showed that natural convection may adequately remove decay heat from the reactor core. The COBRA-WC computer code was developed by the Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) to account for buoyancy-induced coolant flow redistribution and interassembly heat transfer, effects that become important in mitigating temperature gradients and reducing reactor core temperatures when coolant flow rate in the core is low. This report presents work sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) with the objective of checking the validity of COBRA-WC during the first 220 seconds (sec) of the FFTF natural-circulation (plant-startup) tests using recorded data from two instrumented Fuel Open Test Assemblies (FOTAs). Comparison of COBRA-WC predictions of the FOTA data is a part of the final confirmation of the COBRA-WC methodology for core natural-convection analysis.

  16. Optimizing performance per watt on GPUs in High Performance Computing: temperature, frequency and voltage effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, D C; Barsdell, B R; Babich, R; Greenhill, L J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of the real-time digital signal processing challenge attached to large radio astronomical antenna arrays motivates use of high performance computing (HPC) systems. The need for high power efficiency (performance per watt) at remote observatory sites parallels that in HPC broadly, where efficiency is an emerging critical metric. We investigate how the performance per watt of graphics processing units (GPUs) is affected by temperature, core clock frequency and voltage. Our results highlight how the underlying physical processes that govern transistor operation affect power efficiency. In particular, we show experimentally that GPU power consumption grows non-linearly with both temperature and supply voltage, as predicted by physical transistor models. We show lowering GPU supply voltage and increasing clock frequency while maintaining a low die temperature increases the power efficiency of an NVIDIA K20 GPU by up to 37-48% over default settings when running xGPU, a compute-bound code used in radio...

  17. Zinc and cadmium residues in striped bass from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tisa, M.S.; Strange, R.J.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc and cadmium concentrations in muscle, liver, and kidney were measured in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs in East Tennessee to determine if these metals had contributed to fish kills observed in Cherokee during the 1970's. The range of mean concentrations of zinc from collections of Cherokee striped bass (muscle 11-14, liver 98-106, kidney 88-105 mg Zn/kg dry weight) were comparable to ranges in fish from Norris and Watts Bar (muscle 12-13, liver 83-132, kidney 96-108 mg/kg dry weight). With the exception of concentrations in the kidneys of one collection, cadmium residues from Cherokee striped bass (muscle 0.02-0.09, liver 0.3-0.7, kidney 0.2-4.0 mg Cd/kg dry weight) were also similar to residues from Norris and Watts Bar fish (muscle 0.05-0.13, liver 0.3-2.1, kidney 0.3-0.5 mg Cd/kg dry weight). There were significant differences in tissue residues among seasons (summer 1979, spring 1980, summer 1980) in Cherokee Reservoir, as well as significant differences among the three reservoirs (Cherokee, Norris, Watts Bar) during the same season (spring 1980). All concentrations, however, were well below those reported for fish exposed to the maximum non-harmful concentrations of zinc and the lowest potentially harmful concentration of cadmium and moreover, were within the range typically reported for fish tissues. It is, therefore, believed that in at least the last two years, zinc and cadmium in the tissues of striped bass from Cherokee Reservoir have not been harmful to the fish.

  18. The distribution of the electric current in a watt-balance coil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasso, Carlo Paolo; Mana, Giovanni

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the watt balance experiment, separate measurements of the Lorentz and electromotive forces in a coil in a radial magnetic field enable a virtual comparison between mechanical and electric powers to be carried out, which lead to an accurate measurement of the Planck constant. This paper investigates the effect of a spatially inhomogeneous distribution of the electric current in the coil due to the higher or lower resistance of the outer or inner paths.

  19. Parametric design study of ``mini-generator`` with 6-watt heat source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, A.; Or, C.T. [Orbital Sciences Corporation, 20301 Century Blvd., Germantown, Maryland 20874 (United States)

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fairchild study showed that generator designs based on a single 1-watt RHU had very poor thermal efficiencies. At their optimum operating point, more than half of the generated heat was lost through the thermal insulation. This resulted in system efficiency of only 2.2%, compared to 7.2% for current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Moreover, there were serious doubts about the fabricability of the required multicouples, particularly of the series/parallel connections between the large number (900) of thermoelectric legs of very small cross-section (0.21 mm square). All in all, the preceding paper showed that neither JPL`s Power Stick design nor the Fairchild-generated derivatives based on the 1-watt heat source looked promising. The present paper describes a similar parametric study of a mini-generator based on a 6-watt heat source, and compares its performance and fabricability to that of the optimum Power Stick derivative and of the current RTG design for the same mission. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  20. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of ASME Section III Hydrostatic Test: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutton,, P. H.; Taylor,, T. T.; Dawson,, J. F.; Pappas,, R. A.; Kurtz,, R. J.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has installed instrumentation on Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 for the purpose of test and evaluation of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and piping for flaw detection. This report describes the acoustic emission monitoring performed during the ASME Section III hydrostatic testing of Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 and the results obtained. Highlights of the results are: • Spontaneous AE was detected from a nozzle area during final pressurization. • Evaluation of the apparent source of the spontaneous AE using an empirically derived AE/fracture mechanics relationship agreed within a factor of two with an evaluation by ASME Section XI Code procedures. • AE was detected from a fracture specimen which was pressure coupled to the 10-inch accumulator nozzle. This provided reassurance of adequate system sensitivity. • High background noise was observed when all four reactor coolant pumps were operating. Work is continuing at Watts Bar Unit 1 toward AE monitoring hot functional testing and subsequently monitoring during reactor operation.

  1. Bottom head assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  2. Lumen Maintenance Testing of the Philips 60-Watt Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Hathaway, John E.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes testing conducted to evaluate the Philips' L Prize award winning 60-watt LED replacement product's ability to meet the lifetime/lumen maintenance requirement of the competition, which was: "having 70 percent of the lumen value under subparagraph (A) [producing a luminous flux greater than 900 lumens] exceeding 25,000 hours under typical conditions expected in residential use." A custom test apparatus was designed and constructed for this testing and a statistical approach was developed for use in evaluating the test results. This will be the only publicly available, third-party data set of long-term LED product operation.

  3. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

  5. Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar CreekWatts

  6. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  7. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  8. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    as well as the many weekly seminars and colloquia, continually ... from the Head ... Meyer Jerison) received the 2009 George David Birkhoff Prize. The prize is ..... Virginia Mashin Scholars ... Alan Legg, Mariana Smit Vega Garcia, Lloyd West.

  9. Field representation of a watt balance magnet by partial profile measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shisong; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Songling

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permanent magnets with high-permeability yokes have been widely used in watt balances for supplying a robust and strong magnetic field at the coil position. Subjected to the mechanical realization, only several $B_r(z)$ (radial magnetic field along the vertical direction) profiles can be measured by coils for field characterization. In this article, we present an algorithm that can construct the global magnetic field of the air gap based on $N(N\\geq1)$ additional measurements of $B_r(z)$ profiles. The proposed algorithm is realized by polynomially estimating the $B_z(r)$ function with analysis of basic relations between two magnetic components in air gap, i.e., $B_r(r,z)$ and $B_z(r,z)$, following the Maxwell's equations. The algorithm, verified by FEM simulations, can characterize the three-dimensional contribution of the magnetic field for a watt balance magnet with acceptable accuracy, which would supply basic field parameters for alignment and misalignment corrections.

  10. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, David L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Kantzos, Pete T. [Ohio Aerospace Institute, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  11. Introduction The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Introduction ® The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy use. When used with specialty fiber optic cables the MI-150 illuminator can also Illuminator from the carton and retain the manual and any additional documents. ! Remove the fiber optic cable

  12. Heriot-Watt University has consolidated and updated its various logos to form a single more distinctive identity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasbey, Chris

    Brand Identity USING THE LOGO It is essential that a consistent use of colour and positioning-Watt Brand Identity. The logo should always appear in Pantone 293 and 30% Pantone 293 with a white keyline, it is necessary to consider the printers normal image parameters. The logo should therefore be positioned using

  13. Policy on the Moderation of Assessment: Approved by the Senate, 22 May 2013 Heriot-Watt University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    1 Policy on the Moderation of Assessment: Approved by the Senate, 22 May 2013 Heriot-Watt University Policy on the Moderation of Assessment With diversity in form of assessment across multi in all disciplines, across all Schools and in all modes or locations of study. The University Policy

  14. A watt-class 1-THz backward-wave oscillator based on sine waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Xiong; Wei Yanyu; Shen Fei; Yin Hairong; Xu Jin; Gong Yubin; Wang Wenxiang

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel backward wave oscillator was proposed by utilizing a concise sine waveguide slow-wave structure combined with sheet electron beam to operate at terahertz frequency band. First, the design method was described, and the dispersion curve and interaction impedance of the sine waveguide were calculated, then the device oscillation frequency and operating voltage were determined. Next, the circuit transmission losses were learned over the tunable frequency range. Finally, the particle-in-cell simulation method was applied to predict its signal generation performance. The investigation results show that, the backward wave oscillator can produce over 1.9 -W peak power output at the central operating frequency of 1-THz under 27-kV operating voltage and 5-mA beam current. And the interaction efficiency at 1-THz is more than 1.4% with a circuit length of 7.2-mm. It, therefore, will be considered as a promising watt-class terahertz radiation source.

  15. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  16. Simulation of Watts Bar Unit 1 Initial Startup Tests with Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Bekar, Kursat B [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors* is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications. One component of the testing and validation plan for VERA is comparison of neutronics results to a set of continuous energy Monte Carlo solutions for a range of pressurized water reactor geometries using the SCALE component KENO-VI developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Recent improvements in data, methods, and parallelism have enabled KENO, previously utilized predominately as a criticality safety code, to demonstrate excellent capability and performance for reactor physics applications. The highly detailed and rigorous KENO solutions provide a reliable nu-meric reference for VERAneutronics and also demonstrate the most accurate predictions achievable by modeling and simulations tools for comparison to operating plant data. This paper demonstrates the performance of KENO-VI for the Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle 1 zero power physics tests, including reactor criticality, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients.

  17. Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle Zero Power Physics Tests Analysis with VERA-CS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL; Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL; Francheschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, including a core simulation capability called VERA-CS. A key milestone for this endeavor is to validate VERA against measurements from operating nuclear power reactors. The first step in validation against plant data is to determine the ability of VERA to accurately simulate the initial startup physics tests for Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (WBN1) cycle 1. VERA-CS calculations were performed with the Insilico code developed at ORNL using cross section processing from the SCALE system and the transport capabilities within the Denovo transport code using the SPN method. The calculations were performed with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections in 252 groups (collapsed to 23 groups for the 3D transport solution). The key results of the comparison of calculations with measurements include initial criticality, control rod worth critical configurations, control rod worth, differential boron worth, and isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient (ITC). The VERA results for these parameters show good agreement with measurements, with the exception of the ITC, which requires additional investigation. Results are also compared to those obtained with Monte Carlo methods and a current industry core simulator.

  18. A nonlinearity in permanent-magnet systems used in watt balances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shisong; Pratt, Jon

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watt balances are used to measure the Planck constant and will be used in the future to realize mass at the kilogram level. They increasingly rely on permanent magnet systems to generate the magnetic flux. It has been known that the weighing current might effect the magnetization state of the permanent magnetic system used in these systems causing a systematic bias that can lead to an error in the result if not accounted for. In this article a simple model explaining the effect of the weighing current on the yoke of the magnet is developed. This model leads to a nonlinear dependence of the magnetic flux density in the gap that is proportional to the squared value of the coil current. The effect arises from changing the reluctance of the yoke by the additional field produced by the coil. Our analysis shows that the effect depends on the width of the air gap, the magnetic flux density in the air gap, and the $BH$ curve of the yoke material. Suggestions to reduce the nonlinear effect are discussed.

  19. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  20. Role Profile Head of School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Role Profile Head of School Purpose of the Role The Head of School is accountable for:- · The provision of academic leadership, developing and delivering School objectives for, in particular, teaching, · The effective governance and management of the School and all of its resources. Context of the Role

  1. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt. No. - 15-33-LNG Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt. No. - 15-33-LNG The Office of...

  2. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 2, Quality assurance/quality control summary report for arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.A.; Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study dffers from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L or 0.0015 to 0.003 {mu}g/L.

  3. Heater head for stirling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A. (R.D. #2, Box 101 E, North Troy, NY 12182)

    1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

  4. Development testing of the two-watt RTG heat source and Hastelloy-S/T-111 alloy compatibility studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, E.I.; Teaney, P.E.

    1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source capsules were tested to determine their survivability under extreme environmental conditions: high external pressure, high impact, and high internal pressure. Test results showed that the capsules could withstand external pressures of 1,000 bars and impacts at velocities near 150 meters per second. However, the results of the internal pressure tests (stress-rupture) were not so favorable, possibly because of copper contamination, leading to a recommendation for additional testing. A material compatibility study examined the use of Hastelloy-S as a material to clad the tantalum strength member of the two-watt radioisotopic heat source. Test capsules were subjected to high temperatures for various lengths of time, then cross sectioned and examined with a scanning electron microscope. Results of the study indicate that Hastelloy-S would be compatible with the underlying alloy, not only at the normal operating temperatures of the heat source, but also when exposed to the much higher temperatures of a credible accident scenario.

  5. Environmental test report on the CTI-Cryogenics 1-watt integral Stirling cooler (long-life HD-1033d). Final report, 16 June-24 July 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doggett, G.; Dunmire, H.; Samuels, R.; Shaffer, J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes and provides the data on the environmental testing of the CTI-Cryogenics 1-Watt Integral Stirling Cooler (Long-Life HD-1033D). The 1-Watt Integral Cooler (HD-1033B/C) is currently used in the M1 FLIR, M60 FLIR, and the Advanced Attack Helicopter FLIR. The long life cooler (clearance seal) improves life of the cooler by approximately two and one half times. C2NVEO evaluated the cooler performance at environmental extremes per the purchase description, PD-0182-001(CR). The cooler successfully passed all the environmental tests with no failures.

  6. Heater head for Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.A.; Emigh, S.G.

    1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a heater head for a Stirling engine comprising: a housing for enclosing the heater head with gas at a substantial elevated pressure; insulator means attached to the housing for insulating the heater head; inlet means attached to a regenerator in the housing for admission of relatively high pressure working fluid from the regenerator of a Stirling engine; a first annular heating wall in the housing attached to the inlet means for heating the working fluid; and, a second annular heating wall in the housing concentric with the first heating wall but of lesser diameters so that an annular space is formed between the first heating wall and the second heating wall for heating working fluid; and a third heating wall in the housing concentric with and smaller in diameter than the second heating wall forming the condensing area of a heat pipe between the second heating wall and the third heating wall.

  7. Unified Description of Bulk and Interface-Enhanced Spin Pumping S. M. Watts, J. Grollier,* C. H. van der Wal, and B. J. van Wees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Wal, Caspar H.

    Unified Description of Bulk and Interface-Enhanced Spin Pumping S. M. Watts, J. Grollier,* C. H in semiconductors or metals by rf magnetic field pumping. With a semiclassical model we show that a rotating applied dynamics of a ferromagnetic electrode into or out of which the spin currents flow. In spin-pumping devices

  8. 3866 JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 26, NO. 24, DECEMBER 15, 2008 Room-Temperature Stable Generation of 19 Watts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    -mode-area fibers has enabled the realization of 100-W- class diffraction-limited infrared sources with optical sources possessing excellent beam quality with overall optical efficiencies well over 10%. However, high-damage Generation of 19 Watts of Single-Frequency 532-nm Radiation in a Periodically Poled Lithium Tantalate Crystal

  9. Pressure testing of torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.; Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two vessels fabricated from SA516-70 steel with 6% knuckle radius torispherical heads were tested under internal pressure to failure. The D/t ratios of Vessel 1 and Vessel 2 were 238 and 185 respectively. The calculated maximum allowable working pressures of Vessel 1 and 2 heads using the ASME Section 8, Div. 1 rules and measured dimensions were 85 and 110 psi, respectively. Vessel 1 failed at a nozzle weld in the cylindrical shell at 700 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed at a theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse pressure of 241 and a calculated buckling pressure of 270 psi. Buckles were observed developing slowly after 600 psi pressure, and a total of 22 buckles were observed after the test, having the maximum amplitude of 0.15 inch. Vessel 2 failed at the edge of the longitudinal weld of the cylindrical shell at 1,080 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed up to the final pressure, which exceeded the theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse and calculated buckling pressures of 274 psi and 342 psi, respectively.

  10. Analyzing pulse from head motions in video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Guha

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract heart rate and beat lengths from videos by measuring subtle head oscillations that accompany the cardiac cycle. Our method tracks features on the head, temporally filters their trajectories and performs principal ...

  11. A summary of the Planck constant measurements using a watt balance with a superconducting solenoid at NIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlamminger, S; Haddad, D; Newell, D B; Seifert, F; Chao, L S; Liu, R; Williams, E R; Pratt, J R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have been using a watt balance, NIST-3, to measure the Planck constant $h$ for over ten years. Two recently published values disagree by more than one standard uncertainty. The motivation for the present manuscript is twofold. First, we correct the latest published number to take into account a recently discovered systematic error in mass dissemination at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Second, we provide guidance on how to combine the two numbers into one final result. In order to adequately reflect the discrepancy, we added an additional systematic uncertainty to the published uncertainty budgets. The final value of $h$ measured with NIST-3 is $h = 6.626\\,069\\,36(37)\\times 10^{-34}\\,\\mbox{J\\,s}$. This result is $77(57) \\times 10^{-9}$ fractionally higher than $h_{\\mathrm{90}}$. Each number in parentheses gives the value of the standard uncertainty in the last two digits of the respective value and $h_{\\mathrm{90}}$ is th...

  12. Reproductive effects assessment of largemouth bass and bluegill in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemela, S.L.; McCracken, M.K.; Ivey, L.J.; Greeley, M.S. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful reproduction is key to the survival and maintenance of viable fish populations and therefore an important consideration in ecological risk assessments. In order to evaluate the reproductive health of fish in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system downstream of the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge, TN, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) were collected from seven sites at the beginning of the spawning period and a suite of parameters indicative of reproductive condition were measured. Measures of reproductive condition common to male and female fish included gonadal somatic index (GSI), and plasma concentrations of reproductive hormones. Gender specific analyses included a histological examination of the testes in males and a quantitative evaluation of ovarian parameters in females including determinations of fecundity, the number of vitellogenic and atretic oocytes, and the incidences of ovarian parasites. Evidence of reproductive impairment in largemouth bass at the two sites immediately adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation included lower GSIs and reproductive hormone levels (males and females), and reduced fecundity and an increase in the number of atretic oocytes (females). Similar trends were not observed in bluegill sunfish. These findings suggest that reproduction in a top-level predatory fish species, the largemouth bass, may be negatively affected by activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  13. A review of "The Arts of 17th-Century Science: Representations of the Natural World in European and North American Culture." by Claire Jowitt and Diane Watt, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol K. Weaver

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Planetary Astronomy in the Development of the Western World, [1957] 260). Claire Jowitt and Diane Watt, eds. The Arts of 17 th -Century Science: Representations of the Natural World in European and North Ameri- can Culture. Aldershot, U.K.: Ashgate... sources of the early modern period overlapped and influenced each other. Editors Claire Jowitt and Diane Watt skillfully separated the volume into four major topics, did a fine job selecting essays that explored these subjects, and placed essays...

  14. Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

  15. HeadLock : wide-range head pose estimation for low resolution video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCamp, Philip (Philip James)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on data mining technologies to extract head pose information from low resolution video recordings. Head pose, as an approximation of gaze direction, is a key indicator of human behavior and interaction. ...

  16. Head of Safety 020 7679 1948

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    Head of Safety Paul Stirk 020 7679 1948 (Internal 41948) p.stirk@ucl.ac.uk Deputy Head of Safety & Biological Safety Advisor Jillian Deans 020 7679 1814 (Internal 41814) j.deans@ucl.ac.uk Safety Training Manager Kuen Yip Porter 020 7679 1299 (Internal 41299) k.yip-porter@ucl.ac.uk Safety Advisors Rhona Brown

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P.S.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplement No. 14 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation with additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 13 was issued, and matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 13 was issued.

  18. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt No. 15-14-NG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, “Bear Head LNG”), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

  19. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC FE Docket No. 15-14-NG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, “Bear Head LNG”), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

  20. DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director (PD) Directory DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director (PD) Directory HCA and PD List Sept 23...

  1. INTERNAL POSTING - Head of Technology Transfer, Patents & Publications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INTERNAL POSTING - Head of Technology Transfer, Patents & Publications Department: Best Practices Supervisor(s): John Delooper Staff: AM 7 Requisition Number: 1400936 The Head of...

  2. Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine Laboratory Demonstration of a New...

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P.S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), and Supplement No. 14 (December 1994) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

  4. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Numbers 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement Number 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), and Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER. These issues relate to: Design criteria -- structures, components, equipment, and systems; Reactor; Instrumentation and controls; Electrical power systems; Auxiliary systems; Conduct of operations; Accident analysis; and Quality assurance.

  5. Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elby, Andy

    Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES Epistemological resources University Maryland, College Park Trisha Kagey Montgomery County Public Schools #12;Epistemological resources are better understood as made up of finer-grained cognitive resources whose activation depends sensitively

  6. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  7. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  8. SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: Spatial transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: Spatial transformations Multiple Systems for Spatial Imagery: Transformations of Objects and Bodies Jeffrey M. Zacks* and Barbara Tversky * Washington COGNITION & COMPUTATION #12;SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 2 Abstract Problem-solving often requires imagining

  9. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

  10. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  11. Most Workers Who Suffer Head Injuries- Were Not Wearing Head Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of accidents and injuries noted that most workers who suffered impact injuries to the head were not wearing head protection. In addition, the same survey showed that the majority of workers were injured while performing their normal jobs at their regular worksites.

  12. Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper Heads-up Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper 1 Heads-up Paper Training called "Training and Certification of Lock and Dam Operators." Interested individuals can send ideas of the Training and Certification program. Examples of what will be in those draft documents are as follows

  13. Dual, rotating stripper rubber drilling head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, T.F.; Campbell, J.E.

    1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In a drilling head for a well bore through which a tool string of varying outside diameter is run, the drilling head sealing against fluid flow past the tool string to divert such fluid through a side outlet port, said drilling head including a housing having an axial passageway through which the tool string is run and a bearing assembly to facilitate rotation of the tool string within the axial passageway, the improved drilling head comprising: first and second stripper rubbers rotatably mounted within the drilling head housing in seating contact with the tool string, said stripper rubbers having substantially identical inner diameters through which the tool string extends, said first stripper rubber formed of an abrasive resistant material to divert fluid flow from the axial passageway of the housing to the side outlet port and said second stripper rubber formed on a sealingly resilient material which maintains sealing contact with the tool string extending there through preventing fluid flow past said tool string; said first stripper rubber being corrected to clamping means associated with the bearing assembly through a first drive ring such that said first stripper rubber rotates with the tool string; and said second stripper rubber is rotatably connected to said clamping means associated with the bearing assembly through a second drive ring, said first and second drive rings coaxially mounted within the housing whereby said first stripper rubber is positioned axially below said second stripper rubber in sealing contact with the tool string.

  14. Rotating head for rotary drilling rigs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.R.

    1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating head is claimed for a rotary drilling rig which is to be secured to the top of a well pipe having an inner rotating portion with an opening therethrough which permits passage of drill pipe, pipe joints, and Kelly tools; the rotating portion has an annular drive rubber formed integrally with the top portion thereof. A rotating head drive bushing having an opening with a cross-sectional shape generally conforming to the cross-section of the Kelly tool to permit only sliding motion therebetween is provided with helical external ridges which produce a disengagable gripping action with the opening in the drive rubber at the top of the rotating portion of the rotating head. The rotating portion has a conventional stripper rubber at the bottom thereof and is mounted with a double roller bearing to provide low friction motion with respect to the fixed portion of the head. The double roller bearing is lubricated with a viscous lubricating material and paddles are provided between the sets of rollers of the double roller bearing for distributing the viscous lubricating material and in particular propel it onto the upper set of bearings; the upper body portion of the rotating head is readily detachable from the lower sleeve portion which is normally welded to the well conductor pipe.

  15. Determination of the Planck constant using a watt balance with a superconducting magnet system at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlamminger, Stephan; Seifert, Frank; Chao, Leon S; Newell, David B; Liu, Ruimin; Steiner, Richard L; Pratt, Jon R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past two years, measurements have been performed with a watt balance at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to determine the Planck constant. A detailed analysis of these measurements and their uncertainties has led to the value $h=6.626\\,069\\,79(30)\\times 10^{-34}\\,$J$\\,$s. The relative standard uncertainty is $ 45\\times 10^{-9}$. This result is $141\\times 10^{-9}$ fractionally higher than $h_{90}$. Here $h_{90}$ is the conventional value of the Planck constant given by $h_{90}\\equiv 4 /( K_{\\mathrm{J-90}}^2R_{\\mathrm{K-90}})$, where $K_{\\mathrm{J-90}}$ and $R_{\\mathrm{K-90}}$ denote the conventional values of the Josephson and von Klitzing constants, respectively.

  16. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print header further includes a first layer comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  17. VICE CHANCELLOR Signature of Head of School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    VICE CHANCELLOR Signature of Head of School Date (dd/mm/yy) Following is a report on the professional and consultative work of my School/section over the twelve months of (year) School/Section One. Yes No (Nil Return) Total number of staff within School/Section at year end who are eligible to engage

  18. The Head-Neck Sensory Motor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Head-Neck Sensory Motor System Edited by Alain Berthoz Laboratoire de Physiologie, sideslip, and thrust) determine its loca- tion in space, and rotations (yaw, pitch, and roll) change its, no functional significance can be attributed to this multiple sampling. Oculomotor System of Calliphora

  19. Judith Sheine Professor and Department Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Environmental Design, Department of Architecture Chair, 2002- present Professor, 2002 - present; AssociateJudith Sheine Professor and Department Head Department of Architecture School of Architecture) 346-3626 e-mail: jesheine@uoregon.edu Education 1979 Princeton University, School of Architecture

  20. Probability Primer 1 Running head: PROBABILITY PRIMER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuille, Alan L.

    provides the opportunity to draw upon work in computer science, engineering, mathematics, and statisticsProbability Primer 1 Running head: PROBABILITY PRIMER A Primer on Probabilistic Inference Thomas L. Griffiths Department of Psychology University of California, Berkeley Alan Yuille Department of Statistics

  1. Department Heads Meeting D. MacFarlane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Department Heads Meeting D. MacFarlane March 21, 2013 #12;Snowmass working groups Snowmass web-7 at SLAC Energy Frontier All Hands: » April 3-6 at Brookhaven (web site) » June 30-July 3 at U. Washington a world leading cosmic frontier program » Cosmology, cosmic ray, dark matter & dark energy emphasis

  2. 3D head anthropometric analysis Reyes Enciso*ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    a current three-dimensional image-based face modeling technique using a plaster head model. We will also. In this paper we acquired and validated 3-dimensional images of a plaster head using structured-light image

  3. Gas cushion control of OVJP print head position

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An OVJP apparatus and method for applying organic vapor or other flowable material to a substrate using a printing head mechanism in which the print head spacing from the substrate is controllable using a cushion of air or other gas applied between the print head and substrate. The print head is mounted for translational movement towards and away from the substrate and is biased toward the substrate by springs or other means. A gas cushion feed assembly supplies a gas under pressure between the print head and substrate which opposes the biasing of the print head toward the substrate so as to form a space between the print head and substrate. By controlling the pressure of gas supplied, the print head separation from the substrate can be precisely controlled.

  4. A 3-D display head-set for personalized computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callahan, Mark A

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis covers the design and implementation of a binocular display head-set akin to Dr . Ivan E. Sutherland's head-mounted display, but using several new technologies and new techniques in computer graphics: small ...

  5. 1 INTRODUCTION High-head storage hydropower plants operate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    1 INTRODUCTION High-head storage hydropower plants operate their turbines during periods of high Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland ABSTRACT: High-head storage hydropower plants

  6. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the Head Injury to a Miner at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico - August 25, 2004 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury to a Miner at...

  7. CX-007524: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Grant Program. 1) Convert high-pressure sodium, cobra head street lights to light emitting diode lights, and replace lights in Central Park; 2) conduct audits on city...

  8. Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI Tolga Tasdizen, David for classifying multispectral MR scans of the human head into nine tissue classes. User initialization is adopted. #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Classification of head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data

  9. Oculomotor Responses to Active Head Movements in Darkness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramat, Stefano

    information on head rotation from the vestibular system to the saccade-generating mechanism in the brain stem482 Oculomotor Responses to Active Head Movements in Darkness Formulation and Testing Sistemistica, Università di Pavia, Pavia, Italy Passive head rotation in darkness produces vestibular nystagmus

  10. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, S.C.

    1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 15 figs.

  11. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and University of Oslo, Oslo, N-0316 (Norway) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  12. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  13. Integrated head package for top mounted nuclear instrumentation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malandra, Louis J. (McKeesport, PA); Hornak, Leonard P. (Forest Hills, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor such as a pressurized water reactor has an integrated head package providing structural support and increasing shielding leading toward the vessel head. A reactor vessel head engages the reactor vessel, and a control rod guide mechanism over the vessel head raises and lowers control rods in certain of the thimble tubes, traversing penetrations in the reactor vessel head, and being coupled to the control rods. An instrumentation tube structure includes instrumentation tubes with sensors movable into certain thimble tubes disposed in the fuel assemblies. Couplings for the sensors also traverse penetrations in the reactor vessel head. A shroud is attached over the reactor vessel head and encloses the control rod guide mechanism and at least a portion of the instrumentation tubes when retracted. The shroud forms a structural element of sufficient strength to support the vessel head, the control rod guide mechanism and the instrumentation tube structure, and includes radiation shielding material for limiting passage of radiation from retracted instrumentation tubes. The shroud is thicker at the bottom adjacent the vessel head, where the more irradiated lower ends of retracted sensors reside. The vessel head, shroud and contents thus can be removed from the reactor as a unit and rested safely and securely on a support.

  14. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  15. Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    chemie 07 Inorganic chemistry 11.14 - 08 Organische chemie 08 Organic chemistry 12.11 - 10 Didactics and priciples of chemistry 14.03 - 16 Vervolgwerken - Annuals 16 Book series and annuals 14Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken

  16. antigenic polar heads: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stenger; Robert L. Modlin; Ian A. Wilson; Steven A. Porcelli; Michael B. Brenner 1999-01-01 11 Head: Vacancy Quality & Standards Mathematics Websites Summary: : Dr Sarah...

  17. Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Abstract This...

  18. Dr. Jim Wright Acting Head, Division of Radiation Oncology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    Dr. Jim Wright Acting Head, Division of Radiation Oncology Associate Professor Department outstanding contributions to the care and treatment of cancer patients through research. Dr. Jim Wright has

  19. Chapter 13. No Watt Left Behind No Watt Left Behind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ from the smallest refrigerator to the largest building air-conditioning system ­ become fouled of previous forays. Much of the current thinking for making buildings "smart" about their energy consumption. This information is essential in order to understand and optimize energy consumption, to detect and #12;Chapter 13

  20. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  1. Closure head for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E. (South Huntingdon, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closure head for a nuclear reactor includes a stationary outer ring integral with the reactor vessel with a first rotatable plug disposed within the stationary outer ring and supported from the stationary outer ring by a bearing assembly. A sealing system is associated with the bearing assembly to seal the annulus defined between the first rotatable plug and the stationary outer ring. The sealing system comprises tubular seal elements disposed in the annulus with load springs contacting the tubular seal elements so as to force the tubular seal elements against the annulus in a manner to seal the annulus. The sealing system also comprises a sealing fluid which is pumped through the annulus and over the tubular seal elements causing the load springs to compress thereby reducing the friction between the tubular seal elements and the rotatable components while maintaining a gas-tight seal therebetween.

  2. Topic Models to Interpret MeSH MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, David

    ://ii.nlm.nih.gov/mti.shtml #12;MeSH heading Major MeSH heading Major qualifier MeSH-qualifier combination Humans Brain metabolism Brain (metabolism) Table 1. Most frequent MeSH headings, major MeSH headings, major qualifiers and MeTopic Models to Interpret MeSH ­ MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings David Newman12 , Sarvnaz Karimi

  3. Mobile Museum Tours 1 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE MUSEUM TOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mobile Museum Tours 1 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE MUSEUM TOURS Using mobile technologies for multimedia MUSEUM TOURS Abstract Mobile technology was used to deliver learner-centred experiences to visitors: Across generations and cultures, Banff : Canada (2006)" #12;Mobile Museum Tours 2 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE

  4. Poverty and Productivity in Female-Headed Households in Zimbabwe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrell, Sara; Krishnan, Pramila

    A household survey conducted in rural Zimbabwe in 2001 is used to compare the position of de facto and de jure female-headed households to those with a male head. These households are characterised by different forms of poverty that impinge...

  5. Design of a dual stage actuator tape head with high-bandwidth track following capability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raeymaekers, Bart; Graham, Matthew R.; Callafon, Raymond A.; Talke, Frank E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the voice coil motor (VCM). A leaf spring on top of thespring Slot Air bearing surface Read/write elements (in slot) Bracket (b) Servo head Read head Write head Voice coil

  6. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  7. Theoretical collapse pressures for two pressurized torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to determine the pressures at which real torispherical heads fail upon a single application of pressure, two heads were pressurized in recent Praxair tests, and displacements and strains were recorded at various locations. In this paper, theoretical results for the two test heads are presented in the form of curves of pressure versus crown deflections, using the available geometry and material parameters. From these curves, limit and collapse pressures are calculated, using procedures permitted by the ASME B and PV Code Section 8/Div.2. These pressures are shown to vary widely, depending on the method and model used to calculate them. The effect of no stress relief on the behavior of the Praxair test heads is also evaluated and found to be of no significance for neither the objectives of the tests nor the objectives of this paper. The results of this paper are submitted as an enhancement to the experimental results recorded during the Praxair tests.

  8. World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave April 16, 2010 - 4:47pm Addthis A California company will harness the Mojave Desert sunshine to create the world's largest solar...

  9. Zeroth-order inversion of transient head observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-frequency, asymptotic solution for transient head,appropriate for a medium containing smoothly varying heterogeneity,provides a basis for efficient inverse modeling. The semi analyticsolution is trajectory based, akin to ray methods used in modeling wavepropagation, and may be constructed by post processing the output of anumerical simulator. For high frequencies, the amplitude sensitivities,the relationship between changes in flow properties and changes in headampliude, are dominated by the phase term which may be computed directlyfrom the output of the simulator. Thus, transient head waveforms may beinverted with little more computation than is required to invert arrivaltimes. An applicatino to synthetic head values indicates that thetechnique can be used to improve the fit to waveforms. An application totransient head data from the Migration experiment in Switzerland revealsa narrow, high conductivity pathway within a 0.5 m thick zone offracturing.

  10. Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbisser, Amelia M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

  11. Metastasis of genitourinary tumors to the head and neck region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogunyemi, Ore; Rojas, A.; Hematpour, K.; Rogers, D.; Head, C.; Bennett, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    · D. Rogers · C. Head · C. Bennett Received: 14 SeptemberO. Ogunyemi · A. Rojas · C. Bennett David GeVen School ofLos Angeles, CA, USA C. Bennett Department of Urology,

  12. arsenic affects head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 430 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  13. acute head injury: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 336 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  14. active head lice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 251 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  15. affects head kidney: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 344 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  16. advanced inoperable head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 208 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  17. acute severe head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 252 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  18. adult human head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 350 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  19. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt. No.- 15-33-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on February 25, 2015, by Bear Head LNG, requesting long-term multi-contract authority as further described in their...

  20. Chapter 17 Eye-head Gaze shifts Oxford Handbook on Eye Movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corneil, Brian D.

    1 Chapter 17 Eye-head Gaze shifts Oxford Handbook on Eye Movements "The Neural Basis of Gaze Shifts" 1. Kinematics of eye-head gaze shifts a. Terminology for describing eye-head gaze shifts b. Variability in eye and head motion during gaze shifts c. Gaze shifts in complex environments d. Bottom

  1. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle 335 - 359 [deg] 0 - 25 - 25 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to right side. b) If the angle within 335 - 359 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to left side. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image

  2. Integrated head package cable carrier for a nuclear power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); Trombola, Daniel M. (Murrysville, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cabling arrangement is provided for a nuclear reactor located within a containment. Structure inside the containment is characterized by a wall having a near side surrounding the reactor vessel defining a cavity, an operating deck outside the cavity, a sub-space below the deck and on a far side of the wall spaced from the near side, and an operating area above the deck. The arrangement includes a movable frame supporting a plurality of cables extending through the frame, each connectable at a first end to a head package on the reactor vessel and each having a second end located in the sub-space. The frame is movable, with the cables, between a first position during normal operation of the reactor when the cables are connected to the head package, located outside the sub-space proximate the head package, and a second position during refueling when the cables are disconnected from the head package, located in the sub-space. In a preferred embodiment, the frame straddles the top of the wall in a substantially horizontal orientation in the first position, pivots about an end distal from the head package to a substantially vertically oriented intermediate position, and is guided, while remaining about vertically oriented, along a track in the sub-space to the second position.

  3. Remote controlled ISI devices for RPV bottom head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiga, S. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Mori, H. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan); Kobayashi, K. Sasaki, T. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bottom head of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) is one of the areas on which it is very difficult to perform an inservice inspection (ISI). Welds in a bottom head central disk and a drain nozzle are required to be inspected, but its accessibility is restricted by a RPV skirt, a thermal insulation, control rod drive housings and incore monitor housings. Therefore, the remote mechanized scanners are necessary to access and examine the welds. Two kinds of new device were developed to accomplish this inspection. The bottom head central disk weld inspection device has a parallel link mechanism scanning arm with a combined-transducer module to get as much as wide scanning area between control rod drive housings. The device is driven along the weld by moving on the separable track which is set temporally on the bottom head insulation. The drain nozzle weld inspection device has a horseshoe shaped gear mechanism to drive a combined-transducer module. The device is set up on to the drain nozzle using an insertion handle. Both devices have an emergency retrieval mechanism to withdraw the devices in case of power loss accident. Those devices were demonstrated by a mock-up test to be applicable to the inspection of the RPV bottom head.

  4. Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

  5. An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Br). Other radionuclides considered may deposit in bone withm the head region (cranium or the spinal skeleton) (is'I, 2P, ssP, tssRe, 'ssRe, 'ssSm, "7~Sb, ssSr, s Sr, "nY, ss~Tc, tsiCs, ss"Ra), or m the thyroid fss~ Tc, and all iodme radionuclides... tagged to them (i. e. , radiopharmaceuticals). Nevertheless, studies of the small-scale dosimetry of the bram, and more generally, the organs of the head (brain, eyes thyroid, skull, skin), have not kept pace with the current advances in nuclear...

  6. Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, Alexey

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

  7. Simultaneous multi-headed imager geometry calibration method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tran, Vi-Hoa (Newport News, VA); Meikle, Steven Richard (Penshurst, AU); Smith, Mark Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for calibrating multi-headed high sensitivity and high spatial resolution dynamic imaging systems, especially those useful in the acquisition of tomographic images of small animals. The method of the present invention comprises: simultaneously calibrating two or more detectors to the same coordinate system; and functionally correcting for unwanted detector movement due to gantry flexing.

  8. EARLY HEAD START Effects of Fathers, Neighborhoods and Family Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    randomly assigned - 1,513 to Early Head Start - 1,488 to other child care program #12;Highlights of the EHS disorder and aggression ­ Depression ­ Alcoholism and other drug abuse · Parental history of relationship Expulsion Lost Job Arrested Substance Abuse % No % Yes #12;Father Antisocial Behavior · 86.1% Low Risk (

  9. Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burtscher, Martin

    Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions Igor Szczyrba School motions in traumatic scenarios that are as- sociated with severe brain injuries. Our results are based on the linear Kelvin-Voigt brain injury model, which treats the brain matter as a viscoelastic solid, and on our

  10. Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

  11. Brief Communications Optic Flow Stimuli Update Anterodorsal Thalamus Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, Angelo

    orientation in the yaw plane relative to environmental landmark cues. Head movements provoke optic field flow)istheonlyknownprojectionofheaddirectioninformationtoentorhinalgridcellsandhippocampalplacecells,yawplaneoptic flow signals likely influence representations in this spatial reference coordinate system to the body, independently of the ani- mal's ongoing behavior and of its spatial location. The HD cell system

  12. UNITED STATES: NOAA Head Vows to Protect Marine Re-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flshmg Off U. West Coas Saury Flshing f U.. to Be R duced Sharply Resume Canned-Tuna Sales to U.S. 1971 for FISh Culture Flshery Aid Mlssion to VISit 'Thlrd World' ·'ev; ·'lchlro Head Stresses 'Systematiza- tion

  13. PPA Department Heads Initial Impressions and SLAC Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    1 PPA Department Heads Initial Impressions and SLAC Challenges James Tarpinian ES&H Director January 19, 2012 #12;2 Agenda · Initial impressions · 2011 Performance · ES&H focus areas and initiatives for 2012 ES&H Director Chief Safety Officer #12;3 Initial impressions Evolutionary change

  14. New Director Heads Actuarial Science Program - Department of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Mathematics x Purdue University x West Lafayette, Indiana. Summer 2001 ... information as well as the current (new) plan of study. ... Allen Weitsman, Associate Head. Lawrence Brown .... Professor J. J. Price was the featured speaker in Purdue's “Focus on Teaching” ..... Virginia Mashin Scholarship ($2,500).

  15. Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power Steven J. Stanton and Oliver C. Schultheiss University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA To appear in: K. Dowding (Ed.), Encyclopedia of power-647-9440, email: stantons@umich.edu #12;Testosterone and power 2 Across many studies in humans, two functional

  16. HIGH RESOLUTION, MRI-BASED, SEGMENTED, COMPUTERIZED HEAD PHANTOM.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. Conclusion and improved. We have developed a voxel based head phantom by manually drawing contours on 124 transverse MRI

  17. IMAGINED TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: IMAGINED TRANSFORMATION OF BODIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    IMAGINED TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: IMAGINED TRANSFORMATION OF BODIES Imagined Transformations TRANSFORMATIONS 2 Abstract A number of spatial reasoning problems can be solved by performing an imagined transformation of one's egocentric perspective. A series of experiments were carried out to characterize

  18. Ms. Maushumi, Head Mistress Babul Sarkar, Vice President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    Ms. Maushumi, Head Mistress Babul Sarkar, Vice President Char Domdoama Primary School Vill: Char Razzaq-Shamsun Best Teacher Award and Abdul Awal Sarkar Best Student Awards in Char Domdoma Primary School Dear Ms. Maushumi and Mr. Sarkar, My proposal for the introduction of one teaching and three

  19. THE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Ian W.

    ancillary data is fundamental to the process of modelling a groundwater system. In an unconfined aquifer of the unconfined groundwater parameters as the unique minimum of a convex functional. 1. Introduction It is commonTHE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN UNCONFINED AQUIFER IAN KNOWLES

  20. Managing Fusarium Head Blight in Virginia Small Grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Breeder, Dept. of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech. cgriffey@vt.edu C.J. LIN Vice@vt.edu WADE THOMASON Extension Grains Specialist, Dept. of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia TechManaging Fusarium Head Blight in Virginia Small Grains MELISSA KELLER Graduate Student, Dept

  1. Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tailleux, Remi

    ) remains the main framework for studying the atmospheric and oceanic energy cycles. Because the APE energy cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Classical view of the ocean energy cycleRecto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in Stratified Fluids R´emi Tailleux

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced head-and-neck squamous Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this costlet... -based approach have been reported for various clinical sites, including brain (Vineberg, 1999), head-and-neck... for a specific head-and-neck case, and compare...

  3. Geostatistical inference of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivities from hydraulic heads and tracer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Geostatistical inference of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivities from hydraulic heads; accepted 25 April 2006; published 10 August 2006. [1] In groundwater, hydraulic heads and solute arrival times depend primarily on the hydraulic conductivity field and hydraulic boundary conditions. The spread

  4. A representation of changing heading direction in human cortical areas pVIP and CSv

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    Running title: Changing heading direction in the human brain Keywords: egomotion; f1 A representation of changing heading direction in human cortical in the environment, we continually change direction. Much work has examined how the brain

  5. Dr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    and oxygenation of the brain and muscle. Since 2002 he heads the Biomedical Optics Research LaboratoryDr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory Clinic of Neonatology

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - actin-bound myosin heads Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of actin-bound myosin heads in spin-labeled myofibrils in the presence of the ATP analogs AMPPNP (5... -Si have demonstrated that actin-bound myosin heads are...

  7. June 8, 2006 15.8 ASSISTANT DEPARTMENT HEAD/DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    June 8, 2006 15.8 ASSISTANT DEPARTMENT HEAD/DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM THIS ASSISTANT DEPARTMENT HEAD / DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM, hereinafter the "Addendum," is entered into by Colorado School

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 2129 Influence of Head Tissue Conductivity in Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 2129 Influence of Head Tissue Conductivity in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head Abstract--The influence of head tissue conductivity on mag- netoencephalography (MEG) was investigated

  9. Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features Dorsal/Ventral dial.352.3139 Toll Free: 1.877.352.3275 ^^ci&ion Q)e&i^n^^^r ^esea/H^/i Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder 923B-1/07 #12;MODEL 923-B MOUSE GAS ANESTHESIA HEAD HOLDER The KOPF Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder

  10. USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS Christine T liners under conditions representative of dams (i.e., high hydraulic heads). Specifically, the objective of interface contact, hydraulic head, and GCL hydration procedures on the leakage rate were considered

  11. Modeling Attractor Deformation in the Rodent Head-Direction JEREMY P. GOODRIDGE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touretzky, David S.

    Modeling Attractor Deformation in the Rodent Head-Direction System JEREMY P. GOODRIDGE1 AND DAVID S attractor deformation in the rodent head-direction system. J Neurophysiol 83: 3402­3410, 2000. We present a model of the head-direction circuit in the rat that improves on earlier models in several respects

  12. Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head of magnetoencephalographic MEG forward or in- verse simulations in realistic head models. We verify the accu- racy of our, in an inhomoge- neous, nonspherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due

  13. NEURAL MODELS OF HEAD-DIRECTION CELLS PETER ZEIDMAN JOHN A. BULLINARIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullinaria, John

    We have seen that navigation requires knowledge of heading, and that HD cells in the brain actNEURAL MODELS OF HEAD-DIRECTION CELLS PETER ZEIDMAN JOHN A. BULLINARIA School of Computer Science background of Head Direction Cells, and existing models of them, we introduce an improved neural model

  14. Double-ring network model of the head-direction system Xiaohui Xie,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaohui Sunney

    Double-ring network model of the head-direction system Xiaohui Xie,1, * Richard H. R. Hahnloser,1,2 and H. Sebastian Seung1,2 1 Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute 2002; published 9 October 2002 In the head-direction system, the orientation of an animal's head

  15. Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models Robert Van of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) forward or inverse sim­ ulations in realistic head models. We verify the accuracy, in an inhomogeneous, non­spherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due to volume

  16. June 8, 2006 15.7 ACTING OR INTERIM DEPARTMENT HEAD/DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    June 8, 2006 15.7 ACTING OR INTERIM DEPARTMENT HEAD/DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM THIS ACTING OR INTERIM DEPARTMENT HEAD / DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM, hereinafter the "Addendum," is entered as a temporary or short-term replacement for his or her Department Head/Division Director, who is temporarily

  17. Heatup of the TMI-2 lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis has been carried out to assess the potential of a melting attack upon the reactor vessel lower head and incore instrument nozzle penetration weldments during the TMI core relocation event at 224 minutes. Calculations were performed to determine the potential for molten corium to undergo breakup into droplets which freeze and form a debris bed versus impinging upon the lower head as one or more coherent streams. The effects of thermal-hydraulic interactions between corium streams and water inside the lower plenum, the effects of the core support assembly structure upon the corium, and the consequences of corium relocation by way of the core former region were examined. 19 refs., 24 figs.

  18. Technical evaluation report TMI action -- NUREG-0737 (II.D.1). Relief and safety valve testing, Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Dockets 50-390 and 50-391)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fineman, C.P.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, safety and relief valves installed in the primary coolant system of light water reactors have performed improperly. As a result, the authors of NUREG-0578 (TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force Status Report and Short-Term Recommendations) and, subsequently, NUREG-0737 (Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements) recommended development and completion of programs to do two things. First, they should reevaluate the functional performance capabilities of pressurized water reactor safety, relief, and block valves. Second, they should verify the integrity of the pressurizer safety and relief valve piping systems for normal, transient, and accident conditions. This report documents the review of those programs by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company. Specifically, this report documents the review of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Applicant response to the requirements of NUREG-0578 and NUREG-0737. This review found the Applicant provided an acceptable response reconfirming they met General Design Criteria 14, 15, and 30 of Appendix A to 10 CFR 50 for the subject equipment. It should also be noted Lockheed Idaho performed this review for both Units 1 and 2. However, the applicability of this review to Unit 2 depends on verifying that the Unit 2 as-built system conforms to the Unit 1 design reviewed in this report.

  19. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D. (Clawson, MI); Neal, Timothy L. (Ortonville, MI); Swain, Jeff L. (Flushing, MI); Raimao, Miguel A. (Colorado Springs, CO)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  20. Development of Power-head based Fan Airflow Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    related to the measured fan speed. Actually the measured fan speed is assumed to equal the motor synchronous speed, which is proportional to the VFD frequency. Theoretically it is not true. The difference between the synchronous speed and motor speed... the basic theory, experiment and results of the power-head based airflow station. Theory Figure 1 shows variable speed fan connection schematic. VFD is normally installed on the motor to adjust the motor speed by modulating frequency. Typically...

  1. Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwls Head, Maine:

  2. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  3. EECBG Success Story: Lighting Retrofit Improving Visibility,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New LED lighting fixtures (right) emit a whiter light than existing high-pressure sodium cobra head streetlights (left) and don't spill light onto nearby houses. | Photos courtesy...

  4. Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

  5. MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal < MHKBluemillBrough Head

  6. Bay Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers Point Housing,Illinois:County is30.1805306°,Harbor Islands,Head,

  7. Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3Informationof Energy Calculator29 Jump to:NaRecNags Head, North

  8. MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3,MarchMFRC BloodMFRSR Head

  9. Supplement 23, Part 6, Section B. Subject Headings: J-Z, Parasite-Subject Headings and Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, Martha W.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the Department over other products not mentioned. SUBJECT HEADINGS 583 Japan Kagei, N., 1973, Snake, v. 5 (1-2), 141-150 macroscopic endoparasites of snakes recorded in Japan Japan Kamiya, H.; et al., 19 73, Japan. J. Vet. Re- search, v. 21 (3), 51... African Med. J., v. 55 (il), 402 [Letter] amoebic liver abscess in patients presenting with jaundice or raised serum bilirubin, suggestions for management Jaundice Hirsch, R. P., 1979, Internat. J. Parasitol., v. 9 (5), 395-399 Histomonas...

  10. Heading Lock Maneuver Testing of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muljowidodo, K

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (UAV) research and development at Bandung Institute of Technology in Indonesia has achieved the testing stage in the field. This testing was still being classified as the early testing, since some of the preliminary tests were carried out in the scale of the laboratory. The paper would discuss the laboratory test and several tests that were done in the field. Discussions were stressed in the procedure and the aim that will be achieved, along with several early results. The testing was carried out in the lake with the area around 8300 Ha and the maximum depth of 50 meters. The location of the testing was chosen with consideration of minimizing the effect of the current and the wave, as well as the location that was not too far from the Laboratory. The type of testing that will be discussed in paper was Heading Lock Maneuver Testing. The vehicle was tested to move with a certain cruising speed, afterwards it was commanded by an arbitrarily selected heading directio...

  11. In search of a new governing failure criterion for torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The failure criterion that governs the present design rules of formed heads in Section 8/Div. 2 of the ASME B and PV Code limits crown displacement upon a single application of pressure, and it does so by means of a calculated collapse pressure. One problem with the rules is that they require greater head thicknesses than those of Section 8/Div. 1. Another problem is that recent test data taken for two formed heads have shown no signs of head displacements or deformations that could have rendered the heads unserviceable at pressures substantially higher than the calculated collapse pressures. Any link between the calculated collapse pressures and the failures of the test heads could not be established. The main thesis proposed in the paper is that such a link does not exist for torispherical heads in general. The reason for this is investigated theoretically and attributed to the geometric strengthening of heads, as they deform. It is recommended that the reasons for limiting displacements or deformations for a single application of pressure be reviewed and, if needed, a new failure criterion defined, or other failure modes, such as tensile plastic instability (burst), be considered. The latter mode is described and options for its evaluation are presented in this paper. The protection of torispherical heads against the failure modes of low-cycle fatigue and incremental plastic growth upon cyclic loading, which are controlled by shakedown, is not covered in this paper but is left to future investigations.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - acceleration head injury Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 2 Clinical Management of Traumatic Brain Injury Summary: -10% of patients with closed head injury (CHI) Cervical collar...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - abusive head trauma Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 28 Motor Dysfunction III: Concussion, Acquired Brain Summary: injury -encephalitis -head trauma, birth trauma Factors leading to the...

  14. Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unit Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Unit 69dhydrogreenhydrodemonstration12.ppt More Documents & Publications Laboratory Demonstration of a New...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute head trauma Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Biochemistry, University of Mississippi Collection: Biology and Medicine 2 CURRICULUM VITAE MARTIN A. SCHREIBER, MD Summary: with Severe Blunt Head Injury. Journal of...

  16. Treating radiation-induced trismus in head and neck cancer;Exercise intervention and risk structures.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauli, Nina

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Abstract The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the incidence of trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) and to assess the treatment… (more)

  17. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  18. Bailer for top head drive rotary well drills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, L.

    1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A bailer mounted to the derrick of a top head drive well drilling rig is described. The bailer includes a winch line drum mounted by a bracket to the derrick. A positive displacement hydraulic motor mounts one end of the drum and receives fluid under pressure from the existing hydraulic pressure supply. Valving is provided to allow reverse operation of the motor so equipment can either be raised or lowered relative to the derrick. The hydraulic delivery line to the motor includes a one way restrictor that will allow relatively free passage of fluid to the motor in a driving or lifting mode but will reverse flow of fluid from the motor, thereby affording a braking effect for lowering a load at a selected rate.

  19. Japan`s refiner/marketers headed for major shakeout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan`s downstream oil industry is in a state of crisis and headed for a major shakeout. The major catalyst for this was a dramatic deregulation step during April 1996 that allowed refined petroleum product imports by non-refiners. The move, together with a sharp drop in refining margins, falling retail gasoline prices, and a service station sector on the brink of collapse, are all leading to massive changes in the way the country`s refiners and marketers do business. This paper reviews the collapse of corporate profits during this period of deregulation; the development of a new price system geared toward bringing the prices of gasoline, fuel oil, and kerosene into line with each other to offset the fall in gasoline prices; and industry restructuring including mergers, acquisitions, and marketing consolidation. The paper then makes predictions on the outcome of these changes on the Japanese oil industry.

  20. Tribo-chemistry at the head/disk interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatia, C.S. [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States)] [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States); Fong, W.; Chen, C.Y.; Wei, J.; Bogy, D.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Computer Mechanics Lab.] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Computer Mechanics Lab.; Anders, S.; Stammler, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States)] [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tribo-chemical studies at the head/disk interface (HDI) were conducted on hydrogenated (CH{sub x}), nitrogenated (CN{sub x}), and cathodic-arc amorphous hard carbon disk samples coated with perfluoropolyether ZDOL and X1P/ZDOL lubricant. The studies involved drag tests with uncoated and carbon-coated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiC sliders and thermal desorption experiments in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) tribochamber followed with a surface chemistry analysis by X-ray Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The friction and catalytic decomposition mechanisms of ZDOL are described, as well as the tribo-chemical performance of cathodic-arc carbon overcoats coated with ZDOL, and data demonstrating the chemical alteration of the lubricant and carbon overcoat are also presented.

  1. Nuclear and Plasma Physics Heriot-Watt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    and nano-diamond for fusion reactors" Romanian J Physics, 56 Supplement, 15-22, 2011 5. D. A. J. Moran, D

  2. VP 100: Retooling Michigan-- Yachts and Watts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Tiara Yachts makes fiber composite structures for boats. Now the Holland, Mich.-based company is transforming part of its factory and using its 30 years of expertise in composites to establish a new company - Energetx Composites - that will produce commercial-sized wind turbine blades.

  3. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitors ProgramEnergyGas Swimming PoolRenewables

  4. WattQuiz | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:CoopWaspa|

  5. Watts, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:CoopWaspa|Wattner and Scheuten JV Jump

  6. Shanghai Solar Watt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search|Sewaren,Shanghai JTU PV TechnologySobanShanghai

  7. MegaWatt Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellisMcDonald is aElectricMeeme,Meetsolar Jump to:Mega

  8. PlotWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: EnergyPierceJump81647°Pleak,3.1237276°,Pleasantville

  9. AlphaWatt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification ProjectAVANTIAireyAlpex Exports

  10. SpectraWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd JumpGTZHolland, Illinois:5717551°FarmsSES Jump to: navigation,Spectra

  11. TerraWatt Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to: navigation, search Name: Terra

  12. 7Name ________________________________ System Watts Energy source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which will do work to move air in your air conditioner, or to keep food cold in your refrigerator. When

  13. Ensemble smoother assimilation of hydraulic head and return flow data to estimate hydraulic conductivity distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bau, Domenico A.

    Ensemble smoother assimilation of hydraulic head and return flow data to estimate hydraulic and data measurements, an ensemble smoother (ES) to provide enhanced estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity (K) through assimilation of hydraulic head (H) and groundwater return flow volume (RFV

  14. The Point Spread Function of the Human Head and its Implications for Transcranial Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra, Lucas C.

    The Point Spread Function of the Human Head and its Implications for Transcranial Current distribution in the head resulting from the application of scalp currents. Derivation of forward models has represented a major effort in brain stimulation research, with model complexity ranging from spherical shells

  15. Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 757 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuen, Walter W.

    Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 7­57 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads T Engineering, Building 208, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass A6enue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Received 24 August 1998; accepted 24 November 1998 Abstract Lower head integrity under steam explosion

  16. Head tilt during driving DANIEL C. ZIKOVITZ and LAURENCE R. HARRIS *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Laurence R.

    Head tilt during driving DANIEL C. ZIKOVITZ ² and LAURENCE R. HARRIS² * Departments of ² Biology and Psychology, York University, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada Keywords: Driving behaviour; Head tilt; Vision with the visually-available estimate of the curvature of the road (r 2 = 0.86) but not with the centripetal force (r

  17. Journees Automates Cellulaires 2008 (Uz`es), pp. 54-64 SOFIC ONE HEAD MACHINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Journ´ees Automates Cellulaires 2008 (Uz`es), pp. 54-64 SOFIC ONE HEAD MACHINES A. GAJARDO-dimensional Turing machines with only one head is adopted. A subshift is associated to each Turing machine, and its properties are studied. The subshift consists in the set of sequences of symbols that the machine reads

  18. Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 1 Research Article9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    #12;Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Research Article915 16 fkanou@pri.kyoto-u.ac.jp17 +81-80-6902-501318 19 #12;Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 2 Abstract20 Previous studies comparing eye movements between humans and their closest relatives

  19. Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golland, Polina

    Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M, we employ an atlas of labeled training images. We register each of these images to the unlabeled

  20. INTERNAL PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Title: CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERNAL PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Title: CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Ref 1200A/56/07 CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head Visibility SUMMARY The use of Continuous Cover Forestry (CCF) can lead to situations where a dense

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 41, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1996 I073 Combinedl Head and Eye Tracking System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, Robert

    range of head motion, mainly low-frequency, yaw rotation. An integrated eye-head tracking system and Eye Tracking System for Dynamilc Testing of the Vestibular System Robert S. Allison,* Moshe Eizenman, and Bob S. K. Cheung Abstruct- We present a comlbined head-eye tracking system suitable for use with free

  2. Quantum phase estimation using a multi-headed cat state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su-Yong Lee; Chang-Woo Lee; Hyunchul Nha; Dagomir Kaszlikowski

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It was recently shown that an entangled coherent state, which is a superposition of two different coherent states, can surpass the performance of N00N state in estimating an unknown phase-shift. This may hint at further enhancement in phase estimation by incorporating more component states in the superposition of resource state. We here study a four-headed cat state (4HCS), a superposition of four different coherent states, and propose its application to quantum phase estimation. We first investigate how the 4HCS is more nonclassical than a 2HCS in view of some nonclassical measures including sub-Poissonian statistics, negativity of Wigner distribution, and entanglement potential. We then demonstrate the enhanced performance in phase estimation by employing an entangled state via the 4HCS, which can surpass that of the 2HCS particularly in the regime of small average photon number. Moreover, we show that an entangled state modified from the 4HCS can further enhance the phase estimation even in the regime of large average photon number under a photon-loss channel. Our investigation further extends to incorporate an increasingly large number of component states in the resource superposition state and clearly show its merit in phase estimation.

  3. Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    outcomes. This study built on this literature by investigating how child, parent, and family risk factors predicted school readiness in Head Start children using two statistical models. Specific aims of this study included identifying 1) to what degree...

  4. Shakedown and stress range of torispherical heads under cyclic internal pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two effects on shakedown of torispherical heads are addressed in this paper: (1) changing geometry, and (2) initial pressurization, such as by a hydro (or proof) test. Shakedown and the cycled stress intensity range are calculated for two head geometries, having diameter-to-thickness ratios of 238 and 192. The calculations are carried out following two approaches: (1) using a nonlinear, elastic-plastic algorithm that accounts for changes in geometry, and (2) using elastic stresses in the undeformed geometry, which is the commonly used approach. The results show that, when the two geometries are subjected to the same initial and cyclic pressures, shakedown is achieved by the first approach but not by the second. Since real heads do benefit from geometry changes, and since most design codes require hydro (or proof) tests before operation, the first approach is recommended for the design of torispherical heads.

  5. Running head: COGNITIVE ROBOTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Computational Modeling/Cognitive Robotics Compliments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    Running head: COGNITIVE ROBOTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Computational Modeling/Cognitive;Cognitive Robotics and Experimental Psychology 2 Abstract This position paper explores the possible contributions to the science of psychology from insights obtained by building and experimenting with cognitive

  6. An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Scott Laurence

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed...

  7. The dynamics of the human head during natural activities that require clear vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Warren (Warren W.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current understanding of the dynamics of the human head, and the demands placed on its control and stability systems, is based largely on the results of experiments conducted in artificial settings, such as when subjects ...

  8. Viewpoint-Invariant Learning and Detection of Human Heads M. Weber W. Einhauser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perona, Pietro

    Viewpoint-Invariant Learning and Detection of Human Heads M. Weber W. Einh¨auser California on histograms of feature detectors to address the same prob- lem. Burl, Leung, Weber and Perona [1] additionally

  9. Artificial gravity : changing the intensity of coriolis cross-coupled stimulus with head-angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adenot, Sophie, 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Artificial Gravity (AG) created by high-speed rotation is a promising method for preventing the serious deconditioning associated with prolonged exposure to weightlessness. Unfortunately, head-movements in a rotating ...

  10. Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    January 2009. This paper researches the possibility of using geothermal energy as an alternative energy Energy Investment cost .................................................... 40 Geothermal use in AlaskaRunning head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska Anthony

  11. TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director of Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director in the current fiscal year. Purchase Requisitions: Purchases under $10,000 (Includes Corporate Express) June 11

  12. Physical and Numerical Space Running Head: Biases in Physical and Numerical Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    Physical and Numerical Space 1 Running Head: Biases in Physical and Numerical Space Elementary school children's attentional biases in physical and numerical space Tilbe Göksun: April 30, 2012 #12; Physical and Numerical Space 2 Abstract Numbers

  13. anne-sylvie catherin head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 313 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  14. advanced non-nasopharyngeal head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 205 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced head-and-neck cancer Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cancer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced head-and-neck cancer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Patient geometry-driven...

  16. Swimming speed and stamina in head started Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys Kempi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stabenau, Erich Kurt

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SWIMMING SPEED AND STAMINA IN HEAD STARTED KEMP'S RIDLEY SEA TURTLES (LEPIDOCHELYS KEMPI) A Thesis by ERICH KURT STABENAU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER QF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SWIMMING SPEED AND STAMINA IN HEAD STARTED KEMP'S RIDLEY SEA TURTLES (LEPIDOCHELYS KEMPI) A Thesis by ERICH KURT STABENAU Approved as to style and content by: Andre M...

  17. Effects of Parent Expectations and Involvement on the School Readiness of Children in Head Start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Krystal Tisha'

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF PARENT EXPECTATIONS AND INVOLVEMENT ON THE SCHOOL READINESS OF CHILDREN IN HEAD START A Dissertation by KRYSTAL TISHA? COOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of children enrolled in Head Start. The study examined how these iv parent variables were related to children?s school readiness, and differences between ethnic groups, gender groups, and level of risk. The study tested a model whereby the effect...

  18. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMSMethanol SteamNOTICE: This

  19. 3D Printing a Classic Shelby Cobra | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment2015 Information Management25thDepartment of Energy

  20. Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPower Address:Climatic SolarInformation Risk

  1. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011 Mon, Next2025 PowerNetwork8th300 MHzMRIYou are

  2. Energy efficient control for power management circuits operating from nano-watts to watts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Saurav

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency and form factor are the key driving forces in today's power electronics. All power delivery circuits, irrespective of the magnitude of power, basically consists of power trains, gate drivers and control ...

  3. Internal strain regulates the nucleotide binding site of the kinesin leading head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyeon, Changbong; 10.1073/pnas.0610939104

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the presence of ATP, kinesin proceeds along the protofilament of microtubule by alternated binding of two motor domains on the tubulin binding sites. Since the processivity of kinesin is much higher than other motor proteins, it has been speculated that there exists a mechanism for allosteric regulation between the two monomers. Recent experiments suggest that ATP binding to the leading head domain in kinesin is regulated by the rearward strain built on the neck-linker. We test this hypothesis by explicitly modeling a $C_{\\alpha}$-based kinesin structure whose both motor domains are bound on the tubulin binding sites. The equilibrium structures of kinesin on the microtubule show disordered and ordered neck-linker configurations for the leading and the trailing head, respectively. The comparison of the structures between the two heads shows that several native contacts present at the nucleotide binding site in the leading head are less intact than those in the binding site of the rear head. The network of n...

  4. Head/tail Breaks for Visualization of City Structure and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Bin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The things surrounding us vary dramatically, which implies that there are far more small things than large ones, e.g., far more small cities than large ones in the world. This dramatic variation is often referred to as fractal or scaling. To better reveal the fractal or scaling structure, a new classification scheme, namely head/tail breaks, has been developed to recursively derive different classes or hierarchical levels. The head/tail breaks works as such: divide things into a few large ones in the head (those above the average) and many small ones (those below the average) in the tail, and recursively continue the dividing process for the large ones (or the head) until the notion of far more small things than large ones has been violated. This paper attempts to argue that head/tail breaks can be a powerful visualization tool for illustrating structure and dynamics of natural cities. Natural cities refer to naturally or objectively defined human settlements based on a meaningful cutoff averaged from a massi...

  5. Evaluation of preharvest chemical dessication and module storage of grain sorghum head chop when fed to cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Walter Louis

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF PHEHARVEST CHEMICAL DESSICATION AND MODULE STORAGE OF GRAIN SORGHUM HEAD CHOP WHEN FED TO CATTLE A Thesis by WALTER LOUIS DAVIS Approved as to style and content bye Chairman of Committee Head of D rtment Member ~c'p Jft ~Is... ~it 8 & ~ Member December 1979 i242841 ABS TRAC T Evaluation of Preharvest Chemical Dessication and Module Storage of Grain Sorghum Head Chop When Fed to Cattle. (December 1979) Walter Louis Davis, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman...

  6. A study to determine the most effective actuation valve and water distribution head combination for emergency showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presswood, James Columbus

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for corrosion and wear. Pressure test to determine strength. (5) Remove shower head and dismantle. Clean scale and rust, from the head inlet and from the slots or orifices in the baffle plate. (6) Reassemble. (7) Open OSBY valve and replace seal..., and orifice sprinkler water distribution heads to determine which valve/head combination produced the greatest flow rate at varying static water pressures. Flow rates were measured at static pressures of 20, 30. 40, 50, and 60 pounds per square inch gauge...

  7. Evaluating the Impact of Head Rotation Amplification on Virtual Reality Training Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragan, Eric D [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Doug A [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Scerbo, Siroberto [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Bacim, Felipe [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtual reality (VR) systems have been proposed for use in numerous training scenarios, such as room clearing, which require the trainee to maintain spatial awareness. But many VR training systems lack a fully surrounding display, requiring trainees to use a combination of physical and virtual turns to view the environment, thus decreasing spatial awareness. One solution to this problem is to amplify head rotations, such that smaller physical turns are mapped to larger virtual turns, allowing trainees to view the surrounding environment with head movements alone. For example, in a multi-monitor system covering only a 90-degree field of regard, head rotations could be amplified four times to allow the user to see the entire 360-degree surrounding environment. This solution is attractive because it can be used with lower-cost VR systems and does not require virtual turning. However, the effects of amplified head rotations on spatial awareness and training transfer are not well understood. We hypothesized that small amounts of amplification might be tolerable, but that larger amplifications might cause trainees to become disoriented and to have decreased task performance and training transfer. In this paper, we will present our findings from an experiment designed to investigate these hypotheses. The experiment placed users in a virtual warehouse and asked them to move from room to room, counting objects placed around them in space. We varied the amount of amplification applied during these trials, and also varied the type of display used (head-mounted display or CAVE). We measured task performance and spatial awareness. We then assessed training transfer in an assessment environment with a fully surrounding display and no amplification. The results of this study will inform VR training system developers about the potential negative effects of using head rotation amplification and contribute to more effective VR training system design.

  8. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

  9. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, D.L.; Baraszu, D.J.; Foulkes, D.M.; Gomes, E.G.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine`s crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages. 4 figs.

  10. Methods for characterizing magnetic footprints of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shaoping, E-mail: shaoping.li@wdc.com; Lin, Ed; George, Zach; Terrill, Dave; Mendez, H.; Santucci, J.; Yie, Derek [Western Digital Corp., 44100 Osgood Road, Fremont, California 94539 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the magnetic footprints, along with some of its dynamic features in recording process, of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads have been characterized by using three different techniques. Those techniques are the spin-stand stationary footprint technique, the spin-stand dynamic footprint technique, and the coherent writing technique combined with magnetic force microscope imaging method. The characteristics of those techniques have been compared to one another. It was found experimentally that the spin-stand stationary method could not precisely catch some peculiar recording dynamics of the write heads in certain conditions. The advantages and disadvantages among all those techniques are also examined and discussed in detail.

  11. The nerve supply to the major organs and tissues of the caprine head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatum, Michael Edward

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . be r ) 111 ABST!'!ACT The !?erve Supply to the '. !ajor Cvr?gans Tissues of the Capiine Head. (!Iay 1969) Michael Edward 1'atum, B. S. , D. y. i!. , Texas . ?L 0 1I '. Jniversity Dir' cted by: Dr. John H. I?Iilliff Dissections were performed... of the American Veterinary 11edical A. ', woe i at ion . " Determining the course and distribution of the cra- n'al nerves in the head reg!on often presents a problem for the studcn. of veterinary aratomy. This is especial- ly true in ruminant dissections...

  12. A SMALL PORTABLE DETECTOR HEAD USING MIS-CONTACTED CdTe FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    339 A SMALL PORTABLE DETECTOR HEAD USING MIS-CONTACTED CdTe FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETRY P. EICHINGER for semiconductor radiation detectors is discussed. A versatile head consisting of a 2 mm thick, 10 mm diameter CdTe and its applica- tion to CdTe and CdS has already been published [2, 3], but because of the many

  13. Influence of tissue conductivity anisotropy on EEG/MEG field and return current computation in a realistic head model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    brain using potential differences and/or magnetic fluxes measured non- invasively directly from the head in a realistic head model: A simulation and visualization study using high-resolution finite element modeling C 3493, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA c Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

  14. POLICIES AND PROCESSES FOR THE APPROVAL OF OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR Departmental Head Advisor Approved Petitions and Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Advisor Approved Petitions and Forms The College of Agricultural Sciences distributes approval for the following Office of the Registrar petitions and forms to the departmental head advisors, only. Please note that some forms contain sections requiring college head advisor approval, and some have time limitations

  15. Head-Loss Calculations Question: Gudwanwadi, of population 400, is to be served by a piped water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Head-Loss Calculations Question: Gudwanwadi, of population 400, is to be served by a piped water away from a tank which is about 20m above Gudwanwadi. The supply comes in a pipe with cross-section 20 sq.cm. The head-loss in this pipe is roughly 2m per km. per meter/sec of velocity of water through

  16. Modeling of an eye-imaging system for optimizing illumination schemes in an eye-tracked head-mounted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Hong

    Modeling of an eye-imaging system for optimizing illumination schemes in an eye-tracked head While the augmentation of head-mounted displays (HMDs) with eye-tracking (ET) capabilities adds of illumination schemes in an ET-HMD system, we present a simulated eye illumination and imaging system, which

  17. Melodic cues to meter 1 Running Head: MELODIC CUES TO METER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Melodic cues to meter 1 Running Head: MELODIC CUES TO METER The Role of Melodic and Temporal Cues in Perceiving Musical Meter Erin E. Hannon Cornell University Joel S. Snyder Cornell University Tuomas Eerola-569-4326 Tel: 905-828-5415 E-mail: eeh5@cornell.edu #12;Melodic cues to meter 2 Abstract A number of different

  18. Heatup of the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to current perceptions of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, corium largely relocated into the reactor vessel lower head at {approximately}224 min into the accident. Defueling examinations have revealed that the corium relocated from the molten core region to the lower head predominantly by way of drainage through the core former region (CFR) located between the vertical baffle plates immediately surrounding the fuel assemblies and the core barrel. An analysis has been carried out to assess the heatup of the reactor vessel lower head during the core relocation event, particularly the potential for a melting attack on the lower head wall and the in-core instrument nozzle penetration weldments. The analysis employed the THIRMAL computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to predict the breakup and quenching or corium jets under film boiling conditions as well as the size distributions and quenching of the resultant molten droplets. The transient heatup and ablation of the vessel wall and penetration weldments due to impinging corium jets was calculated using the MISTI computer code.

  19. Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models Leonid Zhukov Abstract-- A pervasive problem in neuroscience is determining which regions of the brain are active, given within the brain from electroencephalo- graphic (EEG) recordings is an ill-posed problem. Specifi- cally

  20. Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models Leonid Zhukov Abstract--- A pervasive problem in neuroscience is determining which regions of the brain are active, given within the brain from electroencephalo­ graphic (EEG) recordings is an ill­posed problem. Specifi­ cally

  1. Effective scattering coefficient of the cerebral spinal fluid in adult head models for diffuse optical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    correct radiative transport equation (RTE); however, it is commonly assumed that scattering lengths must. Boas An efficient computation of the time-dependent forward solution for photon transport in a head of the brain. The diffusion approximation to photon transport is much faster to simulate than the physically

  2. SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES Vice Chancellors, Deans, Directors, and Department Heads shall implement the safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES Vice Chancellors, Deans, Directors, and Department Heads shall implement the safety program in their areas of administrative responsibility and are responsible for the safety for the safety of the personnel under their supervision and will: · Train employees in the safe use of equipment

  3. OSU Council of Head Advisors Spring 2006 OSU Advisor-Advisee Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    OSU Council of Head Advisors ­ Spring 2006 OSU Advisor-Advisee Responsibilities As an advisee, you accurate and truthful information when being advised. Initiate a purposeful relationship with your advisor during advising sessions. Your advisor should: Develop a purposeful relationship with and be an advocate

  4. Mind Perception and Objectification 1 Running Head: Mind Perception and Objectification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobe, Joshua

    Mind Perception and Objectification 1 Running Head: Mind Perception and Objectification More than a Body: Mind Perception and the Nature of Objectification Kurt Gray1, Joshua Knobe2, Mark Sheskin2, Paul@umd.edu #12;Mind Perception and Objectification 2 Abstract According to models of objectification, viewing

  5. J Comp Physiol A (1988) 163:151-165 Mechanosensory control of compensatory head roll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    load of the two wings elicits a transient head roll partly compensating a banked attitude (Figs. 4-6). The majority of campaniform sensilla at the wing base seems suitable to measure wing load. 5. Steady roll change of the flight attitude, for example by turbulence (Hengstenberg et al. 1986). Yaw turns are ulti

  6. Late-to Post-Cretaceous Inversion of the British Isles Tectonic Stylolites at Flamborough Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    not much is known about younger inversion events in the UK. Industrial: A lot of the oil and gas traps. Geology 36(11), 839-842. Koehn, D., Renard, F., Toussaint, R., Passchier, C.W. (2007) Growth of stylolite at Flamborough Head, U.K. Journal of Structural Geology 16, 97-107. Application procedure and deadlines

  7. M.K. Johnson et al. 1 Running Head: COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF MEMORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Marcia K.

    M.K. Johnson et al. 1 Running Head: COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF MEMORY In Press. In R. F. Belli (Ed on Motivation, Vol. 58. The Cognitive Neuroscience of True and False Memories Marcia K. Johnson, Carol L. Raye, Karen J. Mitchell, & Elizabeth Ankudowich Yale University Send correspondence to: Marcia K. Johnson

  8. Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES A computational model of event segmentation from perceptual prediction. Jeremy R. Reynolds, Jeffrey M. Zacks, and Todd S. Braver Washington University Manuscript #12;Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 2 People tend

  9. J. Mol. Biol. (1976) 108, 139-150 Head to Tail Polymerization of Actin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholey, Jonathan

    J. Mol. Biol. (1976) 108, 139-150 Head to Tail Polymerization of Actin ALBRECHTWEGNER Department actin monomers to solutions of polymeric actin. The incoqooration and release of subunits can be explained by a polymerization mechanism in which the filaments grow at one end and shorten simultaneously

  10. UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED REGISTERED & HEAD OFFICE: 24, WHITES ROAD, CHENNAI-600014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhingra, Narender K.

    UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED REGISTERED & HEAD OFFICE: 24, WHITES ROAD, CHENNAI-600014 HEALTH INSURANCE POLICY ­ GROUP 1 WHEREAS the insured designated in the Schedule hereto has by a proposal to be incorporated herein has applied to UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LTD. (hereinafter called the COMPANY

  11. To: Officers, Deans, Department Heads, and Department Administrators From: Diane Devlin, Purchasing Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    To: Officers, Deans, Department Heads, and Department Administrators From: Diane Devlin, Purchasing BY THE PURCHASING OFFICE NO LATER THAN FRIDAY, MAY 16, 2014. Certain commodity items may require longer lead times for such items should be received by the purchasing office no later than MONDAY, MAY 5, 2014. ITEMS OR SERVICES

  12. Running Head: PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 1 Toward a Phenomenology of Feelings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Running Head: PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 1 Toward a Phenomenology of Feelings Christopher L. Heavey 455030, Las Vegas, NV 89154- 5030. E-mail: chris.heavey@unlv.edu #12;PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 2 Abstract present a preliminary phenomenology of feelings. We begin by observing that often feelings do occur

  13. Measurements on 5:1 Scale Abrasive Water Jet Cutting Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nozzle orifice s Isentropic (e.g. in w.jet.s) w.jet Water jet water Water Superscripts: * Symbol for non, an achievable accuracy also mentioned by Hashish in [7]. Improving the AWJ cutting process in a way that parts with precise accuracy of motion, a precisely manufactured tool (cutting head) and optimally set machining

  14. CASING-HEADING PHENOMENON IN GAS-LIFTED WELL AS A LIMIT CYCLE OF A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , France CSTJF, TOTAL Exploration-Production, Pau, France Abstract: Oil well instabilities cause production losses. One of these instabilities, referred to as the "casing-heading" is an oscillatory: Process Control, Dynamic Systems, Limit Cycles, Switching System, Gas-Lifted Well. 1. INTRODUCTION

  15. PHENOLOGY AND BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD PARASITISM B.A., University of Colorado, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    PHENOLOGY AND BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD PARASITISM by TY TUFF B.A., University of Colorado, 2003 A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Colorado in partial, to evaluate the impact of parasitism on two local hosts in the Colorado Front Range: the primary host

  16. Professor Veronica HoPe Hailey Dean & Head of the School of Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Professor Veronica HoPe Hailey Dean & Head of the School of Management In attendance V eronica's research focuses on the link between Business Strategy, HR Strategy and Change Management. She is particularly interested in the relationship between organisational change and individual transition. She

  17. Making the abstract concrete 1 Running head: VISUALIZING MATHEMATICAL SOLUTION PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Making the abstract concrete 1 Running head: VISUALIZING MATHEMATICAL SOLUTION PROCEDURES Making the Abstract Concrete: Visualizing Mathematical Solution Procedures Katharina Scheiter University of Tuebingen) (2006) 9-25" DOI : 10.1016/j.chb.2005.01.009 #12;Making the abstract concrete 2 Abstract This article

  18. Running head: CONCRETE PROSOCIAL GOALS MAXIMIZE HAPPINESS 1 Getting the Most out of Giving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Running head: CONCRETE PROSOCIAL GOALS MAXIMIZE HAPPINESS 1 Getting the Most out of Giving: Concretely Framing a Prosocial Goal Maximizes Happiness Melanie Rudda University of Houston Jennifer Aakerb Melcher Hall, Houston, TX 77204-6021; Email: mrrudd@bauer.uh.edu; Phone: 713.743.4572. #12;CONCRETE

  19. Multiple systems or task complexity 1 Running head: Multiple systems or task complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoiciu, Mihai

    Multiple systems or task complexity 1 Running head: Multiple systems or task complexity Procedural memory effects in categorization: evidence for multiple systems or task complexity? Safa R. Zaki and Dave College Williamstown, MA 10267 413-597-4594 Email: szaki@williams.edu #12;Multiple systems or task

  20. A new design criterion based on pressure testing of torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, A. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics; Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two vessels with torispherical heads were pressurized to destruction at the Praxair Tonawanda facility on September 12--13, 1994. The objective was to determine pressures at which observable or measurable indications of failure could be detected. Plastic limit pressures for the two heads were calculated at 190 and 240 psi, respectively. For Vessel 1, the only observable action was a slow formation of some waviness of the knuckle profile at approximately 600 psi. It lost pressure at 700 psi when a crack developed at a nozzle weld at the bottom of the shell. For Vessel 2, no indication of any sign of failure was observed until it burst at a pressure of 1,080 psi by a ductile fracture along the longitudinal weld of the shell. The main conclusion is that there is a problem in the application of the double elastic slope collapse criterion to torispherical heads. It was determined that when using this criterion a collapse pressure signaling excessive deformation cannot be determined with any certainty. Furthermore, the test data do not show anything at any of the calculated collapse pressures that suggests excessive deformation. Thus, the collapse pressures for torispherical heads cannot be confirmed by test. This leads to the inconsistency that if the collapse load is divided by a safety factor, say 1.5, to obtain an allowable pressure, the actual safety margin of the design is not known and may not be 1.5. For a material with sufficient ductility, the use of an estimated burst pressure appears preferable. A design criterion based on the membrane stress at the crown of a torispherical head reaching the ultimate tensile strength is proposed, which is simple, can be supported by theoretical arguments, and is shown to be conservative by current test results as well as by those of two previous test programs.

  1. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

  2. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.

  3. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

  4. Enhancement of Corium Coolability with CRGTs in the Lower Head of a BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehgal, Bal Raj; Jasiulevicius, Audrius; Konovalikhin, Maxim J. [Nuclear Power Safety Division, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm Drottning Kristinas vaeg 33A, SE-10044, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments were preformed in the POMECO (Porous Media Coolability) and the COMECO (Corium Melt Coolability) test facilities at the Nuclear Power Safety Division of the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. During the experiments particulate debris beds and molten pools were cooled by establishing a water layer above them. The main aim of the experiments was to investigate the additional coolability capacity offered by the Control Rod Guide Tubes (CRGTs) in the lower head of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Each CRGT has a substantial heat transfer area and there is large number of these tubes in the BWR lower head. The coolant is supplied to the RPV via the CRGTs during the normal reactor operation and this coolant flow could be maintained during a severe accident. The primary objective of the experimental program was to obtain data on the heat removal capacity, offered by a CRGT. This paper presents results of the experiments. (authors)

  5. Head-on collision of ion-acoustic solitary waves in multicomponent plasmas with positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Shamy, E. F.; Sabry, R. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta-Branch, New Damietta 34517, Damietta (Egypt); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The head-on collision between two ion-acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized multicomponent plasma consisting of hot ions, hot positrons, and two-electron temperature distributions is investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method. The Kortwege-de Vries equations and the analytical phase shifts after the head-on collision of two solitary waves in this multicomponent plasma are obtained. The effects of two different types of isothermal electrons, the ratio of the hot ion temperature to the effective temperature, the ratio of the effective temperature to the positron temperature, the ratio of the number density of positrons to that of electrons species, and the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic) on the phase shifts are studied. It is found that these parameters can significantly influence the phase shifts of the solitons. The relevance of this investigation to space and laboratory plasmas is pointed out.

  6. Determination of selected trace elements in human head hair by neutron activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courson, Leonard Austin

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    barber shops and beauty salons in the Bryan-College Station Met- ropolitan Area. The locations of the prospective collection sites were selected at random from the local telephone directory. Though some of these sites did not elect to participate... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering DETERMINATION OF SELECTEO TRACE ELEMENTS IN HUMAN HEAD HAIR BY NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS A Thesis by LEONARD AUSTIN COURSON Approved as to style and content by Chai r...

  7. Head-end process for the reprocessing of HTGR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.; Wen, M. [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Bejing 10084 (China)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reprocessing of HTGR spent fuels is in favor of the sustainable development of nuclear energy to realize the maximal use of nuclear resource and the minimum disposal of nuclear waste. The head-end of HTGR spent fuels reprocessing is different from that of the LWR spent fuels reprocessing because of the difference of spent fuel structure. The dismantling of the graphite spent fuel element and the highly effective dissolution of fuel kernel is the most difficult process in the head end of the reprocessing. Recently, some work on the head-end has been done in China. First, the electrochemical method with nitrate salt as electrolyte was studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from HTGR fuel elements and release the coated fuel particles, to provide an option for the head-end technology of reprocessing. The results show that the graphite matrix can be effectively separated from the coated particle without any damage to the SiC layer. Secondly, the microwave-assisted heating was applied to dissolve the UO{sub 2} kernel from the crashed coated fuel particles. The ceramic UO{sub 2} as the solute has a good ability to absorb the microwave energy. The results of UO{sub 2} kernel dissolution from crushed coated particles by microwave heating show that the total dissolution percentage of UO{sub 2} is more than 99.99% after 3 times cross-flow dissolution with the following parameters: 8 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, temperature 100 Celsius degrees, initial ratio of solid to liquid 1.2 g/ml. (authors)

  8. Assessing the Transient Flow Behavior in Falling-head Permeameter Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavdar, Sevgi

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Hongbin Zhan Committee Members, David Sparks Marcelo Sanchez Benchun Duan Head of Department, John R. Giardino May 2013 Major Subject: Geology Copyright 2013 Sevgi Cavdar ii... support throughout the final weeks and procedures. I am indebted to my committee members: to Dr. David Sparks for his honesty and his guidance through the programing part, and to Dr. Benchun Duan and Dr. Marcelo Sanchez for accepting to serve in my...

  9. Supplement 19, Part 6, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Subject Headings And Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Martha L.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Shaw, Judith H.; Kirby, Margie D.; Edwards, Shirley J.

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE i INDEX-CATALOGUE OF MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 19, PART 6 PARASITE-SUBJECT CATALOGUE: SUBJECT HEADINGS AND TREATMENT By MARTHA L. WALKER, Zoologist JANE D. RAYBURN, Technical Information... Specialist JUDITH HUMPHREY SHAW, Zoologist MARGIE D. KIRBY, Technical Information Specialist SHIRLEY J. EDWARDS, Technical Information Specialist ANIMAL PARASITOLOGY INSTITUTE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE Issued March 1974 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING...

  10. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilch, M.M.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Chu, T.Y. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rashid, Y.R. [Anatech, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In order to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication.

  11. Laboratory life-fertility table assessment and field biology of millet head miner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Niger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou Kadi Kadi, Hame

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life tables were used to study millet head miner, Heliocheilus albipunctella de Joannis, under controlled conditions in a laboratory. Population reproductive statistics were estimated and survivorship curves described. Survival, oviposition period...

  12. Proteome Profiling for Assessing Diversity: Analysis of Individual Heads of Drosophila melanogaster Using LC-Ion Mobility-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    Proteome Profiling for Assessing Diversity: Analysis of Individual Heads of Drosophila melanogaster dimensions of condensed-phase separations with mass spec- trometry (MS).4 In this approach, mass-to-charge (m-speed, gas-phase sep

  13. Design, fabrication, and characterization of a low-cost flexural bearing based 3D printing tool head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Aaron Eduardo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses the design, characterization and optimization of a low-cost additive rapid-prototyping tool head for a technology known as Fused Filament Fabrication for use in an educational curriculum. Building a ...

  14. Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Approved by: Chair of Committee, Michael Delp Committee Members, Robert Armstrong Judy Muller-Delp Janet r Head of Department, Steve M. Dorman December 2005 Major Subject: Kinesiology iii ABSTRACT Effects of Head-up Tilt... Armstrong, and Dr. Janet Parker for their patience, guidance, and support thoughout the course of this research. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT????????????????????????.. iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS??????????????????.. v TABLE OF CONTENTS...

  15. Studies on the effect of heading back and chemical treatments of vegetative and fruiting response of pecans Carya illinoensis (Wag.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooks, Ronald Fred

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF HEADING BACK AND CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ON VEGETATIVE AND FRUITING RESPONSE OF PECANS CARYA ILLINOENSIS (WAG. ) A Thesis RONALD FRED HOOKS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE January l966 Major Subject: Horticulture STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF HEADING BACK AND CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ON VEGETATIVE AND FRUITING RESPONSE OF PECANS CARYA ILLINOENSIS (WAG. ) A The...

  16. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analysis, and general lab duties. Computer Skills Languages Programming experience in Matlab and Visual Basic Word ProcessingSpreadsheetOther Proficient with Microsoft Excel,...

  17. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, Edited by Mustafa Ali Mohd, Intech Publishers, ISBN 979-953-307-737-5. 8. Hess, J.R.; Kenney, K.L.; Wright, C.T.; Perlack, R.; and Turhollow, A. (2009). Corn Stover...

  18. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work on project designs, engineering design files, and design analysis studies for wind farms, transmission linessystems, power plant systems, and controls, etc;...

  19. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R.F.; Jacobson, J.J.; and Searcy, E.M. (2012). Dynamic Analysis of Policy Drivers for Bioenergy Commodity Markets. Energy Policy, accepted for publication. 3. Piet, S.J.;...

  20. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GERING, Ph.D. Education and Training University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA, Ph.D., Chemical Engineering 1989 University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA, M.S., Chemical...

  1. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R.K.; and Bennett, J.E. (2006). Evaluating the Long-Term Performance of Geosynethic Clay Liners Exposed to Freeze-Thaw. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. Eng., 132(2), 265-268. 7. Ogunro,...

  2. Heading 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pic|Roadmap to Success Self-Development Plan | |Name: |Position: Organization Code: | |Date Developed: |Date Approved: | |Part 1 - Where am I now?| |Greatest Strengths|...

  3. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conditioning, and Refrigeration Systems-An Overview: Part II: Soft and Fusion Control. HVAC&R Research, 17(2), 144-158. 3. Naidu, D.S.; and Rieger, C.G. (2011). Advanced Control...

  4. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on odor control and waste water disposal to regional trout farm, beet sugar, and potato industries. Bioremediation: Tested and developed design procedures for a new style of...

  5. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JAMES E. FRANCFORT Education and Training Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho, USA, M S., Business Administration 1991 Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho, USA, B.S.,...

  6. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the development of technologies to enhance feasibility of power generation from geothermal energy. In addition to being an investigator for two program projects, his...

  7. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program and a CRADA project with a leading agricultural equipment manufacturer. This bionergy related work focused on the development of selective harvest strategies, and involved...

  8. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    involved in advanced vehicle and energy storage development for the DOE and automotive company customers. He has developed annual operating plans, writing proposals, and managed...

  9. Heading 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and foster the professional growth and advancements through individual development planning for all individuals in the Department Federal workforce to ensure our employees...

  10. Heading 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reqd. Factored Cost per Train from Normalized Cost Total Current Cost for Required Trains Subcritical Princeton Report (Kreutz 2008) 10 MW 1 2007 6,310,000 6,310,000 6,149,067...

  11. Heading 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThisThe Hawaii Hazle Spindle, LLCFor

  12. Heading 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThisThe Hawaii Hazle Spindle,

  13. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patents Files; R.D. Boardman, R.A. Carrington; "Method and Apparatus for Oil Shale Pollutant SorptionNOx Reburning, Multi-pollutant Control," June 10, 2008. 2. U.S....

  14. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Wood is currently working with the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Office to stand up the Western Energy Corridor Initiative, and he is also...

  15. Heading 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2011 Technical Evaluation Study Project No. 23843 Integration of HTGRs to an Ex Situ Oil Shale Retort Operation, Economic Analysis 08022011 Form 412.09 (Rev. 10) Idaho National...

  16. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    logistics for biomass energy conversion, environmental impacts of in situ and ex situ oil shale energy development, and watershed resource management and energy issues; provides...

  17. Heading 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Evaluation Study Project No. 23843 Integration of HTGRs with an In Situ Oil Shale Operation 05162011 2 Form 412.09 (Rev. 10) Idaho National Laboratory INTEGRATION...

  18. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M.S., Electrical and Computer Engineering 1989 Universidad de Carabobo, Naguanagua, Venezuela, B.S., Electrical Engineering 1987 Current Q, SCI, and Sigmas clearances...

  19. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics analysis, and aerothermal analysis to predict the environment for spacecraft and missile systems; performed Navier-Stokes computations for a large flexible aerobrake...

  20. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycles, and combined cycles; bio-mass pyrolysis and gasification; and atmosphere revitalization for NASA. He has been the technical lead for...

  1. An on-line replanning method for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng, Cheng; Godley, Andrew; Schultz, Christopher; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily setup for head and neck (HN) radiotherapy (RT) can vary randomly due to neck rotation and anatomy change. These differences cannot be totally corrected by the current practice of image guided RT with translational repositioning. The authors present a novel rapid correction scheme that can be used on-line to correct both interfractional setup variation and anatomy change for HN RT. The scheme consists of two major steps: (1) Segment aperture morphing (SAM) and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO). SAM is accomplished by applying the spatial relationship between the apertures and the contours of the planning target and organs at risk (OARs) to the new target and OAR contours. The new target contours are transferred from planning target contours to the CT of the day by means of deformable registration (MIMVISTA). The dose distribution for each new aperture was generated using a planning system with a fast dose engine and hardware and was input into a newly developed SWO package using fast sequential quadratic programming. The entire scheme was tested based on the daily CT images acquired for representative HN IMRT cases treated with a linac and CT-on-Rails combo. It was found that the target coverage and/or OAR sparing was degraded based on the CT of the day with the current standard repositioning from rigid registration. This degradation can be corrected by the SAM/SWO scheme. The target coverage and OAR sparing for the SAM/SWO plans were found to be equivalent to the original plan. The SAM/SWO process took 5-8 min for the head and neck cases studied. The proposed aperture morphing with weight optimization is an effective on-line approach for correcting interfractional patient setup and anatomic changes for head and neck cancer radiotherapy.

  2. A comparison of two methods of femoral head and neck excision in the dog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Fred Anthony

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    femoral head and neck excision in all dogs. Lameness was graded by the author and 3 unbiased examiners, and forceplate analysis was performed preoperatively and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 16 weeks postoperatively. Other parameters evaluated at these times.... Weight bearing forces of the operated limb were increased at 6 and 16 weeks, but did not return to the preoperative value in either group. The muscle flap group demonstrated less weight bearing force on the operated limb at weeks 6 and 16 than...

  3. The Shapiro Conjecture: Prompt or Delayed Collapse in the head-on collision of neutron stars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Miller; Wai-Mo Suen; Malcolm Tobias

    1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the question of prompt vs. delayed collapse in the head-on collision of two neutron stars. We show that the prompt formation of a black hole is possible, contrary to a conjecture of Shapiro which claims that collapse is delayed until after neutrino cooling. We discuss the insight provided by Shapiro's conjecture and its limitation. An understanding of the limitation of the conjecture is provided in terms of the many time scales involved in the problem. General relativistic simulations in the Einstein theory with the full set of Einstein equations coupled to the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations are carried out in our study.

  4. Shapiro conjecture: Prompt or delayed collapse in the head-on collision of neutron stars?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Mark; Suen, Wai-Mo; Tobias, Malcolm

    2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the question of prompt versus delayed collapse in the head-on collision of two neutron stars. We show that the prompt formation of a black hole is possible, contrary to a conjecture of Shapiro which claims that collapse is delayed until after neutrino cooling. An understanding of the limitation of the conjecture is provided in terms of the many time scales involved in the problem. General relativistic simulations with the full set of Einstein equations coupled to the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations are carried out.

  5. The Shapiro Conjecture Prompt or Delayed Collapse in the head-on collision of neutron stars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, M; Tobias, M; Miller, Mark; Suen, Wai-Mo; Tobias, Malcolm

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the question of prompt vs. delayed collapse in the head-on collision of two neutron stars. We show that the prompt formation of a black hole is possible, contrary to a conjecture of Shapiro which claims that collapse is delayed until after neutrino cooling. We discuss the insight provided by Shapiro's conjecture and its limitation. An understanding of the limitation of the conjecture is provided in terms of the many time scales involved in the problem. General relativistic simulations in the Einstein theory with the full set of Einstein equations coupled to the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations are carried out in our study.

  6. Head of the Harbor, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridorPart A Permit Application Jump to:CapitalHead of

  7. Redelegation/Designation Order No. 00-022.06A to Anthony H. Montoya as head

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 RevisionDivision and TeamOfficeHead ofof

  8. Head Loss Through Fibrous Debris Bed with Different Types of Perforated Strainers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulsattar, Suhaeb S

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Loss of Coolant Accident LWR Light Water Reactor MBLOCA Medium Break Loss of Coolant Accident MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet NEI Nuclear Energy Institute NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology NPP Nuclear Power Plants NPSH Net... than the randomly generated debris bed on the sump strainer of the NPP. The U.S. NRC began their analysis in 1996 in order to predict and estimate the loss of the Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) by establishing GSI-191. In 1995, NUREG/CR-6224...

  9. Optimization of UAV Heading for the Ground-to-Air Uplink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Feng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider a collection of single-antenna ground nodes communicating with a multi-antenna unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) over a multiple-access ground-to-air wireless communications link. The UAV uses beamforming to mitigate the inter-user interference and achieve spatial division multiple access (SDMA). First, we consider a simple scenario with two static ground nodes and analytically investigate the effect of the UAV heading on the system sum rate. We then study a more general setting with multiple mobile ground-based terminals, and develop an algorithm for dynamically adjusting the UAV heading in order to maximize a lower bound on the ergodic sum rate of the uplink channel, using a Kalman filter to track the positions of the mobile ground nodes. Fairness among the users can be guaranteed through weighting the bound for each user's ergodic rate with a factor inversely proportional to their average data rate. For the common scenario where a high $K$-factor channel exists between the ground node...

  10. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [comps.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  11. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  12. Margin on Gross Tumor Volume and Risk of Local Recurrence in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Keene, Kimberley S.; Dobelbower, M. Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bonner, James A., E-mail: jabonner@uabmc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether the method or extent of construction of the high-dose clinical target volume (CTV) and high-dose planning target volume (PTV) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer are associated with an increased risk of locoregional failure. Materials and Methods: Patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, oral cavity, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated definitively with IMRT were included. All patients without local relapse had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 24 months. Treatment plans of 85 available patients were reviewed, and the gross tumor volume (GTV) to PTV expansion method was estimated. Results: The GTVs were expanded volumetrically in 71 of 85 patients, by a median of 15 mm (range, 4-25 mm). An anatomic component to the expansion of GTV was used in 14 of 85 patients. Eighteen patients failed locoregionally, for an actuarial locoregional control rate of 77.2% at 2 years. There was no significant difference in locoregional control between patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically vs. those with a component of anatomic expansion. In patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically, no increase in risk of local failure was seen in patients with a total GTV expansion of <=15 mm. Conclusion: In this retrospective study, there was not an increased risk of local failure using smaller margins or expanding GTVs volumetrically when treating head-and-neck cancer patients definitively with IMRT.

  13. Effect of oxide films on hydrogen permeability of candidate Stirling heater head tube alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuon, S R; Misencik, J A

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure hydrogen has been selected as the working fluid for the developmental automotive Stirling engine. Containment of the working fluid during operation of the engine at high temperatures and at high hydrogen gas pressures is essential for the acceptance of the Stirling engine as an alternative to the internal combustion engine. Most commercial alloys are extremely permeable to pure hydrogen at high temperatures. A program was undertaken at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) to reduce hydrogen permeability in the Stirling engine heater head tubes by doping the hydrogen working fluid with CO or CO/sub 2/. Small additions of these gases were shown to form an oxide on the inside tube wall and thus reduce hydrogen permeability. A study of the effects of dopant concentration, alloy composition, and effects of surface oxides on hydrogen permeability in candidate heater head tube alloys is summarized. Results showed that hydrogen permeability was similar for iron-base alloys (N-155, A286, IN800, 19-9DL, and Nitronic 40), cobalt-base alloys (HS-188) and nickel-base alloys (IN718). In general, the permeability of the alloys decreased with increasing concentration of CO or CO/sub 2/ dopant, with increasing oxide thickness, and decreasing oxide porosity. At high levels of dopants, highly permeable liquid oxides formed on those alloys with greater than 50% Fe content. Furthermore, highly reactive minor alloying elements (Ti, Al, Nb, and La) had a strong influence on reducing hydrogen permeability.

  14. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

  15. Evaluation of horizonal resistance to head smut Sporisorium reilianum (Kuhn) Langdon & Fullerton in Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palma Carias, Alejandro

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inoculation in two A/B inbred lines known for their different levels of resistance in different genetic backgrounds at the Texas A&M Research Farm in College Station during the Summer of 1992 33 Means % susceptible reactions of F 1 hybrids derived from.... . . . . 2. Overall mean resistance reactions to head smut in overall F I hybrid combinations (13 hybrids each) with 4 A/B and 10 restorer lines with different genetic backgrounds for resistance / susceptibility to head smut using hypodermic syringe...

  16. Design of a 50-watt air supplied turbogenerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Stevan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design of a high-pressure-ratio, low-flow turbogenerator with 50 W electrical power output, designed to operate from a 5-bar air supply. The research shows that a MEMS-based silicon turbine in ...

  17. Working with Industry Heriot-Watt University has a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    the wind farm, and electric load modelling software. I Green Logistics Green Logistics is a four year EPSRC

  18. Tape-Spring Rolling Hinges Alan M. Watt1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    for solar array panels, synthetic aperture radars (SARs), booms, radiators and the like. Several successful design of a low cost, unlubricated, self-deploying, self-locking hinge whose properties can be easily-high power solar arrays, involve the use of stiff members connected by self-locking hinges. The design

  19. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    fuel economy. A growing percentage of customers are demanding greener vehicles. Waste heat is an untapped source for electric power that could reduce CO 2 3% - 7% near term and...

  20. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industry Amerigon Inc. Amerigon Inc. - - Europe Europe Sales, Technical Support Germany Sales, Technical Support Germany Amerigon Inc. Amerigon Inc. - - Europe Europe Sales,...

  1. HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY DUBAI CAMPUS Student Visa Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Applying from Outside the United Arab Emirates (UAE) United Arab Emirates (UAE) law requires all non and Emirates ID card) * 1590 AED 900 AED 2490 AED Refundable Visa Deposit Not applicable 3000 AED 3000 AED

  2. HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY DUBAI CAMPUS Student Visa Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Applying from Inside the United Arab Emirates (UAE) United Arab Emirates (UAE) law requires all non University Service Charge Total Amount Due Processing of new visa (including medical test and Emirates ID, you will receive your: Emirates I

  3. Heriot-Watt University Spin-Out Company Successes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    in geological reservoirs TotallyTextures Ltd 2007 Provision of integrated set of tools for surface capture, management and visualisation Hydrafact Ltd 2006 Test equipment, technical support and software for flow Ltd 1997 Integrated IT solutions providers Edinburgh Instruments Ltd 1971 Laser, non-linear optics

  4. Where are your BTUs? Watt are you doing about it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Renewable Energy To Better Foster Planetary Sustainability. #12;USA ENERGY FLOW 2007 Net Usage = 101.6 Quads (MMBtu) #12;USA Energy Sources Imported 29.0% US Production 71.0% EIA AER 2007 #12;USA Energy Control, No Change in Comfort Parameters #12;Electricity Energy Usage 42 Quads Input, 13.3 Quads to load EIA AER 2007

  5. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C Solar heating will introduce stresses into the tower’sTower. The LACMA weather station records additional variables such as humidity and solar

  6. Improvement of wave form of automatic watt regulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vick, John Edward

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . k program was then devised which would add Z& to b55, solve 415, divide by d, and multiply by -pxZL. The data in Table I were determined in this manner. The curve in Figure 3 is a plot of these data. -1. 5X105+jp 0+ J 0 0+ j0 0+Jp 4. 45X10... +Jp 1. 5X10 -j6. 36X10' 0+$6. 36X10 0+jp 0+jp 0+$6. 36X10~ 2. 7X105-$6. 36X10~ 3. 62X10 +Jp 0+ J 0 0+Jp 0+ JO 0+Jp 1. 15X104-$8. 0X10 0+)B. OX105 0+Jp 0+JO -1. 5X105+Jp 0+ J 0 0+J0 0+Jp 1. 5X10 -j6. 36X10 0+~6. 36X10~ 0+ jp 0...

  7. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- SunWatts Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) has a loan program that allows its members to finance a portion of a photovoltaic (PV) or small wind system. Loans are available in an amount of...

  8. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorge Waldmann George WaldmannAnnualGilbertDepartment ofof Energy JPG

  9. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (Low-Resolution Billboard) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorge Waldmann George WaldmannAnnualGilbertDepartment ofof Energy

  10. Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 | Department7JanuaryWASTE-TO-ENERGY:About

  11. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMDHeavy Duty Trucks |2|Department of

  12. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMDHeavy Duty Trucks |2|Department

  13. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM Flash2011-55 OPAMFugitiveGarySource Justifications |of Energy

  14. Watt Does It Cost To Use It? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| DepartmentVolvoWater ElectrolysisProgram Areas

  15. Head-on-collision of modulated dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Depsy, A.; Zedan, N. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); El-Taibany, W. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, P.O. 960, Abha (Saudi Arabia); El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The derivative expansion perturbation method is applied to a strongly coupled dusty plasma system consisting of negatively charged dust grains, electrons, and ions. The basic equations are reduced to a nonlinear Schroedinger type equation appropriate for describing the modulated dust acoustic (DA) waves. We have examined the modulation (in) stability and the dependence of the system physical parameters (angular frequency and group velocity) on the polarization force variation. Finally, the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo technique is employed to investigate the head-on collision (HoC) between two DA dark solitons. The analytical phase shifts and the trajectories of these dark solitons after the collision are derived. The numerical illustrations show that the polarization effect has strong influence on the nature of the phase shifts and the trajectories of the two DA dark solitons after collision.

  16. GEANT4 Application for the Simulation of the Head of a Siemens Primus Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Quesada, J. M.; Gallardo, M. I. [Dep. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, University of Sevilla. Apdo. 1065 E-41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monte Carlo simulation of the head of a Siemens Primus Linac used at Virgen Macarena Hospital (Sevilla, Spain) has been performed using the code GEANT4, version 9.2. In this work, the main features of the application built by our group are presented. They are mainly focused in the optimization of the performance of the simulation. The geometry, including the water phantom, has been entirely wrapped by a shielding volume which discards all the particles escaping far away through its walls. With this, a factor of four in the time spent by the simulation can be saved. An interface to read and write phase-space files in IAEA format has been also developed to save CPU time in our simulations. Finally, some calculations of the dose absorption in the water phantom have been done and compared with the results given by EGSnrc and with experimental data obtained for the calibration of the machine.

  17. Head-on collisions of electrostatic solitons in multi-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verheest, Frank [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, Manfred A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hereman, Willy A. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401-1887 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Head-on collisions between two electrostatic solitons are dealt with by the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method of strained coordinates, for a plasma composed of a number of cold (positive and negative) ion species and Boltzmann electrons. The nonlinear evolution equations for both solitons and their phase shift due to the collision, resulting in time delays, are established. A Korteweg-de Vries description is the generic conclusion, except when the plasma composition is special enough to replace the quadratic by a cubic nonlinearity in the evolution equations, with concomitant repercussions on the phase shifts. Applications include different two-ion plasmas, showing positive or negative polarity solitons in the generic case. At critical composition, a combination of a positive and a negative polarity soliton is possible.

  18. A Theory of the Beam Transfer Function (BTF) with Chromaticity Induced Head-Tail Phase Shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fartoukh, S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of chromaticity determination by measuring head-tail phase shifts has been demonstrated both in the CERN-SPS, at HERA (DESY) and at RHIC (BNL). This method, however, requires to apply sizable transverse kick to the beam which might turn to be detrimental to the LHC performance in view of the tight emittance growth budget allowed for this machine. The aim of this paper is to extend the theory to the case of a coherent beam excitation of small amplitude, in particular at a frequency equal to the beam betatron tune (Phase Locked Loop mode), with, as a result, the possibility of envisaging a chromaticity feed-back system based on this technique for the LHC.

  19. Unbounded energies of debris from head-on particle collisions near black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. B. Zaslavskii

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    If two particles move toward a black hole and collide near the horizon, the energy E_{c.m.} in the centre of mass can grow unbounded. This is a so-called Ba\\~nados-Silk-West (BSW) effect. One of problems creating obstacles to the possibility of its observation consists in that individual energy E of a fragment at infinity remains finite because of redshift. We show that in the case of head-on collision, debris may have unbounded energy E. An essential ingredient of this scenario is a particle moving away from a black hole in the near-horizon region. It can appear due to precedent collision that implies multiple scattering.

  20. Computer modeling of infrared head-on emission from missile noses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tofani, A. (Officine Galileo SpA, Via Einstein 35, 50013 Campi Bisenzio, Florence (IT))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model that takes into account the effect of aerodynamic and solar heating, sky irradiation, and radiative cooling on infrared emission from missile noses is presented. The heat transfer equation was solved with numerical techniques both in the steady-state (constant sped and altitude flight of cruise missiles) and in the nonstationary regime (quickly variable speed and altitude of short to medium range ballistic missiles) to give the temperature distribution on the skin surface. The corresponding head-on absolute infrared emission in the 3 to 5 {mu}m spectral bands was computed as a function of time of flight and missile altitude. Results show a strong dependence of temperature on the skin material, on the character of the aerodynamic flow (laminar or turbulent boundary layer), and on the physical characteristics of the atmosphere. By varying these parameters into reasonable ranges, infrared emissions spanning over more than an order of magnitude were obtained.

  1. Cognitive Functioning After Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Hui K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bernstein, Lori J. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brown, Jennifer [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ringash, Jolie; Vakilha, Mehrdad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wang, Lisa [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Goldstein, David [Department of Otolaryngology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Kim, John; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.; Chen, Eric X. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Siu, Lillian L., E-mail: lillian.siu@uhn.on.ca [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive cognitive function (CF) assessment in patients who were relapse free after curative intent radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent neuropsychological tests to assess their objective CF; completed questionnaires to assess subjective CF, quality of life, and affect; and underwent blood tests to assess hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Retrospectively, the dosimetry of incidental radiation to the brain was determined for all patients, and the dose intensity of cisplatin was determined in those who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Results: A total of 10 patients were enrolled (5 treated with radiotherapy only and 5 with radiotherapy and cisplatin). The mean time from the end of treatment was 20 months (range, 9-41). All patients were able to complete the assessment protocol. Of the 10 patients, 9 had impaired objective CF, with memory the most severely affected. The severity of memory impairment correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the temporal lobes, and impaired dexterity correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the cerebellum, suggesting that these deficits might be treatment related. Patients receiving cisplatin appeared to have poorer objective CF than patients receiving only RT, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance, likely owing to the small sample size. Consistent with the published data, objective CF did not correlate with subjective CF or quality of life. No association was found between objective CF and patients' affect, hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Conclusion: Neuropsychological testing is feasible in squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck survivors. The findings were suggestive of treatment-related cognitive dysfunction. These results warrant additional investigation.

  2. Evaluation of Thyroid Disorders During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy by Using Functional Analysis and Ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Edraki, Hamid Reza [Department of Radiology, Panzdahe-Khordad Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate thyroid function and vascular changes during radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various cancers in the head and neck region were prospectively evaluated. The serum samples (triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free triiodothyronine [FT3], and free thyroxine [FT4]), the echo level of the thyroid gland, and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) parameters of the right inferior thyroid artery (RITA) of the patients were measured before and at regular intervals during radiotherapy. The thyroid gland dose-volume histograms of the patients were derived from their computed tomography-based treatment plans. Results: There was a significant fall in TSH level (p < 0.0001) but an increase in FT4 (p < 0.0001) and T4 (p < 0.022) levels during the radiotherapy course. The threshold dose required to produce significant changes was 12 Gy (Biologically Effective Dose in 2-Gy fractions, BED{sub 2}). There were significant rises in the patients' pulsatility index, resistive index, peak systolic velocity, blood volume flow levels, and RITA diameter (p < 0.0001), as detected by CDU during radiotherapy, compared to those parameters measured before the treatment. Hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns (p < 0.0001) were seen during radiotherapy compared to those before treatment. There was significant Pearson's correlation between the CDU parameters and T4, FT4, and TSH levels. Conclusions: Radiation-induced thyroiditis is regarded as primary damage to the thyroid gland. Thyroiditis can subsequently result in hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Our results demonstrated that changes in thyroid vessels occur during radiotherapy delivered to patients. Vessel changes also can be attributed to the late effect of radiation on the thyroid gland. The hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns observed in patients may result from the increase in intrathyroidal flow.

  3. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Reirradiation of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unger, Keith R., E-mail: kxu2@gunet.georgetown.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C (United States); Lominska, Christopher E. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C (United States); Deeken, John F. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C (United States)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an appealing treatment option after previous radiotherapy because of its precision, conformality, and reduced treatment duration. We report our experience with reirradiation using fractionated SRS for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2008, 65 patients received SRS to the oropharynx (n = 13), hypopharynx (n = 8), nasopharynx (n = 7), paranasal sinus (n = 7), neck (n = 7), and other sites (n = 23). Thirty-eight patients were treated definitively and 27 patients with metastatic disease and/or untreated local disease were treated palliatively. Nine patients underwent complete macroscopic resection before SRS. Thirty-three patients received concurrent chemoradiation. The median initial radiation dose was 67 Gy, and the median reirradiation SRS dose was 30 Gy (21-35 Gy) in 2-5 fractions. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 16 months. Fifty-six patients were evaluable for response: 30 (54%) had complete, 15 (27%) had partial, and 11 (20%) had no response. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 12 months. For definitively treated patients, the 2-year OS and locoregional control (LRC) rates were 41% and 30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that higher total dose, surgical resection, and nasopharynx site were significantly associated with improved LRC; surgical resection and nonsquamous histology were associated with improved OS. Seven patients (11%) experienced severe reirradiation-related toxicity, including one treatment-attributed death. Conclusion: SRS reirradiation for head-and-neck cancer is feasible. This study demonstrates encouraging response rates with acceptable toxicity. Fractionated SRS reirradiation with concurrent chemotherapy in select patients warrants further study.

  4. Inter- and Intrafractional Positional Uncertainties in Pediatric Radiotherapy Patients With Brain and Head and Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltran, Chris, E-mail: chris.beltran@stjude.or [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate radiation therapy planning margins based on inter- and intrafractional uncertainty for pediatric brain and head and neck tumor patients at different imaging frequencies. Methods: Pediatric patients with brain (n = 83) and head and neck (n = 17) tumors (median age = 7.2 years) were enrolled on an internal review board-approved localization protocol and stratified according to treatment position and use of anesthesia. Megavoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) was performed before each treatment and after every other treatment. The pretreatment offsets were used to calculate the interfractional setup uncertainty (SU), and posttreatment offsets were used to calculate the intrafractional residual uncertainty (RU). The SU and RU are the patient-related components of the setup margin (SM), which is part of the planning target volume (PTV). SU data was used to simulate four intervention strategies using different imaging frequencies and thresholds. Results: The SM based on all patients treated on this study was 2.1 mm (SU = 0.9 mm, RU = 1.9 mm) and varied according to treatment position (supine = 1.8 mm, prone = 2.6 mm) and use of anesthesia (with = 1.7 mm, without = 2.5 mm) because of differences in the RU. The average SU for a 2-mm threshold based on no imaging, once per week imaging, initial five images, and daily imaging was 3.6, 2.1, 2.2, and 0.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: On the basis of this study, the SM component of the PTV may be reduced to 2 mm for daily CBCT compared with 3.5 mm for weekly CBCT. Considering patients who undergo daily pretreatment CBCT, the SM is larger for those treated in the prone position or smaller for those treated under anesthesia because of differences in the RU.

  5. Testosterone and prolactin in two songbirds that differ in paternal care: the blue-headed vireo and the red-eyed vireo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and prolactin (PRL). Concentrations of plasma T and PRL were compared in breeding Blue-headed Vireos (Vireo decreased during incubation, nestling, and fledgling stages. In male Blue-headed Vireos, plasma PRL stages. Plasma PRL increased in male Red-eyed Vireos at the incubation stage and remained moderately

  6. Abstract--During quadrupedal robot locomotion, there is pitch, yaw, and roll of the head and body due to the stepping.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Simon

    Abstract--During quadrupedal robot locomotion, there is pitch, yaw, and roll of the head and body vestibular system that has been embedded in the robot's head. Our approach can rapidly learn of the biped and quadrupedal robots, however, generates considerable pitch, roll, and yaw body

  7. [To be printed on the headed notepaper of the Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer Group (if an independent organisation) or the Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    [To be printed on the headed notepaper of the Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer of Signature:___________________________ [Signed by Head Technology Transfer Office (TTO) or Group on behalf of Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer Group if independent or if the University does not have

  8. IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 30, NO. 5, JUNE 2012 993 Optimization of UAV Heading for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 30, NO. 5, JUNE 2012 993 Optimization of UAV-antenna unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) over a multiple-access ground-to-air communi- cations link. The UAV uses of the UAV's heading on the system sum rate. We then study a more general setting with multiple mobile ground

  9. Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework energy levels as a strategic framework to help identify conservation priorities and22 those management of three energy levels to achieve conservation objectives. The24 #12;2 geographic distribution of each

  10. Seeing the whole elephant in the room: a holistic approach to ebooks Pamela Jacobs, Head (Acting), Information Resources & Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    1 Seeing the whole elephant in the room: a holistic approach to ebooks Pamela Jacobs, Head (Acting We chose the title for our presentation to reflect that fact that ebooks are often the "elephant implications for users and staff. Ebooks can also be likened to the story of the Blind Man and the Elephant

  11. May 29, 2013 ACADEMIC POSITION PROFILE APP. 209 TITLE: New Jersey Regional Studies Librarian and Head of Public Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    . The New Jersey Regional Studies Librarian and Head of Public Services will: In collaboration with other including electronic publications relating to the State and region Enhance access to the Sinclair New service and collection management staff Direct and coordinate public service activities in the SC

  12. Duopoly Interaction and Expected Price for Local Access Running Heading: Duopoly Interaction and Expected Price for Local Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Duopoly Interaction and Expected Price for Local Access Running Heading: Duopoly Interaction and Expected Price for Local Access Judith A. Molka-Danielsen Department of Informatics Molde College P.O. Box. Competition brings pricing flexibility, so that one could expect implicit subsidies, like geographic averaging

  13. R163B -Eye movements and time-based selection Running head: EYE MOVEMENTS AND TIME-BASED SELECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inglis, Matthew

    R163B - Eye movements and time-based selection Running head: EYE MOVEMENTS AND TIME-BASED SELECTION Eye movements and time-based selection: Where do the eyes go in preview search? Derrick G. Watson.g.watson@warwick.ac.uk 1 #12;R163B - Eye movements and time-based selection Abstract In visual search tasks, presenting one

  14. CGD Staff and Visitor List Blackmon, Maurice Director Hack, James (head) Anderson, Jeff (long-term visitor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Lesley Mahowald, Natalie Norton, Nancy Stepaniak, Dave Marcum, Erika Schramm, Julie Wigley, Tom McKeown, Rebecca Yeager, Stephen Oleson, Keith Rosenbloom, Nan Jeff Kiehl Project Leader Stephens, Britt Lydia, Doug (head) Keith Lindsay Bettge, Tom Bengtsson, Thomas (long-term visitor) Brady, Esther Furrer

  15. Please leave this heading unchanged! Sound radiation of a non-rigid piston and pole cap compared with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Please leave this heading unchanged! Sound radiation of a non-rigid piston and pole cap compared are often modelled as a rigid piston in an infinite baffle. This model is for real loudspeakers somewhat of the baffled-piston radiation the spatial impulse response is presented. 1. Nijboer-Zernike approach

  16. Running Head: MORAL HAZARD, POWER AND ACCOUNTABILITY Masters of the Universe: How Power and Accountability Influence Self-Serving Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Running Head: MORAL HAZARD, POWER AND ACCOUNTABILITY Masters of the Universe: How Power Pitesa, Department of People, Organizations and Society, Grenoble Ecole de Management; Stefan Thau this article should be addressed to Marko Pitesa, Department of People, Organizations and Society, Grenoble

  17. Running heading: Bulk density of a clayey subsoil Increase in the bulk density of a Grey Clay subsoil by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Running heading: Bulk density of a clayey subsoil Increase in the bulk density of a Grey Clay of the prisms were coated by material similar in composition to the topsoil and separated from as the profile dries over summer leading to widening of cracks between prismatic peds, (2) infilling of cracks

  18. Multi-vehicle Convoy Analysis Based on ANPR data A. Homayounfar*, A. T. S. Ho*, N. Zhu*, G. Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Multi-vehicle Convoy Analysis Based on ANPR data A. Homayounfar*, A. T. S. Ho*, N. Zhu*, G. Head mining techniques for convoy analysis of vehicles based on the automatic number plate recognition (ANPR of multi-vehicle convoy activities. 1 Introduction Convoy Analysis of vehicles is a relatively new research

  19. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES, CHRISTMAS ISLAND, 1954-69 GUNTHER It SECKEL' AND MARIAN Y. Y. YONG' ABSTRACT Harmonic functions, with daily sampling, are on average 0.07° C. Harmonic analysis spanning the entire sampling duration shows

  20. Using MR equations built from summary data 1 Running head: Using MR equations built from summary data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R.

    Using MR equations built from summary data 1 Running head: Using MR equations built from summary, United Kingdom. E-mail: j.crawford@abdn.ac.uk #12;Using MR equations built from summary data 2 Abstract; regression equations; single-case methods #12;Using MR equations built from summary data 3 INTRODUCTION

  1. Running head: Virtual Peer Technology for Children with Autism Using Virtual Peer Technology as an Intervention for Children with Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassell, Justine

    an affinity for computers. Instead of labeling these technologies as useless for children with ASD1 Running head: Virtual Peer Technology for Children with Autism Using Virtual Peer Technology of key features that we believe to be important ­ and as yet undervalued -- in technological

  2. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

  3. The use of cotton blue stain to improve the efficiency of picking and identifying chironomid head capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    NOTE The use of cotton blue stain to improve the efficiency of picking and identifying chironomid Cotton blue was added to sediment sam- ples at least 2 h before chironomid head capsules were picked during the picking process. Cotton blue has been used previously to stain chitin in fungal cell walls

  4. Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kieper, Douglas Arthur (Seattle, WA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, WV); Welch, Benjamin L. (Hampton, VA)

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

  5. Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kieper, Douglas Arthur (Newport News, VA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Welch, Benjamin L. (Hampton, VA)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

  6. Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Ramus, Liliane [DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Automatique et en Automatique)-Asclepios Research Project, Sophia-Antipolis (France); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon Cedex (France); Odin, Guillaume [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St.-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Darcourt, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology-Dentistry, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Guevara, Nicolas [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Orlanducci, Marie-Helene [Department of Odontology, CHU, Nice (France); Marcie, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Poissonnet, Gilles [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); and others

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas-based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

  7. Head-on collision of dust-acoustic shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EL-Shamy, E. F., E-mail: emadel-shamy@hotmail.com [Department of physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Al-Asbali, A. M., E-mail: aliaa-ma@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, Abha, P.O. 960 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the propagation and the head-on collision of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of negative dust fluid, Maxwellian distributed electrons and ions. Applying the extended Poincaré–Lighthill–Kuo method, a couple of Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equations for describing DA shock waves are derived. This study is a first attempt to deduce the analytical phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The impacts of physical parameters such as the kinematic viscosity, the unperturbed electron-to-dust density ratio, parameter determining the effect of polarization force, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the effective dust temperature-to-ion temperature ratio on the structure and the collision of DA shock waves are examined. In addition, the results reveal the increase of the strength and the steepness of DA shock waves as the above mentioned parameters increase, which in turn leads to the increase of the phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The present model may be useful to describe the structure and the collision of DA shock waves in space and laboratory dusty plasmas.

  8. Cascades of Multi-headed Chimera States for Coupled Phase Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri L. Maistrenko; Anna Vasylenko; Oleksandr Sudakov; Roman Levchenko; Volodymyr L. Maistrenko

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Chimera state is a recently discovered dynamical phenomenon in arrays of nonlocally coupled oscillators, that displays a self-organized spatial pattern of co-existing coherence and incoherence. We discuss the appearance of the chimera states in networks of phase oscillators with attractive and with repulsive interactions, i.e. when the coupling respectively favors synchronization or works against it. By systematically analyzing the dependence of the spatiotemporal dynamics on the level of coupling attractivity/repulsivity and the range of coupling, we uncover that different types of chimera states exist in wide domains of the parameter space as cascades of the states with increasing number of intervals of irregularity, so-called chimera's heads. We report three scenarios for the chimera birth: 1) via saddle-node bifurcation on a resonant invariant circle, also known as SNIC or SNIPER, 2) via blue-sky catastrophe, when two periodic orbits, stable and saddle, approach each other creating a saddle-node periodic orbit, and 3) via homoclinic transition with complex multistable dynamics including an "eight-like" limit cycle resulting eventually in a chimera state.

  9. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  10. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1 : Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elston, Ralph

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Head burn is a descriptive clinical term used by fishery biologists to describe exfoliation of skin and underlying connective tissue of the jaw and cranial region of salmonids, observed at fish passage facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The observations are usually made on upstream migrant adult salmon or steelhead. An expert panel, convened in 1996, to evaluate the risk and severity of gas bubble disease (GBD) in the Snake and Columbia River system believed that, while head burns appeared to be distinct from GBD, the relationship between dissolved gas saturation in the rivers and head burns was uncertain.

  11. On Comparing the Quality of Head and Neck Imrt Plans Delivered with Two Different Linear Accelerator Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basran, Parminder S., E-mail: pbasran@bccancer.bc.c [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Balogh, Judith; Poon, Ian; MacKenzie, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Timothy [Department of Medical Sciences, University of Western Ontario, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether 2 different types of linear accelerators manufacturers with similar MLC leaf widths deliver equivalent IMRT distributions for head and neck radiotherapy patients. In this study, plans delivered with Siemens linacs were re-optimized with an Elekta linac and vice versa. To test for significance, paired t-tests were computed to examine differences in target and normal tissue doses and monitor units. Dose distributions, dose-volume histograms, and dose to targets and normal tissues were found to be equivalent irrespective of the linac type. However, approximately 15% more monitor units were delivered when planned on the Elekta machine (p < 0.002). Both linear accelerators provide plans of comparable dosimetric quality; however, Elekta machines deliver slightly more monitor units than Siemens machines. This increase is likely due differences in geometric properties of the machine head designs, as modeled in the treatment planning system.

  12. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Kaushik, E-mail: kaushikbolpur@rediffmail.com [Beluti M. K. M. High School, P.O. Beluti, Birbhum, West Bengal 731301 (India); Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  13. Impact of Concomitant Chemotherapy on Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Shlok; Kong, Weidong [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen’s Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Booth, Christopher M. [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen’s Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Mackillop, William J., E-mail: william.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen’s Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Clinical trials have shown that the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy (RT) improves survival in advanced head-and-neck cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) in routine practice. Methods and Materials: This was a population-based cohort study. Electronic records of treatment from all provincial cancer centers were linked to a population--based cancer registry to describe the adoption of C-CRT for head-and-neck cancer patients in Ontario, Canada. The study population was then divided into pre- and postadoption cohorts, and their outcomes were compared. Results: Between 1992 and 2008, 18,867 patients had diagnoses of head-and-neck cancer in Ontario, of whom 7866 (41.7%) were treated with primary RT. The proportion of primary RT cases that received C-CRT increased from 2.2% in the preadoption cohort (1992-1998) to 39.3% in the postadoption cohort (2003-2008). Five-year survival among all primary RT cases increased from 43.6% in the preadoption cohort to 51.8% in the postadoption cohort (P<.001). Over the same period, treatment-related hospital admissions increased significantly, but there was no significant increase in treatment-related deaths. Conclusions: C-CRT was widely adopted in Ontario after 2003, and its adoption was temporally associated with an improvement in survival.

  14. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  15. Comparison of Methods to Reduce Dose to Swallowing-Related Structures in Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Jimmy J., E-mail: jjcaudell@gmail.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States); Burnett, Omer L.; Schaner, Philip E.; Bonner, James A.; Duan Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Emerging data suggest that reduction of dose to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictor may lower the risk of swallowing complications such as long-term gastrostomy dependence and aspiration. Organ avoidance becomes difficult when the primary tumor or involved nodes are present at the level of the larynx. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with Stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with high-dose target volume at the level of the larynx (but not involving the glottic larynx) were planned with whole-field IMRT (WF-IMRT), as well as a low anterior neck field dynamically matched to an IMRT plan (D-SCLV). Plans were compared with respect to coverage of targets and sparing of normal tissues including the larynx, inferior pharyngeal constrictor (IPC), parotid, and cord. Results: There was no significant difference between the two techniques in coverage of the high- or intermediate-dose planning target volumes (PTVs). Coverage of the elective nodal PTV was inferior with the D-SCLV technique, with a mean of 96.5% vs. 86.3% of the volume receiving the prescription dose (p = 0.001) compared with WF-IMRT plans. However, the D-SCLV technique significantly reduced mean dose to the larynx (43.7 vs. 46.7 Gy, p = 0.05) and IPC (39.1 vs. 46.1 Gy, p = 0.002). There was no significant difference in dose to the parotid or cord. Conclusion: Given the steep dose responses seen in studies examining the association between swallowing toxicity and dose to the larynx and IPC, dose reductions using the D-SCLV technique may be clinically significant.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

  17. The data this time will be the Motorcycle Acceleration Data: A data frame giving a series of measurements of head acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Donglin

    Cosines The data this time will be the Motorcycle Acceleration Data: A data frame giving a series of measurements of head acceleration in a simulated motorcycle accident, used to test crash helmets. Usage: data

  18. Effectiveness of robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy planning for head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Li Xiaoqiang; Park, Peter C.; Ronald Zhu, X.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li Yupeng [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Dong Lei [Scripps Proton Center, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to uncertainties in beam range and patient setup. Conventionally, these uncertainties are dealt using geometrically expanded planning target volume (PTV). In this paper, the authors evaluated a robust optimization method that deals with the uncertainties directly during the spot weight optimization to ensure clinical target volume (CTV) coverage without using PTV. The authors compared the two methods for a population of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients. Methods: Two sets of IMPT plans were generated for 14 H and N cases, one being PTV-based conventionally optimized and the other CTV-based robustly optimized. For the PTV-based conventionally optimized plans, the uncertainties are accounted for by expanding CTV to PTV via margins and delivering the prescribed dose to PTV. For the CTV-based robustly optimized plans, spot weight optimization was guided to reduce the discrepancy in doses under extreme setup and range uncertainties directly, while delivering the prescribed dose to CTV rather than PTV. For each of these plans, the authors calculated dose distributions under various uncertainty settings. The root-mean-square dose (RMSD) for each voxel was computed and the area under the RMSD-volume histogram curves (AUC) was used to relatively compare plan robustness. Data derived from the dose volume histogram in the worst-case and nominal doses were used to evaluate the plan optimality. Then the plan evaluation metrics were averaged over the 14 cases and were compared with two-sided paired t tests. Results: CTV-based robust optimization led to more robust (i.e., smaller AUCs) plans for both targets and organs. Under the worst-case scenario and the nominal scenario, CTV-based robustly optimized plans showed better target coverage (i.e., greater D{sub 95%}), improved dose homogeneity (i.e., smaller D{sub 5%}- D{sub 95%}), and lower or equivalent dose to organs at risk. Conclusions: CTV-based robust optimization provided significantly more robust dose distributions to targets and organs than PTV-based conventional optimization in H and N using IMPT. Eliminating the use of PTV and planning directly based on CTV provided better or equivalent normal tissue sparing.

  19. A Phase 1 Study of Everolimus + Weekly Cisplatin + Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Sherman, Eric; Ho, Alan L. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Rao, Shyam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Heguy, Adriana [Department of Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shen, Ronglai [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Korte, Susan; Lisa, Donna [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Haque, Sofia [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Katabi, Nora [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Elevated expression of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in histologically cancer-free margins of resected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and has been associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. Preclinically, inhibition of mTORC1 with everolimus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin and radiation. Methods and Materials: This was single-institution phase 1 study to establish the maximum tolerated dose of daily everolimus given with fixed dose cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2} weekly × 6) and concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locally and/or regionally advanced head-and-neck cancer. The study had a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Results: Tumor primary sites were oral cavity (4), salivary gland (4), oropharynx (2), nasopharynx (1), scalp (1), and neck node with occult primary (1). In 4 of 4 cases in which resected HNSCC surgical pathology specimens were available for immunohistochemistry, elevated expression of eIF4E was observed in the cancer-free margins. The most common grade ?3 treatment-related adverse event was lymphopenia (92%), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were mucositis (n=2) and failure to thrive (n=1). With a median follow up of 19.4 months, 2 patients have experienced recurrent disease. The maximum tolerated dose was everolimus 5 mg/day. Conclusions: Head-and-neck cancer patients tolerated everolimus at therapeutic doses (5 mg/day) given with weekly cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The regimen merits further evaluation, especially among patients who are status post resection of HNSCCs that harbor mTORC1-mediated activation of eIF4E in histologically negative surgical margins.

  20. The Residual Setup Errors of Different IGRT Alignment Procedures for Head and Neck IMRT and the Resulting Dosimetric Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graff, Pierre [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Alexis Vautrin Cancer Center, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Doctoral School BioSE (EA4360), Nancy (France); Kirby, Neil [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Josephine; Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Lambert, Louise [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Montreal University Centre, Montreal (Canada); Pouliot, Jean, E-mail: jpouliot@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess residual setup errors during head and neck radiation therapy and the resulting consequences for the delivered dose for various patient alignment procedures. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) scans from 11 head and neck patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy were used to assess setup errors. Each MVCBCT scan was registered to its reference planning kVCT, with seven different alignment procedures: automatic alignment and manual registration to 6 separate bony landmarks (sphenoid, left/right maxillary sinuses, mandible, cervical 1 [C1]-C2, and C7-thoracic 1 [T1] vertebrae). Shifts in the different alignments were compared with each other to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences. Then, the dose distribution was recalculated on 3 MVCBCT images per patient for every alignment procedure. The resulting dose-volume histograms for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared to those from the planning kVCTs. Results: The registration procedures produced statistically significant global differences in patient alignment and actual dose distribution, calling for a need for standardization of patient positioning. Vertically, the automatic, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses alignments mainly generated posterior shifts and resulted in mean increases in maximal dose to OARs of >3% of the planned dose. The suggested choice of C1-C2 as a reference landmark appears valid, combining both OAR sparing and target coverage. Assuming this choice, relevant margins to apply around volumes of interest at the time of planning to take into account for the relative mobility of other regions are discussed. Conclusions: Use of different alignment procedures for treating head and neck patients produced variations in patient setup and dose distribution. With concern for standardizing practice, C1-C2 reference alignment with relevant margins around planning volumes seems to be a valid option.

  1. Dosimetric Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Desmond, Renee A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bonner, James A., E-mail: jabonner@uabmc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia. Dosimetric predictors of objective findings of long-term dysphagia were sought. Methods and Materials: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy. Dosimetric parameters were analyzed relative to three objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube dependence at 12 months, aspiration on modified barium swallow, or pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Results: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V{sub 60}) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 60} greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 65} greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Conclusions: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors. The addition of these structures to intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization may reduce the incidence of dysphagia, although cautious clinical validation is necessary.

  2. Effect of Recombinant Human Deoxyribonuclease on Oropharyngeal Secretions in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancers Treated With Radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Wang, Edward [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sejpal, Samir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Agulnik, Mark [Section of Medical Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Amit [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Harris, Kirk [Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The current study examined the effect of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) on quality of life (QOL) measures, clinical improvement, and DNA content of thick oropharyngeal secretions (OPS) in patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with local-regional advanced H and N cancer receiving chemoradiationtherapy (CRT) were randomized to receive either placebo or rhDNase. Endpoints included MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Head and Neck (FACT-NH) scores, along with clinical assessment and DNA concentration of OPS. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in patients' QOL outcomes over the study period. Both groups showed an increase in symptom and interference scores, although patients in the rhDNase group showed a greater decline in both scores during the 3 months posttreatment. Similarly, both groups showed a decline in physical and functional well being but recovered in the 3 months posttreatment follow-up, with the rhDNase group exhibiting speedier recovery. Patients in the rhDNase group exhibited significant clinical improvement in OPS, blindly assessed by a physician, compared with the placebo group (67% vs 27%, respectively; P=.046). The rhDNase group showed no change in OPS-DNA concentration, although the placebo group showed a significant increase in DNA concentration during the drug trial (P=.045). There was no differences in acute toxicities between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our preliminary data suggest that rhDNase did not significantly improve study primary endpoints of QOL measures compared with the placebo group. However, there was a significant improvement in secondary endpoints of clinically assessed OPS and DNA concentration compared with placebo in H and N cancer patients treated with CRT. Further investigation in larger numbers of patients is warranted.

  3. The role of human and social capital in explaining the lack of female head coaches in women's intercollegiate sports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stumph, Kelly J

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    likely receiving lower salaries than males. vet the 1'cmales did not report less career satisfaction (Parks et al. , 1995). There are specific factors attributed to the disparity ol' 1'emale head soccer coaches. 'I'he intrinsic measure of career success... that this salary deficit is simply a result of vvomen earning lower salaries in an array of industries not just that of coaching. For instance, it was reported that in 1995, a full-time female communications manager earned $. 86 for every $1. 00 earned bv her...

  4. A study of the morphology and anatomy of a strain of seed producing great-headed garlic (Allium ampeloprasum L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuqua, Mack Charles

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    centers. Each of these centers gives rise to a group of flcwers ax'range4 in a spiral or helicoid cyme (21). This type of developsLent is similxxr to the inflorescence development found. in great headed gax'lic The first heLLsoid cyme develops opposite... the last foli? ags leaf axe. 1 and opposite the suture of She one or tyo bxaats that encloses the inflorescence. The apical flower of this helicoid cyme is the first to develop. Tha 'second cyme develops, approxximataly opposite the first one {Plate 2...

  5. First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

  6. Clinical Management of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Successes and Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vissink, Arjan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Grongingen (Netherlands); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Limesand, Kirsten H. [Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Jensen, Siri Beier [Department of Oral Medicine, Institute of Odontology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Fox, Philip C. [PC Fox Consulting, Spello (Italy); Elting, Linda S. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Reyland, Mary E., E-mail: Mary.Reyland@UCDenver.ed [Department of Craniofacial Biology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy.

  7. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka, during the 1998 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake and Salmon rivers. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam 19 1998 were marked with a fin-clip. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 226% of the 1997 number and 110% of the 1996 catch. The wild chinook catch was 120% of the 1997 catch but was only 93% of 1996. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 501% of 1997 numbers but only 90% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 569% of 1997 and 125% of the 1996 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 106 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998, for the first time, the Snake River trap captured a significant number of hatchery sockeye salmon (1,552) and hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch (166). Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 8 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 12. The trap was out of operation for 34 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 476% and wild chinook salmon catch was 137% of 1997 numbers and 175% and 82% of 1996 catch, respectively. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 96% of the 1997 catch and 13% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 170% of the 1997 catch and 37% of the 1996 numbers. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 1998 detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon there was a 2.0- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 thousands of cubic feet per second (kcfs). For hatchery steelhead trout there was a 2.6-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 1998 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon hatchery and found a 3.3- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. A significant relation between migration rate and discharge was not detected for hatchery steelhead trout. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT-tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam.

  8. 3-D printed Shelby Cobra highlights ORNL R&D at Detroit Auto...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and vehicle technologies including displays on energy absorption, composite tooling, printed power electronics and connected vehicles. For more info, visit http:...

  9. CASL-U-2015-0054-000 COBRA-TF Subchannel Thermal-Hydraulics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPa and tem- peratures up to 1073 K for specific enthalpy, specific volume, and specific heat capacity. Figure 8.1: IAPWS-IF97 Fluid Regions March 10, 2015 pg. 227 of 247...

  10. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    , and Pierre Baldi*, School of Information and Computer Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-3435, United States § Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 climate and visibility by interacting with solar radiation, atmospheric oxidants, and water vapor2

  11. Photo Gallery: 3D Printing Brings Classic Shelby Cobra to Life | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange VisitorsforDepartmentPOET-DSMCarbon CaptureDepartment

  12. 3-D printed Shelby Cobra highlights ORNL R&D at Detroit Auto Show |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGasand Video Clips

  13. Secretary Moniz Test Drives the 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNews PressThemesLinks for

  14. Just Plain Cool, the 3D Printed Shelby Cobra | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 | Department7January 2015JimJulieandJust Plain Cool, the 3D

  15. The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004 North Slope of Alaska

  16. The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on EnergyEnergy Secretary ChuAsWhatTheTedTestimony

  17. Secretary Moniz Tours the 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Ownedof Energy ThePrivacy Act System of Records NoticeofEnergyDepartmentThis

  18. Particle-in-cell simulation of the head-on collision between two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Xin; Xu, Yan-xia; Duan, Wen-shan, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Zhang, Ling-yu [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Lei, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The head-on collision of two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions has been studied by using the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method and one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. Then the phase lags of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) obtained from the two approaches have been compared and discussed. It has been found that: if the amplitudes of both the colliding IASWs are small enough, the phase lags obtained from PLK method are in good agreement with those obtained from PIC simulation. As the amplitudes of IASWs increase, the phase lags from PIC simulation become smaller than the analytical ones from PLK method. Besides, the PIC simulation shows the phase lag of an IASW involved in collision depends not only on the characteristics of the wave it collides with but also on itself, which disagrees with the prediction of the PLK method. Finally, the application scopes of the PLK method in studying both the single IASW and the head-on collisions of IASWs have been studied and discussed, and the latter turns out to be more strict.

  19. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  20. Reduced 30% scanning time 3D multiplexer integrated circuit applied to large array format 20KHZ frequency inkjet print heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, J -C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of the number and array density of nozzles within an inkjet head chip is one of the keys to raise the printing speed and printing resolutions. However, traditional 2D architecture of driving circuits can not meet the requirement for high scanning speed and low data accessing points when nozzle numbers greater than 1000. This paper proposes a novel architecture of high-selection-speed three-dimensional data registration for inkjet applications. With the configuration of three-dimensional data registration, the number of data accessing points as well as the scanning lines can be greatly reduced for large array inkjet printheads with nozzles numbering more than 1000. This IC (Integrated Circuit) architecture involves three-dimensional multiplexing with the provision of a gating transistor for each ink firing resistor, where ink firing resistors are triggered only by the selection of their associated gating transistors. Three signals: selection (S), address (A), and power supply (P), are employed toge...

  1. Theoretical study of head-on collision of dust acoustic solitary waves in a strongly coupled complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, S., E-mail: surabhi@ipr.res.in; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of two counter propagating dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) undergoing a head-on collision, in the presence of strong coupling between micron sized charged dust particles in a complex plasma. A coupled set of nonlinear dynamical equations describing the evolution of the two DASWs using the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation technique is derived. The nature and extent of post collision phase-shifts of these solitary waves are studied over a wide range of dusty plasma parameters in a strongly and a weakly coupled medium. We find a significant change in the nature and amount of phase delay in the strongly coupled regime as compared to a weakly coupled regime. The phase shift is seen to change its sign beyond a threshold value of compressibility of the medium for a given set of dusty plasma parameters.

  2. Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include J CIP category 3 description now reads: Natural resources and conservation J CIP category 5 description now reads: Area, ethnic, and gender studies J CIP category 16 description now reads

  3. Running Head: WHAT ARE LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 1 An Argument for Clarity: What are Learning Management Systems, What are They Not,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Running Head: WHAT ARE LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 1 An Argument for Clarity: What are Learning Management Systems, What are They Not, and What Should They Become? William R. Watson Indiana University. Indianapolis, IN 46234 Keywords: Course Management Systems, E-learning, Integrated Learning System, Learning

  4. The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes the calmodulin-binding protein in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes and abolish the ability of Hcm1p to act as a suppressor of calmodulin mutants. The promoter of SPC110 contains a match to the consensus binding site. Deletion of HCM1 does not affect the basal level of SPC110

  5. Evaluation of advanced turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. Part 3. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines for operating heads of 1000 to 1500 m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigo, A.A.; Pistner, C.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report in a series of three on studies of advanced hydraulic turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. All three reports address Francis-type, reversible pump/turbines. The first report covered single-stage regulated units; the second report covered two-stage regulated units; the present report covers multistage unregulated units. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines offer an economically attractive option for heads of 1000 to 1500 m. The feasibility of developing such machines for capacities up to 500 MW and operating heads up to 1500 m has been evaluated. Preliminary designs have been generated for six multistage pump/turbines. The designs are for nominal capacities of 350 and 500 MW and for operating heads of 1000, 1250, and 1500 m. Mechanical, hydraulic, and economic analyses indicate that these machines will behave according to the criteria used to design them and that they can be built at a reasonable cost with no unsolvable problems. Efficiencies of 85.8% and 88.5% in the generating and pumping modes, respectively, can be expected for the 500-MW, 1500-m unit. Performances of the other five machines are at least comparable, and usually better. Over a 1000 to 1500-m head range, specific $/kW costs of the pump/turbines in mid-1978 US dollars vary from 19.0 to 23.1 for the 500-MW machines, and from 21.0 to 24.1 for the 350-MW machines.

  6. 20 Years of Four HCI Conferences: A Visual Exploration 1 Running head: 20 YEARS OF FOUR HCI CONFERENCES: A VISUAL EXPLORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with the exploration process that produced them. Some expected patterns emerged, such as that -- like most social20 Years of Four HCI Conferences: A Visual Exploration 1 Running head: 20 YEARS OF FOUR HCI CONFERENCES: A VISUAL EXPLORATION 20 Years of Four HCI Conferences: A Visual Exploration Nathalie Henry INRIA

  7. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

  8. A Space Weather Information Service Based Upon Remote and In-Situ Measurements of Coronal Mass Ejections Heading for Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Birgit; Miles, Oscar; Rußwurm, Michael; Scully, Stephen; Roldán, Andrés; Hartkorn, Oliver; Jüstel, Peter; Réville, Victor; Lupu, Sorina; Ruffenach, Alexis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth's magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of interaction between the planet's magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past forty years with the intention of understanding and forecasting solar behavior. One of these phenomena in particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs), can significantly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. This publication presents a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field's orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather (SW) forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the aforementioned CM...

  9. Observational Study Designs for Comparative Effectiveness Research: An Alternative Approach to Close Evidence Gaps in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulart, Bernardo H.L., E-mail: bhg@uw.edu [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Division of Public Health Sciences, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research (HICOR), Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Ramsey, Scott D. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Division of Public Health Sciences, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research (HICOR), Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Parvathaneni, Upendra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has emerged as an approach to improve quality of care and patient outcomes while reducing healthcare costs by providing evidence to guide healthcare decisions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have represented the ideal study design to support treatment decisions in head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. In RCTs, formal chance (randomization) determines treatment allocation, which prevents selection bias from distorting the measure of treatment effects. Despite this advantage, only a minority of patients qualify for inclusion in H and N RCTs, which limits the validity of their results to the broader H and N cancer patient population seen in clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials often do not address other knowledge gaps in the management of H and N cancer, including treatment comparisons for rare types of H and N cancers, monitoring of rare or late toxicity events (eg, osteoradionecrosis), or in some instances an RCT is simply not feasible. Observational studies, or studies in which treatment allocation occurs independently of investigators' choice or randomization, may address several of these gaps in knowledge, thereby complementing the role of RCTs. This critical review discusses how observational CER studies complement RCTs in generating the evidence to inform healthcare decisions and improve the quality of care and outcomes of H and N cancer patients. Review topics include a balanced discussion about the strengths and limitations of both RCT and observational CER study designs; a brief description of design and analytic techniques to handle selection bias in observational studies; examples of observational studies that inform current clinical practices and management of H and N cancers; and suggestions for relevant CER questions that could be addressed by an observational study design.

  10. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Saito, Naoko [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Qureshi, Muhammad M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ozonoff, Al [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Romesser, Paul B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  11. Efficacy and Toxicity of Chemoradiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Unknown Primary of Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Haddad, Robert I. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Norris, Charles M. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Posner, Marshall R. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wirth, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: No single standard treatment paradigm is available for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (HNCUP). Bilateral neck radiotherapy with mucosal axis irradiation is widely used, with or without chemotherapy and/or surgical resection. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a highly conformal method for delivering radiation that is becoming the standard of care and might reduce the long-term treatment-related sequelae. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for HNCUP. Patients and Materials: A retrospective study of all patients treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for HNCUP with IMRT between August 2004 and January 2009. The primary endpoint was overall survival; the secondary endpoints were locoregional and distant control, and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: A total of 24 patients with HNCUP were included. Of these patients, 22 had Stage N2 disease or greater. All patients underwent neck computed tomography, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and examination under anesthesia with directed biopsies. Of the 24 patients, 22 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 7 (29%) also underwent induction chemotherapy. The median involved nodal dose was 70 Gy, and the median mucosal dose was 60 Gy. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the 2-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rate was 92% and 100%, respectively. Only 25% of the patients had Grade 2 xerostomia, although 11 patients (46%) required esophageal dilation for stricture. Conclusion: In a single-institution series, IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for HNCUP was associated with superb overall survival and locoregional control. The xerostomia rates were promising, but the aggressive therapy was associated with significant rates of esophageal stenosis.

  12. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 24, 2010 ... Markets, Inc., a firm he founded. Powell also is involved in ..... Edray has devoted much time and energy to working with underrepresented ...

  13. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the study was mentioned by Senator Susan Co llins, who co- chaired a .... Together with ... and scientific computation, including in particular the design and analysis of ... fluid dynamics, both nationally and internationally. ... theorems within the field, solving some very long-standing problems ... His project, “Stringy Structures.

  14. Heads and Tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, M.F.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    here assumed he was simply a collector of the unmentionable vice. Not quite enough to make him jump up, wave his badge and tell them it wasn?t that kind of photograph he?d been given. But definitely enough to make him spurn the first couple...

  15. Comparison of Four Cisplatin-Based Radiochemotherapy Regimens for Nonmetastatic Stage III/IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck;Head-and-neck cancer; Cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy; Toxicity; Treatment outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Kronemann, Stefanie; Meyners, Thekla; Bohlen, Guenther [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Tribius, Silke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Kazic, Nadja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Schroeder, Ursula [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Hakim, Samer G. [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AR (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes of four cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy regimens in 311 patients with Stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of three courses of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 (Group A, n = 74), two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 plus 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group B, n = 49), two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 plus 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group C, n = 102), or two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group D, n = 86). The groups were retrospectively compared for toxicity and outcomes, and 11 additional factors were evaluated for outcomes. Results: No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding radiation-related acute oral mucositis and radiation-related late toxicities. Acute Grade 3 skin toxicity was significantly more frequent in Group B than in the patients of the other three groups (p = .013). The chemotherapy-related Grade 3 nausea/vomiting rate was 24% for Group A, 8% for Group B, 9% for Group C, and 6% for Group D (p = .003). The corresponding Grade 3 nephrotoxicity rates were 8%, 1%, 2%, and 1% (p = .019). The corresponding Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity rates were 35%, 41%, 19%, and 21% (p = .027). Chemotherapy could be completed in 50%, 59%, 74%, and 83% of the Group A, B, C, and D patients, respectively (p = .002). Toxicity-related radiotherapy breaks occurred in 39%, 43%, 21%, and 15% of Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively (p = .005). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 67%, 72%, 60%, and 59% for Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively (p = .48). The corresponding 3-year metastasis-free survival rates were 67%, 74%, 63%, and 79% (p = .31), and the corresponding 3-year survival rates were 60%, 63%, 50%, and 71% (p = .056). On multivariate analysis, Karnofsky performance status, histologic grade, T/N category, preradiotherapy hemoglobin level, completion of chemotherapy, and radiotherapy breaks were associated with the outcome. Conclusion: The four compared radiochemotherapy regimens were not significantly different regarding treatment outcomes. Two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 were better tolerated than the other three regimens.

  16. FDG-PET Assessment of the Effect of Head and Neck Radiotherapy on Parotid Gland Glucose Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Michael C. [School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Turkington, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Higgins, Kristin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hawk, Thomas C. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M., E-mail: david.brizel@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Functional imaging with [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) provides the opportunity to define the physiology of the major salivary glands before and after radiation therapy. The goal of this retrospective study was to identify the radiation dose-response relationship of parotid gland glucose metabolism in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and Methods: Forty-nine adults with HNSCC were identified who had curative intent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and FDG-PET imaging before and after treatment. Using a graphical user interface, contours were delineated for the parotid glands on axial CT slices while all authors were blinded to paired PET slices. Average and maximal standard uptake values (SUV) were measured within these anatomic regions. Changes in SUV and volume after radiation therapy were correlated with parotid gland dose-volume histograms from IMRT plans. Results: The average parotid gland volume was 30.7 mL and contracted 3.9 {+-} 1.9% with every increase of 10 Gy in mean dose (p = 0.04). However, within the first 3 months after treatment, there was a uniform reduction of 16.5% {+-} 7.3% regardless of dose. The average SUV{sub mean} of the glands was 1.63 {+-} 0.48 pretreatment and declined by 5.2% {+-} 2.5% for every increase of 10 Gy in mean dose (p = 0.04). The average SUV{sub max} was 4.07 {+-} 2.85 pretreatment and decreased in a sigmoid manner with mean dose. A threshold of 32 Gy for mean dose existed, after which SUV{sub max} declined rapidly. Conclusion: Radiation dose responses of the parotid glands can be measured by integrated CT/FDG-PET scans. Retrospective analysis showed sigmoidal declines in the maximum metabolism but linear declines in the average metabolism of the glands with dose. Future studies should correlate this decline in FDG uptake with saliva production to improve treatment planning.

  17. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)] [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States)] [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy is Associated With Improved Global Quality of Life Among Long-term Survivors of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Vazquez, Esther G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the long-term quality of life among patients treated with and without intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: University of Washington Quality of Life instrument scores were reviewed for 155 patients previously treated with radiation therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. All patients were disease free and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Eighty-four patients (54%) were treated with IMRT. The remaining 71 patients (46%) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) by use of initial opposed lateral fields matched to a low anterior neck field. Results: The mean global quality of life scores were 67.5 and 80.1 for the IMRT patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively, compared with 55.4 and 57.0 for the 3D CRT patients, respectively (p < 0.001). At 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy, the proportion of patients who rated their global quality of life as 'very good' or 'outstanding' was 51% and 41% among patients treated by IMRT and 3DCRT, respectively (p = 0.11). At 2 years, the corresponding percentages increased to 73% and 49%, respectively (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis accounting for sex, age, radiation intent (definitive vs. postoperative), radiation dose, T stage, primary site, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and neck dissection, the use of IMRT was the only variable independently associated with improved quality of life (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The early quality of life improvements associated with IMRT not only are maintained but apparently become more magnified over time. These data provide powerful evidence attesting to the long-term benefits of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

  19. Accuracy of Computed Tomography for Predicting Pathologic Nodal Extracapsular Extension in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Undergoing Initial Surgical Resection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhu, Roshan S., E-mail: roshansprabhu@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Magliocca, Kelly R. [Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hanasoge, Sheela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Aiken, Ashley H.; Hudgins, Patricia A. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Susie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States); Eaton, Bree R.; Higgins, Kristin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Saba, Nabil F. [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Beitler, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Nodal extracapsular extension (ECE) in patients with head-and-neck cancer increases the loco-regional failure risk and is an indication for adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). To reduce the risk of requiring trimodality therapy, patients with head-and-neck cancer who are surgical candidates are often treated with definitive CRT when preoperative computed tomographic imaging suggests radiographic ECE. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of preoperative CT imaging for predicting pathologic nodal ECE (pECE). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 432 consecutive patients with oral cavity or locally advanced/nonfunctional laryngeal cancer who underwent preoperative CT imaging before initial surgical resection and neck dissection. Specimens with pECE had the extent of ECE graded on a scale from 1 to 4. Results: Radiographic ECE was documented in 46 patients (10.6%), and pECE was observed in 87 (20.1%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 43.7%, 97.7%, 82.6%, and 87.3%, respectively. The sensitivity of radiographic ECE increased from 18.8% for grade 1 to 2 ECE, to 52.9% for grade 3, and 72.2% for grade 4. Radiographic ECE criteria of adjacent structure invasion was a better predictor than irregular borders/fat stranding for pECE. Conclusions: Radiographic ECE has poor sensitivity, but excellent specificity for pECE in patients who undergo initial surgical resection. PPV and NPV are reasonable for clinical decision making. The performance of preoperative CT imaging increased as pECE grade increased. Patients with resectable head-and-neck cancer with radiographic ECE based on adjacent structure invasion are at high risk for high-grade pECE requiring adjuvant CRT when treated with initial surgery; definitive CRT as an alternative should be considered where appropriate.

  20. Locally Advanced Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Impact of Pre-Radiotherapy Hemoglobin Level and Interruptions During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Stoehr, Monika [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Kazic, Nadja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Sarajevo, Sarajevo(Bosnia and Herzegowina); Hakim, Samer G. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Walz, Annette [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Stage IV head and neck cancer patients carry a poor prognosis. Clear understanding of prognostic factors can help to optimize care for the individual patient. This study investigated 11 potential prognostic factors including pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level and interruptions during radiotherapy for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC) after radiochemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven factors were investigated in 153 patients receiving radiochemotherapy for Stage IV squamous cell head and neck cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor site, grading, T stage, N stage, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, surgery, chemotherapy type, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with KPS 90-100 (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.93; p = .012), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.53; p = .048), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.15-5.78; p = .021). Improved LC was significantly associated with lower T stage (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.16-4.63; p = .013), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.92-9.09; p < .001), surgery (RR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.28-5.88; p = .008), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.26-8.79; p = .015). Improved MFS was associated with KPS 90-100 (RR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.46-8.85; p = .012). Conclusions: Significant predictors for outcome in Stage IV head and neck cancer were performance status, stage, surgery, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. It appears important to avoid anemia and radiotherapy interruptions to achieve the best treatment results.

  1. Improved Survival in Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy as Primary Local Treatment Modality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@UCHSC.edu

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the overall and cause-specific survival in patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy (RT) as the primary local treatment modality. Methods and Materials: The survival of patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT was queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The effect of the year of treatment on overall and cause-specific survival was analyzed as a categorical and continuous variable. The patterns of care for these patients were also evaluated. Results: Between 1988 and 2004, 6,759 patients were identified. Survival was significantly improved in patients treated more recently. When analyzed as a continuous variable, each year was associated with a 3% and 4.1% reduction in the relative risk of overall and cause-specific mortality, respectively (p < 0.0001). Patients treated after 1998 had a 7.6% and 6.1% absolute improvement in overall and cause-specific survival, respectively, compared with patients treated before 1998 (overall survival, hazard ratio, 0.81; cause-specific survival, hazard ratio, 0.77; p < 0.0001). This benefit in survival was limited to tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. The use of RT increased among patients treated more recently. This shift in patterns of care was most pronounced for tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Conclusions: The overall and cause-specific survival of patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT has improved with time. The improvement is consistent with that observed in a large meta-analysis of randomized patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  2. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

  3. The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Margaret Lo

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the University of Central Florida, students have taken it upon themselves to create a culture of energy efficiency. Each year, different dorm buildings compete to see who can save the most. In 2009, the school saw a total savings of $27,000. As of March 2010, they've saved over $24,000 this year alone.

  4. Commissioning and Start Up of a 110 MegaWatt Cogeneration Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R.

    manufacturing facility constraints 4. Mechanical problems 5. Electrical problems 6. Control system/instrumentation problems The commissioning and start up had to be coordinated with existing Plant operations. As a result of the Project Team's efforts...

  5. Examples of MathML Stephen M. Watt and Xuehong Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, Stephen M.

    > ∫ mi> C mi> ⅆ mi> ? mi> = ∫ ∂ mi> C mi> mi> ? mi> 2. The law of quadratic reciprocity p q q

  6. A fully-integrated multi-watt permanent-magnet turbine generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Bernard Chih-Hsun, 1981-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy density available from batteries is increasingly becoming a limiting factor in the capabilities of portable electronics. As a result, there is a growing need for compact, high energy density sources. This thesis ...

  7. The LSST Camera 500 watt -130 degC Mixed Refrigerant Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, Gordon B.; Langton, Brian J.; /SLAC; Little, William A.; /MMR-Technologies, Mountain View, CA; Powers, Jacob R; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC; Spektor, Sam; /MMR-Technologies, Mountain View, CA

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSST Camera has a higher cryogenic heat load than previous CCD telescope cameras due to its large size (634 mm diameter focal plane, 3.2 Giga pixels) and its close coupled front-end electronics operating at low temperature inside the cryostat. Various refrigeration technologies are considered for this telescope/camera environment. MMR-Technology’s Mixed Refrigerant technology was chosen. A collaboration with that company was started in 2009. The system, based on a cluster of Joule-Thomson refrigerators running a special blend of mixed refrigerants is described. Both the advantages and problems of applying this technology to telescope camera refrigeration are discussed. Test results from a prototype refrigerator running in a realistic telescope configuration are reported. Current and future stages of the development program are described. (auth)

  8. The contested legitimacy of investment arbitration and the human rights ordeal By Horatia Muir Watt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    International Investment Protection and Human Rights, A. REINISCH & U. KRIEBAUM economy of international investment law and the way in which its arbitration; Marc Jacobs, "International Investment Agreements and Human Rights", INEF Research

  9. New SLED 3 system for Multi-mega Watt RF compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Chen; Tantawi, Sami

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact X band SLED is introduced for X band RF compressing application. This SLED compressor consists two major parts: a rectangular to circular waveguide converter and an overmoded spherical cavity. The RF compressor is designed to convert 50 magawatt X band RF power with pulse length 1.5 microseconds and deliver 200 megawatts with pulse length 106 nanoseconds to the X band accelerating structure.

  10. AVTA: GE Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: GE Smart Grid Capable AC Level 2 Testing Results AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge...

  11. 0.6 cu. ft. (17 litre) capacity microwave 700 watts of cooking power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotze, Heike K.

    . Installation/yearly maintenance not included. Danby ENERGY STAR Mini Fridge (DCR88WDD) Danby Microwave (DMW608W

  12. EWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    resource assessments, to calculate loads and wakes as well as for reliable short-term wind power forecasts. Nevertheless, the numerical analysis of the marine wind field above the North Sea from the German Weather turbulence intensities. This feature influences the whole structure of the marine wind field, which

  13. Heriot-Watt University Dubai Campus Student Medical Insurance Plan September 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    & emergency treatment Extended worldwide includes USA & Canada Third party administrator Next care Annual per year Network Network 2 Basis of claims settlement Within UAE within Network 100% on direct settlement basis Within UAE Outside Network 80% reimbursement subject to reasonable and customary tariffs

  14. Watts nickel and rinse water recovery via an advanced reverse osmosis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, C.; White, I.E.; Ludwig, R.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the results of an eight month test program conducted at the Hewlett Packard Printed Circuit Board Production Plant, Sunnyvale, CA (H.P.) to assess the effectiveness of an advanced reverse osmosis system (AROS). The AROS unit, manufactured by Water Technologies, Inc. (WTI) of Minneapolis, MN, incorporates membrane materials and system components designed to treat metal plating rinse water and produce two product streams; (1) a concentrated metal solution suitable for the plating bath, and (2) rinse water suitable for reuse as final rinse. Waste water discharge can be virtually eliminated and significant reductions realized in the need for new plating bath solution and rinse water.

  15. Michael J. Watts Winner, Netting Award, Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batterbury, Simon

    social and historical explanation for food insecurity and famines in Africa and, with Amartya Sen's work

  16. Watts2Share: Energy-Aware Traffic Consolidation Ekhiotz Jon Vergara, Simin Nadjm-Tehrani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Computer and Information Science Link¨oping University, Sweden {ekhiotz.vergara, siminFi; SoftAP; I. INTRODUCTION With the advent of computationally powerful handsets we are finally entering by the WiFi access points. The growing wave of mobile data communication has two extreme consequences: (1

  17. TKN -Telecommunication Networks Group -Prof. Wolisz The miniWatt Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    (ad hoc) multi-hop communication principles to reduce transmission power as a means to reduce electro of data to the receiver, using all available relay nodes. For all transmissions, a modulation type is fixed. The transmission power between any two nodes is set such that (for the given modulation

  18. Less Watts, More Performance: An Intelligent Storage Engine for Data Appliances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teubner, Jens

    how Ibex reduces data movement, CPU usage, and overall energy consumption in database appliances­27, 2013, New York, New York, USA. Copyright 2013 ACM 978-1-4503-2037-5/13/06 ...$10.00. MySQL Server M y- proves performance and also reduces energy consumption. Query processing in relational databases may

  19. Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial...

  20. The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Castro, Chris; Lo, Margaret; Norvell, David; Coelho, Keith; Hitt, John

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    At the University of Central Florida, students have taken it upon themselves to create a culture of energy efficiency. Each year, different dorm buildings compete to see who can save the most. In 2009, the school saw a total savings of $27,000. As of March 2010, they've saved over $24,000 this year alone. Hear more stories about energy efficiency and renewable energy at Energy Empowers: http://www.eereblogs.energy.gov/energyempowers/page/Home-Page.aspx

  1. WATTS TOWERS: THE EFFECTS OF THERMAL CYCLES ON THE FORMATION AND BEHAVIOR OF CRACKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Matthew T

    2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of cracks in Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) and Grout has become a problem of rising concern in a country with an aging infrastructure. A detailed understanding of the causes as well as the behavior of these cracks is vital...

  2. Supporting our students to get ahead in business... Heriot-Watt University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    are very busy people, so to make the relationship work, you need to devote the necessary time and energy had learned over the years." "It has improved my objective-setting, counselling and facilitating

  3. AVTA: GE Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated6-05.pdfATTENDEEES: Ashley Armstrong,ofDepartment of

  4. DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt R20

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:DepartmentaEnergy

  5. Using Complete Machine Simulation for Software Power Estimation: The SoftWatt Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    and thermal packaging for cooling the components goes up significantly [3, 33]. Cooling systems need]. At the circuit level, several techniques such as clock gating, supply voltage scaling and supply voltage gating

  6. Is the hourly data from the NREL PV Watts program adjusted for daylight

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climate compatibleInformation off grid energyIreland:savings

  7. Is the hourly data I get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted for daylight

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview OfIowa/Incentives < Iowa JumpIran:savings

  8. Final Technical Report: CO{sub 2} Budget and Rectification Airborne Study -- North America (COBRA--NA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wofsy, Steven C

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the concentrations of CO{sub 2}, CO, and other gases were carried out using small aircraft platforms, spanning northern North America, with missions in 1999, 2000, 2003 and 2004. The measurements provided the first large-scale, fine-grained observations of the spatial and temporal structure of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. A new data analysis framework was developed to utilize these novel data, providing regional scale determinations of net carbon balance.

  9. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece); Medical Diagnostic Center 'Ayios Therissos,' P.O. Box 28405, Nicosia 2033, Cyprus and Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Panepistimioupolis, Dragana 68100, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Heraklion 71110, Crete (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of signal-to-noise ratio mainly to the peripheral region of the phantom. Conclusions: Despite typical peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain, and RBM from the standard low-dose brain perfusion 256-slice CT protocol are well below the corresponding thresholds for the induction of erythema, cataract, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively, every effort should be made toward optimization of the procedure and minimization of dose received by these tissues. The current study provides evidence that the use of the narrower bowtie filter available may considerably reduce peak absorbed dose to all above radiosensitive tissues with minimal deterioration in image quality. Considerable reduction in peak eye-lens dose may also be achieved by positioning patient head center a few centimeters above isocenter during the exposure.

  10. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake kinetics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A PET imaging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dan, E-mail: dan.liu@oncology.ox.ac.uk; Fenwick, John D. [Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Chalkidou, Anastasia; Landau, David B.; Marsden, Paul K. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, King's College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, King's College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the kinetics of 3{sup ?}-deoxy-3{sup ?}-[F-18]-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) uptake by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and involved nodes imaged using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Two- and three-tissue compartment models were fitted to 12 tumor time-activity-curves (TACs) obtained for 6 structures (tumors or involved nodes) imaged in ten dynamic PET studies of 1 h duration, carried out for five patients. The ability of the models to describe the data was assessed using a runs test, the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and leave-one-out cross-validation. To generate parametric maps the models were also fitted to TACs of individual voxels. Correlations between maps of different parameters were characterized using Pearson'sr coefficient; in particular the phosphorylation rate-constants k{sub 3-2tiss} and k{sub 5} of the two- and three-tissue models were studied alongside the flux parameters K{sub FLT-2tiss} and K{sub FLT} of these models, and standardized uptake values (SUV). A methodology based on expectation-maximization clustering and the Bayesian information criterion (“EM-BIC clustering”) was used to distil the information from noisy parametric images. Results: Fits of two-tissue models 2C3K and 2C4K and three-tissue models 3C5K and 3C6K comprising three, four, five, and six rate-constants, respectively, pass the runs test for 4, 8, 10, and 11 of 12 tumor TACs. The three-tissue models have lower AIC and cross-validation scores for nine of the 12 tumors. Overall the 3C6K model has the lowest AIC and cross-validation scores and its fitted parameter values are of the same orders of magnitude as literature estimates. Maps ofK{sub FLT} and K{sub FLT-2tiss} are strongly correlated (r = 0.85) and also correlate closely with SUV maps (r = 0.72 for K{sub FLT-2tiss}, 0.64 for K{sub FLT}). Phosphorylation rate-constant maps are moderately correlated with flux maps (r = 0.48 for k{sub 3-2tiss} vs K{sub FLT-2tiss} and r = 0.68 for k{sub 5} vs K{sub FLT}); however, neither phosphorylation rate-constant correlates significantly with SUV. EM-BIC clustering reduces the parametric maps to a small number of levels—on average 5.8, 3.5, 3.4, and 1.4 for K{sub FLT-2tiss}, K{sub FLT}, k{sub 3-2tiss}, and k{sub 5.} This large simplification is potentially useful for radiotherapy dose-painting, but demonstrates the high noise in some maps. Statistical simulations show that voxel level noise degrades TACs generated from the 3C6K model sufficiently that the average AIC score, parameter bias, and total uncertainty of 2C4K model fits are similar to those of 3C6K fits, whereas at the whole tumor level the scores are lower for 3C6K fits. Conclusions: For the patients studied here, whole tumor FLT uptake time-courses are represented better overall by a three-tissue than by a two-tissue model. EM-BIC clustering simplifies noisy parametric maps, providing the best description of the underlying information they contain and is potentially useful for radiotherapy dose-painting. However, the clustering highlights the large degree of noise present in maps of the phosphorylation rate-constantsk{sub 5} and k{sub 3-2tiss}, which are conceptually tightly linked to cellular proliferation. Methods must be found to make these maps more robust—either by constraining other model parameters or modifying dynamic imaging protocols.

  11. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1, Examination of Fish at Lookingglass Hatchery in 1996 : Addendum to Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groberg, Warren J.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This information is an addendum to the report 'Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids, Phase 1: Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996' by Ralph Elston because there may be relevant observations included here. The author of this document participated in the examinations at Lower Granite Dam described in that report. Because of Endangered Species Act issues, the Rapid River stock of spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery on the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon are annually being captured as returning adults at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and trucked to Lookingglass. During the peak migration period they are held in an adult holding facility at Lower Granite for as long as 72 hours and then transported by truck to Lookingglass for holding in an adult pond for spawning. In 1996 a total of 572 adults were transported from Lower Granite Dam between May 3 and August 6. Two-hundred eighty-one of these were later transported from Lookingglass to Wallowa Hatchery for artificial spawning and the remaining 291 were held for spawning at Lookingglass. On May 21, 24, 30 and June 2, 1996 hatchery personnel identified a total of 32 off-loaded fish with lesions on the dorsal area of the head they described as having the appearance of blisters (Robert Lund personal communication). By date these are shown in Table 1 (fish with similar lesions were also observed on May 27 but the number of these was not recorded). Such lesions were not observed on fish offloaded on any other dates. On May 24, 1996 hatchery personnel took photographs of fish with these lesions but do to light-meter problems the photographs did not turn out. On June 28, 1996 personnel of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Fish Pathology laboratory in La Grande were notified by James Lauman, ODFW Northeast Region supervisor, of discussions and concerns of head burn on returning adult chinook while he was on a visitation to Lower Granite Dam. That led to subsequent investigations at Lower Granite Dam (Ralph Elston 1996) and Lookingglass Hatchery. The results of the Lookingglass investigations are reported here.

  12. Archived Departmental Assessment Plans Note: These pre-date the Program Assessment Plans started in 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    and Theater Arts X X AA Music X X AA School of Film and Photography X AG Agricultural Economics and Economics X X AG Agricultural Education X AG Animal and Range Sciences X AG Land Resources and Environmental-2009 Department: Agricultural Economics & Economics Department Head: Wendy Stock & Myles Watts Assessment

  13. Treatment Planning Constraints to Avoid Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: An Independent Test of QUANTEC Criteria Using a Prospectively Collected Dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moiseenko, Vitali, E-mail: vmoiseenko@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hovan, Allan [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Saleh, Ziad; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Harrow, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Rabuka, Carman; Muggli, Adam [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Thompson, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The severe reduction of salivary function (xerostomia) is a common complication after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Consequently, guidelines to ensure adequate function based on parotid gland tolerance dose-volume parameters have been suggested by the QUANTEC group and by Ortholan et al. We perform a validation test of these guidelines against a prospectively collected dataset and compared with a previously published dataset. Methods and Materials: Whole-mouth stimulated salivary flow data from 66 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) were measured, and treatment planning data were abstracted. Flow measurements were collected from 50 patients at 3 months, and 60 patients at 12-month follow-up. Previously published data from a second institution, Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), were used for comparison. A logistic model was used to describe the incidence of Grade 4 xerostomia as a function of the mean dose of the spared parotid gland. The rate of correctly predicting the lack of xerostomia (negative predictive value [NPV]) was computed for both the QUANTEC constraints and Ortholan et al. recommendation to constrain the total volume of both glands receiving more than 40 Gy to less than 33%. Results: Both datasets showed a rate of xerostomia of less than 20% when the mean dose to the least-irradiated parotid gland is kept to less than 20 Gy. Logistic model parameters for the incidence of xerostomia at 12 months after therapy, based on the least-irradiated gland, were D{sub 50} = 32.4 Gy and and {gamma} = 0.97. NPVs for QUANTEC guideline were 94% (BCCA data), and 90% (WUSTL data). For Ortholan et al. guideline NPVs were 85% (BCCA) and 86% (WUSTL). Conclusion: These data confirm that the QUANTEC guideline effectively avoids xerostomia, and this is somewhat more effective than constraints on the volume receiving more than 40 Gy.

  14. The Impact of Individual In Vivo Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks on Oral Mucositis in Adjuvant Radiotherapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen, E-mail: rajfle@uks.eu [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Kuehne, Martin; Seegmueller, Katharina; Derschang, Sarah; Melchior, Patrick [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology und Medical Informatics (IMBEI), Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Fricke, Andreas; Ruebe, Claudia E.; Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of individual in vivo DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair capacity on the incidence of severe oral mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Patients and Methods: Thirty-one patients with resected head-and-neck cancer undergoing adjuvant RT or RCT were examined. Patients underwent RT of the primary tumor site and locoregional lymph nodes with a total dose of 60-66 Gy (single dose 2 Gy, five fractions per week). Chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. To assess DSB repair, {gamma}-H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes were quantified before and 0.5 h, 2.5 h, 5 h, and 24 h after in vivo radiation exposure (the first fraction of RT). World Health Organization scores for oral mucositis were documented weekly and correlated with DSB repair. Results: Sixteen patients received RT alone; 15 patients received RCT. In patients who developed Grade {>=} 3 mucositis (n = 18) the amount of unrepaired DSBs 24 h after radiation exposure and DSB repair half-times did not differ significantly from patients with Grade {<=}2 mucositis (n = 13). Patients with a proportion of unrepaired DSBs after 24 h higher than the mean value + one standard deviation had an increased incidence of severe oral mucositis. Conclusions: Evaluation of in vivo DSB repair by determination of {gamma}-H2AX foci loss is feasible in clinical practice and allows identification of patients with impaired DSB repair. The incidence of oral mucositis is not closely correlated with DSB repair under the evaluated conditions.

  15. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Head-and-Neck Cancer: The Impact of Region of Interest Selection on the Intra- and Interpatient Variability of Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craciunescu, Oana I., E-mail: oana.craciunescu@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Yoo, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Cleland, Esi [GECAD Ghana Ltd., Acra (Ghana); Muradyan, Naira [iCAD Inc., Nashua, NH (United States); Carroll, Madeline D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); MacFall, James R.; Barboriak, Daniel P. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI-extracted parameters measure tumor microvascular physiology and are usually calculated from an intratumor region of interest (ROI). Optimal ROI delineation is not established. The valid clinical use of DCE-MRI requires that the variation for any given parameter measured within a tumor be less than that observed between tumors in different patients. This work evaluates the impact of tumor ROI selection on the assessment of intra- and interpatient variability. Method and Materials: Head and neck cancer patients received initial targeted therapy (TT) treatment with erlotinib and/or bevacizumab, followed by radiotherapy and concurrent cisplatin with synchronous TT. DCE-MRI data from Baseline and the end of the TT regimen (Lead-In) were analyzed to generate the vascular transfer function (K{sup trans}), the extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}), and the initial area under the concentration time curve (iAUC{sub 1min}). Four ROI sampling strategies were used: whole tumor or lymph node (Whole), the slice containing the most enhancing voxels (SliceMax), three slices centered in SliceMax (Partial), and the 5% most enhancing contiguous voxels within SliceMax (95Max). The average coefficient of variation (aCV) was calculated to establish intrapatient variability among ROI sets and interpatient variability for each ROI type. The average ratio between each intrapatient CV and the interpatient CV was calculated (aRCV). Results: Baseline primary/nodes aRCVs for different ROIs not including 95Max were, for all three MR parameters, in the range of 0.14-0.24, with Lead-In values between 0.09 and 0.2, meaning a low intrapatient vs. interpatient variation. For 95Max, intrapatient CVs approximated interpatient CVs, meaning similar data dispersion and higher aRCVs (0.6-1.27 for baseline) and 0.54-0.95 for Lead-In. Conclusion: Distinction between different patient's primary tumors and/or nodes cannot be made using 95Max ROIs. The other three strategies are viable and equivalent for using DCE-MRI to measure head and neck cancer physiology.

  16. Assessment of Interfraction Patient Setup for Head-and-Neck Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Multiple Computed Tomography-Based Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hu, Angie Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Lee, Steve P.; Lee, Percy; DeMarco, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Steinberg, Michael L.; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Various image guidance systems are commonly used in conjunction with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in head-and-neck cancer irradiation. The purpose of this study was to assess interfraction patient setup variations for 3 computed tomography (CT)-based on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities. Methods and Materials: A total of 3302 CT scans for 117 patients, including 53 patients receiving megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT), 29 receiving kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT), and 35 receiving megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVFBCT), were retrospectively analyzed. The daily variations in the mediolateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions were measured. The clinical target volume-to-planned target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins were calculated using 2.5? + 0.7 ?, where ? and ? were systematic and random positioning errors, respectively. Various patient characteristics for the MVCBCT group, including weight, weight loss, tumor location, and initial body mass index, were analyzed to determine their possible correlation with daily patient setup. Results: The average interfraction displacements (± standard deviation) in the ML, CC, and AP directions were 0.5 ± 1.5, ?0.3 ± 2.0, and 0.3 ± 1.7 mm (KVCBCT); 0.2 ± 1.9, ?0.2 ± 2.4, and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.0 ± 1.8, 0.5 ± 1.7, and 0.8 ± 3.0 mm (MVCBCT). The day-to-day random errors for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT were 1.4-1.6, 1.7, and 2.0-2.1 mm. The interobserver variations were 0.8, 1.1, and 0.7 mm (MVCBCT); 0.5, 0.4, and 0.8 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.5, 0.4, and 0.6 mm (KVCBCT) in the ML, CC, and AP directions, respectively. The maximal calculated uniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 5.6, 6.9, and 8.9 mm for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. For the evaluated patient characteristics, the calculated margins for different patient parameters appeared to differ; analysis of variance (ANOVA) and/or t test analysis found no statistically significant setup difference in any direction. Conclusions: Daily random setup errors and CTV-to-PTV margins for treatment of head-and-neck cancer were affected by imaging quality. Our data indicated that larger margins were associated with MVFBCT and MVCBCT, compared with smaller margins for KVCBCT. IGRT modalities with better image quality are encouraged in clinical practice.

  17. Analysis of Pretreatment FDG-PET SUV Parameters in Head-and-Neck Cancer: Tumor SUV{sub mean} Has Superior Prognostic Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Roach, Michael C.; Chino, Junzo; Yoo, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Turkington, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Graduate Program in Medical Physics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of different descriptive parameters in head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing pretreatment [F-18] fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Patients and Methods: Head-and-neck cancer patients who underwent FDG-PET before a course of curative intent radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. FDG-PET imaging parameters included maximum (SUV{sub max}), and mean (SUV{sub mean}) standard uptake values, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Tumors and lymph nodes were defined on co-registered axial computed tomography (CT) slices. SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} were measured within these anatomic regions. The relationships between pretreatment SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, and TLG for the primary site and lymph nodes were assessed using a univariate analysis for disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and compared via the log-rank method. SUV data were analyzed as continuous variables. Results: A total of 88 patients was assessed. Two-year OS, LRC, DMFS, and DFS for the entire cohort were 85%, 78%, 81%, and 70%, respectively. Median SUV{sub max} for the primary tumor and lymph nodes was 15.4 and 12.2, respectively. Median SUV{sub mean} for the primary tumor and lymph nodes was 7 and 5.2, respectively. Median TLG was 770. Increasing pretreatment SUV{sub mean} of the primary tumor was associated with decreased disease-free survival (p = 0.01). Neither SUV{sub max} in the primary tumor or lymph nodes nor TLG was prognostic for any of the clinical endpoints. Patients with pretreatment tumor SUV{sub mean} that exceeded the median value (7) of the cohort demonstrated inferior 2-year DFS relative to patients with SUV{sub mean} {<=} the median value of the cohort, 58% vs. 82%, respectively, p = 0.03. Conclusion: Increasing SUV{sub mean} in the primary tumor was associated with inferior DFS. Although not routinely reported, pretreatment SUV{sub mean} may be a useful prognostic FDG-PET parameter and should be further evaluated prospectively.

  18. Department Heads Meeting: July 15, 2010 1 Department Heads Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    . In concrete practical terms how can we improve here? ­ Conduct of operations: Series of small incidents

  19. DEPT HEAD CHECKLIST Updated Aug 2011 Page 1 DEPARTMENT HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    . G Unplug computers, printers, and all other electrical equipment (except freezers and refrigerators in the dumpster outside of the building and not in your office trashcan. I Turn down refrigerators and freezers). H Empty all refrigerators of food and other items that will spoil. Please dispose of these materials

  20. Department Heads Meeting: May 20, 2010 1 Department Heads Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    technology with broad application across OS ­ Low cost compact acceleration applications such as storage ring injectors, light source drivers, compact linacs for security, industry and medicine · Core capability in rf technology options beyond cold-rf for ILC ­ Pursue ALC warm x-band rf technologies of benefit to both HEP