Sample records for watt cobra head

  1. Cobra Judy II Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor, Jeffrey

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strategic community relies heavily on the Cobra Judy (CJ1) instrumentation to provide high-quality radar and telemetry data for ballistic missile system testing and development. The current CJ1 platform, USNS Observation ...

  2. Grupo Cobra | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A SUKHydrogen CompanyGroSolar formerlyCobra Jump

  3. The COBRA Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, J. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton. BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress of the COBRA neutrinoless double beta decay experiment is discussed. Potential backgrounds are described. Estimates on the contamination levels of 214Bi in the detectors have been made using previously acquired low background data. New crystals with a different passivation material show an improved background count rate of approximately one order of magnitude.

  4. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic Aerosols. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition...

  5. Forging Attacks on two Authenticated Encryptions COBRA and POET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forging Attacks on two Authenticated Encryptions COBRA and POET Mridul Nandi Indian Statistical COBRA [4], based on pseudorandom per- mutation (PRP) blockcipher, and POET [3], based on Almost XOR and a simple vari- ant of the original proposal of POET (due to a forging attack [13] on the original proposal

  6. GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD EHRINGHAUS BOSHAMER BASEBALL STADIUM

  7. COBRA/RELAP5; A merged version of the COBRA-TF and RELAP5/MOD3 codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.Y.; Jeong, J.J.; Kim, S.H. (Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Chang, S.H.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that the best-estimate thermal-hydraulic codes RELAP5/MOD3 and COBRA-TF were adopted to the Apollo DN 10000 workstation and subsequently merged. This was done to combine the excellent features of the two codes and thus product a code with much enhanced capability. The resulting code was named COBRA/RELAP5. This code has features in common with COBRA/TRAC or TRAC-PF1; three-dimensional reactor vessel and one-dimensional loop modeling capability. The merging of the two codes is focused on the hydrodynamic model and numerical solution schemes. In COBRA/RELAP5, the system pressure matrices of the two codes are merged and solved simultaneously. The merged COBRA/RELAP5 calculations are done in process-level parallel mode on the Apollo DN10000 computer with two central processing units.

  8. COBRA-WC: a version of COBRA for single-phase multiassembly thermal hydraulic transient analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Wheeler, C.L.; Prather, W.A.; Masterson, R.E.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide the user of the COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code a basic understanding of the code operation and capabilities. Included in this manual are the equations solved and the assumptions made in their derivations, a general description of the code capabilities, an explanation of the numerical algorithms used to solve the equations, and input instructions for using the code. Also, the auxiliary programs GEOM and SPECSET are described and input instructions for each are given. Input for COBRA-WC sample problems and the corresponding output are given in the appendices. The COBRA-WC code has been developed from the COBRA-IV-I code to analyze liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) assembly transients. It was specifically developed to analyze a core flow coastdown to natural circulation cooling.

  9. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  10. 3D Cobra, Renewable Energy, and Green Button at the National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3D Cobra, Renewable Energy, and Green Button at the National Maker Faire 3D Cobra, Renewable Energy, and Green Button at the National Maker Faire June 12, 2015 - 9:15am Addthis The...

  11. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * TEG thermal and electrical interfaces modified to withstand high temperature environment 8 5 August, 2009 Deer 2009 9 100 Watt High Temperature TEG 100 Watt High...

  12. Watt Does It Cost To Use It?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. WATT DOES IT COST TO USE IT? By Mark Ziesmer, Sultana High School Hesperia Unified...

  13. WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

  14. COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briand, Lionel C.

    COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment approaches (referred to as COBRA, COst estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment). We find through a case accurate and reliable cost estimates to allocate and control project resources, and to make realistic bids

  15. Cobra Instalaciones y Servicios S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoated Conductors Cylinder Ltd Jump to:Cobra

  16. CASL-U-2015-0167-000 COBRA-TF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o .7-0007-000 COBRA-TF

  17. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugSameWatts Bar Nuclear

  18. Watts, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,AreaWatson, New York: EnergyWattnerWatts,

  19. Shanghai Solar Watt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScottsOklahoma:SevinShamil AyntraziLTDHuiyangSTSobanWatt

  20. PlotWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratini Energia S APlataformaTexas:PlotWatt Jump to:

  1. MegaWatt Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy ResourcesMegaWatt Solar

  2. The Watt Stopper Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformationPolicyREDD+ Book JumpTimken CompanyThe Watt

  3. AstroWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrimArkansasAshford,AsotinAston Solar LLC JumpAstroWatt Jump

  4. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    performance TEG thermal and electrical interfaces modified to withstand high temperature environment Development of a 100 watt High Temperature TE Generator DEER 2008 11 Prototype...

  5. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program...

  6. Reactor core thermal-hydraulic analysis ; improvement and application of the code COBRA-IIICMIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loomis, James N.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several improvements have been made to COBRA-IIIC/MIT. All of the improvements, except for one, have been made in response to the recommendations of past research. The improvements are included in a new version of the code ...

  7. Secretary Moniz Tours the 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of the Shelby Cobra 500 pounds of printed parts were produced in 24 hours The BAAM 3D printing system used less than half the amount of energy, or 1,700 Btu per pound of parts,...

  8. COBRA-SFS modifications and cask model optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rector, D.R.; Michener, T.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent-fuel storage systems are complex systems and developing a computational model for one can be a difficult task. The COBRA-SFS computer code provides many capabilities for modeling the details of these systems, but these capabilities can also allow users to specify a more complex model than necessary. This report provides important guidance to users that dramatically reduces the size of the model while maintaining the accuracy of the calculation. A series of model optimization studies was performed, based on the TN-24P spent-fuel storage cask, to determine the optimal model geometry. Expanded modeling capabilities of the code are also described. These include adding fluid shear stress terms and a detailed plenum model. The mathematical models for each code modification are described, along with the associated verification results. 22 refs., 107 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Solid state watt-hour meter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, J.R.; Gilker, C.S.

    1984-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A watt-hour meter is disclosed which includes: a microprocessor coupled to a solid-state Hall-Effect sensor; an electrically alterable ROM coupled to the microprocessor; a power supply; a power outage timing means using the discharge characteristic of a capacitor; apparatus for supplying a 60 Hz clock signal to the microprocessor; a readout device coupled to the microprocessor to provide an indication of the power consumed; an output on the microprocessor for controlling a circuit breaker; and a switch for overriding the microprocessor controlled circuit breaker. The microprocessor and the electrically alterable ROM are connected and programmed: to sense the time of day as determined from an initial time of day and setting the 60 Hz clock signal; to sense and compute the power used by the consumer; to automatically open the circuit breaker when power demand on the electric power source is high and/or the cost per kilowatt hour is high; to automatically close the circuit breaker when the power demand on the source of electric power is low and/or the cost per kilowatt power is low; and to allow a consumer to override the microprocessor's control of the circuit breaker.

  10. Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative- SunWatts Rebate Program (Arizona)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative is providing rebates to for the purchase of renewable energy systems through its SunWatts program. Photovoltaic (PV) and wind energy systems 10 kilowatts (kW) or...

  11. Trico Electric Cooperative- SunWatts Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the SunWatts Program, Trico Electric Cooperative offers residential and business customers a rebate for installing photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heaters. The up-front rebate for...

  12. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Aerosols David R. Fooshee,, Tran B. Nguyen,, Sergey A. Nizkorodov,*, Julia Laskin, Alexander Laskin aerosols (OA) represent a significant fraction of airborne particulate matter and can impact climate insignificant. COBRA is not limited to atmospheric aerosol chemistry; it should be applicable to the prediction

  13. Stray capacitances in the watt balance operation: electrostatic forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quagliotti, Danilo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a watt balance, stray capacitances exist between the coil and the magnet. Since the electric current flowing in the coil originates a difference between the coil and magnet electric-potentials, their electrostatic interactions must be taken into account. This paper reports the results of a finite element analysis of the forces acting on the coil.

  14. A Practical Approach to Dynamic Load Balancing Jerrell Watts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transfer Vector Calculation ¢ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ £ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ £ ¢ ¤ £ ¢ 8 2.3.1 Heat DiffusionA Practical Approach to Dynamic Load Balancing Jerrell Watts Scalable Concurrent Programming versions of the node adaption and movement routines which were used by the load balancing code; he also

  15. Development of an in vitro model for migration inhibitory factor utilizing a component of cobra venom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmack, Lee James

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solution (Linbro Chemical Co. , Inc. , New Haven, Conn. ), rinsed and soaked for 24 hours in deionized water, and sterilized by autocl aving. Capillary tubes were rinsed in distilled water to remove any residue and sterilized in a hot air oven at 160 C... tro model for the elusive MIF. Whole cobra venom (CV) was separated into its component fractions by ion exchange chromatography on an anion exchange resin. Each fraction was analyzed for protein content and subjected to an in vitro test...

  16. White LED Benchmark of 65 Lumens Per Watt Achieved

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel chip design and the balance of multiple interrelated design parameters have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with efficacies greater than 65 lumens per watt at 350 mA. The results are particularly significant because they were achieved with a pre-production prototype chip using the same package used in Cree's commercially available XLamp 7090 high power LED, rather than a laboratory device.

  17. Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM to 2:05PM PDT PacificFutureKick-OffKill-a-Watt

  18. WATT Production of Solar Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph Home Wzeng'sVortex Energy JumpWATT Production

  19. STATE OF CALIFORNIA HSPP/PSPP INSTALLATION; COOLING COIL AIRFLOW & FAN WATT DRAW TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA HSPP/PSPP INSTALLATION; COOLING COIL AIRFLOW & FAN WATT DRAW TEST CEC- CF-4R TESTING CF-4R-MECH-22 HSPP/PSPP Installation; Cooling Coil Airflow & Fan Watt Draw Test (Page 1 of 3) Site of a Static Pressure Probe (HSPP), and Permanently installed Static Pressure Probe (PSPP) in the supply plenum

  20. STATE OF CALIFORNIA HSPP/PSPP INSTALLATION; COOLING COIL AIRFLOW & FAN WATT DRAW TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA HSPP/PSPP INSTALLATION; COOLING COIL AIRFLOW & FAN WATT DRAW TEST CEC-CF-6R/PSPP Installation; Cooling Coil Airflow & Fan Watt Draw Test (Page 1 of 3) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit), and Permanently installed Static Pressure Probe (PSPP) in the supply plenum When the Certificate of Compliance (CF

  1. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

  2. Improvement of wave form of automatic watt regulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vick, John Edward

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & the load output resistor of Figure 5& in con]unction w1th other circuit components in the watt regulator. This circuit may be analyzed for overall gain a' s follows: Figurc 7 Rp Eo AEo Ia PZg = Ia(Ry+RL+Rp) + laRg AEo = IiR~ + Ia(Rg+Rf) (2) PZg... = VEs 8'(i~+Is)Ry AEo ( I&RL) A (3) By substituting equation 3 in equation l and equat1on g in equation 2& the following equations may be wrItten. ' 20- pEs Z. j( ~+1)Rk+RL+Bg + Zs( 1+g)Rk 0 = Zz(Rk-ARZ, ) + Za(Rk+Bf) (5) Row the gain A may...

  3. First measurements of the flux integral with the NIST-4 watt balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, D; Chao, L S; Cao, A; Sineriz, G; Pratt, J R; Newell, D B; Schlamminger, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 2014, construction of a new watt balance, named NIST-4, has started at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In a watt balance, the gravitational force of an unknown mass is compensated by an electromagnetic force produced by a coil in a magnet system. The electromagnetic force depends on the current in the coil and the magnetic flux integral. Most watt balances feature an additional calibration mode, referred to as velocity mode, which allows one to measure the magnetic flux integral to high precision. In this article we describe first measurements of the flux integral in the new watt balance. We introduce measurement and data analysis techniques to assess the quality of the measurements and the adverse effects of vibrations on the instrument.

  4. Is the hourly data I get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted for daylight savings time. Home I take the hourly AC output numbers and apply them to a program I built that assigns a dollar value to the...

  5. A guide to web content for Heriot-Watt University websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howie, Jim

    1 A guide to web content for Heriot-Watt University websites #12;2 Contents A guide to web content..........................................................................................................................3 Why is writing for the web different?..........................................................................................3 Planning your web content

  6. COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 1, Mathematical models and solution method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations: however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the method used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of these methods.

  7. Pulse-shape discrimination of surface events in CdZnTe detectors for the COBRA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Fritts; Jan Tebrgge; Jrgen Durst; Joachim Ebert; Claus Gling; Thomas Gpfert; Daniel Gehre; Caren Hagner; Nadine Heidrich; Michael Homann; Tobias Kttig; Till Neddermann; Christian Oldorf; Thomas Quante; Silke Rajek; Oscar Reinecke; Oliver Schulz; Jan Timm; Bjrn Wonsak; Kai Zuber

    2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Events near the cathode and anode surfaces of a coplanar grid CdZnTe detector are identifiable by means of the interaction depth information encoded in the signal amplitudes. However, the amplitudes cannot be used to identify events near the lateral surfaces. In this paper a method is described to identify lateral surface events by means of their pulse shapes. Such identification allows for discrimination of surface alpha particle interactions from more penetrating forms of radiation, which is particularly important for rare event searches. The effectiveness of the presented technique in suppressing backgrounds due to alpha contamination in the search for neutrinoless double beta decay with the COBRA experiment is demonstrated.

  8. Rigid Deployable Solar Array A.M. Watt and S. Pellegrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    with the design of low-cost rigid-panel deployable solar arrays with self- locking tape-spring hinges. The reportRigid Deployable Solar Array A.M. Watt and S. Pellegrino CUED/D-STRUCT/TR214 Department on the deployment of a solar array wing are evaluated experimentally. #12;#12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Layout

  9. University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis Phase I Interim Report Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any

  10. University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Hawai`i Watt Watcher: Energy Consumption Data Analysis Phase I Final Report Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither

  11. EWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    resource assessments, to calculate loads and wakes as well as for reliable short-term wind power forecastsEWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines Jens Tambke1 Durante5 , Jrg-Olaf Wolff6 1 ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, University

  12. Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Data Bank Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara December 2010 Keywords: Wind Wind speed Energy Capacity factor Electricity Chile a b s t r a c t Bearing has been remarkably influenced by new requirements e the search for new energy supply sources has

  13. Optimizing performance per watt on GPUs in High Performance Computing: temperature, frequency and voltage effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, D C; Barsdell, B R; Babich, R; Greenhill, L J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of the real-time digital signal processing challenge attached to large radio astronomical antenna arrays motivates use of high performance computing (HPC) systems. The need for high power efficiency (performance per watt) at remote observatory sites parallels that in HPC broadly, where efficiency is an emerging critical metric. We investigate how the performance per watt of graphics processing units (GPUs) is affected by temperature, core clock frequency and voltage. Our results highlight how the underlying physical processes that govern transistor operation affect power efficiency. In particular, we show experimentally that GPU power consumption grows non-linearly with both temperature and supply voltage, as predicted by physical transistor models. We show lowering GPU supply voltage and increasing clock frequency while maintaining a low die temperature increases the power efficiency of an NVIDIA K20 GPU by up to 37-48% over default settings when running xGPU, a compute-bound code used in radio...

  14. The distribution of the electric current in a watt-balance coil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasso, Carlo Paolo; Mana, Giovanni

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the watt balance experiment, separate measurements of the Lorentz and electromotive forces in a coil in a radial magnetic field enable a virtual comparison between mechanical and electric powers to be carried out, which lead to an accurate measurement of the Planck constant. This paper investigates the effect of a spatially inhomogeneous distribution of the electric current in the coil due to the higher or lower resistance of the outer or inner paths.

  15. Bottom head assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  16. Parametric design study of ``mini-generator`` with 6-watt heat source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, A.; Or, C.T. [Orbital Sciences Corporation, 20301 Century Blvd., Germantown, Maryland 20874 (United States)

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fairchild study showed that generator designs based on a single 1-watt RHU had very poor thermal efficiencies. At their optimum operating point, more than half of the generated heat was lost through the thermal insulation. This resulted in system efficiency of only 2.2%, compared to 7.2% for current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Moreover, there were serious doubts about the fabricability of the required multicouples, particularly of the series/parallel connections between the large number (900) of thermoelectric legs of very small cross-section (0.21 mm square). All in all, the preceding paper showed that neither JPL`s Power Stick design nor the Fairchild-generated derivatives based on the 1-watt heat source looked promising. The present paper describes a similar parametric study of a mini-generator based on a 6-watt heat source, and compares its performance and fabricability to that of the optimum Power Stick derivative and of the current RTG design for the same mission. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  17. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  18. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  19. Lumen Maintenance Testing of the Philips 60-Watt Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Hathaway, John E.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes testing conducted to evaluate the Philips' L Prize award winning 60-watt LED replacement product's ability to meet the lifetime/lumen maintenance requirement of the competition, which was: "having 70 percent of the lumen value under subparagraph (A) [producing a luminous flux greater than 900 lumens] exceeding 25,000 hours under typical conditions expected in residential use." A custom test apparatus was designed and constructed for this testing and a statistical approach was developed for use in evaluating the test results. This will be the only publicly available, third-party data set of long-term LED product operation.

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

  1. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  2. Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1 DOEEmissionLowell,2Watts Bar

  3. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    as well as the many weekly seminars and colloquia, continually ... from the Head ... Meyer Jerison) received the 2009 George David Birkhoff Prize. The prize is ..... Virginia Mashin Scholars ... Alan Legg, Mariana Smit Vega Garcia, Lloyd West.

  4. Field representation of a watt balance magnet by partial profile measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shisong; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Songling

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permanent magnets with high-permeability yokes have been widely used in watt balances for supplying a robust and strong magnetic field at the coil position. Subjected to the mechanical realization, only several $B_r(z)$ (radial magnetic field along the vertical direction) profiles can be measured by coils for field characterization. In this article, we present an algorithm that can construct the global magnetic field of the air gap based on $N(N\\geq1)$ additional measurements of $B_r(z)$ profiles. The proposed algorithm is realized by polynomially estimating the $B_z(r)$ function with analysis of basic relations between two magnetic components in air gap, i.e., $B_r(r,z)$ and $B_z(r,z)$, following the Maxwell's equations. The algorithm, verified by FEM simulations, can characterize the three-dimensional contribution of the magnetic field for a watt balance magnet with acceptable accuracy, which would supply basic field parameters for alignment and misalignment corrections.

  5. A FIVE-WATTS G-M/J-T REFRIGERATOR FOR LHE TARGET AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JIA,L.X.; WANG,L.; ADDESSI,L.; MIGLIONICO,G.; MARTIN,D.; LESKOWICZ,J.; MCNEILL,M.; YATAURO,B.; TALLERICO,T.

    2001-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A five-watts G-M/J-T refrigerator was built and installed for the high-energy physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. A liquid helium target of 8.25 liters was required for an experiment in the proton beam line at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of BNL. The large radiation heat load towards the target requires a five-watts refrigerator at 4.2 K to support a liquid helium flask of 0.2 meter in diameter and 0.3 meter in length which is made of Mylar film of 0.35 mm in thickness. The liquid helium flask is thermally exposed to the vacuum windows that are also made of 0.35 mm thickness Mylar film at room temperature. The refrigerator uses a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler for precooling the Joule-Thomson circuit that consists of five Linde-type heat exchangers. A mass flow rate of 0.8 {approx} 1.0 grams per second at 17.7 atm is applied to the refrigerator cold box. The two-phase helium flows between the liquid target and liquid/gas separator by means of thermosyphon. The paper presents the system design as well as the test results including the control of thermal oscillation.

  6. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

  7. The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to 2.5 microns.This Tungsten-Halogen Lamp Standard bears the ANSI designation of FEL might be discernible at the crossover point of the two referenced NIST Scales. 5000 FEL 1000Watt Lamp

  8. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, David L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Kantzos, Pete T. [Ohio Aerospace Institute, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  9. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  10. A watt-class 1-THz backward-wave oscillator based on sine waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Xiong; Wei Yanyu; Shen Fei; Yin Hairong; Xu Jin; Gong Yubin; Wang Wenxiang

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel backward wave oscillator was proposed by utilizing a concise sine waveguide slow-wave structure combined with sheet electron beam to operate at terahertz frequency band. First, the design method was described, and the dispersion curve and interaction impedance of the sine waveguide were calculated, then the device oscillation frequency and operating voltage were determined. Next, the circuit transmission losses were learned over the tunable frequency range. Finally, the particle-in-cell simulation method was applied to predict its signal generation performance. The investigation results show that, the backward wave oscillator can produce over 1.9 -W peak power output at the central operating frequency of 1-THz under 27-kV operating voltage and 5-mA beam current. And the interaction efficiency at 1-THz is more than 1.4% with a circuit length of 7.2-mm. It, therefore, will be considered as a promising watt-class terahertz radiation source.

  11. Introduction The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Introduction The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy use. When used with specialty fiber optic cables the MI-150 illuminator can also Illuminator from the carton and retain the manual and any additional documents. ! Remove the fiber optic cable

  12. Policy on the Moderation of Assessment: Approved by the Senate, 22 May 2013 Heriot-Watt University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    1 Policy on the Moderation of Assessment: Approved by the Senate, 22 May 2013 Heriot-Watt University Policy on the Moderation of Assessment With diversity in form of assessment across multi in all disciplines, across all Schools and in all modes or locations of study. The University Policy

  13. (K. Martin, Head) University Librarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    (Elisabeth Long, Assoc Univ Lib) Law (S. Lewis) Sciences (B. Kern & A. TwissBrooks) Hum, SocSci & Spec Coll. Larsen, Head) Stacks Management (D. Bottorff, Head) Special Projects Reference Instruction Outreach (J

  14. HEAD OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneralGuiding Documents and Links GuidingTank Farm6HEAD

  15. A nonlinearity in permanent-magnet systems used in watt balances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shisong; Pratt, Jon

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watt balances are used to measure the Planck constant and will be used in the future to realize mass at the kilogram level. They increasingly rely on permanent magnet systems to generate the magnetic flux. It has been known that the weighing current might effect the magnetization state of the permanent magnetic system used in these systems causing a systematic bias that can lead to an error in the result if not accounted for. In this article a simple model explaining the effect of the weighing current on the yoke of the magnet is developed. This model leads to a nonlinear dependence of the magnetic flux density in the gap that is proportional to the squared value of the coil current. The effect arises from changing the reluctance of the yoke by the additional field produced by the coil. Our analysis shows that the effect depends on the width of the air gap, the magnetic flux density in the air gap, and the $BH$ curve of the yoke material. Suggestions to reduce the nonlinear effect are discussed.

  16. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  17. Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts Casing Connection on 7" Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Watts

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This particular test required the application of a variety of loads including axial tension and compression, internal pressure (gas), external pressure (water), bending and both low and elevated temperature. These loads were used to determine the sealing and structural limits of the connection. The connection design tested had tapered threads with 10 threads per inch. A square thread form and a round thread form were tested. The square thread form had a 2{sup o} load flank and 15{sup o} stab flank. The round thread had a 0{sup o} load flank and 20{sup o} stab flank. Most of the testing was performed on the round thread form. Both a coupled connection design and an integral connection design were tested. The coupling was a pin by pin (male) thread, with the pipe having a box (female) thread. Both designs have outside and inside diameters that are flush with the pipe body. Both designs also contain a small external shoulder. The test procedure selected for this evaluation was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test was performed with four coupled samples and included most of these loads. Two integral samples were also included for limit load testing ISO makeup/breakout tests are divided into three types--initial makeup, IML1, repeated makeup within the same sample, MBL, and repeated makeup using several samples called round robin, RR. IMU and MBL were performed in this project. The ISO sealing and structural procedure is divided into four primary tests and identified as Series A, B, C and Limit Load (failure). Series A and B test to 95% actual yield of the pipe and Series C uses 90% of actual yield. Samples 1 and 3 were tested to Series A and the loads are shown in Figure 1. For these samples, the axial compression was limited to 75% pipe body yield, which was set by Mr. Watts at the beginning of the test. Samples 2 and 4 were tested to Series B with loads shown in Figure 2. This series included 20 degrees per 100 feet bending but no external pressure. Due to premature leaks, no samples were subjected to Series C which included mechanical and thermal cycles. Samples 5 and 6 were tested to failure. The project started with the selection and purchase of a popular size of oilfield pipe, which was 7-inch OD, 32 pound per foot, P-110 casing. While the connections were being threaded, material tensile tests were performed to get the actual strength of the 7-inch pipe. The first samples contained a square thread form. Excessive galling was experienced during the first series of makeup/breakout tests and Mr. Watts decided to change the thread form and remachine the samples. The second samples had a round thread form and performed very well in the makeup/breakout tests. Basically no galling occurred of any consequence. Samples 1 and 3 were to be tested with external water (ISO Series A) while samples 2 and 4 were to be tested with bending (ISO Series B, no external pressure). Testing of all four samples started with tension and internal gas pressure. During this initial pressure testing, samples 1, 3 and 4 developed leaks and the test was stopped before any external pressure or bending was applied. Sample 2 successfully tested to ISO Load Point 5 which included bending before developing a leak. Figure 3 shows the loads at which the samples leaked and the relative pipe body performance capability. Sample 1 and end A of sample 2 held a high pressure while samples 3, 4 and end B of sample 2 leaked at relatively low pressures. All of these leaks were with nitrogen gas pressure. After reviewing the results, it was believed that several conditions may have contributed to the prema

  18. Role Profile Head of School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Role Profile Head of School Purpose of the Role The Head of School is accountable for:- · The provision of academic leadership, developing and delivering School objectives for, in particular, teaching, · The effective governance and management of the School and all of its resources. Context of the Role

  19. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt. No. - 15-33-LNG Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt. No. - 15-33-LNG The Office of...

  20. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 2, Quality assurance/quality control summary report for arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.A.; Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study dffers from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L or 0.0015 to 0.003 {mu}g/L.

  1. Heater head for stirling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A. (R.D. #2, Box 101 E, North Troy, NY 12182)

    1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

  2. Task 5: TVA sediment-disturbing activities within the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of Task 5 of the Interagency Agreement No. DE-AI05-91OR22007 were to review: (1) the extent of dredging, construction, and other sediment-disturbing activities conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in potentially contaminated areas of Watts Bar Reservoir, and (2) the disposition of the materials from these activities. This memorandum is the final report for Task 5. This memorandum describes major activities in the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River that possibly resulted in significant disturbance of potentially contaminated sediments. TVA records from the construction of Watts Bar Dam, Kingston Fossil Plant, and Melton Hill Dam were reviewed to facilitate qualitative description of the effect of these activities in disturbing potentially contaminated sediments. The critical period for these activities in disturbing contaminated sediments was during or after 1956 when the peak releases of radioactive contaminants occurred from the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  3. Heater head for Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.A.; Emigh, S.G.

    1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a heater head for a Stirling engine comprising: a housing for enclosing the heater head with gas at a substantial elevated pressure; insulator means attached to the housing for insulating the heater head; inlet means attached to a regenerator in the housing for admission of relatively high pressure working fluid from the regenerator of a Stirling engine; a first annular heating wall in the housing attached to the inlet means for heating the working fluid; and, a second annular heating wall in the housing concentric with the first heating wall but of lesser diameters so that an annular space is formed between the first heating wall and the second heating wall for heating working fluid; and a third heating wall in the housing concentric with and smaller in diameter than the second heating wall forming the condensing area of a heat pipe between the second heating wall and the third heating wall.

  4. Preliminary systems-interaction results from the Digraph Matrix Analysis of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant safety-injection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacks, I.J.; Ashmore, B.C.; Champney, J.M.; Alesso, H.P.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides preliminary results generated by a Digraph Matrix Analysis (DMA) for a Systems Interaction analysis performed on the Safety Injection System of the Tennessee Valley Authority Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant. An overview of DMA is provided along with a brief description of the computer codes used in DMA.

  5. Unified Description of Bulk and Interface-Enhanced Spin Pumping S. M. Watts, J. Grollier,* C. H. van der Wal, and B. J. van Wees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Wal, Caspar H.

    Unified Description of Bulk and Interface-Enhanced Spin Pumping S. M. Watts, J. Grollier,* C. H in semiconductors or metals by rf magnetic field pumping. With a semiclassical model we show that a rotating applied dynamics of a ferromagnetic electrode into or out of which the spin currents flow. In spin-pumping devices

  6. POLICY ON STAFF USE OF WEB 2.0 TECHNOLOGIES Heriot-Watt University encourages staff to make appropriate use of Web 2.0 technologies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howie, Jim

    POLICY ON STAFF USE OF WEB 2.0 TECHNOLOGIES Summary Heriot-Watt University encourages staff to make appropriate use of Web 2.0 technologies in work and private life. In order to promote student and staff safety and reduce legal, operational, financial and reputational risk to the University, all staff who use Web 2

  7. 3866 JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 26, NO. 24, DECEMBER 15, 2008 Room-Temperature Stable Generation of 19 Watts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    sources possessing excellent beam quality with overall optical efficiencies well over 10%. However, high-damage Generation of 19 Watts of Single-Frequency 532-nm Radiation in a Periodically Poled Lithium Tantalate Crystal, IEEE, Fellow, OSA Abstract--We report on a system that produces 19 W of diffrac- tion-limited radiation

  8. Pressure testing of torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.; Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two vessels fabricated from SA516-70 steel with 6% knuckle radius torispherical heads were tested under internal pressure to failure. The D/t ratios of Vessel 1 and Vessel 2 were 238 and 185 respectively. The calculated maximum allowable working pressures of Vessel 1 and 2 heads using the ASME Section 8, Div. 1 rules and measured dimensions were 85 and 110 psi, respectively. Vessel 1 failed at a nozzle weld in the cylindrical shell at 700 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed at a theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse pressure of 241 and a calculated buckling pressure of 270 psi. Buckles were observed developing slowly after 600 psi pressure, and a total of 22 buckles were observed after the test, having the maximum amplitude of 0.15 inch. Vessel 2 failed at the edge of the longitudinal weld of the cylindrical shell at 1,080 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed up to the final pressure, which exceeded the theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse and calculated buckling pressures of 274 psi and 342 psi, respectively.

  9. Analyzing pulse from head motions in video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Guha

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract heart rate and beat lengths from videos by measuring subtle head oscillations that accompany the cardiac cycle. Our method tracks features on the head, temporally filters their trajectories and performs principal ...

  10. Reproductive effects assessment of largemouth bass and bluegill in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemela, S.L.; McCracken, M.K.; Ivey, L.J.; Greeley, M.S. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful reproduction is key to the survival and maintenance of viable fish populations and therefore an important consideration in ecological risk assessments. In order to evaluate the reproductive health of fish in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system downstream of the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge, TN, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) were collected from seven sites at the beginning of the spawning period and a suite of parameters indicative of reproductive condition were measured. Measures of reproductive condition common to male and female fish included gonadal somatic index (GSI), and plasma concentrations of reproductive hormones. Gender specific analyses included a histological examination of the testes in males and a quantitative evaluation of ovarian parameters in females including determinations of fecundity, the number of vitellogenic and atretic oocytes, and the incidences of ovarian parasites. Evidence of reproductive impairment in largemouth bass at the two sites immediately adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation included lower GSIs and reproductive hormone levels (males and females), and reduced fecundity and an increase in the number of atretic oocytes (females). Similar trends were not observed in bluegill sunfish. These findings suggest that reproduction in a top-level predatory fish species, the largemouth bass, may be negatively affected by activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  11. A summary of the Planck constant measurements using a watt balance with a superconducting solenoid at NIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlamminger, S; Haddad, D; Newell, D B; Seifert, F; Chao, L S; Liu, R; Williams, E R; Pratt, J R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have been using a watt balance, NIST-3, to measure the Planck constant $h$ for over ten years. Two recently published values disagree by more than one standard uncertainty. The motivation for the present manuscript is twofold. First, we correct the latest published number to take into account a recently discovered systematic error in mass dissemination at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Second, we provide guidance on how to combine the two numbers into one final result. In order to adequately reflect the discrepancy, we added an additional systematic uncertainty to the published uncertainty budgets. The final value of $h$ measured with NIST-3 is $h = 6.626\\,069\\,36(37)\\times 10^{-34}\\,\\mbox{J\\,s}$. This result is $77(57) \\times 10^{-9}$ fractionally higher than $h_{\\mathrm{90}}$. Each number in parentheses gives the value of the standard uncertainty in the last two digits of the respective value and $h_{\\mathrm{90}}$ is th...

  12. Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

  13. A review of "The Arts of 17th-Century Science: Representations of the Natural World in European and North American Culture." by Claire Jowitt and Diane Watt, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol K. Weaver

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Planetary Astronomy in the Development of the Western World, [1957] 260). Claire Jowitt and Diane Watt, eds. The Arts of 17 th -Century Science: Representations of the Natural World in European and North Ameri- can Culture. Aldershot, U.K.: Ashgate... sources of the early modern period overlapped and influenced each other. Editors Claire Jowitt and Diane Watt skillfully separated the volume into four major topics, did a fine job selecting essays that explored these subjects, and placed essays...

  14. HeadLock : wide-range head pose estimation for low resolution video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCamp, Philip (Philip James)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on data mining technologies to extract head pose information from low resolution video recordings. Head pose, as an approximation of gaze direction, is a key indicator of human behavior and interaction. ...

  15. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P.S.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplement No. 14 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation with additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 13 was issued, and matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 13 was issued.

  16. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC FE Docket No. 15-14-NG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, Bear Head LNG), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

  17. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt No. 15-14-NG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, Bear Head LNG), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

  18. Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors Poster presented at the 16th Directions in...

  19. acceleration head injury: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activity in the ADRIA project concerns the performance of numerical simulations of the brain response to human head loading during car Verhoeve Bovendeerd Wismans 2 Head injury...

  20. Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine Laboratory Demonstration of a New...

  1. Nanotechnology in Head and Neck Cancer: The Race Is On

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1007/s11912-010-0087-2 Nanotechnology in Head and Neckthe applications of nanotechnology in head and neck cancer,plasmonic gold nanotechnology. Keywords Nanotechnology .

  2. KU alumna to head Spencer Research Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    12/5/13 KU alumna to head Spencer Research Library www.lib.ku.edu/news/spencer_head_announced.shtml 1/2 The University of Kansas Libraries Libraries Home Articles & Databases Catalog: books & more E-journals Research by Subject Course Reserves... Library Pages A-Z Images KU ScholarWorks KU Digital Collections Hours My Account Request Articles, Books, Friends & Benefactors Suggestions University of Kansas alumna Beth M. Whittaker will become the next head of KUs Kenneth Spencer Research Library...

  3. Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elby, Andy

    Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES Epistemological resources University Maryland, College Park Trisha Kagey Montgomery County Public Schools #12;Epistemological resources are better understood as made up of finer-grained cognitive resources whose activation depends sensitively

  4. SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: Spatial transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: Spatial transformations Multiple Systems for Spatial Imagery: Transformations of Objects and Bodies Jeffrey M. Zacks* and Barbara Tversky * Washington COGNITION & COMPUTATION #12;SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 2 Abstract Problem-solving often requires imagining

  5. Vacuum compatible miniature CCD camera head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conder, Alan D. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera head which can replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating x-rays, such as within a target chamber where laser produced plasmas are studied. The camera head is small, capable of operating both in and out of a vacuum environment, and is versatile. The CCD camera head uses PC boards with an internal heat sink connected to the chassis for heat dissipation, which allows for close(0.04" for example) stacking of the PC boards. Integration of this CCD camera head into existing instrumentation provides a substantial enhancement of diagnostic capabilities for studying high energy density plasmas, for a variety of military industrial, and medical imaging applications.

  6. Head & base production optimization : setup time reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Haiqing

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Schlumberger, the make-to-order strategy and number of Head & Base product types (about 1000 types) requires a flexible manufacturing system in which the machine setup is frequent. However, the lengthy CNC machine setup ...

  7. Facilitating Forgiveness 1 Running head: FACILITATING FORGIVENESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Facilitating Forgiveness 1 Running head: FACILITATING FORGIVENESS FACILITATING FORGIVENESS. Infidelity causes significant damage for couples and results in a loss of trust and relationship stability undermine a relationship's stability and security, resulting in confusion, loss of trust, and tremendous

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P.S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), and Supplement No. 14 (December 1994) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

  9. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

  10. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  11. Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper Heads-up Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper 1 Heads-up Paper Training called "Training and Certification of Lock and Dam Operators." Interested individuals can send ideas of the Training and Certification program. Examples of what will be in those draft documents are as follows

  12. Most Workers Who Suffer Head Injuries- Were Not Wearing Head Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey by the U.S. Department of Labors Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of accidents and injuries noted that most workers who suffered impact injuries to the head were not wearing head protection. In addition, the same survey showed that the majority of workers were injured while performing their normal jobs at their regular worksites.

  13. Determination of the Planck constant using a watt balance with a superconducting magnet system at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlamminger, Stephan; Seifert, Frank; Chao, Leon S; Newell, David B; Liu, Ruimin; Steiner, Richard L; Pratt, Jon R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past two years, measurements have been performed with a watt balance at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to determine the Planck constant. A detailed analysis of these measurements and their uncertainties has led to the value $h=6.626\\,069\\,79(30)\\times 10^{-34}\\,$J$\\,$s. The relative standard uncertainty is $ 45\\times 10^{-9}$. This result is $141\\times 10^{-9}$ fractionally higher than $h_{90}$. Here $h_{90}$ is the conventional value of the Planck constant given by $h_{90}\\equiv 4 /( K_{\\mathrm{J-90}}^2R_{\\mathrm{K-90}})$, where $K_{\\mathrm{J-90}}$ and $R_{\\mathrm{K-90}}$ denote the conventional values of the Josephson and von Klitzing constants, respectively.

  14. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print header further includes a first layer comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  15. Use of Gold in Head and Neck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    Use of Gold in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments Q & A with Dr. Frank McCormick UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center Cancer Center Connection Frank McCormick, PhD, FRS, is the director of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center (HDFCCC) and is Associate Dean of the UCSF School

  16. Probability Primer 1 Running head: PROBABILITY PRIMER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuille, Alan L.

    provides the opportunity to draw upon work in computer science, engineering, mathematics, and statisticsProbability Primer 1 Running head: PROBABILITY PRIMER A Primer on Probabilistic Inference Thomas L. Griffiths Department of Psychology University of California, Berkeley Alan Yuille Department of Statistics

  17. VICE CHANCELLOR Signature of Head of School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    VICE CHANCELLOR Signature of Head of School Date (dd/mm/yy) Following is a report on the professional and consultative work of my School/section over the twelve months of (year) School/Section One. Yes No (Nil Return) Total number of staff within School/Section at year end who are eligible to engage

  18. Department Heads Meeting March15, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Department Heads Meeting March15, 2012 David B. MacFarlane #12;Science program news Update on LBNE » Significant advance in our understanding of the neutrino sector » Centerpiece of the national program » SLAC Neutrinos Science interest beyond neutrino properties » Colleagues from KIPAC Energy release from core

  19. Adherence to Head Computed Tomography Guidelines in the Setting of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Landon A; Morley, Eric J; Grant, William D; Wojcik, Susan M; Paolo, William F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adherence to Head Computed Tomography Guidelines for Mildal Adherence to Head Computed Tomography Guidelines system,non-contrast head computed tomography (CT) in patients with

  20. Gas cushion control of OVJP print head position

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An OVJP apparatus and method for applying organic vapor or other flowable material to a substrate using a printing head mechanism in which the print head spacing from the substrate is controllable using a cushion of air or other gas applied between the print head and substrate. The print head is mounted for translational movement towards and away from the substrate and is biased toward the substrate by springs or other means. A gas cushion feed assembly supplies a gas under pressure between the print head and substrate which opposes the biasing of the print head toward the substrate so as to form a space between the print head and substrate. By controlling the pressure of gas supplied, the print head separation from the substrate can be precisely controlled.

  1. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on the Head Injury to a Miner at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico - August 25, 2004 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury to a Miner at...

  2. World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave April 16, 2010 - 4:47pm Addthis A California company will harness the...

  3. 1 INTRODUCTION High-head storage hydropower plants operate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    1 INTRODUCTION High-head storage hydropower plants operate their turbines during periods of high Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland ABSTRACT: High-head storage hydropower plants

  4. Data:4c35189a-1bf8-4bfc-8bd7-23ccd715e973 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Effective date: 20130201 End date if known: Rate name: SPL Experimental Light Emitting Diode Cobra Head 70 W Sector: Lighting Description: The following rates shall be...

  5. CX-007524: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Grant Program. 1) Convert high-pressure sodium, cobra head street lights to light emitting diode lights, and replace lights in Central Park; 2) conduct audits on city...

  6. Data:A4423bc0-5f8d-4ef2-a967-bea6ed1f5fc9 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    street lighting near the Cooperative's electric distribution lines with existing transformers. MV Mercury Vapor; HPS High Pressure Sodium; MH Metal Halide; X Cobra Head...

  7. Data:89f6d69a-85f5-4a51-936d-0f72768c0a56 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    street lighting near the Cooperative's electric distribution lines with existing transformers. MV Mercury Vapor; HPS High Pressure Sodium; MH Metal Halide; X Cobra Head...

  8. MODEL BUILDING FOR INTERACTIVE SEGMENTATION OF THE FEMORAL HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Rick

    MODEL BUILDING FOR INTERACTIVE SEGMENTATION OF THE FEMORAL HEAD G ZSEMLYE 1 , G SZKELY 1 1 by the user. Our first #12;study concentrates on the femoral head, containing only two well defined point the femoral neck at its smallest perimeter with a circle and the femoral head with a half-sphere. After

  9. Contact Stress in Hips with Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglic, Ales

    Contact Stress in Hips with Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Matej Daniel, PhD*; Srecko Herman, MD by elevated con- tact stress. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a relatively common disorder of the human of the hip are af- fected by osteonecrosis of the femoral head,8 they have been the subject of numerous

  10. Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI Tolga Tasdizen, David for classifying multispectral MR scans of the human head into nine tissue classes. User initialization is adopted. #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Classification of head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data

  11. Oculomotor Responses to Active Head Movements in Darkness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramat, Stefano

    information on head rotation from the vestibular system to the saccade-generating mechanism in the brain stem482 Oculomotor Responses to Active Head Movements in Darkness Formulation and Testing Sistemistica, Universit di Pavia, Pavia, Italy Passive head rotation in darkness produces vestibular nystagmus

  12. Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burtscher, Martin

    Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions Igor Szczyrba School the HIC scale to arbitrary head motions. Our simulations of the brain dynamics in sagittal and horizontal injury modeling, resonance effects 1 Introduction A rapid head motion can result in a severe brain injury

  13. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and University of Oslo, Oslo, N-0316 (Norway) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  14. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  15. Integrated head package for top mounted nuclear instrumentation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malandra, Louis J. (McKeesport, PA); Hornak, Leonard P. (Forest Hills, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor such as a pressurized water reactor has an integrated head package providing structural support and increasing shielding leading toward the vessel head. A reactor vessel head engages the reactor vessel, and a control rod guide mechanism over the vessel head raises and lowers control rods in certain of the thimble tubes, traversing penetrations in the reactor vessel head, and being coupled to the control rods. An instrumentation tube structure includes instrumentation tubes with sensors movable into certain thimble tubes disposed in the fuel assemblies. Couplings for the sensors also traverse penetrations in the reactor vessel head. A shroud is attached over the reactor vessel head and encloses the control rod guide mechanism and at least a portion of the instrumentation tubes when retracted. The shroud forms a structural element of sufficient strength to support the vessel head, the control rod guide mechanism and the instrumentation tube structure, and includes radiation shielding material for limiting passage of radiation from retracted instrumentation tubes. The shroud is thicker at the bottom adjacent the vessel head, where the more irradiated lower ends of retracted sensors reside. The vessel head, shroud and contents thus can be removed from the reactor as a unit and rested safely and securely on a support.

  16. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  17. Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Abstract This...

  18. antigenic polar heads: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stenger; Robert L. Modlin; Ian A. Wilson; Steven A. Porcelli; Michael B. Brenner 1999-01-01 11 Head: Vacancy Quality & Standards Mathematics Websites Summary: : Dr Sarah...

  19. adaptive head motion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and performs principal ... Balakrishnan, Guha 2014-01-01 7 Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions Computer Technologies and Information...

  20. Closure head for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E. (South Huntingdon, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closure head for a nuclear reactor includes a stationary outer ring integral with the reactor vessel with a first rotatable plug disposed within the stationary outer ring and supported from the stationary outer ring by a bearing assembly. A sealing system is associated with the bearing assembly to seal the annulus defined between the first rotatable plug and the stationary outer ring. The sealing system comprises tubular seal elements disposed in the annulus with load springs contacting the tubular seal elements so as to force the tubular seal elements against the annulus in a manner to seal the annulus. The sealing system also comprises a sealing fluid which is pumped through the annulus and over the tubular seal elements causing the load springs to compress thereby reducing the friction between the tubular seal elements and the rotatable components while maintaining a gas-tight seal therebetween.

  1. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  2. Head Observation Organizer (HObO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Predmore

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Head Observation Organizer, HObO, is a computer program that stores and manages measured ground-water levels. HObO was developed to help ground-water modelers compile, manage, and document water-level data needed to calibrate ground-water models. Well-construction and water-level data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Database (NWIS) easily can be imported into HObO from the NWIS web site (NWISWeb). The water-level data can be flagged to determine which data will be included in the calibration data set. The utility program HObO_NWISWeb was developed to simplify the down loading of well and water-level data from NWISWeb. An ArcGIS NWISWeb Extension was developed to retrieve site information from NWISWeb. A tutorial is presented showing the basic elements of HObO.

  3. Chapter 13. No Watt Left Behind No Watt Left Behind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gathering and control capability for managing grid demand, it is imperative that we consider the results consumption profiles for utility services like electricity, water, and gas consumed in their buildings predictive maintenance of various utility loads. As electrical, gas, and water costs rise, residential

  4. Topic Models to Interpret MeSH MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, David

    ://ii.nlm.nih.gov/mti.shtml #12;MeSH heading Major MeSH heading Major qualifier MeSH-qualifier combination Humans Brain metabolism Brain (metabolism) Table 1. Most frequent MeSH headings, major MeSH headings, major qualifiers and MeTopic Models to Interpret MeSH MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings David Newman12 , Sarvnaz Karimi

  5. Mobile Museum Tours 1 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE MUSEUM TOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Mobile Museum Tours 1 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE MUSEUM TOURS Using mobile technologies for multimedia MUSEUM TOURS Abstract Mobile technology was used to deliver learner-centred experiences to visitors: Across generations and cultures, Banff : Canada (2006)" #12;Mobile Museum Tours 2 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE

  6. Poverty and Productivity in Female-Headed Households in Zimbabwe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrell, Sara; Krishnan, Pramila

    A household survey conducted in rural Zimbabwe in 2001 is used to compare the position of de facto and de jure female-headed households to those with a male head. These households are characterised by different forms of poverty that impinge...

  7. Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head-to-head domain walls using off-axis electron holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    transformations.7 Recent experimental reports confirm these predictions of domain wall movement8Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head-to-head domain walls using off-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based

  8. Kinetic and Friction Head Loss Impacts on Horizontal Water Supply and Aquifer Storage and Recovery Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenthal, Benjamin

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    well construction or intra-wellbore head loss. Currently no analytical groundwater model rigorously accounts for intra-wellbore kinetic and friction head loss. We have developed a semi-analytical, intra-wellbore head loss model dynamically linked...

  9. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  10. Sorghum head silage, with and without haylage, for fattening steers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stilwell, Daniel Emerson

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    steers in all treatment groups during the first few days of the trial. A ma)ority of the cases occurred in the group fed soxghum heads and 2 lb. CSM and most of these cases wex'e during the first three days of the experiment when s dry ground mixture..., and 2 lb. CSM (285 lb. ). The steers fed heads, haylage, and 1 lb. CSM had the lowest total gain (254 lb. ), but this was not significantly diffexent from the group fed heads, haylage, and 2 lb. of CSM (264 lb. ), ox the group fed grain, haylage...

  11. arsenic affects head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 430 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  12. acute head injury: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 336 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  13. active head lice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 251 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  14. acute head trauma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 278 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  15. affects head kidney: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 344 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  16. advanced inoperable head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 208 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  17. acute severe head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 252 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  18. adult human head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 350 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  19. Printed circuit board for a CCD camera head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conder, Alan D. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera head which can replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating x-rays, such as within a target chamber where laser produced plasmas are studied. The camera head is small, capable of operating both in and out of a vacuum environment, and is versatile. The CCD camera head uses PC boards with an internal heat sink connected to the chassis for heat dissipation, which allows for close (0.04" for example) stacking of the PC boards. Integration of this CCD camera head into existing instrumentation provides a substantial enhancement of diagnostic capabilities for studying high energy density plasmas, for a variety of military industrial, and medical imaging applications.

  20. Zeroth-order inversion of transient head observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-frequency, asymptotic solution for transient head,appropriate for a medium containing smoothly varying heterogeneity,provides a basis for efficient inverse modeling. The semi analyticsolution is trajectory based, akin to ray methods used in modeling wavepropagation, and may be constructed by post processing the output of anumerical simulator. For high frequencies, the amplitude sensitivities,the relationship between changes in flow properties and changes in headampliude, are dominated by the phase term which may be computed directlyfrom the output of the simulator. Thus, transient head waveforms may beinverted with little more computation than is required to invert arrivaltimes. An applicatino to synthetic head values indicates that thetechnique can be used to improve the fit to waveforms. An application totransient head data from the Migration experiment in Switzerland revealsa narrow, high conductivity pathway within a 0.5 m thick zone offracturing.

  1. Theoretical collapse pressures for two pressurized torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to determine the pressures at which real torispherical heads fail upon a single application of pressure, two heads were pressurized in recent Praxair tests, and displacements and strains were recorded at various locations. In this paper, theoretical results for the two test heads are presented in the form of curves of pressure versus crown deflections, using the available geometry and material parameters. From these curves, limit and collapse pressures are calculated, using procedures permitted by the ASME B and PV Code Section 8/Div.2. These pressures are shown to vary widely, depending on the method and model used to calculate them. The effect of no stress relief on the behavior of the Praxair test heads is also evaluated and found to be of no significance for neither the objectives of the tests nor the objectives of this paper. The results of this paper are submitted as an enhancement to the experimental results recorded during the Praxair tests.

  2. Metastasis of genitourinary tumors to the head and neck region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogunyemi, Ore; Rojas, A.; Hematpour, K.; Rogers, D.; Head, C.; Bennett, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. Rogers C. Head C. Bennett Received: 14 SeptemberO. Ogunyemi A. Rojas C. Bennett David GeVen School ofLos Angeles, CA, USA C. Bennett Department of Urology,

  3. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt. No.- 15-33-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on February 25, 2015, by Bear Head LNG, requesting long-term multi-contract authority as further described in their...

  4. Chapter 17 Eye-head Gaze shifts Oxford Handbook on Eye Movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corneil, Brian D.

    1 Chapter 17 Eye-head Gaze shifts Oxford Handbook on Eye Movements "The Neural Basis of Gaze Shifts" 1. Kinematics of eye-head gaze shifts a. Terminology for describing eye-head gaze shifts b. Variability in eye and head motion during gaze shifts c. Gaze shifts in complex environments d. Bottom

  5. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle 335 - 359 [deg] 0 - 25 - 25 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to right side. b) If the angle within 335 - 359 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to left side. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image

  6. The Mechatonic Design of a Human-like Robot Head Karsten Berns1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Karsten

    The Mechatonic Design of a Human-like Robot Head Karsten Berns1 Carsten Hillenbrand1 and Krzystof. In this paper the design concept as well as the constructed human-like robot head is introduced. Main goal of the head design is the support of an adequate human machine interaction. Therefore, our robots head should

  7. Integrated head package cable carrier for a nuclear power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); Trombola, Daniel M. (Murrysville, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cabling arrangement is provided for a nuclear reactor located within a containment. Structure inside the containment is characterized by a wall having a near side surrounding the reactor vessel defining a cavity, an operating deck outside the cavity, a sub-space below the deck and on a far side of the wall spaced from the near side, and an operating area above the deck. The arrangement includes a movable frame supporting a plurality of cables extending through the frame, each connectable at a first end to a head package on the reactor vessel and each having a second end located in the sub-space. The frame is movable, with the cables, between a first position during normal operation of the reactor when the cables are connected to the head package, located outside the sub-space proximate the head package, and a second position during refueling when the cables are disconnected from the head package, located in the sub-space. In a preferred embodiment, the frame straddles the top of the wall in a substantially horizontal orientation in the first position, pivots about an end distal from the head package to a substantially vertically oriented intermediate position, and is guided, while remaining about vertically oriented, along a track in the sub-space to the second position.

  8. Remote controlled ISI devices for RPV bottom head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiga, S. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Mori, H. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan); Kobayashi, K. Sasaki, T. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bottom head of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) is one of the areas on which it is very difficult to perform an inservice inspection (ISI). Welds in a bottom head central disk and a drain nozzle are required to be inspected, but its accessibility is restricted by a RPV skirt, a thermal insulation, control rod drive housings and incore monitor housings. Therefore, the remote mechanized scanners are necessary to access and examine the welds. Two kinds of new device were developed to accomplish this inspection. The bottom head central disk weld inspection device has a parallel link mechanism scanning arm with a combined-transducer module to get as much as wide scanning area between control rod drive housings. The device is driven along the weld by moving on the separable track which is set temporally on the bottom head insulation. The drain nozzle weld inspection device has a horseshoe shaped gear mechanism to drive a combined-transducer module. The device is set up on to the drain nozzle using an insertion handle. Both devices have an emergency retrieval mechanism to withdraw the devices in case of power loss accident. Those devices were demonstrated by a mock-up test to be applicable to the inspection of the RPV bottom head.

  9. Doppler-free intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy of $^4He$ $2^3P-3^{1,3}D$ transitions at 588 nm with a one-watt compact laser system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Feng, Yan; Wang, Li-Bang; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated Doppler-free intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy of helium $2^3P-3^{1,3}D$ transitions in an rf discharged sealed-off cell using a compact laser system at 588 nm. An external cavity diode laser at 1176 nm was constructed to seed a Raman fiber amplifier. Laser power of more than one watt at 588 nm was produced by frequency doubling of the fiber amplifier output using a MgO:PPLN crystal. A doubling efficiency of 23 % was achieved. The power-dependent spectra of the $2^3P-3^3D$ transitions were investigated. Furthermore, the Doppler-free spectrum of the spin-forbidden $2^3P-3^1D$ transitions was observed for the first time. Our results are crucial towards precision test of QED atomic calculations, especially for improving the determination of the helium $3^1D-3^3D$ separation.

  10. Watt-level, all-fiber, ultrafast Er/Yb-codoped double-clad fiber laser mode-locked by reduced graphene oxide interacting with a weak evanescent field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Lei; Li, Yujia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a Watt-level, all-fiber, ultrafast Er/Yb-codoped double-clad fiber laser passively mode-locked by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) interacting with a weak evanescent field of photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The rGO solution is filled into the cladding holes of the PCF based on total reflection, and after evaporation, the rGO flakes bear only 1/107 of the total energy in laser system, which enhances the thermal damage threshold and decreases the accumulated nonlinearity. By incorporating the saturable absorber into an Er/Yb-codoped fiber ring cavity, stable conventional soliton with a duration of 573 fs is generated, and a average output power up to 1.14 W is obtained.

  11. Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

  12. An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Br). Other radionuclides considered may deposit in bone withm the head region (cranium or the spinal skeleton) (is'I, 2P, ssP, tssRe, 'ssRe, 'ssSm, "7~Sb, ssSr, s Sr, "nY, ss~Tc, tsiCs, ss"Ra), or m the thyroid fss~ Tc, and all iodme radionuclides... tagged to them (i. e. , radiopharmaceuticals). Nevertheless, studies of the small-scale dosimetry of the bram, and more generally, the organs of the head (brain, eyes thyroid, skull, skin), have not kept pace with the current advances in nuclear...

  13. Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power Steven J. Stanton and Oliver C. Schultheiss University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA To appear in: K. Dowding (Ed.), Encyclopedia of power-647-9440, email: stantons@umich.edu #12;Testosterone and power 2 Across many studies in humans, two functional

  14. Associate Professor, Head, Research Institute of Circuits and Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    ), and power and reliability aware system design methodology. Dr. Wang has authored and coauthored over 100.1-2017.12 Research on LTE-Advanced Soft-Baseband Processing System o National Key Technology Program, o PI: Yu WangRESUME Yu Wang Associate Professor, Head, Research Institute of Circuits and Systems Department

  15. New Director Heads Actuarial Science Program - Department of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Mathematics x Purdue University x West Lafayette, Indiana. Summer 2001 ... information as well as the current (new) plan of study. ... Allen Weitsman, Associate Head. Lawrence Brown .... Professor J. J. Price was the featured speaker in Purdue's Focus on Teaching ..... Virginia Mashin Scholarship ($2,500).

  16. HIGH RESOLUTION, MRI-BASED, SEGMENTED, COMPUTERIZED HEAD PHANTOM.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. Conclusion and improved. We have developed a voxel based head phantom by manually drawing contours on 124 transverse MRI

  17. IMAGINED TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: IMAGINED TRANSFORMATION OF BODIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    IMAGINED TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: IMAGINED TRANSFORMATION OF BODIES Imagined Transformations TRANSFORMATIONS 2 Abstract A number of spatial reasoning problems can be solved by performing an imagined transformation of one's egocentric perspective. A series of experiments were carried out to characterize

  18. ADSORPTION OF CHAIN MOLECULES WITH A POLAR HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    983 ADSORPTION OF CHAIN MOLECULES WITH A POLAR HEAD A SCALING DESCRIPTION S. ALEXANDER (*) Physique (Reu le 24 mars 1977, accepte le 4 mai 1977) Rsum. 2014 L'adsorption de molcules en chanes une The adsorption of chain molecules at an interface is investigated assuming that the molecule has both a polar

  19. Simultaneous multi-headed imager geometry calibration method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tran, Vi-Hoa (Newport News, VA); Meikle, Steven Richard (Penshurst, AU); Smith, Mark Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for calibrating multi-headed high sensitivity and high spatial resolution dynamic imaging systems, especially those useful in the acquisition of tomographic images of small animals. The method of the present invention comprises: simultaneously calibrating two or more detectors to the same coordinate system; and functionally correcting for unwanted detector movement due to gantry flexing.

  20. Molecular architecture of the prolate head of bacteriophage T4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossmann, Michael G.

    -Maklaya Street, Moscow 117997, Russia; and Department of Biology, Center for Advanced Training in Cell) The head of bacteriophage T4 is a prolate icosahedron with one unique portal vertex to which the phage tail by the portal protein gp20. The prohead contains an internal core made up of the major core protein, gp22

  1. Diffuse optical imaging of the whole head Maria Angela Franceschini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diffuse optical imaging of the whole head Maria Angela Franceschini Danny K. Joseph Theodore J@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu Abstract. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy NIRS and diffuse optical im- aging DOI are increasingly used to detect of optodes in NIRS instruments has hampered measurement of optical signals from diverse brain regions. Our

  2. Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

  3. Learning expressive human-like head motion sequences from speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busso, Carlos

    With the development of new trends in human-machine interfaces, animated feature films and video games, better avatars and virtual agents are required that more accurately mimic how humans communicate and interact. Gestures the emotional perception of facial animations [6]. Given the importance of head motion in human-human

  4. EARLY HEAD START Effects of Fathers, Neighborhoods and Family Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    randomly assigned - 1,513 to Early Head Start - 1,488 to other child care program #12;Highlights of the EHS disorder and aggression ­ Depression ­ Alcoholism and other drug abuse · Parental history of relationship Expulsion Lost Job Arrested Substance Abuse % No % Yes #12;Father Antisocial Behavior · 86.1% Low Risk (

  5. Head Knowledge: Summary (Segment from the Tin Shed essay)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Head Knowledge: Summary (Segment from the Tin Shed essay) While certainly much more nuanced than would declare that it's to be discovered outside Tin Shed, viewed from the wooden bench. Reality of reliability and validity (Frey 1994:95-104). While traveling outside the Tin Shed, systematic analysis

  6. Budzik et al., page 1 of 30 RUNNING HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabin E.

    Budzik et al., page 1 of 30 RUNNING HEAD Resource Discovery Assistants JOURNAL TITLE International Resource Discovery in the Context of Ongoing Tasks with Proactive Assistants CONTACT AUTHOR Jay Budzik. Evanston, IL 60201 USA +1 847 467-1771 (phone) +1 847 491-5258 (fax) budzik@infolab.nwu.edu AUTHORS Jay

  7. PPA Department Heads Initial Impressions and SLAC Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    1 PPA Department Heads Initial Impressions and SLAC Challenges James Tarpinian ES&H Director January 19, 2012 #12;2 Agenda · Initial impressions · 2011 Performance · ES&H focus areas and initiatives for 2012 ES&H Director Chief Safety Officer #12;3 Initial impressions Evolutionary change

  8. Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, Alexey

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

  9. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    of employment at Truman. Richard J. Coughlin Director of Libraries; Head, Division of Libraries and Museums Carolina. (2001) Janet Romine Reference Librarian BA, Bowling Green State University; MLS, Indiana University. (1999) Libraries and Museums G E N E R A L C A T A L O G 175 2003-2005 #12;Judith Sapko Special

  10. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    of Libraries; Head, Division of Libraries and Museums BA, Merrimack College; MS (LS), Simmons College. (1995, Indiana University. (1980) Gayla McHenry Supervisor, Library Circulation Department BS, Northeast Missouri, University of North Carolina. (2001) Janet Romine Reference Librarian BA, Bowling Green State University; MLS

  11. Ms. Maushumi, Head Mistress Babul Sarkar, Vice President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    Ms. Maushumi, Head Mistress Babul Sarkar, Vice President Char Domdoama Primary School Vill: Char Razzaq-Shamsun Best Teacher Award and Abdul Awal Sarkar Best Student Awards in Char Domdoma Primary School Dear Ms. Maushumi and Mr. Sarkar, My proposal for the introduction of one teaching and three

  12. THE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Ian W.

    ancillary data is fundamental to the process of modelling a groundwater system. In an unconfined aquifer of the unconfined groundwater parameters as the unique minimum of a convex functional. 1. Introduction It is commonTHE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN UNCONFINED AQUIFER IAN KNOWLES

  13. Managing Fusarium Head Blight in Virginia Small Grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Breeder, Dept. of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech. cgriffey@vt.edu C.J. LIN Vice@vt.edu WADE THOMASON Extension Grains Specialist, Dept. of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia TechManaging Fusarium Head Blight in Virginia Small Grains MELISSA KELLER Graduate Student, Dept

  14. Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tailleux, Remi

    ) remains the main framework for studying the atmospheric and oceanic energy cycles. Because the APE energy cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Classical view of the ocean energy cycleRecto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in Stratified Fluids R´emi Tailleux

  15. Effects of Head Movement on Perceptions of Humanoid Robot Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Effects of Head Movement on Perceptions of Humanoid Robot Behavior Emily Wang Constantine Lignos@cs.yale.edu ABSTRACT This paper examines human perceptions of humanoid robot behavior, specifically how perception and write about the experience. A coding scheme originally created to gauge human intentionality was applied

  16. Neural compass or epiphenomenon? Experimental and theoretical investigations into the rodent head direction cell system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Meer, Matthijs

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    How does the brain convert sensory information into abstract representations that can support complex behaviours? The rodent head-direction (HD) system, whose cell ensembles represent head direction in the horizontal plane, ...

  17. University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012...

  18. Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Unit Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Unit Real World Demonstration of a New American...

  19. Geostatistical inference of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivities from hydraulic heads and tracer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Geostatistical inference of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivities from hydraulic heads; accepted 25 April 2006; published 10 August 2006. [1] In groundwater, hydraulic heads and solute arrival times depend primarily on the hydraulic conductivity field and hydraulic boundary conditions. The spread

  20. A representation of changing heading direction in human cortical areas pVIP and CSv

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    Running title: Changing heading direction in the human brain Keywords: egomotion; f1 A representation of changing heading direction in human cortical in the environment, we continually change direction. Much work has examined how the brain

  1. Dr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    and oxygenation of the brain and muscle. Since 2002 he heads the Biomedical Optics Research LaboratoryDr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory Clinic of Neonatology

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 2129 Influence of Head Tissue Conductivity in Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 2129 Influence of Head Tissue Conductivity in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head Abstract--The influence of head tissue conductivity on mag- netoencephalography (MEG) was investigated

  3. Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features Dorsal/Ventral dial.352.3139 Toll Free: 1.877.352.3275 ^^ci&ion Q)e&i^n^^^r ^esea/H^/i Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder 923B-1/07 #12;MODEL 923-B MOUSE GAS ANESTHESIA HEAD HOLDER The KOPF Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder

  4. USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS Christine T liners under conditions representative of dams (i.e., high hydraulic heads). Specifically, the objective of interface contact, hydraulic head, and GCL hydration procedures on the leakage rate were considered

  5. Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models Robert Van of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) forward or inverse sim- ulations in realistic head models. We verify the accuracy, in an inhomogeneous, non-spherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due to volume

  6. Modeling Attractor Deformation in the Rodent Head-Direction JEREMY P. GOODRIDGE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touretzky, David S.

    Modeling Attractor Deformation in the Rodent Head-Direction System JEREMY P. GOODRIDGE1 AND DAVID S attractor deformation in the rodent head-direction system. J Neurophysiol 83: 34023410, 2000. We present a model of the head-direction circuit in the rat that improves on earlier models in several respects

  7. Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head of magnetoencephalographic MEG forward or in- verse simulations in realistic head models. We verify the accu- racy of our, in an inhomoge- neous, nonspherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due

  8. NEURAL MODELS OF HEAD-DIRECTION CELLS PETER ZEIDMAN JOHN A. BULLINARIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullinaria, John

    We have seen that navigation requires knowledge of heading, and that HD cells in the brain actNEURAL MODELS OF HEAD-DIRECTION CELLS PETER ZEIDMAN JOHN A. BULLINARIA School of Computer Science background of Head Direction Cells, and existing models of them, we introduce an improved neural model

  9. Double-ring network model of the head-direction system Xiaohui Xie,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaohui Sunney

    Double-ring network model of the head-direction system Xiaohui Xie,1, * Richard H. R. Hahnloser,1,2 and H. Sebastian Seung1,2 1 Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute 2002; published 9 October 2002 In the head-direction system, the orientation of an animal's head

  10. Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models Robert Van of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) forward or inverse sim ulations in realistic head models. We verify the accuracy, in an inhomogeneous, nonspherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due to volume

  11. Heatup of the TMI-2 lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis has been carried out to assess the potential of a melting attack upon the reactor vessel lower head and incore instrument nozzle penetration weldments during the TMI core relocation event at 224 minutes. Calculations were performed to determine the potential for molten corium to undergo breakup into droplets which freeze and form a debris bed versus impinging upon the lower head as one or more coherent streams. The effects of thermal-hydraulic interactions between corium streams and water inside the lower plenum, the effects of the core support assembly structure upon the corium, and the consequences of corium relocation by way of the core former region were examined. 19 refs., 24 figs.

  12. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D. (Clawson, MI); Neal, Timothy L. (Ortonville, MI); Swain, Jeff L. (Flushing, MI); Raimao, Miguel A. (Colorado Springs, CO)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  13. Development of Power-head based Fan Airflow Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    related to the measured fan speed. Actually the measured fan speed is assumed to equal the motor synchronous speed, which is proportional to the VFD frequency. Theoretically it is not true. The difference between the synchronous speed and motor speed... the basic theory, experiment and results of the power-head based airflow station. Theory Figure 1 shows variable speed fan connection schematic. VFD is normally installed on the motor to adjust the motor speed by modulating frequency. Typically...

  14. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  15. Supplement 22, Part 6, Section A. Subject Headings: A-I, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Subject Headings and Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    other products not mentioned. SUBJECT HEADINGS 1 Abnormalities. See Anomalies. Abortion Arnaudov, D.; et al., 1976, Vet. Med., Praha, v. 49, v. 21 (6), 375-384 Toxoplasma gondii, sheep, immunoepizootio- logical study by hemagglutination, indirect... fluorescence, and microprecipitation reaction in agar gel; higher incidence in aborting ewes and in sheep in montane regions : Bul- garia; Czechoslovakia Abortion Donev, ?., 1975, Vet. Med. Nauki, v. 12 (1), 64-68 final results of pregnancy in 5 flocks...

  16. EECBG Success Story: Lighting Retrofit Improving Visibility,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New LED lighting fixtures (right) emit a whiter light than existing high-pressure sodium cobra head streetlights (left) and don't spill light onto nearby houses. | Photos courtesy...

  17. Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

  18. Los Alamos names new head of stockpile manufacturing and support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos Alamos honorsNew head

  19. Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls Head, Maine: Energy

  20. MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07)AKBrough Head Wave Farm < MHK

  1. Head of EM Visits Northwest Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TO THEHudson Hazle Spindle, LLC BeaconHead of

  2. Bear Head Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBay County, Florida:Tyngsboro, MassachusettsCreek,Head Lake,

  3. Heading Lock Maneuver Testing of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muljowidodo, K

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (UAV) research and development at Bandung Institute of Technology in Indonesia has achieved the testing stage in the field. This testing was still being classified as the early testing, since some of the preliminary tests were carried out in the scale of the laboratory. The paper would discuss the laboratory test and several tests that were done in the field. Discussions were stressed in the procedure and the aim that will be achieved, along with several early results. The testing was carried out in the lake with the area around 8300 Ha and the maximum depth of 50 meters. The location of the testing was chosen with consideration of minimizing the effect of the current and the wave, as well as the location that was not too far from the Laboratory. The type of testing that will be discussed in paper was Heading Lock Maneuver Testing. The vehicle was tested to move with a certain cruising speed, afterwards it was commanded by an arbitrarily selected heading directio...

  4. Quantum phase estimation using a multi-headed cat state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su-Yong Lee; Chang-Woo Lee; Hyunchul Nha; Dagomir Kaszlikowski

    2015-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It was recently shown that an entangled coherent state, which is a superposition of two different coherent states, can surpass the performance of noon state in estimating an unknown phase-shift. This may hint at further enhancement in phase estimation by incorporating more component states in the superposition of resource state. We here introduce a four-headed cat state (4HCS), a superposition of four different coherent states, and propose its application to quantum phase estimation. We demonstrate the enhanced performance in phase estimation by employing an entangled state via the 4HCS, which can surpass that of the two-headed cat state (2HCS), particularly in the regime of small average photon numbers. Moreover, we show that an entangled state modified from the 4HCS can further enhance the phase estimation, even in the regime of large average photon number under a photon-loss channel. Our investigation further extends to incorporate an increasingly large number of component states in the resource superposition state and clearly show its merit in phase estimation.

  5. Post-Cretaceous faulting at head of Mississippi embayment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Harrison, R.W. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent mapping in southernmost Illinois and southeastern Missouri has revealed numerous faults that displace Cretaceous and Tertiary strata. Units as young as the Pliocene-Pleistocene( ) Mounds Gravel are deformed; some faults possibly displace Quaternary sediments. The faults strike northeast, dip nearly vertically, and exhibit characteristics of dextral strike-slip. Pull-apart grabens occur along right-stepping fault strands, they contain chaotically jumbled blocks of Paleozoic, Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks downdropped as much as 800 m relative to wall rocks. Faults at the head of the Mississippi embayment probably originated during Cambrian rifting (Reelfoot rift) and have a long, complex history of reactivation under different stress fields. Some faults are on strike with faults in the New Madrid seismic zone. Kinematics of post-Cretaceous displacements fit the contemporary stress regime of ENE-WSW compression. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as close proximity, suggest a close link between faulting at the head of the embayment and ongoing tectonism in the New Madrid seismic zone.

  6. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  7. In search of a new governing failure criterion for torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The failure criterion that governs the present design rules of formed heads in Section 8/Div. 2 of the ASME B and PV Code limits crown displacement upon a single application of pressure, and it does so by means of a calculated collapse pressure. One problem with the rules is that they require greater head thicknesses than those of Section 8/Div. 1. Another problem is that recent test data taken for two formed heads have shown no signs of head displacements or deformations that could have rendered the heads unserviceable at pressures substantially higher than the calculated collapse pressures. Any link between the calculated collapse pressures and the failures of the test heads could not be established. The main thesis proposed in the paper is that such a link does not exist for torispherical heads in general. The reason for this is investigated theoretically and attributed to the geometric strengthening of heads, as they deform. It is recommended that the reasons for limiting displacements or deformations for a single application of pressure be reviewed and, if needed, a new failure criterion defined, or other failure modes, such as tensile plastic instability (burst), be considered. The latter mode is described and options for its evaluation are presented in this paper. The protection of torispherical heads against the failure modes of low-cycle fatigue and incremental plastic growth upon cyclic loading, which are controlled by shakedown, is not covered in this paper but is left to future investigations.

  8. advanced head-and-neck cancer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in skin cancer, colorectal carcinoma, testicular teratoma and liver cancer types: brain, breast, head and neck, renal, skin and testicular cancers. Conclusions: SULF1 and...

  9. Japan`s refiner/marketers headed for major shakeout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan`s downstream oil industry is in a state of crisis and headed for a major shakeout. The major catalyst for this was a dramatic deregulation step during April 1996 that allowed refined petroleum product imports by non-refiners. The move, together with a sharp drop in refining margins, falling retail gasoline prices, and a service station sector on the brink of collapse, are all leading to massive changes in the way the country`s refiners and marketers do business. This paper reviews the collapse of corporate profits during this period of deregulation; the development of a new price system geared toward bringing the prices of gasoline, fuel oil, and kerosene into line with each other to offset the fall in gasoline prices; and industry restructuring including mergers, acquisitions, and marketing consolidation. The paper then makes predictions on the outcome of these changes on the Japanese oil industry.

  10. Conserving Energy with No Watt Left Behind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeb, Steven B.

    Facilities managers for industrial and commercial sites want to develop detailed electrical consumption profiles of their electrical and electromechanical loads, including expensive physical plant for heating, ventilation, ...

  11. Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flash Register Input/Output Emitters Light emitting diode (LED) Light emitting diode (LED) Liquid crystal display (LCD)displays are light emitting diodes (LEDs) and vacuum

  12. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino,Glen Wattman - Director, OfficeThe GoldenofJohn

  13. 7Name ________________________________ System Watts Energy source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which will do work to move air in your air conditioner, or to keep food cold in your refrigerator. When

  14. WattQuiz | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,AreaWatson, New York: Energy

  15. AlphaWatt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumAgua Caliente Solar PowerAlaskanSolar

  16. GlobalWatt Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo,GEF Jump to:GlobalData Jump to:

  17. NoWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniX LtdNewNingguoNiobrara ValleyNitol

  18. SpectraWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,Southeast Colorado PowerSouthwesternCompaniesSES JumpSpectra

  19. TerraWatt Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar JumpTennessee/Wind Resources < Tennessee

  20. Frankie Phua Executive Director and Head of Credit & Country Risk Management Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Frankie Phua Executive Director and Head of Credit & Country Risk Management Division UOB Frankie Phua is the Executive Director and the Global Head of the Credit & Country Risk Management Division (PD, LGD and EAD), economic capital modelling, credit portfolio risk management, counterparty credit

  1. To Tilt Your Head or Not To: Potentially Bijoy K. Ghosh and Indika Wijayasinghe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Bijoy K.

    heading directions, as a simple mechanical control system. Head movements obey Donders' constraint (as Systems, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA indika.wijayasinghe@ttu.edu the control of eye treatment of the topic in the framework of modern control theory and geometric mechanics. Assuming the eye

  2. Maximum Running Speed of Captive Bar-Headed Geese Is Unaffected by Severe Hypoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Graham

    of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 6 Department of Biology, McMaster University lower than bar-headed geese. In bar-headed geese, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in both Research Council (BBSRC) of the United Kingdom [Grant number BB/F015615/1] to CMB and PJB. The funders had

  3. FAST MULTIPOLE ACCELERATED BOUNDARY ELEMENTS FOR NUMERICAL COMPUTATION OF THE HEAD RELATED TRANSFER FUNCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zotkin, Dmitry N.

    FAST MULTIPOLE ACCELERATED BOUNDARY ELEMENTS FOR NUMERICAL COMPUTATION OF THE HEAD RELATED TRANSFER with measure- ments are also difficult. We present a fast multipole based iterative preconditioned Krylov are presented. Index Terms-- Head related transfer function, Boundary ele- ment method, Fast Multipole Method

  4. Model Predictive Tracking Control for a Head-Positioning in a Hard-Disk-Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Model Predictive Tracking Control for a Head-Positioning in a Hard-Disk-Drive M. Taktak-Meziou, A generated from Model Predictive Control (MPC). The first approach consists of a classical linear MPC without/Write (R/W) head of a Hard-Disk-Drive (HDD) servo-system, which is resolved with two control algorithms

  5. Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    PET/CT patient images. The intensity value of the threshold contour level that returns 100Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes Eric as a function of the reconstruction method, smoothing, and lesion size in head and neck cancer patients using

  6. Pre-clinical evaluation of ceramic femoral head resurfacing prostheses using computational models and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .534 kN to 5.34 kN. In worst- case tests representing a complete lack of superior femoral head bonePre-clinical evaluation of ceramic femoral head resurfacing prostheses using computational models in resurfacing hip replacement (RHR) have been reported as early femoral neck fracture, infection, and loosening

  7. Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 1 Research Article9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    #12;Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Research Article915 16 fkanou@pri.kyoto-u.ac.jp17 +81-80-6902-501318 19 #12;Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 2 Abstract20 Previous studies comparing eye movements between humans and their closest relatives

  8. Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska Anthony Bryant Senior Project Alaska Pacific University May 5, 2010 #12;Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION January 2009. This paper researches the possibility of using geothermal energy as an alternative energy

  9. Audio-based Head Motion Synthesis for Avatar-based Telepresence Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busso, Carlos

    ]: Three Dimensional Graphics and Realism-Animation, Virtual Reality; I.2.6 [Artificial Intelligence, Design, Experimentation, Human Factors Keywords Computer Graphics, Facial Animation, Data-driven, Head- thesis technique is presented for avatar-based telepresence systems. First, head motion of a human

  10. Ensemble smoother assimilation of hydraulic head and return flow data to estimate hydraulic conductivity distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bau, Domenico A.

    Ensemble smoother assimilation of hydraulic head and return flow data to estimate hydraulic and data measurements, an ensemble smoother (ES) to provide enhanced estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity (K) through assimilation of hydraulic head (H) and groundwater return flow volume (RFV

  11. The Point Spread Function of the Human Head and its Implications for Transcranial Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra, Lucas C.

    The Point Spread Function of the Human Head and its Implications for Transcranial Current distribution in the head resulting from the application of scalp currents. Derivation of forward models has represented a major effort in brain stimulation research, with model complexity ranging from spherical shells

  12. The Rotational Propulsion Characteristics of Scaled-up Helical Microswimmers with different heads and magnetic positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the cut-off frequency. The rotational propulsion characteristics of helical swimmers with a magnetic headThe Rotational Propulsion Characteristics of Scaled-up Helical Microswimmers with different heads and magnetic positioning Tiantian Xu1, Gilgueng Hwang2, Nicolas Andreff3 and Stephane Regnier1 Abstract

  13. Experimental measurement of human head motion for high-resolution computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Experimental measurement of human head motion for high-resolution computed tomography system design experimentally measured for high-resolution computed tomography CT design using a Canon digital camera. Our goal-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. DOI: 10.1117/1.3454379 Subject terms: head motion; computed tomography CT ; image

  14. INTERNAL PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Title: CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERNAL PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Title: CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Ref 1200A/56/07 CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head Visibility SUMMARY The use of Continuous Cover Forestry (CCF) can lead to situations where a dense

  15. Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 757 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuen, Walter W.

    Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 7­57 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads T Received 24 August 1998; accepted 24 November 1998 Abstract Lower head integrity under steam explosion is `physically unreasonable'. © 1999 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved. Keywords: Steam explosions

  16. &p.1:Abstract We reviewed 24 hips with avascular necrosis of the femoral head in 24 patients treated with vascular-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglic, Ales

    was to evaluate the treatment of femoral head necrosis using a vascularized iliac crest bone graft. Materials&p.1:Abstract We reviewed 24 hips with avascular necrosis of the femoral head in 24 patients and early Stage III, when necrosis does not yet involve the complete femoral head. &p.1:Rsum Nous avons

  17. In vivo evaluation of wearable head impact sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lyndia C; Bui, Kevin; Hammoor, Bradley; Kurt, Mehmet; Hernandez, Fidel; Kuo, Calvin; Camarillo, David B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human skull accelerations are difficult to measure due to imperfect skull coupling. Some approaches have been validated with dummy or cadaver experiments, but methods to evaluate sensors in vivo are lacking. Here we present a novel method using high speed video to evaluate teeth-mounted (mouthguard), soft tissue-mounted (skin patch), and headgear-mounted (skull cap) sensors during 5-10g sagittal soccer head impacts. Skull coupling is quantified by displacement from an ear-canal reference. Mouthguard displacements were within video measurement error (<1mm), while the skin patch and skull cap displaced up to 4mm and 13mm from the ear-canal reference, respectively. With close skull-coupling, we used the mouthguard as the reference to assess 6-degree-of-freedom skin patch and skull cap measurements. Linear and rotational acceleration magnitudes were over-predicted by both the skin patch (23+/-9g, 2500+/-1200rad/s^2) and the skull cap (74+/-50g, 4300+/-2700rad/s^2). Such over-predictions were largely due to out...

  18. Quantum phase estimation using a multi-headed cat state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su-Yong Lee; Chang-Woo Lee; Hyunchul Nha; Dagomir Kaszlikowski

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It was recently shown that an entangled coherent state, which is a superposition of two different coherent states, can surpass the performance of N00N state in estimating an unknown phase-shift. This may hint at further enhancement in phase estimation by incorporating more component states in the superposition of resource state. We here study a four-headed cat state (4HCS), a superposition of four different coherent states, and propose its application to quantum phase estimation. We first investigate how the 4HCS is more nonclassical than a 2HCS in view of some nonclassical measures including sub-Poissonian statistics, negativity of Wigner distribution, and entanglement potential. We then demonstrate the enhanced performance in phase estimation by employing an entangled state via the 4HCS, which can surpass that of the 2HCS particularly in the regime of small average photon number. Moreover, we show that an entangled state modified from the 4HCS can further enhance the phase estimation even in the regime of large average photon number under a photon-loss channel. Our investigation further extends to incorporate an increasingly large number of component states in the resource superposition state and clearly show its merit in phase estimation.

  19. RUNNING HEAD: Balkanization of Probability Balkanization and Unification of Probabilistic Inferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Alex

    RUNNING HEAD: Balkanization of Probability Balkanization and Unification of Probabilistic;Balkanization of Probability 2 Abstract Many research-related classes in social sciences present probability;Balkanization of Probability 3 Balkanization and Unification of Probabilistic Inferences Introduction Use

  20. anne-sylvie catherin head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 313 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  1. actin-bound myosin heads: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 362 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  2. advanced non-nasopharyngeal head: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 205 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  3. Efficient analysis of ordinal data from clinical trials in head injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHugh, Gillian Stephanie

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Many promising Phase II trials have been carried out in head injury however to date there has been no successful translation of the positive results from these explanatory trials into improved patient outcomes in Phase ...

  4. Head Loss Through Fibrous Debris Bed with Different Types of Perforated Strainers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulsattar, Suhaeb S

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and becomes an important cause of head loss through the sump strainer, affecting the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) performance. This study was dedicated to measure the pressure drop across randomly accumulated debris bed on the sump strainer along...

  5. An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Scott Laurence

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed...

  6. Probabilistic phonotactics in production 1 Running Head: PROBABILISTIC PHONOTACTICS IN PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, Paul J.

    Probabilistic phonotactics in production 1 Running Head: PROBABILISTIC PHONOTACTICS IN PRODUCTION Phonotactic probability influences speech production Matthew Goldrick and Meredith Larson Department in production 2 Abstract Speakers are faster and more accurate at processing certain sound sequences within

  7. Viewpoint-Invariant Learning and Detection of Human Heads M. Weber W. Einhauser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perona, Pietro

    Viewpoint-Invariant Learning and Detection of Human Heads M. Weber W. Einh¨auser California on histograms of feature detectors to address the same prob- lem. Burl, Leung, Weber and Perona [1] additionally

  8. Artificial gravity : changing the intensity of coriolis cross-coupled stimulus with head-angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adenot, Sophie, 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Artificial Gravity (AG) created by high-speed rotation is a promising method for preventing the serious deconditioning associated with prolonged exposure to weightlessness. Unfortunately, head-movements in a rotating ...

  9. Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS TITLE: A psychological construction account of emotion regulation and dysregulation: The role of situated conceptualizations Lisa Feldman Barrett Northeastern University; Massachusetts General Hospital

  10. Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    outcomes. This study built on this literature by investigating how child, parent, and family risk factors predicted school readiness in Head Start children using two statistical models. Specific aims of this study included identifying 1) to what degree...

  11. The dynamics of the human head during natural activities that require clear vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Warren (Warren W.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current understanding of the dynamics of the human head, and the demands placed on its control and stability systems, is based largely on the results of experiments conducted in artificial settings, such as when subjects ...

  12. TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director of Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director in the current fiscal year. Purchase Requisitions: Purchases under $10,000 (Includes Corporate Express) June 11

  13. Physical and Numerical Space Running Head: Biases in Physical and Numerical Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    Physical and Numerical Space 1 Running Head: Biases in Physical and Numerical Space Elementary school children's attentional biases in physical and numerical space Tilbe Göksun: April 30, 2012 #12; Physical and Numerical Space 2 Abstract Numbers

  14. Swimming speed and stamina in head started Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys Kempi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stabenau, Erich Kurt

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SWIMMING SPEED AND STAMINA IN HEAD STARTED KEMP'S RIDLEY SEA TURTLES (LEPIDOCHELYS KEMPI) A Thesis by ERICH KURT STABENAU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER QF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SWIMMING SPEED AND STAMINA IN HEAD STARTED KEMP'S RIDLEY SEA TURTLES (LEPIDOCHELYS KEMPI) A Thesis by ERICH KURT STABENAU Approved as to style and content by: Andre M...

  15. Classification of brain compartments and head injury lesions by neural networks applied to magnetic resonance images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kischell, Eric Robert

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' (Member) A. D. Patton ( ead of epartment) August 1993 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ABSTRACT Classification of Brain Compartments and Head Injury Lesions by Neural Networks Applied to Magnetic Resonance Images. (August 1993) Eric Robert... Kischell, B. S. , Northeastern University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Nasser Kehtarnavaz An automatic neural network-based approach was ap- plied to segment brain compartments and closed-head-injury lesions in magnetic resonance (MR) images Two...

  16. Effects of Parent Expectations and Involvement on the School Readiness of Children in Head Start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Krystal Tisha'

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF PARENT EXPECTATIONS AND INVOLVEMENT ON THE SCHOOL READINESS OF CHILDREN IN HEAD START A Dissertation by KRYSTAL TISHA? COOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of children enrolled in Head Start. The study examined how these iv parent variables were related to children?s school readiness, and differences between ethnic groups, gender groups, and level of risk. The study tested a model whereby the effect...

  17. Partial Core Blockage Simulation Using COBRA-TF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Christopher

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    in fuel failure. CTF has not been widely used for testing these scenarios and the results should be compared alongside other simulations performed in STAR-CCM+ and RELAP5-3D. . For the TRIGA reactor simulations, limitations of CTF were discovered...

  18. Partial Core Blockage Simulation Using COBRA-TF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Christopher

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    in fuel failure. CTF has not been widely used for testing these scenarios and the results should be compared alongside other simulations performed in STAR-CCM+ and RELAP5-3D. . For the TRIGA reactor simulations, limitations of CTF were discovered...

  19. 3D Printing a Classic Shelby Cobra | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010 1 TNewsEnergyDepartmentof153D Printing a

  20. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,FNeedDepartment of

  1. Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCityFundCo-benefits Evaluation Tools

  2. Energy efficient control for power management circuits operating from nano-watts to watts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Saurav

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency and form factor are the key driving forces in today's power electronics. All power delivery circuits, irrespective of the magnitude of power, basically consists of power trains, gate drivers and control ...

  3. Publications: 1) Scott, T.W. 1979. Growth and age determination of nestling Brown-headed Cowbirds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    :961-964. 9) Scott, T.W., G.S. Bowen and T.P. Monath. 1984. Effects of Fort Morgan virus, an alphavirus of mosquitoes. Insect Science and its Application. 8:617-622. 15) Scott, T.W., J.G. Olson, B.P. All III and E.P. Grumstrup-Scott, eds. Misc. Pub. ESA. pp. 9-17. 21) Hubbard, J.L., T.W. Scott, L.H. Lorenz, D.M. Watts and L.A

  4. Internal strain regulates the nucleotide binding site of the kinesin leading head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyeon, Changbong; 10.1073/pnas.0610939104

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the presence of ATP, kinesin proceeds along the protofilament of microtubule by alternated binding of two motor domains on the tubulin binding sites. Since the processivity of kinesin is much higher than other motor proteins, it has been speculated that there exists a mechanism for allosteric regulation between the two monomers. Recent experiments suggest that ATP binding to the leading head domain in kinesin is regulated by the rearward strain built on the neck-linker. We test this hypothesis by explicitly modeling a $C_{\\alpha}$-based kinesin structure whose both motor domains are bound on the tubulin binding sites. The equilibrium structures of kinesin on the microtubule show disordered and ordered neck-linker configurations for the leading and the trailing head, respectively. The comparison of the structures between the two heads shows that several native contacts present at the nucleotide binding site in the leading head are less intact than those in the binding site of the rear head. The network of n...

  5. Evaluation of preharvest chemical dessication and module storage of grain sorghum head chop when fed to cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Walter Louis

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF PHEHARVEST CHEMICAL DESSICATION AND MODULE STORAGE OF GRAIN SORGHUM HEAD CHOP WHEN FED TO CATTLE A Thesis by WALTER LOUIS DAVIS Approved as to style and content bye Chairman of Committee Head of D rtment Member ~c'p Jft ~Is... ~it 8 & ~ Member December 1979 i242841 ABS TRAC T Evaluation of Preharvest Chemical Dessication and Module Storage of Grain Sorghum Head Chop When Fed to Cattle. (December 1979) Walter Louis Davis, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman...

  6. Computational evaluation of a novel approach to process planning for circuit card assembly on dual head placement machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Nilanjan Dutta

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    nozzle that uses vacuum to pick a component. Spindles can be rotated around the z-axis simultaneously, by a common drive motor to achieve proper component orientations. Each head can pick components from a set of two racks, each having 32 feeder.... Two nozzle change racks are also associated with each head. These consist of nozzle pads, which hold different nozzle types. Operation managers pre-assign nozzle types to heads. Nozzles are picked up from the pads by spindles using vacuum...

  7. Routine Repeat Head CT may not be Indicated in Patients on Anticoagulant/Antiplatelet Therapy Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCammack, Kevin C.; Sadler, Charlotte; Guo, Yueyang; Ramaswamy, Raja S; Farid, Nikdokht

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    needed when the computed tomography scan is normal. Acadof noncontrast cranial computed tomography for the emergencyMcCammack et al. Head Computed Tomography anticoagulant and

  8. Routine Repeat Head CT may not be Indicated in Patients on Anticoagulant/Antiplatelet Therapy Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCammack, Kevin C.; Sadler, Charlotte; Guo, Yueyang; Ramaswamy, Raja S; Farid, Nikdokht

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    needed when the computed tomography scan is normal. AcadMcCammack et al. Head Computed Tomography anticoagulant andof sequential computed tomography scanning in anticoagulated

  9. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  10. Evaluating the Impact of Head Rotation Amplification on Virtual Reality Training Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragan, Eric D [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Doug A [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Scerbo, Siroberto [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Bacim, Felipe [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtual reality (VR) systems have been proposed for use in numerous training scenarios, such as room clearing, which require the trainee to maintain spatial awareness. But many VR training systems lack a fully surrounding display, requiring trainees to use a combination of physical and virtual turns to view the environment, thus decreasing spatial awareness. One solution to this problem is to amplify head rotations, such that smaller physical turns are mapped to larger virtual turns, allowing trainees to view the surrounding environment with head movements alone. For example, in a multi-monitor system covering only a 90-degree field of regard, head rotations could be amplified four times to allow the user to see the entire 360-degree surrounding environment. This solution is attractive because it can be used with lower-cost VR systems and does not require virtual turning. However, the effects of amplified head rotations on spatial awareness and training transfer are not well understood. We hypothesized that small amounts of amplification might be tolerable, but that larger amplifications might cause trainees to become disoriented and to have decreased task performance and training transfer. In this paper, we will present our findings from an experiment designed to investigate these hypotheses. The experiment placed users in a virtual warehouse and asked them to move from room to room, counting objects placed around them in space. We varied the amount of amplification applied during these trials, and also varied the type of display used (head-mounted display or CAVE). We measured task performance and spatial awareness. We then assessed training transfer in an assessment environment with a fully surrounding display and no amplification. The results of this study will inform VR training system developers about the potential negative effects of using head rotation amplification and contribute to more effective VR training system design.

  11. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, D.L.; Baraszu, D.J.; Foulkes, D.M.; Gomes, E.G.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine`s crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages. 4 figs.

  12. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

  13. Modeling of an eye-imaging system for optimizing illumination schemes in an eye-tracked head-mounted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Hong

    Modeling of an eye-imaging system for optimizing illumination schemes in an eye-tracked head While the augmentation of head-mounted displays (HMDs) with eye-tracking (ET) capabilities adds of illumination schemes in an ET-HMD system, we present a simulated eye illumination and imaging system, which

  14. Influence of tissue conductivity anisotropy on EEG/MEG field and return current computation in a realistic head model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    brain using potential differences and/or magnetic fluxes measured non- invasively directly from the head in a realistic head model: A simulation and visualization study using high-resolution finite element modeling C 3493, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA c Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

  15. Talk to the Virtual Hands: Self-Animated Avatars Improve Communication in Head-Mounted Display Virtual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talk to the Virtual Hands: Self-Animated Avatars Improve Communication in Head-Mounted Display Virtual Environments Trevor J. Dodds1 *, Betty J. Mohler1 , Heinrich H. Bu lthoff1,2 1 Human Perceptionlthoff HH (2011) Talk to the Virtual Hands: Self-Animated Avatars Improve Communication in Head

  16. CASING-HEADING PHENOMENON IN GAS-LIFTED WELL AS A LIMIT CYCLE OF A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    phenomenon occurring on gas- lift artificially lifted well. This behavior is well represented by a 2D model: Process Control, Dynamic Systems, Limit Cycles, Switching System, Gas-Lifted Well. 1. INTRODUCTIONCASING-HEADING PHENOMENON IN GAS-LIFTED WELL AS A LIMIT CYCLE OF A 2D MODEL WITH SWITCHES Laure Sin

  17. UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED REGISTERED & HEAD OFFICE: 24, WHITES ROAD, CHENNAI-600014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhingra, Narender K.

    UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED REGISTERED & HEAD OFFICE: 24, WHITES ROAD, CHENNAI-600014 HEALTH INSURANCE POLICY ­ GROUP 1 WHEREAS the insured designated in the Schedule hereto has by a proposal to be incorporated herein has applied to UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LTD. (hereinafter called the COMPANY

  18. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, Yi; Wu, Qishi; Rao, Nageswara S. V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many complex sensor network applications require deploying a large number of inexpensive and small sensors in a vast geographical region to achieve quality through quantity. Hierarchical clustering is generally considered as an efficient and scalable way to facilitate the management and operation of such large-scale networks and minimize the total energy consumption for prolonged lifetime. Judicious selection of cluster heads for data integration and communication is critical to the success of applications based on hierarchical sensor networks organized as layered clusters. We investigate the problem of selecting sensor nodes in a predeployed sensor network to be the cluster heads tomoreminimize the total energy needed for data gathering. We rigorously derive an analytical formula to optimize the number of cluster heads in sensor networks under uniform node distribution, and propose a Distance-based Crowdedness Clustering algorithm to determine the cluster heads in sensor networks under general node distribution. The results from an extensive set of experiments on a large number of simulated sensor networks illustrate the performance superiority of the proposed solution over the clustering schemes based onk-means algorithm.less

  19. IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 1 Running Head: IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 1 Running Head: IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION How to Bite Your Tongue without Blowing Your Top: Implicit Evaluation of Emotion Regulation Predicts EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 2 Abstract People frequently have to control their emotions to function

  20. Mind Perception and Objectification 1 Running Head: Mind Perception and Objectification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobe, Joshua

    Mind Perception and Objectification 1 Running Head: Mind Perception and Objectification More than a Body: Mind Perception and the Nature of Objectification Kurt Gray1, Joshua Knobe2, Mark Sheskin2, Paul@umd.edu #12;Mind Perception and Objectification 2 Abstract According to models of objectification, viewing

  1. Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 1 Running head: DANGERS OF UNILATERAL FORGIVENESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, Paul J.

    Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 1 Running head: DANGERS OF UNILATERAL FORGIVENESS On the Dangers Northwestern University Word Count: 5096 #12;Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 2 On the Dangers of Resolving forgiveness helps victims preserve a relationship #12;Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 3 that is likely

  2. Stereotype threat in sports 1 Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT AND ACHIEVEMENT GOALS IN SPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Stereotype threat in sports 1 Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT AND ACHIEVEMENT GOALS IN SPORTS Do Achievement Goals Mediate Stereotype Threat? An Investigation on Females' Soccer Performance Ana Chalabaev Psycholoy 30 (2008) 143-158" #12;Stereotype threat in sports 2 Abstract This research investigated

  3. Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults' memory errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Mara

    Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults, 90089-0191. Phone: 213-740-6772. Email: barbersa@usc.edu #12;STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS 2 Abstract (144 words) Stereotype threat often incurs the cost of reducing the amount of information

  4. Promoting Self Directed Learning 1 Running head: PROMOTING SELF DIRECTED LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    as incompatible. This is due to the origins of both types of learning environments which, when consideredPromoting Self Directed Learning 1 Running head: PROMOTING SELF DIRECTED LEARNING Promoting Self Directed Learning in Simulation Based Discovery Learning Environments through Intelligent Support Koen

  5. Making the abstract concrete 1 Running head: VISUALIZING MATHEMATICAL SOLUTION PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Making the abstract concrete 1 Running head: VISUALIZING MATHEMATICAL SOLUTION PROCEDURES Making the Abstract Concrete: Visualizing Mathematical Solution Procedures Katharina Scheiter University of Tuebingen) (2006) 9-25" DOI : 10.1016/j.chb.2005.01.009 #12;Making the abstract concrete 2 Abstract This article

  6. Running head: CONCRETE PROSOCIAL GOALS MAXIMIZE HAPPINESS 1 Getting the Most out of Giving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Running head: CONCRETE PROSOCIAL GOALS MAXIMIZE HAPPINESS 1 Getting the Most out of Giving: Concretely Framing a Prosocial Goal Maximizes Happiness Melanie Rudda University of Houston Jennifer Aakerb Melcher Hall, Houston, TX 77204-6021; Email: mrrudd@bauer.uh.edu; Phone: 713.743.4572. #12;CONCRETE

  7. Agricultural Biotechnology: What's all the fuss about? Marshall A. Martin,* Professor and Associate Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it mean for soci- ety? And, where are we headed? This article provides background on biotechnologyAgricultural Biotechnology: What's all the fuss about? Marshall A. Martin,* Professor and Associate in the news media, in agribusiness boardrooms, among consumer and environmental activist groups, among

  8. Heatup of the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to current perceptions of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, corium largely relocated into the reactor vessel lower head at {approximately}224 min into the accident. Defueling examinations have revealed that the corium relocated from the molten core region to the lower head predominantly by way of drainage through the core former region (CFR) located between the vertical baffle plates immediately surrounding the fuel assemblies and the core barrel. An analysis has been carried out to assess the heatup of the reactor vessel lower head during the core relocation event, particularly the potential for a melting attack on the lower head wall and the in-core instrument nozzle penetration weldments. The analysis employed the THIRMAL computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to predict the breakup and quenching or corium jets under film boiling conditions as well as the size distributions and quenching of the resultant molten droplets. The transient heatup and ablation of the vessel wall and penetration weldments due to impinging corium jets was calculated using the MISTI computer code.

  9. Classifying Facial Gestures in Presence of Head Motion Wei-Kai Liao and Isaac Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Issac

    -computer interaction. Besides, it has many other potential applications, such as virtual reality and facial animation. After estimating the head pose, the human face is modeled by a collection of face's regions vector machine. Our experiments show that this approach could classify human expressions in interactive

  10. Identity and Leadership 1 running head: Psychoanalytic Dialogues of Identity and Leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Identity and Leadership 1 running head: Psychoanalytic Dialogues of Identity and Leadership Identities and Ideals: Psychoanalytic Dialogues of Self and Leadership Gazi Islam Associate Professor,version1-21Mar2014 #12;Identity and Leadership 2 Abstract The author contextualizes recent developments

  11. A systematic review of clinical decision rules in the management of adult minor head injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    is the diagnostic standard for identifying intracranial injury. Routine CT of all minor head injury patients would or APi). Twenty-two articles, representing nineteen studies, were identified. The median prevalence.5%). Patient selection, use of reference standards and outcome definitions all varied. These variations

  12. MEDIA RELEASE --John Herbert, Head of Digital Technologies, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    MEDIA RELEASE Contacts: --John Herbert, Head of Digital Technologies, J. Willard Marriott Library Maps at the University of Utah's J. Willard Marriott Library. The library has completed digitization Marriott Library, 801-585-9391, walter.jones@utah.edu --Dale Snyder, External Relations Director, J

  13. Predicting Library of Congress Classifications From Library of Congress Subject Headings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Eibe

    Predicting Library of Congress Classifications From Library of Congress Subject Headings Eibe Frank This paper addresses the problem of automatically assigning a Library of Congress Classification (LCC and training data from a large library catalog to learn a model which maps from sets of LCSH to classifications

  14. Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models Leonid Zhukov Abstract-- A pervasive problem in neuroscience is determining which regions of the brain are active, given within the brain from electroencephalo- graphic (EEG) recordings is an ill-posed problem. Specifi- cally

  15. Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models Leonid Zhukov Abstract--- A pervasive problem in neuroscience is determining which regions of the brain are active, given within the brain from electroencephalo graphic (EEG) recordings is an illposed problem. Specifi cally

  16. Digital library as a controversy Running head: DIGITAL LIBRARY AS A CONTROVERSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Digital library as a controversy Running head: DIGITAL LIBRARY AS A CONTROVERSY Digital library nouvelle 1 hal-00718385,version1-16Jul2012 Author manuscript, published in "Digital library as a controversy: Gallica vs Google, Dubrovnik : Croatia (2009)" #12;Digital library as a controversy Abstract

  17. Late-to Post-Cretaceous Inversion of the British Isles Tectonic Stylolites at Flamborough Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    not much is known about younger inversion events in the UK. Industrial: A lot of the oil and gas traps. Geology 36(11), 839-842. Koehn, D., Renard, F., Toussaint, R., Passchier, C.W. (2007) Growth of stylolite at Flamborough Head, U.K. Journal of Structural Geology 16, 97-107. Application procedure and deadlines

  18. Running head: Diagenesis of Beacon Sandstone Diagenetic history of Triassic sandstone from the Beacon Supergroup in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Running head: Diagenesis of Beacon Sandstone Diagenetic history of Triassic sandstone from of shallow burial diagenesis, contact diagenesis (temperatures of 200-300C), and post-contact diagenesis, on the basis of petrographic and geochemical analyses. Shallow burial diagenesis is characterised by minor

  19. Student Award Competition Finite Element EEG and MEG Simulations for Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhukov, Leonid

    than would be possible using linear elements alone. [1] D.S. Burnett. Finite Element Analysis: FromStudent Award Competition Finite Element EEG and MEG Simulations for Realistic Head Models be approximated by a technique such as the finite element method [1]. Most applications of the finite element

  20. Running Head: Patterns of Sequence Evolution Patterns of Sequence Evolution and Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Richard

    Running Head: Patterns of Sequence Evolution Patterns of Sequence Evolution and Implications. Yen. 1998. Patterns of sequence evolution and implications for parsimony analysis of chloroplast DNA. Pp. 164-187 In: Molecular Systematics of Plants II: DNA sequencing (eds, P. S. Soltis, D. E. Soltis

  1. JN-00488-2005.R2 Running Head: SOMATOTOPY AND MOTOR IMAGERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    JN-00488-2005.R2 Running Head: SOMATOTOPY AND MOTOR IMAGERY Lateral somatotopic organization during-7588 #12;JN-00488-2005.R2 Somatotopy and motor imagery 2 Abstract Motor imagery is a complex cognitive of the physical movements being imagined. Likewise, motor preparation may or may not involve computations

  2. August 18, 2009 MEMO TO: Vice Presidents, Deans, Directors, Chairs and Administrative Heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Heads FROM: Jon Whitmore President SUBJECT: Presidential Directive 2009-04 Executive Order No. 1043 Student Conduct Procedures Supersedes: Presidential Directive 2007-01 In accordance with California State or some proceedings. San Jos State University does not permit attorneys to be present in any proceeding

  3. Dumbarton Express Line DB heading to Stanford Oval. AC Transit Line U on Palm Drive.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumbarton Express Line DB heading to Stanford Oval. AC Transit Line U on Palm Drive. Photo: Karl Nielsen Photo: Dong Wang Schedules: AC Transit Line U Dumbarton Express Line DB Connections with BART Transit Line U Line U provides express service between Stanford and the Fremont BART station. Other East

  4. Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES A computational model of event segmentation from perceptual prediction. Jeremy R. Reynolds, Jeffrey M. Zacks, and Todd S. Braver Washington University Manuscript #12;Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 2 People tend

  5. Highway 280 North or South Take the Sand Hill Road exit, head east

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Highway 280 North or South Take the Sand Hill Road exit, head east Turn right on Stock Farm for "all" below From Bayshore US Highway 101 NorthFrom Bayshore US Highway 101 North or South Take Turn left on Stock Farm Road LKSC ParkingTurn left on Stock Farm Road Make the next lefthand turn

  6. Multiple systems or task complexity 1 Running head: Multiple systems or task complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoiciu, Mihai

    Multiple systems or task complexity 1 Running head: Multiple systems or task complexity Procedural memory effects in categorization: evidence for multiple systems or task complexity? Safa R. Zaki and Dave College Williamstown, MA 10267 413-597-4594 Email: szaki@williams.edu #12;Multiple systems or task

  7. A new design criterion based on pressure testing of torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, A. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics; Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two vessels with torispherical heads were pressurized to destruction at the Praxair Tonawanda facility on September 12--13, 1994. The objective was to determine pressures at which observable or measurable indications of failure could be detected. Plastic limit pressures for the two heads were calculated at 190 and 240 psi, respectively. For Vessel 1, the only observable action was a slow formation of some waviness of the knuckle profile at approximately 600 psi. It lost pressure at 700 psi when a crack developed at a nozzle weld at the bottom of the shell. For Vessel 2, no indication of any sign of failure was observed until it burst at a pressure of 1,080 psi by a ductile fracture along the longitudinal weld of the shell. The main conclusion is that there is a problem in the application of the double elastic slope collapse criterion to torispherical heads. It was determined that when using this criterion a collapse pressure signaling excessive deformation cannot be determined with any certainty. Furthermore, the test data do not show anything at any of the calculated collapse pressures that suggests excessive deformation. Thus, the collapse pressures for torispherical heads cannot be confirmed by test. This leads to the inconsistency that if the collapse load is divided by a safety factor, say 1.5, to obtain an allowable pressure, the actual safety margin of the design is not known and may not be 1.5. For a material with sufficient ductility, the use of an estimated burst pressure appears preferable. A design criterion based on the membrane stress at the crown of a torispherical head reaching the ultimate tensile strength is proposed, which is simple, can be supported by theoretical arguments, and is shown to be conservative by current test results as well as by those of two previous test programs.

  8. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

  9. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.

  10. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

  11. Calibration of an Active Binocular Head ShengWen Shih y , YiPing Hung z , and WeiSong Lin y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    1 Calibration of an Active Binocular Head Sheng­Wen Shih y , Yi­Ping Hung z , and Wei­Song Lin y y binocular head, the IIS head, can be easily calibrated with very high accuracy. Our calibration method can­stage calibration process, there are three major contributions in this paper. First, we propose a MFL (Motorized

  12. Chemical effects head-loss research in support of generic safety issue 191.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J. H.; Kasza, K.; Fisher, B.; Oras, J.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary report describes studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the potential for chemical effects on head loss across sump screens. Three different buffering solutions were used for these tests: trisodium phosphate (TSP), sodium hydroxide, and sodium tetraborate. These pH control agents used following a LOCA at a nuclear power plant show various degrees of interaction with the insulating materials Cal-Sil and NUKON. Results for Cal-Sil dissolution tests in TSP solutions, settling rate tests of calcium phosphate precipitates, and benchmark tests in chemically inactive environments are also presented. The dissolution tests were intended to identify important environmental variables governing both calcium dissolution and subsequent calcium phosphate formation over a range of simulated sump pool conditions. The results from the dissolution testing were used to inform both the head loss and settling test series. The objective of the head loss tests was to assess the head loss produced by debris beds created by Cal-Sil, fibrous debris, and calcium phosphate precipitates. The effects of both the relative arrival time of the precipitates and insulation debris and the calcium phosphate formation process were specifically evaluated. The debris loadings, test loop flow rates, and test temperature were chosen to be reasonably representative of those expected in plants with updated sump screen configurations, although the approach velocity of 0.1 ft/s used for most of the tests is 3-10 times that expected in plants with large screens . Other variables were selected with the intent to reasonably bound the head loss variability due to arrival time and calcium phosphate formation uncertainty. Settling tests were conducted to measure the settling rates of calcium phosphate precipitates (formed by adding dissolved Ca to boric acid and TSP solutions) in water columns having no bulk directional flow. For PWRs where NaOH and sodium tetraborate are used to control sump pH and fiberglass insulation is prevalent, relatively high concentrations of soluble aluminum can be expected. Tests in which the dissolved aluminum (Al) resulted from aluminum nitrate additions were used to investigate potential chemical effects that may lead to high head loss. Dissolved Al concentrations of 100 ppm were shown to lead to large pressure drops for the screen area to sump volume ratio and fiber debris bed studied. No chemical effects on head loss were observed in sodium tetraborate buffered solutions even for environments with high ratios of submerged Al area to sump volume. However, in tests with much higher concentrations of dissolved Al than expected in plants, large pressure drops did occur. Interaction with NUKON/Cal-Sil debris mixtures produced much lower head losses than observed in corresponding tests with TSP, although tests were not performed over the full range of Cal-Sil that might be of interest.

  13. Enhancement of Corium Coolability with CRGTs in the Lower Head of a BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehgal, Bal Raj; Jasiulevicius, Audrius; Konovalikhin, Maxim J. [Nuclear Power Safety Division, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm Drottning Kristinas vaeg 33A, SE-10044, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments were preformed in the POMECO (Porous Media Coolability) and the COMECO (Corium Melt Coolability) test facilities at the Nuclear Power Safety Division of the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. During the experiments particulate debris beds and molten pools were cooled by establishing a water layer above them. The main aim of the experiments was to investigate the additional coolability capacity offered by the Control Rod Guide Tubes (CRGTs) in the lower head of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Each CRGT has a substantial heat transfer area and there is large number of these tubes in the BWR lower head. The coolant is supplied to the RPV via the CRGTs during the normal reactor operation and this coolant flow could be maintained during a severe accident. The primary objective of the experimental program was to obtain data on the heat removal capacity, offered by a CRGT. This paper presents results of the experiments. (authors)

  14. Head-on collision of ion-acoustic solitary waves in multicomponent plasmas with positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Shamy, E. F.; Sabry, R. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta-Branch, New Damietta 34517, Damietta (Egypt); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The head-on collision between two ion-acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized multicomponent plasma consisting of hot ions, hot positrons, and two-electron temperature distributions is investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method. The Kortwege-de Vries equations and the analytical phase shifts after the head-on collision of two solitary waves in this multicomponent plasma are obtained. The effects of two different types of isothermal electrons, the ratio of the hot ion temperature to the effective temperature, the ratio of the effective temperature to the positron temperature, the ratio of the number density of positrons to that of electrons species, and the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic) on the phase shifts are studied. It is found that these parameters can significantly influence the phase shifts of the solitons. The relevance of this investigation to space and laboratory plasmas is pointed out.

  15. Observation of the 'head-tail' effect in nuclear recoils of low-energy neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Dujmic; H. Tomita; M. Lewandowska; S. Ahlen; P. Fisher; S. Henderson; A. Kaboth; G. Kohse; R. Lanza; J. Monroe; A. Roccaro; G. Sciolla; N. Skvorodnev; R. Vanderspek; H. Wellenstein; R. Yamamoto

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional detection of dark matter can provide unambiguous observation of dark matter interactions even in the presence of background. This article presents an experimental method to measure the direction tag ("head-tail") of the dark matter wind by detecting the scintillation light created by the elastic nuclear recoils in the scattering of dark matter particles with the detector material. The technique is demonstrated by tagging the direction of the nuclear recoils created in the scattering of low-energy neutrons with CF4 in a low-pressure time-projection chamber that is developed by the DMTPC collaboration. The measurement of the decreasing ionization rate along the recoil trajectory provides the direction tag of the incoming neutrons, and proves that the "head-tail" effect can be observed.

  16. Head-end process for the reprocessing of HTGR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.; Wen, M. [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Bejing 10084 (China)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reprocessing of HTGR spent fuels is in favor of the sustainable development of nuclear energy to realize the maximal use of nuclear resource and the minimum disposal of nuclear waste. The head-end of HTGR spent fuels reprocessing is different from that of the LWR spent fuels reprocessing because of the difference of spent fuel structure. The dismantling of the graphite spent fuel element and the highly effective dissolution of fuel kernel is the most difficult process in the head end of the reprocessing. Recently, some work on the head-end has been done in China. First, the electrochemical method with nitrate salt as electrolyte was studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from HTGR fuel elements and release the coated fuel particles, to provide an option for the head-end technology of reprocessing. The results show that the graphite matrix can be effectively separated from the coated particle without any damage to the SiC layer. Secondly, the microwave-assisted heating was applied to dissolve the UO{sub 2} kernel from the crashed coated fuel particles. The ceramic UO{sub 2} as the solute has a good ability to absorb the microwave energy. The results of UO{sub 2} kernel dissolution from crushed coated particles by microwave heating show that the total dissolution percentage of UO{sub 2} is more than 99.99% after 3 times cross-flow dissolution with the following parameters: 8 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, temperature 100 Celsius degrees, initial ratio of solid to liquid 1.2 g/ml. (authors)

  17. Head-on beam-beam tune shifts with high brightness beams in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Calaga, R; Cornelis, K; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Herr, W; McPherson, A; Miyamoto, R; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Schaumann, M; Suykerbuyk, R; Trad, G; Paret, S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this experiment (fills 1765, 1766) we have collided bunches with highest brightness, i.e. small emittances and high intensities, to explore the achievable beam-beam tune shift for head-on collisions. Different parameters and filling schemes have been used for this experiment and tune shifts above 0.015 have been achieved in single collisions and above 0.030 for two collision points.

  18. Determination of selected trace elements in human head hair by neutron activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courson, Leonard Austin

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    barber shops and beauty salons in the Bryan-College Station Met- ropolitan Area. The locations of the prospective collection sites were selected at random from the local telephone directory. Though some of these sites did not elect to participate... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering DETERMINATION OF SELECTEO TRACE ELEMENTS IN HUMAN HEAD HAIR BY NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS A Thesis by LEONARD AUSTIN COURSON Approved as to style and content by Chai r...

  19. Assessing the Transient Flow Behavior in Falling-head Permeameter Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavdar, Sevgi

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Hongbin Zhan Committee Members, David Sparks Marcelo Sanchez Benchun Duan Head of Department, John R. Giardino May 2013 Major Subject: Geology Copyright 2013 Sevgi Cavdar ii... support throughout the final weeks and procedures. I am indebted to my committee members: to Dr. David Sparks for his honesty and his guidance through the programing part, and to Dr. Benchun Duan and Dr. Marcelo Sanchez for accepting to serve in my...

  20. Lattice design for head-on beam-beam compensation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag, C.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron lenses for head-on beam-beam compensation will be installed in IP 10 at RHIC. Compensation of the beam-beam effect experienced at IP 8 requires betatron phase advances of {Delta}{psi} = k {center_dot} {pi} between the proton-proton interaction point at IP 8, and the electron lens at IP 10. This paper describes the lattice solutions for both the BLUE and the YELLOW ring to achieve this goal.

  1. Redelegation/Designation Order No. 00-022.06A to Anthony H. Montoya as head

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead of Contracting Activity (HCA) for theof

  2. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilch, M.M.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Chu, T.Y. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rashid, Y.R. [Anatech, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In order to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication.

  3. A SMALL PORTABLE DETECTOR HEAD USING MIS-CONTACTED CdTe FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    339 A SMALL PORTABLE DETECTOR HEAD USING MIS-CONTACTED CdTe FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETRY P. EICHINGER and the implications of this material for the spectroscopy of gamma rays and X-rays. Instead an arrangement

  4. Design, fabrication, and characterization of a low-cost flexural bearing based 3D printing tool head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Aaron Eduardo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses the design, characterization and optimization of a low-cost additive rapid-prototyping tool head for a technology known as Fused Filament Fabrication for use in an educational curriculum. Building a ...

  5. Proteome Profiling for Assessing Diversity: Analysis of Individual Heads of Drosophila melanogaster Using LC-Ion Mobility-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    Proteome Profiling for Assessing Diversity: Analysis of Individual Heads of Drosophila melanogaster dimensions of condensed-phase separations with mass spec- trometry (MS).4 In this approach, mass-to-charge (m-speed, gas-phase sep

  6. Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Many senescent individuals demonstrate an inability to regulate mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to standing or head-up tilt; however, whether this aging effect is the result of depressed cardiac function or an ...

  7. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5. Hess, J.R.; Wright, C.T.; and Kenney, K.L. (2007). Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production. Biofuels, Bioprod. Biorefin., 1(3),...

  8. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JAMES E. FRANCFORT Education and Training Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho, USA, M S., Business Administration 1991 Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho, USA, B.S.,...

  9. Heading 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    willingly give and accept constructive feedback and coaching. On-going Dialogue I have good interpersonal skills. I am a good listener. I seek to find out information through...

  10. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    logistics for biomass energy conversion, environmental impacts of in situ and ex situ oil shale energy development, and watershed resource management and energy issues; provides...

  11. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patents Files; R.D. Boardman, R.A. Carrington; "Method and Apparatus for Oil Shale Pollutant SorptionNOx Reburning, Multi-pollutant Control," June 10, 2008. 2. U.S....

  12. Heading 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2011 Technical Evaluation Study Project No. 23843 Integration of HTGRs to an Ex Situ Oil Shale Retort Operation, Economic Analysis 08022011 Form 412.09 (Rev. 10) Idaho National...

  13. Heading 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Evaluation Study Project No. 23843 Integration of HTGRs with an In Situ Oil Shale Operation 05162011 2 Form 412.09 (Rev. 10) Idaho National Laboratory INTEGRATION...

  14. HEADING FRONTMATTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Wood is currently working with the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Office to stand up the Western Energy Corridor Initiative, and he is also...

  15. Heading 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Mentor May 2014 ONE PROGRAM BRINGING TOGETHER ALL DOE COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE O O f f f f i i c c e e o o f f L L e e a a r r n n i i n n g g & & W W o o r r k k f f o o r r c...

  16. Heading 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecoveryG -Hazmat work opens up

  17. Heading 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing theWhiz! |Nearly sixDepartment

  18. Heading 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing theWhiz! |Nearly sixDepartmentfor

  19. An on-line replanning method for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng, Cheng; Godley, Andrew; Schultz, Christopher; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily setup for head and neck (HN) radiotherapy (RT) can vary randomly due to neck rotation and anatomy change. These differences cannot be totally corrected by the current practice of image guided RT with translational repositioning. The authors present a novel rapid correction scheme that can be used on-line to correct both interfractional setup variation and anatomy change for HN RT. The scheme consists of two major steps: (1) Segment aperture morphing (SAM) and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO). SAM is accomplished by applying the spatial relationship between the apertures and the contours of the planning target and organs at risk (OARs) to the new target and OAR contours. The new target contours are transferred from planning target contours to the CT of the day by means of deformable registration (MIMVISTA). The dose distribution for each new aperture was generated using a planning system with a fast dose engine and hardware and was input into a newly developed SWO package using fast sequential quadratic programming. The entire scheme was tested based on the daily CT images acquired for representative HN IMRT cases treated with a linac and CT-on-Rails combo. It was found that the target coverage and/or OAR sparing was degraded based on the CT of the day with the current standard repositioning from rigid registration. This degradation can be corrected by the SAM/SWO scheme. The target coverage and OAR sparing for the SAM/SWO plans were found to be equivalent to the original plan. The SAM/SWO process took 5-8 min for the head and neck cases studied. The proposed aperture morphing with weight optimization is an effective on-line approach for correcting interfractional patient setup and anatomic changes for head and neck cancer radiotherapy.

  20. Tobacco Smoking During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Is Associated With Unfavorable Outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Leon M.; Vaughan, Andrew; Sreeraman, Radhika [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stuart, Kerri; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of continued cigarette smoking among patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer by comparing the clinical outcomes among active smokers and quitters. Methods and Materials: A review of medical records identified 101 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who continued to smoke during radiation therapy. Each active smoker was matched to a control patient who had quit smoking before initiation of radiation therapy. Matching was based on tobacco history (pack-years), primary site, age, sex, Karnofsky Performance Status, disease stage, radiation dose, chemotherapy use, year of treatment, and whether surgical resection was performed. Outcomes were compared by use of Kaplan-Meier analysis. Normal tissue effects were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 49 months, active smokers had significantly inferior 5-year overall survival (23% vs. 55%), locoregional control (58% vs. 69%), and disease-free survival (42% vs. 65%) compared with the former smokers who had quit before radiation therapy (p < 0.05 for all). These differences remained statistically significant when patients treated by postoperative or definitive radiation therapy were analyzed separately. The incidence of Grade 3 or greater late complications was also significantly increased among active smokers compared with former smokers (49% vs. 31%, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking during radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer is associated with unfavorable outcomes. Further studies analyzing the biologic and molecular reasons underlying these differences are planned.

  1. The Shapiro Conjecture: Prompt or Delayed Collapse in the head-on collision of neutron stars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Miller; Wai-Mo Suen; Malcolm Tobias

    1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the question of prompt vs. delayed collapse in the head-on collision of two neutron stars. We show that the prompt formation of a black hole is possible, contrary to a conjecture of Shapiro which claims that collapse is delayed until after neutrino cooling. We discuss the insight provided by Shapiro's conjecture and its limitation. An understanding of the limitation of the conjecture is provided in terms of the many time scales involved in the problem. General relativistic simulations in the Einstein theory with the full set of Einstein equations coupled to the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations are carried out in our study.

  2. Shapiro conjecture: Prompt or delayed collapse in the head-on collision of neutron stars?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Mark; Suen, Wai-Mo; Tobias, Malcolm

    2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the question of prompt versus delayed collapse in the head-on collision of two neutron stars. We show that the prompt formation of a black hole is possible, contrary to a conjecture of Shapiro which claims that collapse is delayed until after neutrino cooling. An understanding of the limitation of the conjecture is provided in terms of the many time scales involved in the problem. General relativistic simulations with the full set of Einstein equations coupled to the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations are carried out.

  3. The Shapiro Conjecture Prompt or Delayed Collapse in the head-on collision of neutron stars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, M; Tobias, M; Miller, Mark; Suen, Wai-Mo; Tobias, Malcolm

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the question of prompt vs. delayed collapse in the head-on collision of two neutron stars. We show that the prompt formation of a black hole is possible, contrary to a conjecture of Shapiro which claims that collapse is delayed until after neutrino cooling. We discuss the insight provided by Shapiro's conjecture and its limitation. An understanding of the limitation of the conjecture is provided in terms of the many time scales involved in the problem. General relativistic simulations in the Einstein theory with the full set of Einstein equations coupled to the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations are carried out in our study.

  4. Read/write head for a magnetic tape device having grooves for reducing tape floating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aoki, Kenji (Kawasaki, JP)

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A read/write head for a magnetic tape includes an elongated chip assembly and a tape running surface formed in the longitudinal direction of the chip assembly. A pair of substantially spaced parallel read/write gap lines for supporting read/write elements extend longitudinally along the tape running surface of the chip assembly. Also, at least one groove is formed on the tape running surface on both sides of each of the read/write gap lines and extends substantially parallel to the read/write gap lines.

  5. Supplement 24, Part 6, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Subject Headings: A to I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.; Shaw, Judith H.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Zidar, Judith A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    index-Catalogue of Medical and veterinary zoology Supplement 24, Part 6 Parasite-Subject Catalogue Subject Headings: A to I ORYX PRESS index-Catalogue of Medical and veterinary zoology Supplement 24, Part 6 Parasite-Subject Catalogue... at Encanto Phoenix, AZ 85004 ISSN 0094-4556 A?L ver C674 ou ISBN 0-89774-051-3 (Set) ISBN 0-89774-057-2 (Part 6A) PREFACE The Index-Catalogue of Medical and Veterinary Zoology is an index to the world's literature on animal parasites of animals...

  6. Head of EM Program Tours Hanford Site Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 QDecemberBlogFEES FOIA FEESGraphicsforHead of EM Program

  7. Effect of oxide films on hydrogen permeability of candidate Stirling heater head tube alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuon, S R; Misencik, J A

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure hydrogen has been selected as the working fluid for the developmental automotive Stirling engine. Containment of the working fluid during operation of the engine at high temperatures and at high hydrogen gas pressures is essential for the acceptance of the Stirling engine as an alternative to the internal combustion engine. Most commercial alloys are extremely permeable to pure hydrogen at high temperatures. A program was undertaken at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) to reduce hydrogen permeability in the Stirling engine heater head tubes by doping the hydrogen working fluid with CO or CO/sub 2/. Small additions of these gases were shown to form an oxide on the inside tube wall and thus reduce hydrogen permeability. A study of the effects of dopant concentration, alloy composition, and effects of surface oxides on hydrogen permeability in candidate heater head tube alloys is summarized. Results showed that hydrogen permeability was similar for iron-base alloys (N-155, A286, IN800, 19-9DL, and Nitronic 40), cobalt-base alloys (HS-188) and nickel-base alloys (IN718). In general, the permeability of the alloys decreased with increasing concentration of CO or CO/sub 2/ dopant, with increasing oxide thickness, and decreasing oxide porosity. At high levels of dopants, highly permeable liquid oxides formed on those alloys with greater than 50% Fe content. Furthermore, highly reactive minor alloying elements (Ti, Al, Nb, and La) had a strong influence on reducing hydrogen permeability.

  8. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  9. Selective evaporation of focusing fluid in two-fluid hydrodynamic print head.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keicher, David M.; Cook, Adam W.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed in this project has demonstrated the feasibility to use hydrodynamic focusing of two fluid steams to create a novel micro printing technology for electronics and other high performance applications. Initial efforts focused solely on selective evaporation of the sheath fluid from print stream provided insight in developing a unique print head geometry allowing excess sheath fluid to be separated from the print flow stream for recycling/reuse. Fluid flow models suggest that more than 81 percent of the sheath fluid can be removed without affecting the print stream. Further development and optimization is required to demonstrate this capability in operation. Print results using two-fluid hydrodynamic focusing yielded a 30 micrometers wide by 0.5 micrometers tall line that suggests that the cross-section of the printed feature from the print head was approximately 2 micrometers in diameter. Printing results also demonstrated that complete removal of the sheath fluid is not necessary for all material systems. The two-fluid printing technology could enable printing of insulated conductors and clad optical interconnects. Further development of this concept should be pursued.

  10. A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Paul D. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Foote, Robert L. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); McLaughlin, Mark P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Halyard, Michele Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ballman, Karla V. [Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Collie, A. Craig [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Miller, Robert C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Flemming, Kelly D. [Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Hallett, John W. [Division of Vascular Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine carotid artery stenosis incidence after radiotherapy for head-and-neck neoplasms. Methods and Materials: This historical prospective cohort study comprised 44 head-and-neck cancer survivors who received unilateral neck radiotherapy between 1974 and 1999. They underwent bilateral carotid duplex ultrasonography to detect carotid artery stenosis. Results: The incidence of significant carotid stenosis (8 of 44 [18%]) in the irradiated neck was higher than that in the contralateral unirradiated neck (3 of 44 [7%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The rate of significant carotid stenosis events increased as the time after radiotherapy increased. The risk of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis was higher in patients who had undergone a neck dissection vs. those who had not. Patients with significant ipsilateral stenosis also tended to be older than those without significant stenosis. No other patient or treatment variables correlated with risk of carotid artery stenosis. Conclusions: For long-term survivors after neck dissection and irradiation, especially those who are symptomatic, ultrasonographic carotid artery screening should be considered.

  11. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [comps.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  12. Margin on Gross Tumor Volume and Risk of Local Recurrence in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Keene, Kimberley S.; Dobelbower, M. Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bonner, James A., E-mail: jabonner@uabmc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether the method or extent of construction of the high-dose clinical target volume (CTV) and high-dose planning target volume (PTV) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer are associated with an increased risk of locoregional failure. Materials and Methods: Patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, oral cavity, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated definitively with IMRT were included. All patients without local relapse had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 24 months. Treatment plans of 85 available patients were reviewed, and the gross tumor volume (GTV) to PTV expansion method was estimated. Results: The GTVs were expanded volumetrically in 71 of 85 patients, by a median of 15 mm (range, 4-25 mm). An anatomic component to the expansion of GTV was used in 14 of 85 patients. Eighteen patients failed locoregionally, for an actuarial locoregional control rate of 77.2% at 2 years. There was no significant difference in locoregional control between patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically vs. those with a component of anatomic expansion. In patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically, no increase in risk of local failure was seen in patients with a total GTV expansion of <=15 mm. Conclusion: In this retrospective study, there was not an increased risk of local failure using smaller margins or expanding GTVs volumetrically when treating head-and-neck cancer patients definitively with IMRT.

  13. Evaluation of horizonal resistance to head smut Sporisorium reilianum (Kuhn) Langdon & Fullerton in Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palma Carias, Alejandro

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inoculation in two A/B inbred lines known for their different levels of resistance in different genetic backgrounds at the Texas A&M Research Farm in College Station during the Summer of 1992 33 Means % susceptible reactions of F 1 hybrids derived from.... . . . . 2. Overall mean resistance reactions to head smut in overall F I hybrid combinations (13 hybrids each) with 4 A/B and 10 restorer lines with different genetic backgrounds for resistance / susceptibility to head smut using hypodermic syringe...

  14. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- SunWatts Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) has a loan program that allows its members to finance a portion of a photovoltaic (PV) or small wind system. Loans are available in an amount of...

  15. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reston, VA. Applied Geomechanics (2001). Model 716-2 biaxial tiltmeter (model 716-2B) from Applied Geomechanics (Applied Geomechanics, 2001), which is accurate down to

  16. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paradigm for Vibration-Based Structural Health Monitoring.Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA,Worden, K (2001) Structural Health Monitoring Using

  17. Heriot-Watt University Spin-Out Company Successes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Technologies Ltd 2009 Innovative technologies for hydrocarbon recovery and storage of carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs TotallyTextures Ltd 2007 Provision of integrated set of tools for surface capture Machine Translation SISTech 1999 Development of new sustainable technologies Computer Application Services

  18. HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY DUBAI CAMPUS Student Visa Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Applying from Outside the United Arab Emirates (UAE) United Arab Emirates (UAE) law requires all non and Emirates ID card) * 1590 AED 900 AED 2490 AED Refundable Visa Deposit Not applicable 3000 AED 3000 AED

  19. HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY DUBAI CAMPUS Student Visa Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Applying from Inside the United Arab Emirates (UAE) United Arab Emirates (UAE) law requires all non University Service Charge Total Amount Due Processing of new visa (including medical test and Emirates ID, you will receive your: Emirates I

  20. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the code-level wind forces (Goldstone, 1963). The forcethe full force of the northerly Santa Ana winds. In Aprilof forces and overall displacement under seismic and wind

  1. Design of a 50-watt air supplied turbogenerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Stevan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design of a high-pressure-ratio, low-flow turbogenerator with 50 W electrical power output, designed to operate from a 5-bar air supply. The research shows that a MEMS-based silicon turbine in ...

  2. Where are your BTUs? Watt are you doing about it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    (1015 BTUs) EIA AER 2007 #12;YOUR BTU Consumption Rate USA P C it E C tiUSA Per Capita Energy Consumption 6.2% Drop EIA AER 2007 #12;More People, More Energy 350 USA Population Growth 1949-2007 250 300 #12;OUR BTU Consumption Rate USA E C tiUSA Energy Consumption EIA AER 2007 #12;You vs Your

  3. Rocky Mountain Power- WattSmart Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power provides incentives for residential customers in Idaho to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Rebates are available for qualified appliances,...

  4. Rocky Mountain Power- WattSmart Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power offers the Home Energy Savings Program for their residential Wyoming customers to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. Incentives are available for energy efficient...

  5. Tape-Spring Rolling Hinges Alan M. Watt1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    for solar array panels, synthetic aperture radars (SARs), booms, radiators and the like. Several successful design of a low cost, unlubricated, self-deploying, self-locking hinge whose properties can be easily-high power solar arrays, involve the use of stiff members connected by self-locking hinges. The design

  6. Working with Industry Heriot-Watt University has a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    the wind farm, and electric load modelling software. I Green Logistics Green Logistics is a four year EPSRC research groups: I Scottish Institute for Solar Energy Research (SISER) SISER enhances international collaboration in the area of solar technologies and provides the expertise and facilities to support R

  7. Stanley K. Yoo, BS Richard Watts, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabih, Ramin

    .2222010608 Radiology 2002; 222:564568 Abbreviations: CNR contrast-to-noise ratio DSA digital subtraction angiography 2D two-dimensional 1 From the Department of Radiology MR Research, Weill Medical College- prove dynamic two-dimensional pro- jection magnetic resonance digital subtraction angiography by using

  8. VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivilegesUnauthorizedVIA EMAILof

  9. Watt Does It Cost To Use It? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell DirectorThe Water Power Program,1

  10. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat...

  11. Watts Community, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,AreaWatson, New York: EnergyWattner

  12. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of a downholeReactorsgoal andLastNetworksof

  13. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of a downholeReactorsgoal andLastNetworksofof

  14. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (Low-Resolution Billboard) | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of a downholeReactorsgoal

  15. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S HBatteries with WideNOxSi-based|Department of

  16. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S HBatteries with WideNOxSi-based|Department

  17. Predictive Modelling of Toxicity Resulting from Radiotherapy Treatments of Head and Neck Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Jamie A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, the radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa (mucosal lining of the throat) is thought to be a major contributing factor to dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction), the most commonly reported severe toxicity. There is a variation in the severity of dysphagia experienced by patients. Understanding the role of the dose distribution in dysphagia would allow improvements in the radiotherapy technique to be explored. The 3D dose distributions delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa of 249 patients treated as part of clinical trials were reconstructed. Pydicom was used to extract DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) data (the standard file formats for medical imaging and radiotherapy data). NumPy and SciPy were used to manipulate the data to generate 3D maps of the dose distribution delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa and calculate metrics describing the dose distribution. Multivariate predictive modelling of severe dysphagia, including descriptions of the d...

  18. A Theory of the Beam Transfer Function (BTF) with Chromaticity Induced Head-Tail Phase Shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fartoukh, S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of chromaticity determination by measuring head-tail phase shifts has been demonstrated both in the CERN-SPS, at HERA (DESY) and at RHIC (BNL). This method, however, requires to apply sizable transverse kick to the beam which might turn to be detrimental to the LHC performance in view of the tight emittance growth budget allowed for this machine. The aim of this paper is to extend the theory to the case of a coherent beam excitation of small amplitude, in particular at a frequency equal to the beam betatron tune (Phase Locked Loop mode), with, as a result, the possibility of envisaging a chromaticity feed-back system based on this technique for the LHC.

  19. GEANT4 Application for the Simulation of the Head of a Siemens Primus Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Quesada, J. M.; Gallardo, M. I. [Dep. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, University of Sevilla. Apdo. 1065 E-41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monte Carlo simulation of the head of a Siemens Primus Linac used at Virgen Macarena Hospital (Sevilla, Spain) has been performed using the code GEANT4, version 9.2. In this work, the main features of the application built by our group are presented. They are mainly focused in the optimization of the performance of the simulation. The geometry, including the water phantom, has been entirely wrapped by a shielding volume which discards all the particles escaping far away through its walls. With this, a factor of four in the time spent by the simulation can be saved. An interface to read and write phase-space files in IAEA format has been also developed to save CPU time in our simulations. Finally, some calculations of the dose absorption in the water phantom have been done and compared with the results given by EGSnrc and with experimental data obtained for the calibration of the machine.

  20. Head-on collisions of electrostatic solitons in multi-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verheest, Frank [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, Manfred A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hereman, Willy A. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401-1887 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Head-on collisions between two electrostatic solitons are dealt with by the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method of strained coordinates, for a plasma composed of a number of cold (positive and negative) ion species and Boltzmann electrons. The nonlinear evolution equations for both solitons and their phase shift due to the collision, resulting in time delays, are established. A Korteweg-de Vries description is the generic conclusion, except when the plasma composition is special enough to replace the quadratic by a cubic nonlinearity in the evolution equations, with concomitant repercussions on the phase shifts. Applications include different two-ion plasmas, showing positive or negative polarity solitons in the generic case. At critical composition, a combination of a positive and a negative polarity soliton is possible.

  1. Computed tomographic studies of the head in a teaching hospital and a community hospital: a comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, B.J.; Kirkwood, J.R.; Hanley, J.A.; Polak, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Funkenstein, H.H.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation compared the use of computed tomography (CT) of the head at a large primary medical-school-affiliated hospital and at a large community hospital. There were two aims: first, to study the intrinsic characteristics of the patients in an attempt to determine the protential for developing accurate discrimination algorithms; and second, to study the patterns of neurodiagnostic tests used at these facilities. The results indicated that separability of patients into normal and abnormal categories at both institutions was extremely small. In addition, there was no significant difference in the numbers or types of ancillary tests used at both institutions. Overall, these data once more confirm the difficulty of altering CT usage patterns in primary or secondary hospitals without significantly affecting the number of abnormal patients identified.

  2. The nerve supply to the major organs and tissues of the caprine head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatum, Michael Edward

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    've, deep brAanehes A ? CAenicuiate I"66npixen 8- . '. tAxi J 0 r pe t re) e a 1 nAe r ve C St. apedxa1 nerve D-Cnerda tyMpan. i nex"ve E- Cauda1 aurieIulax nex've P ? Digastric nexve G- Stylobyoid nexve FXgUX S 1 1 - D3 S jXXbUt XOIX 0 f tI1Q IXPPOg... ? ZggoQlet 1c bo ne 6-Maxilla H-Fncial tubelasi. ty l-N!Isnl bone J leal . Ol"b3. id. l fazed!!Ien K- incisive bane 4- Pills ' 1ne f 3. sen 1'e figure 3 - Sagittal section of the head showing dietri13ntion 0 f the ol factor/ nerve A...

  3. Head-on-collision of modulated dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Depsy, A.; Zedan, N. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); El-Taibany, W. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, P.O. 960, Abha (Saudi Arabia); El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, P.O. 34517, New Damietta (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The derivative expansion perturbation method is applied to a strongly coupled dusty plasma system consisting of negatively charged dust grains, electrons, and ions. The basic equations are reduced to a nonlinear Schroedinger type equation appropriate for describing the modulated dust acoustic (DA) waves. We have examined the modulation (in) stability and the dependence of the system physical parameters (angular frequency and group velocity) on the polarization force variation. Finally, the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo technique is employed to investigate the head-on collision (HoC) between two DA dark solitons. The analytical phase shifts and the trajectories of these dark solitons after the collision are derived. The numerical illustrations show that the polarization effect has strong influence on the nature of the phase shifts and the trajectories of the two DA dark solitons after collision.

  4. Unbounded energies of debris from head-on particle collisions near black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. B. Zaslavskii

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    If two particles move toward a black hole and collide near the horizon, the energy E_{c.m.} in the centre of mass can grow unbounded. This is a so-called Ba\\~nados-Silk-West (BSW) effect. One of problems creating obstacles to the possibility of its observation consists in that individual energy E of a fragment at infinity remains finite because of redshift. We show that in the case of head-on collision, debris may have unbounded energy E. An essential ingredient of this scenario is a particle moving away from a black hole in the near-horizon region. It can appear due to precedent collision that implies multiple scattering.

  5. Inter- and Intrafractional Positional Uncertainties in Pediatric Radiotherapy Patients With Brain and Head and Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltran, Chris, E-mail: chris.beltran@stjude.or [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate radiation therapy planning margins based on inter- and intrafractional uncertainty for pediatric brain and head and neck tumor patients at different imaging frequencies. Methods: Pediatric patients with brain (n = 83) and head and neck (n = 17) tumors (median age = 7.2 years) were enrolled on an internal review board-approved localization protocol and stratified according to treatment position and use of anesthesia. Megavoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) was performed before each treatment and after every other treatment. The pretreatment offsets were used to calculate the interfractional setup uncertainty (SU), and posttreatment offsets were used to calculate the intrafractional residual uncertainty (RU). The SU and RU are the patient-related components of the setup margin (SM), which is part of the planning target volume (PTV). SU data was used to simulate four intervention strategies using different imaging frequencies and thresholds. Results: The SM based on all patients treated on this study was 2.1 mm (SU = 0.9 mm, RU = 1.9 mm) and varied according to treatment position (supine = 1.8 mm, prone = 2.6 mm) and use of anesthesia (with = 1.7 mm, without = 2.5 mm) because of differences in the RU. The average SU for a 2-mm threshold based on no imaging, once per week imaging, initial five images, and daily imaging was 3.6, 2.1, 2.2, and 0.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: On the basis of this study, the SM component of the PTV may be reduced to 2 mm for daily CBCT compared with 3.5 mm for weekly CBCT. Considering patients who undergo daily pretreatment CBCT, the SM is larger for those treated in the prone position or smaller for those treated under anesthesia because of differences in the RU.

  6. Protons in Head-and-Neck Cancer: Bridging the Gap of Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramaekers, Bram L.T., E-mail: bram.ramaekers@mumc.nl [Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Grutters, Janneke P.C. [Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Joore, Manuela A. [Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands) [Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To use Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) models and comparative planning studies to explore the (cost-)effectiveness of swallowing sparing intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) compared with swallowing sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy with photons (IMRT) in head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: A Markov model was constructed to examine and compare the costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) of the following strategies: (1) IMPT for all patients; (2) IMRT for all patients; and (3) IMPT if efficient. The assumption of equal survival for IMPT and IMRT in the base case analysis was relaxed in a sensitivity analysis. Results: Intensity modulated proton radiation therapy and IMRT for all patients yielded 6.620 and 6.520 QALYs and cost 50,989 and 41,038, respectively. Intensity modulated proton radiation therapy if efficient yielded 6.563 QALYs and cost 43,650. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of IMPT if efficient versus IMRT for all patients was 60,278 per QALY gained. In the sensitivity analysis, IMRT was more effective (0.967 QALYs) and less expensive (8218) and thus dominated IMPT for all patients. Conclusions: Cost-effectiveness analysis based on normal tissue complication probability models and planning studies proved feasible and informative and enables the analysis of individualized strategies. The increased effectiveness of IMPT does not seem to outweigh the higher costs for all head-and-neck cancer patients. However, when assuming equal survival among both modalities, there seems to be value in identifying those patients for whom IMPT is cost-effective.

  7. Testosterone and prolactin in two songbirds that differ in paternal care: the blue-headed vireo and the red-eyed vireo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and prolactin (PRL). Concentrations of plasma T and PRL were compared in breeding Blue-headed Vireos (Vireo decreased during incubation, nestling, and fledgling stages. In male Blue-headed Vireos, plasma PRL stages. Plasma PRL increased in male Red-eyed Vireos at the incubation stage and remained moderately

  8. Running heading: Water retention properties of the clay in clayey soils Water retention properties of the clay in soils developed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Running heading: Water retention properties of the clay in clayey soils Water retention properties of the clay in soils developed on clayey sediments: Significance of parent material and soil of clayey subsoils horizons according to the variation of clay characteristics. The horizons studied

  9. Running Head: MORAL HAZARD, POWER AND ACCOUNTABILITY Masters of the Universe: How Power and Accountability Influence Self-Serving Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Running Head: MORAL HAZARD, POWER AND ACCOUNTABILITY Masters of the Universe: How Power Pitesa, Department of People, Organizations and Society, Grenoble Ecole de Management; Stefan Thau this article should be addressed to Marko Pitesa, Department of People, Organizations and Society, Grenoble

  10. Running heading: Bulk density of a clayey subsoil Increase in the bulk density of a Grey Clay subsoil by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Running heading: Bulk density of a clayey subsoil Increase in the bulk density of a Grey Clay of the prisms were coated by material similar in composition to the topsoil and separated from as the profile dries over summer leading to widening of cracks between prismatic peds, (2) infilling of cracks

  11. Running head: APA SIXTH EDITION GUIDELINES 1 APA Sixth Edition Guidelines for Paper Formatting in the College of Nursing Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    Running head: APA SIXTH EDITION GUIDELINES 1 APA Sixth Edition Guidelines for Paper Formatting of Arizona #12;APA SIXTH EDITION GUIDELINES 2 APA Sixth Edition Guidelines for Paper Formatting of the page. The abstract does not have paragraph indentation and is double spaced. It is okay to use

  12. Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference, August 16-19 2007, Hilton Head, South Carolina Parameterized Optimal Trajectory Generation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langelaan, Jack W.

    Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference, August 16-19 2007, Hilton Head, South Carolina as finely discretized tables. I. Introduction Unmanned aerial vehicles (uavs) have played an integral role by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. with permission. aStrictly speaking slam

  13. Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT IN OLDER ADULTS 1 Stereotype threat can enhance, as well as impair, older adults' memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Mara

    Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT IN OLDER ADULTS 1 Stereotype threat can enhance, as well as impair, and Rico Velasco for research assistance and to Dr. Tom Hess for providing us with the stereotype threat for publication. #12;STEREOTYPE THREAT IN OLDER ADULTS 2 Abstract (150) Negative stereotypes about aging can

  14. R163B -Eye movements and time-based selection Running head: EYE MOVEMENTS AND TIME-BASED SELECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inglis, Matthew

    R163B - Eye movements and time-based selection Running head: EYE MOVEMENTS AND TIME-BASED SELECTION Eye movements and time-based selection: Where do the eyes go in preview search? Derrick G. Watson.g.watson@warwick.ac.uk 1 #12;R163B - Eye movements and time-based selection Abstract In visual search tasks, presenting one

  15. Head-on beam-beam collisions with high intensities and long range beam-beam studies in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, M; Assmann, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Cornelis, K; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Miyamoto, R; Norman, L; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In two experiments we studied possible limitations due to the beam-beam effects in the LHC. In the first experiment we collided high intensity bunches head-on to explore the region for high luminosity collisions. In the second test we reduced the crossing angle in the presence of long range encounters to increase their effects.

  16. Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3 Management Strategies4 5 Andrew James Hansen6 Ecology property, ecosystem energy levels, which,14 while once widely recognized as important, has received little

  17. Running Head: The Autonomic Nervous System's responses to losses Loss aversion in the eye and in the heart: The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yechiam, Eldad

    Running Head: The Autonomic Nervous System's responses to losses Loss aversion in the eye and in the heart: The Autonomic Nervous System's responses to losses Guy Hochman and Eldad Yechiam Technion@tx.technion.ac.il #12;ANS responses to losses 2 Loss aversion in the eye and in the heart: The Autonomic Nervous System

  18. May 29, 2013 ACADEMIC POSITION PROFILE APP. 209 TITLE: New Jersey Regional Studies Librarian and Head of Public Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    . The New Jersey Regional Studies Librarian and Head of Public Services will: In collaboration with other including electronic publications relating to the State and region Enhance access to the Sinclair New service and collection management staff Direct and coordinate public service activities in the SC

  19. CGD Staff and Visitor List Blackmon, Maurice Director Hack, James (head) Anderson, Jeff (long-term visitor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Lesley Mahowald, Natalie Norton, Nancy Stepaniak, Dave Marcum, Erika Schramm, Julie Wigley, Tom McKeown, Rebecca Yeager, Stephen Oleson, Keith Rosenbloom, Nan Jeff Kiehl Project Leader Stephens, Britt Lydia, Doug (head) Keith Lindsay Bettge, Tom Bengtsson, Thomas (long-term visitor) Brady, Esther Furrer

  20. Is social-emotional development a predictor of school success in Head Start children? A field study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Team, Rachel Marie

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    -emotional development in the beginning and end of one school year. Approximately 150 children ages 3 to 5 years old were assessed in six Head Start centers in different cities in rural Texas. Each student participated in an academic screening within the first 45 days...

  1. Central auditory neurons display flexible feature recombination1 Running head: Flexible logic of central auditory neurons3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentner, Timothy

    these operations in individual neurons, violating the fixed neuron-to-38 computation mapping posited in the state but are generic, the flexible neuron-to-computation mapping43 demonstrated in this study in the auditory system1 Central auditory neurons display flexible feature recombination1 functions2 Running head

  2. Multi-vehicle Convoy Analysis Based on ANPR data A. Homayounfar*, A. T. S. Ho*, N. Zhu*, G. Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Multi-vehicle Convoy Analysis Based on ANPR data A. Homayounfar*, A. T. S. Ho*, N. Zhu*, G. Head mining techniques for convoy analysis of vehicles based on the automatic number plate recognition (ANPR of multi-vehicle convoy activities. 1 Introduction Convoy Analysis of vehicles is a relatively new research

  3. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES, CHRISTMAS ISLAND, 1954-69 GUNTHER It SECKEL' AND MARIAN Y. Y. YONG' ABSTRACT Harmonic functions, with daily sampling, are on average 0.07° C. Harmonic analysis spanning the entire sampling duration shows

  4. Using MR equations built from summary data 1 Running head: Using MR equations built from summary data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R.

    Using MR equations built from summary data 1 Running head: Using MR equations built from summary, United Kingdom. E-mail: j.crawford@abdn.ac.uk #12;Using MR equations built from summary data 2 Abstract; regression equations; single-case methods #12;Using MR equations built from summary data 3 INTRODUCTION

  5. Running head: Virtual Peer Technology for Children with Autism Using Virtual Peer Technology as an Intervention for Children with Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassell, Justine

    an affinity for computers. Instead of labeling these technologies as useless for children with ASD1 Running head: Virtual Peer Technology for Children with Autism Using Virtual Peer Technology of key features that we believe to be important and as yet undervalued -- in technological

  6. Simulations of the Nuclear Recoil Head-Tail Signature in Gases Relevant to Directional Dark Matter Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Majewski; D. Muna; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first detailed simulations of the head-tail effect relevant to directional Dark Matter searches. Investigations of the location of the majority of the ionization charge as being either at the beginning half (tail) or at the end half (head) of the nuclear recoil track were performed for carbon and sulphur recoils in 40 Torr negative ion carbon disulfide and for fluorine recoils in 100 Torr carbon tetrafluoride. The SRIM simulation program was used, together with a purpose-written Monte Carlo generator, to model production of ionizing pairs, diffusion and basic readout geometries relevant to potential real detector scenarios, such as under development for the DRIFT experiment. The results clearly indicate the existence of a head-tail track asymmetry but with a magnitude critically influenced by two competing factors: the nature of the stopping power and details of the range straggling. The former tends to result in the tail being greater than the head and the latter the reverse.

  7. RUNNING HEAD: Subaerial Exposure Unconformities on the Vercors Carbonate Platform Subaerial Exposure Unconformities on the Vercors Carbonate Platform (SE France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    1 RUNNING HEAD: Subaerial Exposure Unconformities on the Vercors Carbonate Platform Subaerial Exposure Unconformities on the Vercors Carbonate Platform (SE France) and their Sequence Stratigraphic carbonate platform (SE France), shows that the most prominent break in depositional style does not coincide

  8. Final Report - Inspection Limit Confirmation for Upper Head Penetration Nozzle Cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Rudland, David L.; Zhang, Tao; Wilkowski, Gery M.

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Code Case N-729-1 defines alternative examination requirements for the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) upper head penetration nozzle welds. The basis for these examination requirements was developed as part of an Industry program conducted by the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The results of this program were published in MRP-95 Rev. 1 and document a set of finite element weld residual stress analyses conducted on a variety of upper head penetration nozzles. The inspection zone selected by the industry was based on the stress where it was assumed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) would not initiate. As explained in MRP-95 Rev. 1, it has been illustrated that PWSCC does not occur in the Alloy 600 tube when the stresses are below the yield strength of that tube. Typical yield strengths at operating conditions for Alloy 600 range from 35 ksi to 65 ksi. A stress less than 20-ksi tension was chosen as a conservative range where PWSCC would not initiate. Over the last several years, Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) has conducted welding residual stress analyses on upper head penetration J-welds made from Alloy 182 weld metal for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. These efforts were performed as a confirmatory evaluation of the industrys analyses conducted as part of their MRP-95 Rev. 1 effort. To this point, the analyses conducted by Emc2 have not been compared to the MRP-95 Rev. 1 results or the examination zones defined in the Code Case. Therefore, this report summarizes the past Emc2 CRDM welding analyses and investigates the regions where the welding stresses may be sufficiently high to promote stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In all, 90 welding residual stress analyses were conducted by Emc2 and the largest distance below the weld where the stress drops below 20 ksi was 5 inches for the uphill weld of the 53-degree nozzle case. For the largest distance above the weld where stress drops below 20 ksi, the worst case was 1.5 inches above the downhill side of the 25-degree nozzle case. The inspection zones described in both MRP-95 Rev. 1 and Code Case N-729-1 were set at 1.0 inch for nozzle angles greater than 30 degrees or 1.5 inches for nozzle angles less than 30 degrees, above the highest or below the lowest point on the weld. In all cases analyzed by Emc2 in this effort, there was only one case where the stress was above 20 ksi outside of this inspection zone. For that case, the stresses were very close to 20 ksi at the inspection zone limit and were considered acceptable.

  9. Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric C.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Hanlon, Lorraine; Alessio, Adam; Rajendran, Joseph; Schwartz, David L.; Phillips, Mark [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) and Puget Sound Veterans Administration, 18801 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 and School of Physics, University College Dublin (Ireland); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, Texas 77030 and Puget Sound Veterans Administration, 1880 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tumor boundary delineation using positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for radiation therapy applications. In this study we quantify the uncertainties in tumor boundary delineation as a function of the reconstruction method, smoothing, and lesion size in head and neck cancer patients using FDG-PET images and evaluate the dosimetric impact on radiotherapy plans. FDG-PET images were acquired for eight patients with a GE Advance PET scanner. In addition, a 20 cm diameter cylindrical phantom with six FDG-filled spheres with volumes of 1.2 to 26.5 cm{sup 3} was imaged. PET emission scans were reconstructed with the OSEM and FBP algorithms with different smoothing parameters. PET-based tumor regions were delineated using an automatic contouring function set at progressively higher threshold contour levels and the resulting volumes were calculated. CT-based tumor volumes were also contoured by a physician on coregistered PET/CT patient images. The intensity value of the threshold contour level that returns 100% of the actual volume, I{sub V100}, was measured. We generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for an example head and neck patient, treating 66 Gy to CT-based gross disease and 54 Gy to nodal regions at risk, followed by a boost to the FDG-PET-based tumor. The volumes of PET-based tumors are a sensitive function of threshold contour level for all patients and phantom datasets. A 5% change in threshold contour level can translate into a 200% increase in volume. Phantom data indicate that I{sub V100} can be set as a fraction, f, of the maximum measured uptake. Fractional threshold values in the cylindrical water phantom range from 0.23 to 0.51. Both the fractional threshold and the threshold-volume curve are dependent on lesion size, with lesions smaller than approximately 5 cm{sup 3} displaying a more pronounced sensitivity and larger fractional threshold values. The threshold-volume curves and fractional threshold values also depend on the reconstruction algorithm and smoothing filter with more smoothing requiring a higher fractional threshold contour level. The threshold contour level affects the tumor size, and therefore the ultimate boost dose that is achievable with IMRT. In an example head and neck IMRT plan, the D95 of the planning target volume decreased from 7770 to 7230 cGy for 42% vs 55% contour threshold levels. PET-based tumor volumes are strongly affected by the choice of threshold level. This can have a significant dosimetric impact. The appropriate threshold level depends on lesion size and image reconstruction parameters. These effects should be carefully considered when using PET contour and/or volume information for radiotherapy applications.

  10. Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kieper, Douglas Arthur; Majewski, Stanislaw; Welch, Benjamin L.

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

  11. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  12. Cascades of Multi-headed Chimera States for Coupled Phase Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri L. Maistrenko; Anna Vasylenko; Oleksandr Sudakov; Roman Levchenko; Volodymyr L. Maistrenko

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Chimera state is a recently discovered dynamical phenomenon in arrays of nonlocally coupled oscillators, that displays a self-organized spatial pattern of co-existing coherence and incoherence. We discuss the appearance of the chimera states in networks of phase oscillators with attractive and with repulsive interactions, i.e. when the coupling respectively favors synchronization or works against it. By systematically analyzing the dependence of the spatiotemporal dynamics on the level of coupling attractivity/repulsivity and the range of coupling, we uncover that different types of chimera states exist in wide domains of the parameter space as cascades of the states with increasing number of intervals of irregularity, so-called chimera's heads. We report three scenarios for the chimera birth: 1) via saddle-node bifurcation on a resonant invariant circle, also known as SNIC or SNIPER, 2) via blue-sky catastrophe, when two periodic orbits, stable and saddle, approach each other creating a saddle-node periodic orbit, and 3) via homoclinic transition with complex multistable dynamics including an "eight-like" limit cycle resulting eventually in a chimera state.

  13. Head Loss Evaluation in a PWR Reactor Vessel Using CFD Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji Hwan Jeong; Jong Pil Park [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Enesys Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Byoung-Sub Han [Jangdae-dong, Yusong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear vendors and utilities perform lots of simulations and analyses in order to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). In general, the simulations are carried out using vendor-specific design codes and best-estimate system analysis codes and most of them were developed based on 1-dimensional lumped parameter models. During the past decade, however, computers, parallel computation methods, and 3-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes have been dramatically enhanced. It is believed to be beneficial to take advantage of advanced commercial CFD codes in safety analysis and design of NPPs. The present work aims to analyze the flow distribution in downcomer and lower plenum of Korean standard nuclear power plants (KSNPs) using STAR-CD. The lower plenum geometry of a PWR is very complicated since there are so many reactor internals, which hinders in CFD analysis for real reactor geometry up to now. The present work takes advantage of 3D CAD model so that real geometry of lower plenum is used. The results give a clear figure about flow fields in the reactor vessel, which is one of major safety concerns. The calculated pressure drop across downcomer and lower plenum appears to be in good agreement with the data in engineering calculation note. A algorithm which can evaluate head loss coefficient which is necessary for thermal-hydraulic system code running was suggested based on this CFD analysis results. (authors)

  14. Is one head and neck immobilization system as good as another? One center's experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, Leah Bapp; May, Sharon; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The William Buckland Radiotherapy Center has used 2 different immobilization systems for patients requiring radiotherapy to the head-and-neck region. A polycarbonate mask was manufactured for radical treatments and a thermoplastic mask for palliative treatments. This study evaluated field placement accuracy, staff opinion, and production costs of both systems. The manual matching program of Varian PortalVision Electronic Portal Imaging (EPI) System was used to assess field placement accuracy on a daily basis. Radiation therapists (RTs) were surveyed before and after the study to determine their opinions of each system. Production time and required materials were recorded to assess cost. Nineteen patients from each system had daily EPI results compiled with no statistically significant difference observed in field placement accuracy. The thermoplastic system was found to be more cost efficient due to a combination of the reduced production time and reuseability of the masks. User acceptability of the thermoplastic system has increased so that it is now the preferred system. In conclusion, the thermoplastic system is a viable alternative to the polycarbonate system in terms of treatment accuracy and cost. It is recommended that the thermoplastic system be used for all radical and palliative treatments. In addition, RTs prefer the thermoplastic system.

  15. Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Ramus, Liliane [DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Automatique et en Automatique)-Asclepios Research Project, Sophia-Antipolis (France); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon Cedex (France); Odin, Guillaume [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St.-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Darcourt, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology-Dentistry, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Guevara, Nicolas [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Orlanducci, Marie-Helene [Department of Odontology, CHU, Nice (France); Marcie, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Poissonnet, Gilles [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); and others

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas-based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

  16. Head-on collision of dust-acoustic shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EL-Shamy, E. F., E-mail: emadel-shamy@hotmail.com [Department of physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Al-Asbali, A. M., E-mail: aliaa-ma@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, Abha, P.O. 960 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the propagation and the head-on collision of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of negative dust fluid, Maxwellian distributed electrons and ions. Applying the extended PoincarLighthillKuo method, a couple of KortewegdeVriesBurgers equations for describing DA shock waves are derived. This study is a first attempt to deduce the analytical phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The impacts of physical parameters such as the kinematic viscosity, the unperturbed electron-to-dust density ratio, parameter determining the effect of polarization force, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the effective dust temperature-to-ion temperature ratio on the structure and the collision of DA shock waves are examined. In addition, the results reveal the increase of the strength and the steepness of DA shock waves as the above mentioned parameters increase, which in turn leads to the increase of the phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The present model may be useful to describe the structure and the collision of DA shock waves in space and laboratory dusty plasmas.

  17. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S., E-mail: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Min Kim, Hyung [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  18. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1 : Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elston, Ralph

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Head burn is a descriptive clinical term used by fishery biologists to describe exfoliation of skin and underlying connective tissue of the jaw and cranial region of salmonids, observed at fish passage facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The observations are usually made on upstream migrant adult salmon or steelhead. An expert panel, convened in 1996, to evaluate the risk and severity of gas bubble disease (GBD) in the Snake and Columbia River system believed that, while head burns appeared to be distinct from GBD, the relationship between dissolved gas saturation in the rivers and head burns was uncertain.

  19. Read/write head having a GMR sensor biased by permanent magnets located between the GMR and the pole shields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Samuel W. (San Carlos, CA); Rottmayer, Robert Earl (Fremont, CA); Carey, Matthew J. (San Jose, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact read/write head having a biased giant magnetoresistive sensor. Permanent magnet films are placed adjacent to the giant magnetoresistive sensor operating in the current-perpendicular-to the-plane (Cpp) mode and spaced with respect to the sensor by conducting films. These permanent magnet films provide a magnetic bias. The bias field is substantial and fairly uniform across sensor height. Biasing of the giant magnetoresistive sensor provides distinguishable response to the rising and falling edges of a recorded pulse on an adjacent recording medium, improves the linearity of the response, and helps to reduce noise. This read/write head is much simpler to fabricate and pattern and provides an enhanced uniformity of the bias field throughout the sensor.

  20. On Comparing the Quality of Head and Neck Imrt Plans Delivered with Two Different Linear Accelerator Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basran, Parminder S., E-mail: pbasran@bccancer.bc.c [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Balogh, Judith; Poon, Ian; MacKenzie, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Timothy [Department of Medical Sciences, University of Western Ontario, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether 2 different types of linear accelerators manufacturers with similar MLC leaf widths deliver equivalent IMRT distributions for head and neck radiotherapy patients. In this study, plans delivered with Siemens linacs were re-optimized with an Elekta linac and vice versa. To test for significance, paired t-tests were computed to examine differences in target and normal tissue doses and monitor units. Dose distributions, dose-volume histograms, and dose to targets and normal tissues were found to be equivalent irrespective of the linac type. However, approximately 15% more monitor units were delivered when planned on the Elekta machine (p < 0.002). Both linear accelerators provide plans of comparable dosimetric quality; however, Elekta machines deliver slightly more monitor units than Siemens machines. This increase is likely due differences in geometric properties of the machine head designs, as modeled in the treatment planning system.

  1. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Kaushik, E-mail: kaushikbolpur@rediffmail.com [Beluti M. K. M. High School, P.O. Beluti, Birbhum, West Bengal 731301 (India); Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  2. The effect of head-on beam-beam compensation on the stochastic boundaries and particle diffusion in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate the effects from the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), an electron lens (elens) is proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. We used an extended version of SixTrack for multiparticle beam-beam simulation in order to study the effect of the e-lens on the stochastic boundary and also on diffusion. The stochastic boundary was analyzed using Lyapunov exponents and the diffusion was characterized as the increase in the rms spread of the action. For both studies the simulations were performed with and without the e-lens and with full and partial compensation. Using the simulated values of the diffusion an attempt to calculate the emittance growth rate is presented.

  3. Lower head creep rupture failure analysis associated with alternative accident sequences of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sang Lung, Chan [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich and Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, Zurich, Switzerland, 8001 (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this lower head creep rupture analysis is to assess the current version of MELCOR 1.8.5-RG against SCDAP/RELAP5 MOD 3.3kz. The purpose of this assessment is to investigate the current MELCOR in-vessel core damage progression phenomena including the model for the formation of a molten pool. The model for stratified molten pool natural heat transfer will be included in the next MELCOR release. Presently, MELCOR excludes the gap heat-transfer model for the cooling associated with the narrow gap between the debris and the lower head vessel wall. All these phenomenological models are already treated in SCDAP/RELAP5 using the COUPLE code to model the heat transfer of the relocated debris with the lower head based on a two-dimensional finite-element-method. The assessment should determine if current MELCOR capabilities adequately cover core degradation phenomena appropriate for the consolidated MELCOR code. Inclusion of these features should bring MELCOR much closer to a state of parity with SCDAP/RELAP5 and is a currently underway element in the MELCOR code consolidation effort. This assessment deals with the following analysis of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) alternative accident sequences. The TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-1 includes the continuation of the base case of the TMI-2 accident with the Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP) tripped, and the High Pressure Injection System (HPIS) throttled after approximately 6000 s accident time, while in the TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-2, the reactor coolant pumps is tripped after 6000 s and the HPIS is activated after 12,012 s. The lower head temperature distributions calculated with SCDAP/RELAP5 are visualized and animated with open source visualization freeware 'OpenDX'. (author)

  4. Effect of Radiotherapy Interruptions on Survival in Medicare Enrollees With Local and Regional Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Mehta, Vivek [Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Blough, David [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tock, Lauri [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Ramsey, Scott D., E-mail: sramsey@fhcrc.or [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate whether interruptions in radiotherapy are associated with decreased survival in a population-based sample of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database we identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years and older diagnosed with local-regional head-and-neck cancer during the period 1997-2003. We examined claims records of 3864 patients completing radiotherapy for the presence of one or more 5-30-day interruption(s) in therapy. We then performed Cox regression analyses to estimate the association between therapy interruptions and survival. Results: Patients with laryngeal tumors who experienced an interruption in radiotherapy had a 68% (95% confidence interval, 41-200%) increased risk of death, compared with patients with no interruptions. Patients with nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral, salivary gland, and sinus tumors had similar associations between interruptions and increased risk of death, but these did not reach statistical significance because of small sample sizes. Conclusions: Treatment interruptions seem to influence survival time among patients with laryngeal tumors completing a full course of radiotherapy. At all head-and-neck sites, the association between interruptions and survival is sensitive to confounding by stage and other treatments. Further research is needed to develop methods to identify patients most susceptible to interruption-induced mortality.

  5. Impact of Concomitant Chemotherapy on Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Shlok; Kong, Weidong [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queens Cancer Research Institute, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Booth, Christopher M. [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queens Cancer Research Institute, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Mackillop, William J., E-mail: william.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queens Cancer Research Institute, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Clinical trials have shown that the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy (RT) improves survival in advanced head-and-neck cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) in routine practice. Methods and Materials: This was a population-based cohort study. Electronic records of treatment from all provincial cancer centers were linked to a population--based cancer registry to describe the adoption of C-CRT for head-and-neck cancer patients in Ontario, Canada. The study population was then divided into pre- and postadoption cohorts, and their outcomes were compared. Results: Between 1992 and 2008, 18,867 patients had diagnoses of head-and-neck cancer in Ontario, of whom 7866 (41.7%) were treated with primary RT. The proportion of primary RT cases that received C-CRT increased from 2.2% in the preadoption cohort (1992-1998) to 39.3% in the postadoption cohort (2003-2008). Five-year survival among all primary RT cases increased from 43.6% in the preadoption cohort to 51.8% in the postadoption cohort (P<.001). Over the same period, treatment-related hospital admissions increased significantly, but there was no significant increase in treatment-related deaths. Conclusions: C-CRT was widely adopted in Ontario after 2003, and its adoption was temporally associated with an improvement in survival.

  6. Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

  7. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  8. Comparison of Methods to Reduce Dose to Swallowing-Related Structures in Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Jimmy J., E-mail: jjcaudell@gmail.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States); Burnett, Omer L.; Schaner, Philip E.; Bonner, James A.; Duan Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Emerging data suggest that reduction of dose to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictor may lower the risk of swallowing complications such as long-term gastrostomy dependence and aspiration. Organ avoidance becomes difficult when the primary tumor or involved nodes are present at the level of the larynx. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with Stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with high-dose target volume at the level of the larynx (but not involving the glottic larynx) were planned with whole-field IMRT (WF-IMRT), as well as a low anterior neck field dynamically matched to an IMRT plan (D-SCLV). Plans were compared with respect to coverage of targets and sparing of normal tissues including the larynx, inferior pharyngeal constrictor (IPC), parotid, and cord. Results: There was no significant difference between the two techniques in coverage of the high- or intermediate-dose planning target volumes (PTVs). Coverage of the elective nodal PTV was inferior with the D-SCLV technique, with a mean of 96.5% vs. 86.3% of the volume receiving the prescription dose (p = 0.001) compared with WF-IMRT plans. However, the D-SCLV technique significantly reduced mean dose to the larynx (43.7 vs. 46.7 Gy, p = 0.05) and IPC (39.1 vs. 46.1 Gy, p = 0.002). There was no significant difference in dose to the parotid or cord. Conclusion: Given the steep dose responses seen in studies examining the association between swallowing toxicity and dose to the larynx and IPC, dose reductions using the D-SCLV technique may be clinically significant.

  9. The Journal of Neuroscience, February 1990, fO(2): 420-435 Head-Direction Cells Recorded from the Postsubiculum in Freely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    /computer system monitored cell discharge while simultaneously tracking the position of 2 colored light emitting diodes (LEDs) secured to the animal's head. The animal's location was calculated from the position of one

  10. Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

  11. Effect of Recombinant Human Deoxyribonuclease on Oropharyngeal Secretions in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancers Treated With Radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Wang, Edward [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sejpal, Samir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Agulnik, Mark [Section of Medical Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Amit [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Harris, Kirk [Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The current study examined the effect of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) on quality of life (QOL) measures, clinical improvement, and DNA content of thick oropharyngeal secretions (OPS) in patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with local-regional advanced H and N cancer receiving chemoradiationtherapy (CRT) were randomized to receive either placebo or rhDNase. Endpoints included MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) and Functional Assessment of Cancer TherapyHead and Neck (FACT-NH) scores, along with clinical assessment and DNA concentration of OPS. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in patients' QOL outcomes over the study period. Both groups showed an increase in symptom and interference scores, although patients in the rhDNase group showed a greater decline in both scores during the 3 months posttreatment. Similarly, both groups showed a decline in physical and functional well being but recovered in the 3 months posttreatment follow-up, with the rhDNase group exhibiting speedier recovery. Patients in the rhDNase group exhibited significant clinical improvement in OPS, blindly assessed by a physician, compared with the placebo group (67% vs 27%, respectively; P=.046). The rhDNase group showed no change in OPS-DNA concentration, although the placebo group showed a significant increase in DNA concentration during the drug trial (P=.045). There was no differences in acute toxicities between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our preliminary data suggest that rhDNase did not significantly improve study primary endpoints of QOL measures compared with the placebo group. However, there was a significant improvement in secondary endpoints of clinically assessed OPS and DNA concentration compared with placebo in H and N cancer patients treated with CRT. Further investigation in larger numbers of patients is warranted.

  12. SU-E-T-08: A Convolution Model for Head Scatter Fluence in the Intensity Modulated Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, M; Mo, X; Chen, Y; Parnell, D; Key, S; Olivera, G; Galmarini, W; Lu, W

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To efficiently calculate the head scatter fluence for an arbitrary intensity-modulated field with any source distribution using the source occlusion model. Method: The source occlusion model with focal and extra focal radiation (Jaffray et al, 1993) can be used to account for LINAC head scatter. In the model, the fluence map of any field shape at any point can be calculated via integration of the source distribution within the visible range, as confined by each segment, using the detector eye's view. A 2D integration would be required for each segment and each fluence plane point, which is time-consuming, as an intensity-modulated field contains typically tens to hundreds of segments. In this work, we prove that the superposition of the segmental integrations is equivalent to a simple convolution regardless of what the source distribution is. In fact, for each point, the detector eye's view of the field shape can be represented as a function with the origin defined at the point's pinhole reflection through the center of the collimator plane. We were thus able to reduce hundreds of source plane integration to one convolution. We calculated the fluence map for various 3D and IMRT beams and various extra-focal source distributions using both the segmental integration approach and the convolution approach and compared the computation time and fluence map results of both approaches. Results: The fluence maps calculated using the convolution approach were the same as those calculated using the segmental approach, except for rounding errors (<0.1%). While it took considerably longer time to calculate all segmental integrations, the fluence map calculation using the convolution approach took only ?1/3 of the time for typical IMRT fields with ?100 segments. Conclusions: The convolution approach for head scatter fluence calculation is fast and accurate and can be used to enhance the online process.

  13. The Residual Setup Errors of Different IGRT Alignment Procedures for Head and Neck IMRT and the Resulting Dosimetric Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graff, Pierre [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Alexis Vautrin Cancer Center, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Doctoral School BioSE (EA4360), Nancy (France); Kirby, Neil [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Josephine; Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Lambert, Louise [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Montreal University Centre, Montreal (Canada); Pouliot, Jean, E-mail: jpouliot@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess residual setup errors during head and neck radiation therapy and the resulting consequences for the delivered dose for various patient alignment procedures. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) scans from 11 head and neck patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy were used to assess setup errors. Each MVCBCT scan was registered to its reference planning kVCT, with seven different alignment procedures: automatic alignment and manual registration to 6 separate bony landmarks (sphenoid, left/right maxillary sinuses, mandible, cervical 1 [C1]-C2, and C7-thoracic 1 [T1] vertebrae). Shifts in the different alignments were compared with each other to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences. Then, the dose distribution was recalculated on 3 MVCBCT images per patient for every alignment procedure. The resulting dose-volume histograms for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared to those from the planning kVCTs. Results: The registration procedures produced statistically significant global differences in patient alignment and actual dose distribution, calling for a need for standardization of patient positioning. Vertically, the automatic, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses alignments mainly generated posterior shifts and resulted in mean increases in maximal dose to OARs of >3% of the planned dose. The suggested choice of C1-C2 as a reference landmark appears valid, combining both OAR sparing and target coverage. Assuming this choice, relevant margins to apply around volumes of interest at the time of planning to take into account for the relative mobility of other regions are discussed. Conclusions: Use of different alignment procedures for treating head and neck patients produced variations in patient setup and dose distribution. With concern for standardizing practice, C1-C2 reference alignment with relevant margins around planning volumes seems to be a valid option.

  14. A Phase 1 Study of Everolimus + Weekly Cisplatin + Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Sherman, Eric; Ho, Alan L. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Rao, Shyam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Heguy, Adriana [Department of Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shen, Ronglai [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Korte, Susan; Lisa, Donna [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Haque, Sofia [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Katabi, Nora [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Elevated expression of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in histologically cancer-free margins of resected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and has been associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. Preclinically, inhibition of mTORC1 with everolimus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin and radiation. Methods and Materials: This was single-institution phase 1 study to establish the maximum tolerated dose of daily everolimus given with fixed dose cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2} weekly 6) and concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locally and/or regionally advanced head-and-neck cancer. The study had a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Results: Tumor primary sites were oral cavity (4), salivary gland (4), oropharynx (2), nasopharynx (1), scalp (1), and neck node with occult primary (1). In 4 of 4 cases in which resected HNSCC surgical pathology specimens were available for immunohistochemistry, elevated expression of eIF4E was observed in the cancer-free margins. The most common grade ?3 treatment-related adverse event was lymphopenia (92%), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were mucositis (n=2) and failure to thrive (n=1). With a median follow up of 19.4 months, 2 patients have experienced recurrent disease. The maximum tolerated dose was everolimus 5 mg/day. Conclusions: Head-and-neck cancer patients tolerated everolimus at therapeutic doses (5 mg/day) given with weekly cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The regimen merits further evaluation, especially among patients who are status post resection of HNSCCs that harbor mTORC1-mediated activation of eIF4E in histologically negative surgical margins.

  15. Dosimetric Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Desmond, Renee A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bonner, James A., E-mail: jabonner@uabmc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia. Dosimetric predictors of objective findings of long-term dysphagia were sought. Methods and Materials: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy. Dosimetric parameters were analyzed relative to three objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube dependence at 12 months, aspiration on modified barium swallow, or pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Results: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V{sub 60}) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 60} greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 65} greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Conclusions: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors. The addition of these structures to intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization may reduce the incidence of dysphagia, although cautious clinical validation is necessary.

  16. First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

  17. Clinical Management of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Successes and Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vissink, Arjan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Grongingen (Netherlands); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Limesand, Kirsten H. [Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Jensen, Siri Beier [Department of Oral Medicine, Institute of Odontology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Fox, Philip C. [PC Fox Consulting, Spello (Italy); Elting, Linda S. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Reyland, Mary E., E-mail: Mary.Reyland@UCDenver.ed [Department of Craniofacial Biology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy.

  18. The role of human and social capital in explaining the lack of female head coaches in women's intercollegiate sports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stumph, Kelly J

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    likely receiving lower salaries than males. vet the 1'cmales did not report less career satisfaction (Parks et al. , 1995). There are specific factors attributed to the disparity ol' 1'emale head soccer coaches. 'I'he intrinsic measure of career success... that this salary deficit is simply a result of vvomen earning lower salaries in an array of industries not just that of coaching. For instance, it was reported that in 1995, a full-time female communications manager earned $. 86 for every $1. 00 earned bv her...

  19. 3-D printed Shelby Cobra highlights ORNL R&D at Detroit Auto...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    automotive icon, the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory is showcasing additive manufacturing research at the 2015 North American International Auto Show in...

  20. CASL-U-2015-0054-000 COBRA-TF Subchannel Thermal-Hydraulics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPa and tem- peratures up to 1073 K for specific enthalpy, specific volume, and specific heat capacity. Figure 8.1: IAPWS-IF97 Fluid Regions March 10, 2015 pg. 227 of 247...

  1. 3D Cobra, Renewable Energy, and Green Button at the National Maker Faire |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  5. Just Plain Cool, the 3D Printed Shelby Cobra | Department of Energy

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  6. Secretary Moniz Tours the 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra | Department of Energy

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  7. Photo Gallery: 3D Printing Brings Classic Shelby Cobra to Life | Department

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  8. The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS SeptemberRenewable Energy, U.S. DepartmentTechnology TenTestimony

  9. 3-D printed Shelby Cobra highlights ORNL R&D at Detroit Auto Show |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are ABOUTBlandineusersornl.gov

  10. Particle-in-cell simulation of the head-on collision between two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Xin; Xu, Yan-xia; Duan, Wen-shan, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Zhang, Ling-yu [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Lei, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The head-on collision of two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions has been studied by using the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method and one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. Then the phase lags of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) obtained from the two approaches have been compared and discussed. It has been found that: if the amplitudes of both the colliding IASWs are small enough, the phase lags obtained from PLK method are in good agreement with those obtained from PIC simulation. As the amplitudes of IASWs increase, the phase lags from PIC simulation become smaller than the analytical ones from PLK method. Besides, the PIC simulation shows the phase lag of an IASW involved in collision depends not only on the characteristics of the wave it collides with but also on itself, which disagrees with the prediction of the PLK method. Finally, the application scopes of the PLK method in studying both the single IASW and the head-on collisions of IASWs have been studied and discussed, and the latter turns out to be more strict.

  11. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  12. Theoretical study of head-on collision of dust acoustic solitary waves in a strongly coupled complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, S., E-mail: surabhi@ipr.res.in; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of two counter propagating dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) undergoing a head-on collision, in the presence of strong coupling between micron sized charged dust particles in a complex plasma. A coupled set of nonlinear dynamical equations describing the evolution of the two DASWs using the extended Poincar-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation technique is derived. The nature and extent of post collision phase-shifts of these solitary waves are studied over a wide range of dusty plasma parameters in a strongly and a weakly coupled medium. We find a significant change in the nature and amount of phase delay in the strongly coupled regime as compared to a weakly coupled regime. The phase shift is seen to change its sign beyond a threshold value of compressibility of the medium for a given set of dusty plasma parameters.

  13. 'Pharyngocise': Randomized Controlled Trial of Preventative Exercises to Maintain Muscle Structure and Swallowing Function During Head-and-Neck Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnaby-Mann, Giselle, E-mail: gmann@phhp.ufl.edu [Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Crary, Michael A. [Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Schmalfuss, Ilona [Department of Radiology, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL (Georgia); Amdur, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is common. The present randomized clinical trial studied the effectiveness of preventative behavioral intervention for dysphagia compared with the 'usual care.' Methods and Materials: A total of 58 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy were randomly assigned to usual care, sham swallowing intervention, or active swallowing exercises (pharyngocise). The intervention arms were treated daily during chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was muscle size and composition (determined by T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary outcomes included functional swallowing ability, dietary intake, chemosensory function, salivation, nutritional status, and the occurrence of dysphagia-related complications. Results: The swallowing musculature (genioglossus, hyoglossuss, and mylohyoid) demonstrated less structural deterioration in the active treatment arm. The functional swallowing, mouth opening, chemosensory acuity, and salivation rate deteriorated less in the pharyngocise group. Conclusion: Patients completing a program of swallowing exercises during cancer treatment demonstrated superior muscle maintenance and functional swallowing ability.

  14. Reduced 30% scanning time 3D multiplexer integrated circuit applied to large array format 20KHZ frequency inkjet print heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, J -C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of the number and array density of nozzles within an inkjet head chip is one of the keys to raise the printing speed and printing resolutions. However, traditional 2D architecture of driving circuits can not meet the requirement for high scanning speed and low data accessing points when nozzle numbers greater than 1000. This paper proposes a novel architecture of high-selection-speed three-dimensional data registration for inkjet applications. With the configuration of three-dimensional data registration, the number of data accessing points as well as the scanning lines can be greatly reduced for large array inkjet printheads with nozzles numbering more than 1000. This IC (Integrated Circuit) architecture involves three-dimensional multiplexing with the provision of a gating transistor for each ink firing resistor, where ink firing resistors are triggered only by the selection of their associated gating transistors. Three signals: selection (S), address (A), and power supply (P), are employed toge...

  15. Impact of Adding Concomitant Chemotherapy to Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuyts, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: sandra.nuyts@uzleuven.be; Dirix, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Clement, Paul M.J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Schoenaers, Joseph [Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, Robert [Department of Radiology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Bogaert, Walter van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule combined with concomitant chemotherapy (Cx) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a total of 90 patients with locoregionally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent irradiation according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily) followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily) to a total dose of 72 Gy. Concomitant Cx (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 73) treated with the same schedule, but without concomitant Cx, between 2001 and 2004. Results: The locoregional control (LRC) rate was 70% after 2 years. Two-year overall and 2-year disease-free survival rates were 74% and 60%, respectively. In comparison with the RT-only group, an improvement of 15% in both LRC (p = 0.03) and overall survival (p = 0.09) was observed. All patients were treated to full radiation dose according to protocol, although the Cx schedule had to be adjusted in 12 patients. No acute Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was seen, but incidences of Grade 3 acute mucositis (74.5% vs. 50.7%; p = 0.002) and dysphagia (82.2% vs. 47.9%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the chemoradiotherapy group compared with patients treated with RT alone. Conclusion: With this chemoradiotherapy regimen, excellent LRC and survival rates were achieved, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  16. SU-E-T-149: Electron Beam Profile Differences Between Elekta MLCi2 and Elekta Agility Treatment Heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C [Sutter Medical Foundation, Roseville, CA 95661 (United States); Hatcher, C [Sutter Shared Services S3, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report and investigate observed differences in electron beam profiles at various energies/applicators between Elekta MLCi2 and Agility treatment head on Elekta Infinity LINAC Methods: When we upgraded from MLCi2 to Agility on one of our Elekta Infinity LINAC's, electron beam PDDs and profiles were acquired for comparison purpose. All clinical electron energies (6/9/12/15/12/18 MeV) and electron applicators (6/10/14/20/25 square) were included in measurement. PDDs were acquired at 100 SSD in water (PTW MP3 water tank) with a plane-parallel ion chamber (PTW Roos). X and Y Profiles were acquired using IC Profiler (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at 1cm and maximum PDD depths (water equivalent). Results: All PDD curves match very well between MLCi2 and Agility treatment head. However, some significant differences on electron profiles were found. On Agility, even after increasing the default auto-tracking offset values for backup diaphragms in Y and MLC in X by 2.8 cm (the maximum allowed change is 3.0 cm), electron profiles still have rounder shoulders comparing to corresponding MLCi2 profiles. This difference is significantly more pronounced at larger applicators (20 and 25 square), for all electron energies. Conclusion: The significant design change between MLCi2 and Agility beam limiting device seems to affect exit electron beam profiles. In IEC1217 X direction, the main change on Agility is the removal of the original MLCi2 X backup diaphragms and replacing it with MLC leaves; In Y direction, the main change is the radius and materials on Y backup diaphragms.

  17. Midline Dose Verification with Diode In Vivo Dosimetry for External Photon Therapy of Head and Neck and Pelvis Cancers During Initial Large-Field Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, Chuan-Jong [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Yu, Pei-Chieh [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Min-Chi [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chi-Yuan [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tungs' Taichung Metroharbor Hospital, Wuci, Taichung County, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian, E-mail: chaot@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During radiotherapy treatments, quality assurance/control is essential, particularly dose delivery to patients. This study was designed to verify midline doses with diode in vivo dosimetry. Dosimetry was studied for 6-MV bilateral fields in head and neck cancer treatments and 10-MV bilateral and anteroposterior/posteroanterior (AP/PA) fields in pelvic cancer treatments. Calibrations with corrections of diodes were performed using plastic water phantoms; 190 and 100 portals were studied for head and neck and pelvis treatments, respectively. Calculations of midline doses were made using the midline transmission, arithmetic mean, and geometric mean algorithms. These midline doses were compared with the treatment planning system target doses for lateral or AP (PA) portals and paired opposed portals. For head and neck treatments, all 3 algorithms were satisfactory, although the geometric mean algorithm was less accurate and more uncertain. For pelvis treatments, the arithmetic mean algorithm seemed unacceptable, whereas the other algorithms were satisfactory. The random error was reduced by using averaged midline doses of paired opposed portals because the asymmetric effect was averaged out. Considering the simplicity of in vivo dosimetry, the arithmetic mean and geometric mean algorithm should be adopted for head/neck and pelvis treatments, respectively.

  18. Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) Frank Elefsen, Centre Manager, Ph.D., and Sten Frandsen, Head of Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) Frank Elefsen, Centre Manager, Ph.D., and Sten Frandsen, Head and an improved environment. 1 Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) A. Background In line with the growing global technology is receiving a great deal of attention. Hydrogen and fuel cells have the potential to replace

  19. Reflections on a record minimum The numbers are in 2012 broke the record for minimum sea ice extent and is still heading down (see

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in climate models. The approach was to freeze an icebreaker into the pack ice and drift for a year makingReflections on a record minimum The numbers are in 2012 broke the record for minimum sea ice extent and is still heading down (see Figure 1). The sea ice extent data tell an unequivocal story of ice

  20. The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes the calmodulin-binding protein in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes and abolish the ability of Hcm1p to act as a suppressor of calmodulin mutants. The promoter of SPC110 contains a match to the consensus binding site. Deletion of HCM1 does not affect the basal level of SPC110

  1. Evaluation of advanced turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. Part 3. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines for operating heads of 1000 to 1500 m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigo, A.A.; Pistner, C.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report in a series of three on studies of advanced hydraulic turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. All three reports address Francis-type, reversible pump/turbines. The first report covered single-stage regulated units; the second report covered two-stage regulated units; the present report covers multistage unregulated units. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines offer an economically attractive option for heads of 1000 to 1500 m. The feasibility of developing such machines for capacities up to 500 MW and operating heads up to 1500 m has been evaluated. Preliminary designs have been generated for six multistage pump/turbines. The designs are for nominal capacities of 350 and 500 MW and for operating heads of 1000, 1250, and 1500 m. Mechanical, hydraulic, and economic analyses indicate that these machines will behave according to the criteria used to design them and that they can be built at a reasonable cost with no unsolvable problems. Efficiencies of 85.8% and 88.5% in the generating and pumping modes, respectively, can be expected for the 500-MW, 1500-m unit. Performances of the other five machines are at least comparable, and usually better. Over a 1000 to 1500-m head range, specific $/kW costs of the pump/turbines in mid-1978 US dollars vary from 19.0 to 23.1 for the 500-MW machines, and from 21.0 to 24.1 for the 350-MW machines.

  2. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

  3. A Space Weather Information Service Based Upon Remote and In-Situ Measurements of Coronal Mass Ejections Heading for Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Birgit; Miles, Oscar; Ruwurm, Michael; Scully, Stephen; Roldn, Andrs; Hartkorn, Oliver; Jstel, Peter; Rville, Victor; Lupu, Sorina; Ruffenach, Alexis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth's magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of interaction between the planet's magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past forty years with the intention of understanding and forecasting solar behavior. One of these phenomena in particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs), can significantly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. This publication presents a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field's orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather (SW) forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the aforementioned CM...

  4. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koyfman, Shlomo A., E-mail: koyfmas@ccf.org [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Adelstein, David J. [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  5. Role of Positron Emission Tomography in the Treatment of Occult Disease in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark H., E-mail: markp@u.washington.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Smith, Wade P. [Department of Veterans Affairs, Albany, NY (United States); Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine under what conditions positron emission tomography (PET) imaging will be useful in decisions regarding the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of clinically occult lymph node metastases in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A decision model of PET imaging and its downstream effects on radiotherapy outcomes was constructed using an influence diagram. This model included the sensitivity and specificity of PET, as well as the type and stage of the primary tumor. These parameters were varied to determine the optimal strategy for imaging and therapy for different clinical situations. Maximum expected utility was the metric by which different actions were ranked. Results: For primary tumors with a low probability of lymph node metastases, the sensitivity of PET should be maximized, and 50 Gy should be delivered if PET is positive and 0 Gy if negative. As the probability for lymph node metastases increases, PET imaging becomes unnecessary in some situations, and the optimal dose to the lymph nodes increases. The model needed to include the causes of certain health states to predict current clinical practice. Conclusion: The model demonstrated the ability to reproduce expected outcomes for a range of tumors and provided recommendations for different clinical situations. The differences between the optimal policies and current clinical practice are likely due to a disparity between stated clinical decision processes and actual decision making by clinicians.

  6. Sperm-head morphology study in B6C3F1 mice following inhalation exposure to 1,3-butadiene: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, P.L.; McClanahan, B.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present report describes the results of a study of the morphology of epididymal sperm heads of B6C3F1 mice that were exposed to varying concentrations of 1,3-butadiene. During the fifth post-exposure week, the animals were killed and examined for gross lesions of the reproductive tract; suspensions of the epididymal sperm were prepared for morphologic evaluations. No mortality was observed in any of the inhalation exposure groups. Transient toxic signs, including piloerection and dyspnea, were evident during a 20- to 30-minute period following exposure to 5000 ppM. Mean values for body weights and weight gains of the mice exposed to 1,3-butadiene were not significantly different from control values. A concentration-related increase in the incidence of sperm-head abnormalities was evident and the percentage of sperm heads that were morphologically abnormal was significantly higher in mice exposed to 1000 and 5000 ppM than in the controls. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy's and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy's and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization techniques, laser positioning may affect setup accuracy and couch deflection may be greater than scanners dedicated to radiotherapy. The full set of departmental commissioning and routine quality assurance tests applied to radiotherapy CT simulators must be carried out on the PET-CT scanner. CT image quality must be optimized for radiotherapy planning whilst understanding that the appearance will differ between scanners and may affect delineation. PET-CT quality assurance schedules will need to be added to and modified to incorporate radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods of working for radiotherapy and PET staff will change to take into account considerations of both parties. PET to CT alignment must be subject to quality control on a loaded and unloaded couch preferably using a suitable emission phantom, and tested throughout the whole data pathway. Data integrity must be tested throughout the whole pathway and a system included to verify that delineated structures are transferred correctly. Excellent multidisciplinary team communication and working is vital, and key staff members on both sides should be specifically dedicated to the project. Patient pathway should be clearly devised to optimize patient care and the resources of all departments. Recruitment of a cohort of patients into a methodology study is valuable to test the quality assurance methods and pathway.

  8. Efficacy and Toxicity of Chemoradiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Unknown Primary of Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Haddad, Robert I. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Norris, Charles M. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Posner, Marshall R. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wirth, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: No single standard treatment paradigm is available for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (HNCUP). Bilateral neck radiotherapy with mucosal axis irradiation is widely used, with or without chemotherapy and/or surgical resection. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a highly conformal method for delivering radiation that is becoming the standard of care and might reduce the long-term treatment-related sequelae. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for HNCUP. Patients and Materials: A retrospective study of all patients treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for HNCUP with IMRT between August 2004 and January 2009. The primary endpoint was overall survival; the secondary endpoints were locoregional and distant control, and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: A total of 24 patients with HNCUP were included. Of these patients, 22 had Stage N2 disease or greater. All patients underwent neck computed tomography, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and examination under anesthesia with directed biopsies. Of the 24 patients, 22 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 7 (29%) also underwent induction chemotherapy. The median involved nodal dose was 70 Gy, and the median mucosal dose was 60 Gy. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the 2-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rate was 92% and 100%, respectively. Only 25% of the patients had Grade 2 xerostomia, although 11 patients (46%) required esophageal dilation for stricture. Conclusion: In a single-institution series, IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for HNCUP was associated with superb overall survival and locoregional control. The xerostomia rates were promising, but the aggressive therapy was associated with significant rates of esophageal stenosis.

  9. Phenylbutyrate Mouthwash Mitigates Oral Mucositis During Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, Sang-Hue; Wang, Ling-Wei [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Hsien [Division of Radiotherapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Yih-Lin, E-mail: ylchung@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Deleterious oral mucositis (OM) develops during radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients. There are currently no effective cytoprotective treatments for OM without a potential risk of tumor protection. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study aimed to determine the therapeutic safety and efficacy of phenylbutyrate (an antitumor histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemical chaperone) 5% mouthwash for treating OM caused by cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2005 and June 2006, 36 HNC patients were randomized to standard oral care plus 5 mL of either phenylbutyrate 5% mouthwash (n = 17) or placebo (mouthwash vehicle, n = 19) taken four times daily (swish and spit). Treatment began when mild mucositis (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1) occurred, and ended 4 weeks after RT completion. Safety and efficacy were based on adverse events, physical examination, laboratory determinations, vital signs, Oral Mucosa Assessment Scale (OMAS) and World Health Organization scores, the ability to eat, body weight change, local control, and survival. Results: We found no severe drug-related side effect. At RT doses of 5500-7500 cGy, phenylbutyrate significantly mitigated the severity of mucositis compared with placebo, based on both the WHO score (severity {>=} 3; p = 0.0262) and the OMAS scale (ulceration score {>=} 2; p = 0.0049). The Kaplan-Meier estimates for 2- and 3-year local control, and overall survival were 100% and 80.8%, and 78.6% and 64.3%, respectively, in the phenylbutyrate group and 74.2% and 74.2%, and 57.4% and 50.2%, respectively, in the placebo group. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggested that phenylbutyrate mouthwash significantly decreased the impact of OM in HNC patients receiving RT or chemoradiotherapy and did not confront the tumor control. Larger Phase II randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  10. Investigation of Pitch and Jaw Width to Decrease Delivery Time of Helical Tomotherapy Treatments for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldovan, Monica [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Fontenot, Jonas D., E-mail: jfontenot@marybird.com [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Gibbons, John P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Lee, Tae Kyu [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Rosen, Isaac I. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Fields, Robert S. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Helical tomotherapy plans using a combination of pitch and jaw width settings were developed for 3 patients previously treated for head and neck cancer. Three jaw widths (5, 2.5, and 1 cm) and 4 pitches (0.86, 0.43, 0.287, and 0.215) were used with a (maximum) modulation factor setting of 4. Twelve plans were generated for each patient using an identical optimization procedure (e.g., number of iterations, objective weights, and penalties, etc.), based on recommendations from TomoTherapy (Madison, WI). The plans were compared using isodose plots, dose volume histograms, dose homogeneity indexes, conformity indexes, radiobiological models, and treatment times. Smaller pitches and jaw widths showed better target dose homogeneity and sparing of normal tissue, as expected. However, the treatment time increased inversely proportional to the jaw width, resulting in delivery times of 24 {+-} 1.9 min for the 1-cm jaw width. Although treatment plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw were dosimetrically superior to plans produced with the 5-cm jaw, subsequent calculations of tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities suggest that these differences may not be radiobiologically meaningful. Because treatment plans produced with the 5-cm jaw can be delivered in approximately half the time of plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw (5.1 {+-} 0.6 min vs. 9.5 {+-} 1.1 min), use of the 5-cm jaw in routine treatment planning may be a viable approach to decreasing treatment delivery times from helical tomotherapy units.

  11. Real-Time In Vivo Dosimetry With MOSFET Detectors in Serial Tomotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi Zhenyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Deng Xiaowu, E-mail: dengxw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Huang Shaomin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Shiu, Almon [Radiation Physics Department, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Lerch, Michael; Metcalfe, Peter; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne VIC 3002 (Australia)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A real-time dose verification method using a recently designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system was evaluated for quality assurance (QA) of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Following the investigation of key parameters that might affect the accuracy of MOSFET measurements (i.e., source surface distance [SSD], field size, beam incident angles and radiation energy spectrum), the feasibility of this detector in IMRT dose verification was demonstrated by comparison with ion chamber measurements taken in an IMRT QA phantom. Real-time in vivo measurements were also performed with the MOSFET system during serial tomotherapy treatments administered to 8 head and neck cancer patients. Results: MOSFET sensitivity did not change with SSD. For field sizes smaller than 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, MOFET sensitivity varied within 1.0%. The detector angular response was isotropic within 2% over 360{sup o}, and the observed sensitivity variation due to changes in the energy spectrum was negligible in 6-MV photons. MOSFET system measurements and ion chamber measurements agreed at all points in IMRT phantom plan verification, within 5%. The mean difference between 48 IMRT MOSFET-measured doses and calculated values in 8 patients was 3.33% and ranged from -2.20% to 7.89%. More than 90% of the total measurements had deviations of less than 5% from the planned doses. Conclusion: The MOSFET dosimetry system has been proven to be an effective tool in evaluating the actual dose within individual patients during IMRT treatment.

  12. Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Schrag, Deborah [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

  13. Observational Study Designs for Comparative Effectiveness Research: An Alternative Approach to Close Evidence Gaps in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulart, Bernardo H.L., E-mail: bhg@uw.edu [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Division of Public Health Sciences, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research (HICOR), Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Ramsey, Scott D. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Division of Public Health Sciences, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research (HICOR), Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Parvathaneni, Upendra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has emerged as an approach to improve quality of care and patient outcomes while reducing healthcare costs by providing evidence to guide healthcare decisions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have represented the ideal study design to support treatment decisions in head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. In RCTs, formal chance (randomization) determines treatment allocation, which prevents selection bias from distorting the measure of treatment effects. Despite this advantage, only a minority of patients qualify for inclusion in H and N RCTs, which limits the validity of their results to the broader H and N cancer patient population seen in clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials often do not address other knowledge gaps in the management of H and N cancer, including treatment comparisons for rare types of H and N cancers, monitoring of rare or late toxicity events (eg, osteoradionecrosis), or in some instances an RCT is simply not feasible. Observational studies, or studies in which treatment allocation occurs independently of investigators' choice or randomization, may address several of these gaps in knowledge, thereby complementing the role of RCTs. This critical review discusses how observational CER studies complement RCTs in generating the evidence to inform healthcare decisions and improve the quality of care and outcomes of H and N cancer patients. Review topics include a balanced discussion about the strengths and limitations of both RCT and observational CER study designs; a brief description of design and analytic techniques to handle selection bias in observational studies; examples of observational studies that inform current clinical practices and management of H and N cancers; and suggestions for relevant CER questions that could be addressed by an observational study design.

  14. SU-E-J-245: Is Off-Line Adaptive Radiotherapy Sufficient for Head and Neck Cancer with IGRT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shang, Q; Liu, H; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation doses delivered to patients with head and neck cancer (HN) may deviate from the planned doses because of variations in patient setup and anatomy. This study was to evaluate whether off-line Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) is sufficient. Methods: Ten HN patients, who received IMRT under daily imaging guidance using CT-on-rail/KV-CBCT, were randomly selected for this study. For each patient, the daily treatment setup was corrected with translational only directions. Sixty weekly verification CTs were retrospectively analyzed. On these weekly verification CTs, the tumor volumes and OAR contours were manually delineated by a physician. With the treatment iso-center placed on the verification CTs, according to the recorded clinical shifts, the treatment beams from the original IMRT plans were then applied to these CTs to calculate the delivered doses. The electron density of the planning CTs and weekly CTs were overridden to 1 g/cm3. Results: Among 60 fractions, D99 of the CTVs in 4 fractions decreased more than 5% of the planned doses. The maximum dose of the spinal cord exceeded 10% of the planned values in 2 fractions. A close examination indicated that the dose discrepancy in these 6 fractions was due to patient rotations, especially shoulder rotations. After registering these 6 CTs with the planning CT allowing six degree of freedoms, the maximum rotations around 3 axes were > 1.5 for these fractions. With rotation setup errors removed, 4 out of 10 patients still required off-line ART to accommodate anatomical changes. Conclusion: A significant shoulder rotations were observed in 10% fractions, requiring patient re-setup. Off-line ART alone is not sufficient to correct for random variations of patient position, although ART is effective to adapt to patients' gradual anatomic changes. Re-setup or on-line ART may be considered for patients with large deviations detected early by daily IGRT images. The study is supported in part by Siemens Medical Solutions.

  15. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Saito, Naoko [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Qureshi, Muhammad M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ozonoff, Al [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Romesser, Paul B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  16. Heads and Tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, M.F.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . www.oblique-publications.net Oblique Publications? library of zines will be available for free download in PDF format from its website. Beginning 1999 j j j Succor Skintone Beacon in the Night A View from the Top Saving Walter S. Foxhole... years, but we have almost never posted stories to lists or put them up in HTML format on anyone?s website. We are resistors. Controlling look and protect- ing content are serious issues with us. We?ve finally decided to make the transition to the web...

  17. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 24, 2010 ... of science, engineering, and technology and in helping all students develop critical thinking skills that are transferable to their future pursuits, ..... physics in the Freshman Summer Institute (FSI) at Caltech; and led a research...

  18. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    2. The College of Science honored distinguished alumni at a banquet on .... Cushman's research interests include fluids in porous media, stochastic processes,.

  19. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dublin, Ohio with their son, Jack, and daughter, Lauren. Dan Rubin .... Spring: Andrew Bohn, Michael Burkhart, ... to present the Gerald R. MacLane award in...

  20. Comparison of Four Cisplatin-Based Radiochemotherapy Regimens for Nonmetastatic Stage III/IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck;Head-and-neck cancer; Cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy; Toxicity; Treatment outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Kronemann, Stefanie; Meyners, Thekla; Bohlen, Guenther [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Tribius, Silke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Kazic, Nadja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Schroeder, Ursula [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Hakim, Samer G. [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AR (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes of four cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy regimens in 311 patients with Stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of three courses of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 (Group A, n = 74), two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 plus 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group B, n = 49), two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 plus 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group C, n = 102), or two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group D, n = 86). The groups were retrospectively compared for toxicity and outcomes, and 11 additional factors were evaluated for outcomes. Results: No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding radiation-related acute oral mucositis and radiation-related late toxicities. Acute Grade 3 skin toxicity was significantly more frequent in Group B than in the patients of the other three groups (p = .013). The chemotherapy-related Grade 3 nausea/vomiting rate was 24% for Group A, 8% for Group B, 9% for Group C, and 6% for Group D (p = .003). The corresponding Grade 3 nephrotoxicity rates were 8%, 1%, 2%, and 1% (p = .019). The corresponding Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity rates were 35%, 41%, 19%, and 21% (p = .027). Chemotherapy could be completed in 50%, 59%, 74%, and 83% of the Group A, B, C, and D patients, respectively (p = .002). Toxicity-related radiotherapy breaks occurred in 39%, 43%, 21%, and 15% of Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively (p = .005). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 67%, 72%, 60%, and 59% for Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively (p = .48). The corresponding 3-year metastasis-free survival rates were 67%, 74%, 63%, and 79% (p = .31), and the corresponding 3-year survival rates were 60%, 63%, 50%, and 71% (p = .056). On multivariate analysis, Karnofsky performance status, histologic grade, T/N category, preradiotherapy hemoglobin level, completion of chemotherapy, and radiotherapy breaks were associated with the outcome. Conclusion: The four compared radiochemotherapy regimens were not significantly different regarding treatment outcomes. Two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 were better tolerated than the other three regimens.