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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and State of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Department Title of Proposed Project: South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program State Involved: Montana Abstract: In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead drainage. The South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program constitutes a

2

DOE/EIS-0353; South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration July 2005 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and State of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Department Title of Proposed Project: South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program State Involved: Montana Abstract: In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic

3

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program (DOE/EIS-0353) (05/01/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program RECORD OF DECISION Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department's (MFWP) South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program. This program is the Proposed Action in the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program EIS (DOE/EIS- 0353, July 2005). BPA will fund the program pursuant to its authority under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in the Columbia River Basin. The project constitutes a portion of the Hungry

4

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

DOE/BP-00005043-1 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and screens were not developed further for consideration. Explosives Pneumatic and percussion explosions were hemorrhaging in the gills and brain. Campbell and O'Neil (1999) found that pneumatic concussion during or surrounding structure. Millisecond (MS) connectors would be required along the primacord trunk line to create

6

Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the South Fork Flatbed Watershed/Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program (5/5/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 86 / Monday, May 5, 2003 / Notices the estimated annual cost to the public of this information collection will be about $128,263. C. Request for Comments The Commission solicits written comments from all interested persons about the proposed collection of information. The Commission specifically solicits information relevant to the following topics: * Whether the collection of information described above is necessary for the proper performance of the Commission's functions, including whether the information would have practical utility; * Whether the estimated burden of the proposed collection of information is accurate; * Whether the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected could be enhanced; and

7

Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program (DOE/EIS-0353) (05/12/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

714 Federal Register 714 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 92 / Friday, May 12, 2006 / Notices 6623. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be electronically mailed to IC DocketMgr@ed.gov. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800-877-8339. [FR Doc. E6-7288 Filed 5-11-06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Special Education-Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities-Access to Emerging Technologies (CFDA No. 84.327C) ACTION: Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2006;

8

Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability of the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslop Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program (DOE/EIS-0353) (08/19/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04 04 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 160 / Friday, August 19, 2005 / Notices electronic docket at 67 FR 38102 (May 31, 2002), or go to http://www.epa.gov/ edocket. Title: NSPS for Primary and Secondary Emissions from Basic Oxygen Furnaces (Renewal). Abstract: The New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for the regulations published at 40 CFR part 60, subparts N and Na were proposed on were proposed on June 11, 1973, and promulgated on March 8, 1974. These regulations apply to each basic oxygen process furnace (BOPF) in an iron and steel plant commencing construction, modification or reconstruction after the date of a proposal. An opacity limit was promulgated on April 13, 1978, as a supplement to the mass standard. On January 20, 1983, amendments to the

9

EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout...

10

EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout...

11

EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Montana EIS No. 040274, Draft EIS, DOE, MT, South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Preserve the Genetic Purity of the Westslope Cutthroat Trout Population, Flathead National Forest, Flathead River, Flathead, Powell and Missoula Counties, Montana DOE/EIS-0353 Environmental Protection Agency, Notice of Availability, Draft Environmental Impact Statement for South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Montana, 69 FR 34161 (June 2004) More Documents & Publications

12

EIS-0353: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: Final Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program In cooperation with Montana, Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage. The South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program constitutes a portion of the Hungry Horse Mitigation Program. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0353 (July 2005) More Documents & Publications EIS-0353: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

13

Appendix 53 Status Review for Westslope Cutthroat Trout in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, February 1987. [3] Roland W. Jeppson. Analysis of Flow in Pipe Networks. Ann Arbor Science, 1976. [4] Peter

14

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

EIS-0353: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Record of Decision Record of Decision EIS-0353: Record of Decision South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department's (MFWP) South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program. This program is the Proposed Action in the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0353, July 2005). South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0353) (05/01/06) More Documents & Publications EIS-0353: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision

17

EIS-0353: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision EIS-0353: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Flathead County, Montana This notice announces the availability of the ROD for the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, based on the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/ EIS-0353, July 2005). BPA is taking this action to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage in Flathead County, Montana. DOE/EIS-353, Bonneville Power Administration, Notice of Availability of the

18

John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day, who contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2002, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, riparian fencing, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, infiltration galleries and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2002 totaled $423,198.00 with a total amount of $345,752.00 (81%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage. The South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program constitutes a portion of the Hungry Horse Mitigation Program. The purpose of the Hungry Horse Mitigation Program is to mitigate for the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam through restoring habitat, improving fish passage, protecting and recovering native fish populations, and

24

Instream Flows Needed for Successful Migration and Rearing of Rainbow and Westslope Cutthroat Trout in Selected Tributaries of the Kootenai River: Final Report FY 1988.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second phase of a two-part study that was conducted by Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks in contractual agreement with Bonneville Power Administration to address measures of the Northwest Power Planning Council's River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Objectives were to determine instream flow needs in Kootenai River tributaries to maintain successful fish migration, spawning and rearing habitat of game fish, evaluate existing resident and rearing fish populations, and compile hydrologic and fishery information required to secure legal reservation of water for the fishery source. The Kootenai River fishery is threatened by microhydro and other water use development which reduce tributary habitat critical for maintaining a healthy spawning and rearing environment. The wetted perimeter method was used to estimate flows required to maintain existing resident and migratory fish populations in 28 tributaries to the Kootenai River. Migrant passage flows were determined using the discharge-average depth relationship at four (usually five) riffle transects. This information will provide the basis to reserve water through application to the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. 45 figs., 56 tabs.

Marotz, Brian

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Multiscale Genetic Structure of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the Upper Snake River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvierii have declined throughout their native range as a result of habitat fragmentation, overharvest, and introductions of nonnative trout that have hybridized with or displaced native populations. The degree to which these factors have impacted the current genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations is of primary interest for their conservation. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity and genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Idaho and Nevada with data from six polymorphic microsatellite loci. A total of 1,392 samples were analyzed from 45 sample locations throughout 11 major river drainages. We found that levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation varied extensively. The Salt River drainage, which is representative of the least impacted migration corridors in Idaho, had the highest levels of genetic diversity and low levels of genetic differentiation. High levels of genetic differentiation were observed at similar or smaller geographic scales in the Portneuf River, Raft River, and Teton River drainages, which are more altered by anthropogenic disturbances. Results suggested that Yellowstone cutthroat trout are naturally structured at the major river drainage level but that habitat fragmentation has altered this structuring. Connectivity should be restored via habitat restoration whenever possible to minimize losses in genetic diversity and to preserve historical processes of gene flow, life history variation, and metapopulation dynamics. However, alternative strategies for management and conservation should also be considered in areas where there is a strong likelihood of nonnative invasions or extensive habitat fragmentation that cannot be easily ameliorated.

Cegelski, Christine C.; Campbell, Matthew R.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 25, 2005 November 25, 2005 EIS-0372: Final Environmental Impact Statement Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) Northeast Reliability Interconnect September 1, 2005 EIS-0351: Final Environmental Impact Statement Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam August 26, 2005 EIS-0372: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) Northeast Reliability Interconnect August 5, 2005 EIS-0355: Final Environmental Impact Statement Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah July 1, 2005 EIS-0353: Final Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program April 29, 2005 EIS-0348: Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and

28

Watershed Mercury Loading Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explains and illustrates a simplified stochastic framework, the Watershed Mercury Loading Framework, for organizing and framing site-specific knowledge and information on mercury loading to waterbodies. The framework permits explicit treatment of data uncertainties. This report will be useful to EPRI members, state and federal regulatory agencies, and watershed stakeholders concerned with mercury-related human and ecological health risk.

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

Watershed Restoration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 – April 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

CX-007364: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007364: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to Purchase the Upper Twin Rivers Conservation Easement CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/17/2011 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of 87 acres in the Kootenai River watershed for wildlife habitat mitigation. The acquisition parcel was selected for protection in part due to the potential to restore altered riparian habitats for wildlife, resident fish species (i.e., rainbow trout, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, kokanee) and the Kootenai River White Sturgeon, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The Kootenai River watershed

32

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

34

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 1770 of 29,416 results. 61 - 1770 of 29,416 results. Download EIS-0353: Draft Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0353-draft-environmental-impact-statement Download VEE-0060- In the Matter of Blakeman Propane, Inc. On May 11, 1999, Blakeman Propane, Inc. (Blakeman) of Moorcroft, Wyoming, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its... http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/vee-0060-matter-blakeman-propane-inc Download Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2004 Welcome to the 39th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned.

36

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 8760 of 31,917 results. 51 - 8760 of 31,917 results. Download EA-1087: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1087-final-environmental-assessment Download EIS-0353: Final Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0353-final-environmental-impact-statement Download EA-1442: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Construction and Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1442-final-environmental-assessment Download CX-006180: Categorical Exclusion Determination

37

EIS-0353: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed/Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program This notice announces BPA's intention to prepare an EIS on removal of all fish from selected lakes in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage that harbor non-native species that threaten to genetically contaminate native fish in streams leading from those lakes, down into the South Fork Flathead River and Hungry Horse Reservoir. The specific lakes proposed for treatment are located in the Montana Counties of Flathead, Missoula, and Powell. This proposed action would take place within floodplains and waters located directly adjacent to and below the high water marks of these lakes.

38

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 4580 of 28,560 results. 71 - 4580 of 28,560 results. Download EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0353-epa-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Download Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms- June 2013 Office of River Protection Assessment of Contractor Quality Assurance, Operational Awareness at the Hanford Tank Farms [HIAR NNSS-2012-12-03] http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/independent-oversight-activity-report-hanford-tank-farms-june-2013 Download LWZ-0023- In the Matter of Universities Research Association, Inc. Universities Research Association, Inc. (URA) is the management and operating contractor for the Department of Energy's (the DOE)

39

EA-1932-DEA-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-mailed E-mailed Region One 490 North Meridian Road Kalispell, MT 59901 (406) 752-5501 Fax: 406-257-0349 Ref: JS062-12 August 9, 2012 Ladies and Gentlemen: Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP), Region One, is seeking public comment for the proposed Bass Lake Restoration Project for the purpose of removing northern pike from Bass Lake and Mud Creek and restocking the lake with westslope cutthroat trout. This project would be conducted within the Mud Creek watershed located approximately 6 miles southeast of the city of Eureka, Montana. The removal of northern pike would help restore native fish populations in the Tobacco River and Lake Koocanusa, which Bass Lake and Mud Creek feed. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Bass Lake

40

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 The past and future implications for salmon habi

Geist, David R.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

43

Montana Watershed Coordination Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watershed Coordination Council Watershed Coordination Council Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Watershed Coordination Council Name Montana Watershed Coordination Council Place Helena, Montana Zip 59604-6873 Website http://mtwatersheds.org/index. References MWCC Website[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Montana Watershed Coordination Council is an organization based in Helena, Montana. MWCC has been cultivating broad-based support for community driven approaches to managing complex land and water issues for over eighteen years as the statewide organization representing each of more than 60 watershed groups. The MWCC mission is to enhance, conserve, and protect natural resources and sustain the high quality of life in Montana for present and future

44

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve

45

The Walker Branch Watershed on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watershed History Prior to World War II, the Walker Branch Watershed was a typical rural area with a mix of forest, sustenance agriculture, and open woodland grazing. After...

46

Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed following the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake for their subsistence needs. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat trout were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. It appears that a suite of factors have contributed to the decline of cutthroat trout stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Mallet 1969; Scholz et al. 1985; Lillengreen et al. 1993). These factors included the construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906, major changes in land cover types, impacts from agricultural activities, and introduction of exotic fish species. The decline in native cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin has been a primary focus of study by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. The overarching goals for recovery have been to restore the cutthroat trout populations to levels that allow for subsistence harvest, maintain genetic diversity, and increase the probability of persistence in the face of anthropogenic influences and prospective climate change. This included recovering the lacustrine-adfluvial life history form that was historically prevalent and had served to provide both resilience and resistance to the structure of cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin. To this end, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe closed Lake Creek and Benewah Creek to fishing in 1993 to initiate recovery of westslope cutthroat trout to historical levels. However, achieving sustainable cutthroat trout populations also required addressing biotic factors and habitat features in the basin that were limiting recovery. Early in the 1990s, BPA-funded surveys and inventories identified limiting factors in Tribal watersheds that would need to be remedied to restore westslope cutthroat trout populations. The limiting factors included: low-quality, low-complexity mainstem stream habitat and riparian zones; high stream temperatures in mainstem habitats; negative interactions with nonnative brook trout in tributaries; and potential survival bottlenecks in Coeur d'Alene Lake. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery (NWPPC Program Measures 10.8B.20). These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fisheries habitat; (3) Conduct an educational/outreach program for the general public within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation to facilitate a 'holistic' watershed protection process; (4) Develop an interim fishery for tribal and non-tribal members of the reservation through construction, operation and maintenance of five trout ponds; (5) Design, construct, operate and maintain a trout production facility; and (6) Implement a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. These activities provide partial mitigation for the extirpation of anadromous fish resources from usual and

Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A. [Coeur d'Alene Tribe Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Program

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

WATERSHED SCIENCE Watershed Science is the study of the natural processes and human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption, agriculture, energy production, transportation, and recreation. Management of fresh water.colostate.edu/career-services/ Sample Watershed Science Employers State of Colorado State of Wyoming Telesto URS US Geological Survey US

51

Watershed Management Program Record of Decision; 28Aug1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watershed Management Program Watershed Management Program Record of Decision SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded watershed management projects. Various sources-including Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agencies-propose watershed management projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, the Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual watershed management programs and projects. This decision is based on consideration of

52

Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed are coordinated with the Clearwater National Forest and Potlatch Corporation. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed of the Clearwater River in 1996. Fencing to exclude cattle for stream banks, stream bank stabilization, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts are the primary focuses of this effort. The successful completion of the replacement and removal of several passage blocking culverts represent a major improvement to the watershed. These projects, coupled with other recently completed projects and those anticipated in the future, are a significant step in improving habitat conditions in Lolo Creek.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Texas connects watershed protection and erosion through compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS CONNECTS WATERSHED PROTECTION AND EROSION THROUGHLandscape Architect, Texas Department of Transportation, 125E. 11 th Street Austin, Texas 78701, Fax: 512-416-3098 Scott

Cogburn, Barrie; McCoy, Scott

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Implementation of the Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF) Watershed Model for Nutrient Trading in the Ohio River Ba sin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Ohio River Water Quality Trading Program, the Scioto, Muskingum, and Allegheny watersheds were analyzed, using the Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF) model, to determine their capacity for nutrient trading. For consistency across the Ohio River Basin, the watershed models were implemented using the hydrological unit code (HUC) 10 delineation available from the United States Geological Survey. Data from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Pennsylvania Department ...

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Analysis Using Aerial Photography and Ground Survey Data " (Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As you are aware, the Watershed Analysis study which we are conducting will require additional time for completion. We are submitting this interim report on the project for your review and comment. The report is intended to: i. 2. Describe the status of the project and projected timeline for completion; Present our conceptual approach to watershed analysis in the context of cumulative effects; 3. Describe the past use of remote sensing for stream, riparian, and watershed studies and some critical issues which must be addressed in any watershed or stream analysis system; 4. Describe our study methods; 5. Present a preliminary analysis of changes in stream habitat in Taneum creek as determined from physical stream surveys conducted for this project and historical stream survey data. Since the aerial photograph analysis is not completed, we do not believe that a

Dave Somers; Jeanette Smith; Robert Wissmar; Nancy Sturnham Dnr; Tim Beechie; Dave Somers; Jeanette Smith; Robert Wissmar

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fish Passage Assessment: Big Canyon Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the fish passage assessment as outlined as part of the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project as detailed in the CY2003 Statement of Work (SOW). As part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP), this project is one of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) many efforts at off-site mitigation for damage to salmon and steelhead runs, their migration, and wildlife habitat caused by the construction and operation of federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The proposed restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed follow the watershed restoration approach mandated by the Fisheries and Watershed Program. Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program vision focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects. We strive toward maximizing historic ecosystem productive health, for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations. The Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program (NPTFWP) sponsors the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project. The NPTFWP has the authority to allocate funds under the provisions set forth in their contract with BPA. In the state of Idaho vast numbers of relatively small obstructions, such as road culverts, block thousands of miles of habitat suitable for a variety of fish species. To date, most agencies and land managers have not had sufficient, quantifiable data to adequately address these barrier sites. The ultimate objective of this comprehensive inventory and assessment was to identify all barrier crossings within the watershed. The barriers were then prioritized according to the amount of habitat blocked at each site and the fish life history stages impacted. This assessment protocol will hopefully prove useful to other agencies and become a model for use in other watersheds.

Christian, Richard

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Potlatch River Watershed Restoration, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project's goal is to improve instream fish habitat in the Potlatch River and the lower Clearwater River through comprehensive watershed planning, implementation of best management practices and expanded water quality and fish habitat monitoring. This proposal has two primary objectives: (1) complete the Potlatch River watershed implementation plan; and, (2) augment existing monitoring efforts in the Potlatch River to broaden the water quality and fish resource data baseline.

Stinson, Kenneth

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1999 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a summary of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until last year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. However, the watershed stream evaluation team used in the watershed analysis determined that there were problems along the Pataha Creek that needed to be addressed that would add further protection to the banks and therefore a further reduction of sedimentation into the stream. 1999 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. In stream work was not addressed this year because of the costs associated with these projects and the low impact of the sediment issue concerning Pataha Creeks impact on Chinook Salmon in the Tucannon River.

Bartels, Duane G.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed; Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed are coordinated with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. During the FY 2002, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

Coty, J

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

65

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed; Annual Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed; Annual Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and designs completed on two of the high priority culverts. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where necessary, and applying fertilizers at rates that maximize agricultural production without polluting the environment. Watershed runoff and industrial and municipal effluents pollute streams and reservoirs. Point source pollution (industries and municipalities) can be monitored. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers, and climatic variables. Routing models are needed to determine the quality of water as it flows from nonpoint sources through streams and valleys to rivers and large reservoirs. Models are also needed to determine optimal strategies for planning land use, conservation practices, and fertilizer application to maximize agricultural production subject to water quality constraints. Three of the most important agricultural pollutants are suspended sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Robinson [1971] pointed out that sediment is the greatest pollutant of water in terms of volume. Sediment also transports other pollutants, like phosphorus and nitrogen. These two elements are principally involved in lake eutrophication. Frequently algae blooms develop in nutrient-laden water and cause it to have an off-taste and an unpleasant odor. The odor of decaying plants becomes offensive; fish are killed because of reduced dissolved oxygen in the water, and recreation is deterred. The objective of this research was to develop models for use in managing large agricultural watersheds to obtain maximum agricultural production and to maintain water quality standards. The models were designed to: 1. Simulate daily runoff, and sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen yields from small watersheds (areas land owners and operators) for planning land use, fertilizer application, and conservation practices on subwatersheds. 4. Determine the optimal strategy for each subwatershed to maximize agricultural production for the entire watershed subject to water quality constraints. Generally, water-quality models are developed by adding chemical modeling components to existing runoff and sediment models because runoff and sediment provide transportation for chemicals. Several conceptual models for predicting chemical yields from small watersheds have been presented [Crawford and Donigian, 1973; Donigian and Crawford, 1976; Frere, et al., 1975; Hagin and Amberger, 1974; Kling, 1974; Johnson and Straub, 1971]. However, these models are not applicable to large watersheds because they have no routing mechanism. For this reason, runoff, sediment, and nutrient models were refined and developed here for application to large watersheds. Probably, the most widely used and accepted model for predicting runoff volume is the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number system [U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 1972]. The SCS model was modified by adding a soil-moisture-index accounting procedure [Williams and Laseur, 1976]. The modified water yield model is considerably more accurate than the original SCS model. On a watershed near Riesel, Texas, the modified model explained 95% of the variation in monthly runoff as compared with 65% for the original model. The water-yield model was refined here by replacing the climatic index (lake evaporation) with daily consumptive water use for individual crops.

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Short communication: Estimation of stream channel geometry in Idaho using GIS-derived watershed characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes estimation of stream channel geometry with multiple regression analysis of GIS-derived watershed characteristics including drainage area, catchment-averaged precipitation, mean watershed slope, elevation, forest cover, percent area ... Keywords: Cross-sections, GIS, Modeling, Stream channels, Streamstats, Watersheds

Daniel P. Ames; Eric B. Rafn; Robert Van Kirk; Benjamin Crosby

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - John Day Watershed Restoration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the John Day Watershed Restoration Program, which includes projects to improve watershed conditions, resulting in improved fish and wildlife habitat. The project was planned and coordinated by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs through the John Day Basin Office in Prairie City, Oregon. A variety of activities will be implemented, described below. The project will involve the installation of four permanent lay flat diversions (structures) to replace temporary diversions. Two structures would be constructed in Beech Creek, one in Little Beech Creek and one in the John Day River. The structures will replace temporary pushup dams, which were constructed annually of various materials. Installation of the permanent diversion structures eliminates the stream-disturbing activities associated with annual installation of temporary structures. They also will enable fish passage in all flow conditions, an improvement over the temporary structures which can obstruct fish passage under some conditions. Five scour chains will be installed in six sites within the John Day River. The chains will be 3 feet long and consist of 1/4 inch chain. They will be buried within the streambed to monitor the movement of material in the streambed. Other activities that will be implemented include: Installation of off-site water systems in areas where fencing and revegetation projects are implemented, in order to restrict livestock access to waterways; construction of facilities to return irrigation flows to the Johns Day River, including the installation of pipe to replace failing drains or return ditches; installation of pumps to replace temporary diversions; and removal of junipers from approximately 500 acres per year by hand felling.

N /A

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ranking criteria were developed to rate 19 tributaries on the Coeur d`Alene Indiana Reservation for potential of habitat enhancement for westslope cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi, and bull trout, Salvelinus malma. Cutthroat and bull trout habitat requirements, derived from an extensive literature review of each species, were compared to the physical and biological parameters of each stream observed during an aerial -- helicopter survey. Ten tributaries were selected for further study, using the ranking criteria that were derived. The most favorable ratings were awarded to streams that were located completely on the reservation, displayed highest potential for improvement and enhancement, had no barriers to fish migration, good road access, and a gradient acceptable to cutthroat and bull trout habitation. The ten streams selected for study were Bellgrove, Fighting, Lake, Squaw, Plummer, Little Plummer, Benewah, Alder, Hell`s Gulch and Evans creeks.

Graves, Suzy

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Unpaving the Way to Creek Restoration in Lower Sausal Creek Watershed: Applying the EU Water Framework Directive to a US Urban Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River. UCthe EU Water Framework Directive to a US Urban Watershed byUnion Water Framework Directive (WFD) provides a strategy

Li, Hong; Wardani, Jane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Application of the soil and water assessment tool in a tropical agricultural catchment of the Panama Canal watershed implications for its use in watershed management activities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Panama Canal Watershed (PCW) provides water to operate the Canal, generate hydroelectricity, and supply water provisions to the local and metropolitan populations. With a… (more)

Oestreicher, Jordan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1998 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a few of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. 1998 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek.

Bartels, Duane G.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Blackland Research Extension Center Temple, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Blackland Research Extension Center Temple, Texas January 25, 2011 Robert Adams Alan Plummer Associates, Inc. radams@apaienv.com Ashley Alexander Texas State Soil Station, Texas Tech University tom.arsuffi@ttu.edu Jenna Barrett Brazos River Authority jbarrett

75

Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on annual average runoff and NPS pollution from the watershed and its five sub-basins. Results highlight the effectiveness of the L-THIA approach in assessing the long-term hydrologic impact of urban sprawl. The L-THIA/NPS GIS model is a powerful tool for identifying environmentally sensitive areas in terms of NPS pollution potential and for evaluating alternative land use scenarios to enhance NPS pollution management. Access to the model via the INTERNET enhances the usability and effectiveness of the technique significantly. Recommendations can be made to community decision makers, based on this analysis, concerning how development can be controlled within the watershed to minimize the long-term impacts of increased stormwater runoff and NPS pollution for better management of water resources.

Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Enhancement of Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF) for Mercury Watershed Management and Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the enhancement of EPRI's Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to enable it to simulate the biogeochemical cycling and fish accumulation of mercury in the environment. This report should be of value to the power sector, industry, environmental organizations, government, and public agencies concerned about environmental mercury.

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

78

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing (08/11/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-169) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-169) Mickey Carter Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing Project No: 1994-017-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources, 6.10 Access Fencing Location: Lemhi County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian exclosure.

79

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, Annual Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to enhance and restore the ecological integrity and ecosystem function of the Grays River watershed. The recommended restoration and enhancement efforts developed in this project should incorporate local community stakeholder interests and needs. The objectives of this project are (1) to perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessment; (2) to develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) to gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River sub-basin.

McGrath, Kathleen E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

Browne, Dave

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

McKenzie River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations, supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. A primary goal of the Council's program is to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. The MWC will always have a baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. This watershed program is strengthened by the completion of the BPA funded Sub-basin Assessment, Conservation Strategy and the establishment of a Benchmarks system, thus, providing the MWC a prioritized framework for restoration efforts. Objectives for FY03 included: (1) Continued coordination of McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups that restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though a strategic and comprehensive outreach and education program, utilizing Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and council operations.

Thrailkil, Jim

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-99): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Watershed Management Program EIS, (DOEEIS-0265SA-99) Dorothy Welch (KEWU - 4) TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, COTR Proposed Action: Longley Meadows Restoration Project...

83

Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds  

SciTech Connect

On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

None available

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

SWAT-Based Streamflow Estimation and Its Responses to Climate Change in the Kadongjia River Watershed, Southern Tibet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Runoff estimation and its response to climate change in ungauged or poorly gauged basins based on hydrological models are frontier research issues of the hydrological cycle. For the Kadongjia River watershed (KRW), a poorly gauged watershed ...

Rui Sun; Xueqin Zhang; Yang Sun; Du Zheng; Klaus Fraedrich

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Assessing the Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Mountain Snowpack in the St. Mary River Watershed, Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The St. Mary River watershed is an important international watershed that supplies irrigation water to large portions of southern Alberta, Canada, and northern Montana. The St. Mary River is fully allocated and users on both sides of the border ...

Ryan J. MacDonald; James M. Byrne; Stefan W. Kienzle; Robert P. Larson

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

SWAT-based streamflow estimation and its responses to climate change in Kadongjia River Watershed, South Tibet, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Runoff estimation and its response to climate change in ungauged or poorly gauged basins based on hydrological models are frontier research issues of the hydrological cycle. For Kadongjia River Watershed (KRW), a poorly gauged watershed located in ...

Rui Sun; Xueqin Zhang; Yang Sun; Du Zheng; Klaus Fraedrich

87

McKenzie River Watershed Coordination, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations and grant funds supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's (MWC) efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. Primary goals of the MWC are to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. Underpinning the goals is the MWC's baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. Objectives for FY02 included: (1) Continue to coordinate McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups to restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the middle to lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though an outreach and education program, utilizing (BPA funded) Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and Council operations.

Thrailkil, Jim

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

89

Protect and Restore Red River Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Red River Watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2001. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. From completing a watershed assessment to two NEPA efforts and a final stream restoration design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Red River to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed. Another major, and extremely, important component of this project is the Red River Meadow Conservation Easement. We have begun the process of pursuing a conservation easement on approximately 270 acres of prime meadow habitat (Red River runs through this meadow and is prime spawning and rearing habitat).

Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

90

An integrated media, integrated processes watershed model Gour-Tsyh Yeh a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated media, integrated processes watershed model Gour-Tsyh Yeh a, , Don-Sin Shih b , Jing modelling Groundwater and surface water coupling High performance parallel computing River hydraulics of a numerical model simulating fluid flow in WAterSHed Systems of 1D Stream-River Networks, 2D Overland Regime

Central Florida, University of

91

An Efficient Hillclimbing-based Watershed Algorithm and its Prototype Hardware Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image segmentation is the process of isolating objects in an input image, that is, partitioning the image into disjoint regions, such that each region is homogeneous with respect to some property, such as gray value or texture. Watershed-based image ... Keywords: FGPA implementation, hillclimbing technique, image segmentation, watershed transformation

C. Rambabu; I. Chakrabarti

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-167: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Program EIS - Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project - Klickitat Meadows Restoration (08/09/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2004 9, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-167) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project - Klickitat Meadows Restoration Project No: 1997-056-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams, 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures, 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 7.18 Road Closures, 8.10 Stream Channel Protection

93

Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River and Coeur d'Alene Lake. Effluents from tailings and mining waste have contributed vast quantities of trace heavy metals to the system. Poor agricultural and forest practices have also contributed to the degradation of water quality and habitat suitability for resident salmonids. Increased sediment loads from agricultural runoff and recent and recovering clearcuts, and increases in water temperature due to riparian canopy removal may be two of the most important problems currently affecting westslope cutthroat trout. Increases in water temperature have reduced the range of resident salmonids to a fraction of its historic extent. Within this new range, sediment has reduced the quality of both spawning and rearing habitats. Historically, municipal waste contributed large quantities of phosphates and nitrogen that accelerated the eutrophication process in Coeur d'Alene Lake. However, over the last 25 years work has been completed to reduce the annual load of these materials. Wastewater treatment facilities have been established near all major municipalities in and around the basin. Species interactions with introduced exotics as well as native species are also acting to limit cutthroat trout populations. Two mechanisms are at work: interspecific competition, and species replacement. Competition occurs when two species utilize common resources, the supply of which is short; or if the resources are not in short supply, they harm each other in the process of seeking these resources. Replacement occurs when some environmental or anthropogenic change (e.g., habitat degradation, fishing pressure, etc.) causes the decline or elimination of one species and another species, either native or introduced, fills the void left by the other. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery. These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

Vitale, Angelo, Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River and Coeur d'Alene Lake. Effluents from tailings and mining waste have contributed vast quantities of trace heavy metals to the system. Poor agricultural and forest practices have also contributed to the degradation of water quality and habitat suitability for resident salmonids. Increased sediment loads from agricultural runoff and recent and recovering clearcuts, and increases in water temperature due to riparian canopy removal may be two of the most important problems currently affecting westslope cutthroat trout. Increases in water temperature have reduced the range of resident salmonids to a fraction of its historic extent. Within this new range, sediment has reduced the quality of both spawning and rearing habitats. Historically, municipal waste contributed large quantities of phosphates and nitrogen that accelerated the eutrophication process in Coeur d'Alene Lake. However, over the last 25 years work has been completed to reduce the annual load of these materials. Wastewater treatment facilities have been established near all major municipalities in and around the basin. Species interactions with introduced exotics as well as native species are also acting to limit cutthroat trout populations. Two mechanisms are at work: interspecific competition, and species replacement. Competition occurs when two species utilize common resources, the supply of which is short; or if the resources are not in short supply, they harm each other in the process of seeking these resources. Replacement occurs when some environmental or anthropogenic change (e.g., habitat degradation, fishing pressure, etc.) causes the decline or elimination of one species and another species, either native or introduced, fills the void left by the other. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery. These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; Skookumchuck Creek Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Skookumchuck Creek juvenile bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat-monitoring program is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. This project was commissioned in planning for fish habitat protection and forest development within the Skookumchuck Creek watershed and was intended to expand upon similar studies initiated within the Wigwam River from 2000 to 2002. The broad intent is to develop a better understanding of juvenile bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout recruitment and the ongoing hydrologic and morphologic processes, especially as they relate to spawning and rearing habitat quality. The 2002 project year represents the first year of a long-term bull trout-monitoring program with current studies focused on collecting baseline information. This report provides a summary of results obtained to date. Bull trout represented 72.4% of the catch. Fry dominated the catch because site selection was biased towards electrofishing sample sites which favored high bull trout fry capture success. The mean density of all juvenile bull trout was estimated to be 6.6 fish/100m{sup 2}. This represents one-half the densities reported for the 2002 Wigwam River enumeration program, even though enumeration of bull trout redds was an order of magnitude higher for the Wigwam River. Typically, areas with combined fry and juvenile densities greater than 1.5 fish per 100 m{sup 2} are cited as critical rearing areas. Trends in abundance appeared to be related to proximity to spawning areas, bed material size, and water depth. Cover components utilized by juvenile and adult bull trout and cutthroat trout were interstices, boulder, depth, overhead vegetation and LWD. The range of morphological stream types encompass the stable and resilient spectrum (C3(1), C3 and B3c). The Skookumchuck can be generalized as a slightly entrenched, meandering, riffle-pool, cobble dominated channel with a well-developed floodplain. The presence of an undisturbed riparian ecosystem dominated by mature, coniferous forest, combined with a high percentage of coarse particles in the stream bank, result in stable stream banks with low sediment supply. The results of the habitat assessment concur with the stable stream channel type and channel disturbance features noted were infrequent and minor in nature. Detailed summaries of channel profile, pattern, dimension and materials are provided in Appendices. It was recommended that a fourth index site representing tributary spawning and rearing habitat be established in lower Sandown Creek and included for baseline data collection in year two.

Cope, R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Multimetric spatial optimization of switchgrass plantings across a watershed  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for bioenergy crops presents our society with the opportunity to design more sustainable landscapes. We have created a Biomass Location for Optimal Sustainability Model (BLOSM) to test the hypothesis that landscape design of cellulosic bioenergy crop plantings may simultaneously improve water quality (i.e., decrease concentrations of sediment, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen) and increase profits for farmer-producers while achieving a feedstock-production goal. BLOSM was run using six scenarios to identify switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) planting locations that might supply a commercial-scale biorefinery planned for the Lower Little Tennessee (LLT) watershed. Each scenario sought to achieve different sustainability goals: improving water quality through reduced nitrogen, phosphorus, or sediment concentrations; maximizing profit; a balance of these conditions; or a balance of these conditions with the additional constraint of converting no more than 25% of agricultural land. Scenario results were compared to a baseline case of no land-use conversion. BLOSM results indicate that a combined economic and environmental optimization approach can achieve multiple objectives simultaneously when a small proportion (1.3%) of the LLT watershed is planted with perennial switchgrass. The multimetric optimization approach described here can be used as a research tool to consider bioenergy plantings for other feedstocks, sustainability criteria, and regions.

Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Griffiths, Natalie A [ORNL; Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Middleton, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Thomas, Neil [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessment of a multi-objective decision support system generated land use plan on forest fodder dependency in a Himalayan watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of integrated watershed land use plans generated through multi-objective optimization techniques in a Central Himalayan watershed on forest fodder dependency for meeting fodder requirements of livestock in the watershed. ... Keywords: Forest fodder dependency, Himalayas, Integrated watershed development, Multi-objective decision support system

A. Raizada; Pradeep Dogra; B. L. Dhyani

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Simulating Typhoon Floods with Gauge Data and Mesoscale-Modeled Rainfall in a Mountainous Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based distributed hydrological model was applied to simulate typhoon floods over a mountainous watershed in Taiwan. The meteorological forcings include the observed gauge rainfall data and the predicted rainfall data from a mesoscale ...

Ming-Hsu Li; Ming-Jen Yang; Ruitang Soong; Hsiao-Ling Huang

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Discharge Characteristics and Changes over the Ob River Watershed in Siberia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes long-term (1936–90) monthly streamflow records for the major subbasins within the Ob River watershed in order to examine discharge changes induced by human activities (particularly reservoirs and agricultural activities) and ...

Daqing Yang; Baisheng Ye; Alexander Shiklomanov

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Topographic and Atmospheric Influences on Precipitation Variability over a Mountainous Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using rotated principal component analysis (PCA), unique, orthogonal spatial patterns of daily and monthlyprecipitation on a well-instrumented, mountainous watershed in Idaho are examined for their relationship totopography, geographic location, ...

Gregory L. Johnson; Clayton L. Hanson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume I of III Reports A thru E, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the ongoing efforts to document life history strategies of steelhead in the Wind River watershed and to formulate criteria for ranking restoration needs and proposed projects.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Rainfall Amount, Intensity, Duration, and Frequency Relationships in the Mae Chaem Watershed in Southeast Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dense tipping-bucket rain gauge network was established in the Mae Chaem watershed in the mountains of northwestern Thailand as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment-Tropics (GAME-T). ...

Koji Dairaku; Seita Emori; Taikan Oki

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Watershed Evaluation and Habitat Response to Recent Storms : Annual Report for 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large and powerful storm systems moved through the Pacific Northwest during the wet season of 1995--96, triggering flooding, mass erosion, and, alteration of salmon habitats in affected watersheds. This project study was initiated to assess whether watershed conditions are causing damage, triggered by storm events, to salmon habitat on public lands in the Snake River basin. The storms and flooding in 1995--96 provide a prime opportunity to examine whether habitat conditions are improving, because the effects of land management activities on streams and salmon habitat are often not fully expressed until triggered by storms and floods. To address these issues, they are studying the recent storm responses of watersheds and salmon habitat in systematically selected subbasins and watersheds within the Snake River system. The study watersheds include several in the Wenaha and Tucannon subbasins in Washington and Oregon, and the watersheds of Squaw Creek (roaded) and Weir Creek (unroaded) in the Lochsa River subbasin, Idaho. The study was designed to examine possible differences in the effects of the storms in broadly comparable watersheds with differing magnitudes or types of disturbance. Watershed response is examined by comparing storm response mechanisms, such as rates of mass failure, among watersheds with similar attributes, but different levels of land management. The response of salmon habitat conditions is being examined by comparing habitat conditions before and after the storms in a stream and among streams in watersheds with similar attributes but different levels of land management. If appropriate to the results, the study will identify priority measures for reducing the severity of storm responses in watersheds within the Snake River Basin with habitat for at-risk salmon. This annual report describes the attributes of the study watersheds and the criteria and methods used to select them. The report also describes the watershed and fish habitat attributes evaluated and the methods used to evaluate them. Watershed responses and attributes evaluated include mass failures, historic soil loss, the integration of roads with the drainage network, estimated flood recurrence intervals, and headwater channel morphology. Habitat attributes evaluated include large woody debris, pool frequency and depth, substrate conditions, and bank stability. Multiple analyses of habitat data in the Tucannon and Wenaha subbasins remain to be completed due to difficulties stemming from data characteristics that indicated that some of the pre-existing data may have be of questionable accuracy. Diagnostic attributes of the questionable data included a change in monitoring protocols during the pre- to post-flood analysis period, physically implausible temporal trends in some habitat attributes at some sites, and conflicting results for the same attribute at the same locations from different data sources. Since unreliable data can lead to spurious results, criteria were developed to screen the data for analysis, as described in this report. It is anticipated that while the data screening will prevent spurious results, it will also truncate some of the planned analysis in the Tucannon and Wenaha systems.

Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Huntington, Charles W.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Spatially Distributed Sensible Heat Flux over a Semiarid Watershed. Part II: Use of a Variable Resistance Approach with Radiometric Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiometric surface temperature images from aircraft observations over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, a semiarid rangeland watershed, were used with ground-based meteorological data at a reference site for extrapolating estimates of ...

William P. Kustas; Karen S. Humes

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Vegetation Control in the Long-Term Self-Stabilization of the Liangzhou Oasis of the Upper Shiyang River Watershed of West-Central Gansu, Northwest China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the relationship between vegetation in the Liangzhou Oasis in the Upper Shiyang River watershed (USRW) of west-central Gansu, China, and within-watershed precipitation, soil water storage, and oasis self-support. Oases along ...

Charles P-A. Bourque; Quazi K. Hassan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-91)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2002 , 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-91) Tom Morse, KEWL-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Hood River Fish Habitat (Evans Creek Culvert Replacement) Project No: 1998-021-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.13 Culvert removal/replacement to improve fish passage, 2.1 Maintain healthy riparian plant communities, 2.4 Provide filter strips to catch sediment and other pollutants, 2.6 Native seeds inventory, 2.7 Avoid exotic species, 7.2 Install hydraulic structures at low streamflows, 7.3 Minimize erosion

112

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-57)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 12, 2001 July 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-57) Allyn Meuleman - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Idaho Fish Screening Improvement (Champion, Iron, Fourth of July, Goat Creeks) Project No: 1994-015-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.15 Fish passage enhancement - fishways; 4.25 Consolidate/Replace irrigation diversion dams; 4.10 Water Conveyance: pipeline. Location: Stanley, Custer County, Idaho. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a project that will enhance in-stream

113

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patterns of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patters of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing streambanks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination includes: within department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Wind River Watershed Restoration Project; Underwood Conservation District, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Wind River project is to preserve, protect and restore Wind River steelhead. In March, 1998, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed the steelhead of the lower Columbia as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act. In 1997, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife rated the status of the Wind River summer run steelhead as critical. Due to the status of this stock, the Wind River summer steelhead have the highest priority for recovery and restoration in the state of Washington's Lower Columbia Steelhead Conservation Initiative. The Wind River Project includes four cooperating agencies. Those are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), United States Geological Service (USGS), US Forest Service (USFS), and Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Tasks include monitoring steelhead populations (USGS and WDFW), Coordinating a Watershed Committee and Technical Advisory Group (UCD), evaluating physical habitat conditions (USFS and UCD), assessing watershed health (all), reducing road sediments sources (USFS), rehabilitating riparian corridors, floodplains, and channel geometry (UCD, USFS), evaluate removal of Hemlock Dam (USFS), and promote local watershed stewardship (UCD, USFS). UCD's major efforts have included coordination of the Wind River Watershed Committee and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), water temperature and water chemistry monitoring, riparian habitat improvement projects, and educational activities. Our coordination work enables the local Watershed Committee and TAC to function and provide essential input to Agencies, and our habitat improvement work focuses on riparian revegetation. Water chemistry and temperature data collection provide information for monitoring watershed conditions and fish habitat, and are comparable with data gathered in previous years. Water chemistry information collected on Trout Creek should, with 2 years data, determine whether pH levels make conditions favorable for a fish parasite, Heteropolaria lwoffi. Educational activities further the likelihood that future generations will continue to understand and enjoy the presence of native fish stocks in the Wind River basin.

White, Jim

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/4/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-165) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-165) Mickey Carter TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence Project No: 1994-017-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 4.12 Filter Strips, 6.1 Differed Grazing, 6.10 Access Fencing Location: Custer County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the

118

Wind River Watershed Restoration Project, Segment II, 2000-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its second year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey - Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW).

Bair, Brian; Olegario, Anthony; Powers, Paul

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Descriptions and Expectations of Recommended BMPs for Improving the Bosque River Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bosque River and its watershed face complex water quality problems that are not easy to solve. Attempts have been made to improve the quality of the water moving through this watershed, but have had little success due to the broad scope of work that is needed to positively impact water quality in the Bosque River. This document is part of a multi-faceted project that aims to improve the environmental infrastructure in the watershed in a manner that focuses on existing pollution issues. The project’s first phase, which included the development of an environmental infrastructure improvement plan, has been completed. This plan outlined a methodology for determining likely areas that would contribute the most significant source of pollution to the watershed and developed a tool for determining the priority in which all sub-watersheds in the basins should be evaluated for needed pollution abatement measures. The Phase I report also established a list of feasible best management practices (BMPs) and ranked them based on the recommendations of a scientific advisory committee. Six steps were identified as an effective process to choose the proper BMPs for each sub-watershed in the basin. If these steps are followed, the best BMPs for each location should be effectively identified. This document expands on the Phase I report by providing an in-depth physical description of each BMP along with an overview of potential costs and applicable areas, situations, and locations where these practices should be implemented. The BMPs are organized into five groups based on applicable location(s): on-farm BMPs, between field and creek BMPs, in-stream or gully BMPs, universal BMPs, and city BMPs. The majority of these BMPs target the excessive amount of nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), entering surface water supplies. Several BMPs also focus on sediment control, as some of the soils in the watershed are highly erosive and pose the threat of transporting nutrients with them when they erode. Some BMPs also address ecosystem health and habitat issues in the watershed. Collectively, the recommended BMPs aim to improve the overall quality and productivity of the entire watershed. Many of these BMPs involve simple, inexpensive adjustments of current practices while others require more significant changes that may require technical and financial assistance. The last section of this document highlights potential sources of technical information and methods for disseminating educational materials to landowners and other interested parties. Potential federal and state sources of funding are also listed in this section for the use of parties considering the installation of multiple or more expensive BMPs on their land. This document serves as a source of general information about BMPs that would benefit landowners and agency personnel assisting landowners in the Bosque River watershed. This information can help guide interested parties to BMPs that are most feasible for their needs as well as provide a general overview of how to implement the selected practice(s) to yield the best results for their location. Successful BMP implementation will reduce the impact of human activities and lead to environmental improvement in the Bosque watershed.

Meier, Megan; Gregory, Lucas

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Watershed Perspective on Bioenergy Sustainability: A Workshop to be held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Watershed Perspective on Bioenergy Sustainability: A Workshop to be held at Oak Ridge National-scale perspective of cellulosic bioenergy feedstock sustainability will be held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory bioenergy feedstock production (particularly hydrology and water quality). Overall goals for the workshop

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An Analysis of Microbial Pollution in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This assessment of fecal coliform sources and pathways in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets is part of the Project ENVironmental InVESTment (ENVVEST) being conducted by the Navy's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, the Suquamish Tribe, Kitsap County, the City of Bremerton, the City of Port Orchard, and other local stakeholders. The goal of this study was to identify microbial pollution problems within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and to provide a comprehensive assessment of fecal coliform (FC) contamination from all identifiable sources in the watershed. This study quantifies levels of contamination and estimated loadings from known sources within the watersheds and describes pollutant transport mechanisms found in the study area. In addition, the effectiveness of pollution prevention and mitigation measures currently in place within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed are discussed. This comprehensive study relies on historical data collected by several cooperating agencies, in addition to data collected during the study period from spring 2001 through summer 2005. This report is intended to provide the technical information needed to continue current water quality cleanup efforts and to help implement future efforts.

May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email Texas Water Resources Institute glbryant@ag.tamu.edu Ruben Camacho EPA SRF Camacho.Ruben@epamail.epa.gov Jody Carton Trinity Basin Conservation Foundation jcarton@trinitybasin.org Pamela Casebolt Texas State

123

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Participants July 27, 2011 First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Participants July 27, 2011 Austin First Last Organization Email Robert Adams Alan Plummer Associates, Inc. radams@apaienv.com Jacqueline Aitkenhead-Peterson Texas@tsswcb.state.tx.us Blake Alldredge Texas AgriLife Extension balldredge@tamu.edu Beth Almaraz Nueces River Authority

124

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable January 25, 2012 # First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable January 25, 2012 # First Last Organization Email 1 Robert Adams Alan Plummer Assoc., Inc. radams@apaienv.com 2 Ashley Alexander Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board aalexander@tsswcb.texas.gov 3 Blake Alldredge Texas AgriLife Extension Service balldredge

125

Re: BPA FY 07-09 Project Proposal #200711200 Teanaway Watershed Protection and Restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re: BPA FY 07-09 Project Proposal #200711200 Teanaway Watershed Protection and Restoration Kittitas draft province recommendations). The conservation easements acquisition costs qualify for funding by BPA as a Capital investment, as indicated in the Project Narrative on page 8. Proposed Project Funding Allocation

126

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-MayagĂĽez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

Gilbes, Fernando

127

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira; McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Extraordinary Flood Response of a Small Urban Watershed to Short-Duration Convective Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 9.1 km2 Moores Run watershed in Baltimore, Maryland, experiences floods with unit discharge peaks exceeding 1 m3 s?1 km?2 12 times yr?1, on average. Few, if any, drainage basins in the continental United States have a higher frequency. A ...

James A. Smith; Andrew J. Miller; Mary Lynn Baeck; Peter A. Nelson; Gary T. Fisher; Katherine L. Meierdiercks

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Watershed Transformation Based Identification of the Combustion Region in an Oxy-coal Flame Image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the increasingly stringent standards on pollutant emissions, oxy-coal combustion technologies are being proposed for both existing and new coal-fired power plants. However, there is lack of research to characterize this new type of combustion ... Keywords: edge detection, image enhancement, wavelet transformation, oxy-coal flame, watershed transformation, image segmentation

Tian Qiu; Yong Yan; Gang Lu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Mercury contamination in fish-eating birds from a polluted watershed  

SciTech Connect

The mercury contents of selected fish-eating birds in the watershed affected by the Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota are reported. The mine had used the mercury amalgamation process to recover gold, and had discharged 12 to 40 pounds of mercury per day. Elevated mercury levels were found in the birds.

Hesse, L.W.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). One suggested Best Management Practice (BMP) is the export of phosphorus (P) through turfgrass sod produced with composted dairy manure from an impaired rural watershed to an urban watershed. The manure-grown sod releases P slowly and would not require additional P fertilizer for up to 20 years in the receiving watershed. This would eliminate P application to the sod and improve the water quality of urban streams. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to model a typical suburban watershed that would receive the transplanted sod. The objective of the modeling was to determine the water quality changes due to the import of sod transplanted from turf fields and grown with composted dairy manure. The SWAT model was calibrated to simulate historical flow and sediment and nutrient loading to Mary's Creek. The total P stream loading to Mary's Creek was lower when manure-grown sod was imported instead of commercial sod grown with inorganic fertilizers. Yet, flow, sediment yield, and total N yield increased equally for both cases at the watershed outlet. The SWAT simulations indicate that a turfgrass BMP can be used effectively to import manure P into an urban watershed and reduce in-stream P levels when compared to sod grown with inorganic fertilizers.

Richards, Chad Edward

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Wind River Watershed Restoration 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2004, researchers from U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. Juvenile salmonid population surveys were conducted within select study areas throughout the subbasin. We expanded our survey coverage of the mainstem Wind River to a reach in the vicinity of Carson National Fish Hatchery to assess effects of non-indigenous Chinook on native steelhead. These efforts add to a database of habitat and fish data collected in the Wind River since 1996. This research contributes to the Wind River Restoration Project, which includes active stream habitat restoration and monitoring of adult and juvenile steelhead populations. We maintained a network of 32 thermographs in the Wind River subbasin during 2004. Additionally, Underwood Conservation District provided us with data from seven thermographs that they maintained during 2004. Thermograph data are identifying areas with chronic high water temperatures and stream sections where high rates of warming are occurring. During 2004, water temperatures at 26 thermograph sites exceeded the 16 C limit for surface waters set by the Washington Department of Ecology. Water temperatures exceeded 20 C at five sites in the Trout Creek watershed. Our thermograph dataset includes information from as early as 1996 at some sites and has become a valuable long-term dataset, which will be crucial in determining bioenergetic relationships with habitat and life-histories. We have monitored salmonid populations throughout the Wind River subbasin by electrofishing and snorkeling. We electrofished four stream sections for population estimates during 2004. In these sections, and others where we simply collected fish without a population estimate, we tagged juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to track growth and movement of individuals. We snorkeled nine stream sections during 2004. Juvenile steelhead populations have varied greatly between streams and between years. Numbers of age-0 steelhead have increased substantially since 2000 within the MINE reach (rkm 35.0-40.0) section of the upper Wind River. Because of potential negative interactions with steelhead, naturally spawned populations of introduced juvenile Chinook salmon are of concern in the mainstem of the Wind River. During 2004, we deployed over 3,000 PIT tags in the Wind River subbasin, primarily in juvenile steelhead, but also in juvenile Chinook. We are compiling a dataset of recapture information on these tagged fish as well as interrogation information from Bonneville Dam and other sites. The habitat and fish data collected have been used in Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment modeling efforts, the Wind River Subbasin Plan, and the Total Maximum Daily Load report from Washington Department of Ecology. Continued monitoring of changes in habitat, combined with data on fish populations, will help guide planning efforts of land and fish managers. As long-term active and passive restoration actions are implemented in the Wind River and its tributaries, these data will provide the ability to measure change. Because the Wind River subbasin has no steelhead hatchery or supplementation, these data will be useful to compare population trends in subbasins with hatchery or supplementation management.

Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-164: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/2/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2004 , 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-164) Mickey Carter TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - L-9 Irrigation Diversion Modification Project No: 1994-017-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways, 4.1 Irrigation Water Management, 4.2 Water Measuring Devices, 4.23 Intake and Return Diversion Screens, 4.25 Consolidation/Replace Irrigation Diversion Dams Location: Lemhi County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Lemhi Soil and Water Conservation District

138

Statistical Comparisons of Watershed-Scale Response to Climate Change in Selected Basins across the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an earlier global climate-change study, air temperature and precipitation data for the entire twenty-first century simulated from five general circulation models were used as input to precalibrated watershed models for 14 selected basins across ...

John Risley; Hamid Moradkhani; Lauren Hay; Steve Markstrom

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-166: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/6/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2004 6, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-166) Jay Marcotte Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Coleman Creek Fish Passage Restoration Project No: 2002-025-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to Improve Fish Passage, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 2.6 Native Seed Inventories, 2.7 Avoid Exotic Species, 2.9 Mechanical Vegetation Removal, 4.2 Water Measuring

140

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-88): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (08/26/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2002 6, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-88) John Baugher, KEWL-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: John Day Watershed Restoration (2002-2003) Project No: 1998-018-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 4.2 Water Measuring Devices; 4.10 Water Conveyance Pipeline; 4.25 Consolidate / Replace Irrigation Diversion Dams; 6.5 Water Supply: Pipeline. Location: Canyon City, Grant County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon.

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141

Hydroclimatic Response of Watersheds to Urban Intensity: An Observational and Modeling-Based Analysis for the White River Basin, Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impervious surface area (ISA) has different surface characteristics from the natural land cover and has great influence on watershed hydrology. To assess the urbanization effects on streamflow regimes, the authors analyzed the U.S. Geological ...

Guoxiang Yang; Laura C. Bowling; Keith A. Cherkauer; Bryan C. Pijanowski; Dev Niyogi

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Numerical Prediction of Precipitation and River Flow over the Russian River Watershed during the January 1995 California Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation and river flow during a January 1995 flood event over the Russian River watershed in the northern Coastal Range of California were simulated using the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Coupled ...

Norman L. Miller; Jinwon Kim

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Identification of sediment sources in forested watersheds with surface coal mining disturbance using carbon and nitrogen isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Sediments and soils were analyzed using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry and carbon and nitrogen elemental analyses to evaluate the their ability to indicate land-use and land management disturbance and pinpoint loading from sediment transport sources in forested watersheds disturbed by surface coal mining. Samples of transported sediment particulate organic matter were collected from four watersheds in the Southern Appalachian forest in Kentucky. The four watersheds had different surface coal mining history that were classified as undisturbed, active mining, and reclaimed conditions. Soil samples were analyzed including reclaimed grassland soils, undisturbed forest soils, geogenic organic matter associated with coal fragments in mining spoil, and soil organic matter from un-mined grassland soils. Statistically significant differences were found for all biogeochemical signatures when comparing transported sediments from undisturbed watersheds and surface coal mining disturbed watersheds and the results were attributed to differences in erosion sources and the presence of geogenic organic matter. Sediment transport sources in the surface coal mining watersheds analyzed using Monte Carlo mass balance un-mixing found that: {delta}{sup 15}N showed the ability to differentiate streambank erosion and surface soil erosion; and {delta} {sup 13}C showed the ability to differentiate soil organic matter and geogenic organic matter. This suggests that streambank erosion downstream of surface coal mining sites is a significant source of sediment in coal mining disturbed watersheds. The results suggest that the sediment transport processes governing streambank erosion loads are taking longer to reach geomorphologic equilibrium in the watershed as compared with the surface erosion processes.

Fox, J.F. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Variation in foliar 15N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance ({sup o}{sup 15}N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N{sub 2}-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O{sub i}-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar {sup 15}N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sedimentation in Lavon Reservoir Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Law 92-500 - the 1972 Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments - mandates the analysis of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution controls. This report presents the results of a study of the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in the watershed above Lavon Reservoir. The study focuses on: (a) effects of erosion controls on farm income, (b) off-side sediment damages in the watersheds; (c) costs of administering and enforcing alternative erosion-sedimentation controls, and (d) effects of adopting cotton pest management methods. Erosion controls considered include possible regulatory programs as well as voluntary programs combined with economic incentives. While the stimulus for this study was concern over pollution (an off-site problem) it can not, because of long-run farm income consequences, be separated from conservation problems (an on-farm problem). Thus, the study is as much an analysis of conservation economics as it is an analysis of environmental economics. Accordingly, the report contains substantial information on the short and long-run on-farm benefits and costs of various soil conservation practices for all soil mapping units in Lavon watershed The results are applicable to much of the Blackland Prairies Land Resource area.

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Remediation of the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Lab: An Accelerated Closure Success Story  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melton Valley (MV) Watershed at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) encompasses approximately 430 hectares (1062 acres). Historic operations at ORNL produced a diverse legacy of contaminated facilities and waste disposal areas in the valley. In addition, from 1955 to 1963, ORNL served as a major disposal site for wastes from over 50 off-site government-sponsored installations, research institutions, and other isotope users. Contaminated areas in the watershed included burial grounds, landfills, underground tanks, surface impoundments, liquid disposal pits/trenches, hydro-fracture wells, leak and spill sites, inactive surface structures, and contaminated soil and sediment. Remediation of the watershed in accordance with the requirements specified in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Actions in Melton Valley, which estimated that remedial actions specified in the ROD would occur over a period of 14 years, with completion by FY 2014. Under the terms of the Accelerated Closure Contract between DOE and its contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, the work was subdivided into 14 separate sub-projects which were completed between August 2001 and September 2006, 8 years ahead of the original schedule. (authors)

Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, R. [U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adams, V. [U.S. DOE, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Topographic variation of soil nitrogen dynamics at Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of soil nitrogen (N) transformations is central to quantifying the N dynamics and productivity of ecosystems. The objectives of this work were to examine spatial and temporal variation of soil N dynamics and to identify factors correlated with topographic variation in soil N dynamics in a forest watershed. Net N mineralization and net nitrification potential were measured by aerobic laboratory incubations of surface (0-7 cm) mineral soils. Principal components analysis was used to describe sampling sites across the watershed based on 13 site characterization variables. A topographic index used in hydrologic modeling, In ({alpha}/tan {beta}), was calculated for each site as the natural logarithm of the ratio of the upslope drainage area per unit contour length ({alpha}) to the local slope angle (tan {beta}). Soils from valley floors had greater total N concentrations, lower carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios, greater potential net nitrification, and greater microbial activity (as indicated by short-term urease assays) than soils from ridges. Mean net nitrification potential was 0.59 {micro}g N g{sup -1} d{sup -1} in surface soils from valley floors and was < 0.01 on ridges and slopes. The first principal component was related to the N and C properties of soils, leaf litter, and leaf fall at a site. The second principal component was related to forest stand composition. The topographic index was significantly correlated with important variables related to soil N dynamics. Once calibration data are derived, this index may be useful as a first approximation to total soil N concentrations and soil C:N ratios in forest watersheds because In ({alpha}/tan {beta}) can be calculated from geographic information systems that contain topographic data.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Huston, Michael A [ORNL; Thoms, C. A. [University of Wisconsin

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-59) (8/14/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2001 14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-59) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Reestablish Safe Access into Tributaries of the Yakima Subbasin, Tucker Creek Fish Passage Project Project No: 98-034-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways/Screening, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams. Location: Tucker Creek, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Yakama Nation Fisheries

149

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-68)(10/12/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2001 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-68) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Mill Creek and Little Creek Crossing Improvement Project No: 1992-026-01 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to Improve Fish Passage. Location: Mill Creek and Little Creek, Union County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP), and the Union County Public Works Department (UCPWD) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA provides funds to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed

150

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-101): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management EIS 1/2/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2003 , 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-101) Mark Shaw, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Restoration of Anadromous Fish Access to Hawley Creek Project No: 2001-052-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 4.18: Purchase / Negotiate Water Right Location: Lemhi, Lemhi County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Lemhi Soil and Water Conservation District, with the cooperation of the Idaho Governor's Office of Species Conservation. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a project to enhance fish habitat on

151

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-79) (5/20/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2002 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-79) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Eisminger/ CREP Dike Relocation Project No: 1992-026-01 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.3 Creation of Wetlands to Provide Near Channel Habitat and Store Water for Land Use, 2.7 Avoid Exotic Species, 2.4 Provide Filter Strips to Catch Sediment and Other Pollutants, 6.1 Deferred Grazing. Location: Union County, Oregon

152

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-102): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 1/17/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-102) David Byrnes, KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program - Ellensburg Water Company/ Cooke Creek Diversion Project Project No: 2002-025-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams; 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures; 1.8 Bank Protection Through Vegetation Management; 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities; 4.10 Water Conveyance - Pipeline; 4.20 Water

153

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-100): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 11/25/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 25, 2002 November 25, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-100) Tracey Yerxa TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Oregon Fish Screening Project, Screen Replacements 2003 Project No: 1993-066-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bio Engineering Techniques; 1.10 Structural Bank Protection using Engineering Structures; 1.14 Reduce Scour and Deposition at Hydraulic Structures; 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement-Fishways; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements;

154

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-92): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/16/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2) 2) Dorothy Welch, KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Asotin Creek Six-Year Direct Seed Program Project No: 1999-060-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 3.2 Conservation Copping Sequence, 3.3 Conservation Tillage, 3.8 Delayed Seed Bed Preparation, 3.9 Grasses and Legumes in rotation, 3.26 Evaluate Field Limitations, 3.27 Equipment Calibration and Use. Location: Various locations in the Asotin Creek Watershed, WA. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a no-till/direct seed farming

155

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/04/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-163) John Baugher TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: John Day Watershed Restoration Program Project No: 1998-018-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 4.2 Water Measuring Devices 4.10 Water Conveyance Pipeline, 4.25 Consolidate/Replace Irrigation Diversion Dams, 6.5 Water Supply: Pipeline, 6.10 Access: Fencing; 8.13 Stand Thinning; 8.15 Manage Stands to Enhance Snowpack Location: Sites within the John Day River Watershed, in Wheeler County and Grant County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm

156

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-69) (11/15/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 15, 2001 November 15, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS, (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-69) Linda Hermeston - KEWL Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Improvement of Anadromous Fish Habitat and Passage in Omak Creek Project No: 2000-001-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures; 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures; 1.8 Bank Protection Through Vegetation Management; 1.9 Structural bank protection using bioengineering methods; 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to improve fish passage; 1.16 Spawning habitat enhancements; 1.17 Rearing habitat enhancement.

157

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-63) (9/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2001 7, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-63) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Pelican Creek Crossing Improvement Project No: 1992-026-01 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to Improve Fish Passage. Location: Pelican Creek, Union County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP), and the Union County Public Works Department (UCPWD) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA provides funds to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed

158

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-78) (5/9/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 9, 2002 May 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-78) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase II (modification to DOE/EIS-0265/SA-72). Project No: 1997-051-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources. Location: Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 310 acres of privately-owned

159

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-66) (10/4/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04, 2001 04, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-66) John Baugher - KEW-4 Tom Morse - KEW-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Managers Proposed Action: Water Right Acquisition Program Project No: 2001-023-00 (Fifteenmile Subbasin Water Right Acquisition Program) 1999-008-00 (Columbia Plateau Water Right Acquisition Program) 2001-056-00 (Trout Creek 2001 Streamflow Enhancement) 2001-069-00 (John Day Basin Stream Enhancement Project, Summer 2001) Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 4.18 Purchase / Negotiate Water Right; 4.19 File for Instream Water Right.

160

Supplement Anlalysis for the Watershed Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-58) (8/7/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2001 7, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-58) Mark Shaw - KEWN-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Asotin Creek Channel, Floodplain and Riparian Restoration (2001) Project Number: 2000-067-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.3 Restoration of Channelized River and Stream Reaches, 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures, 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures, 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 2.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Model Watershed Plan; Lemhi, Pahsimeroi, and East Fork of the Salmon River Management Plan, 1995 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho`s Model Watershed Project was established as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s plan for salmon recovery in the Columbia River Basin. The Council`s charge was simply stated and came without strings. The tasks were to identify actions within the watershed that are planned or needed for salmon habitat, and establish a procedure for implementing habitat-improvement measures. The Council gave the responsibility of developing this project to the Idaho Soil Conservation Commission. This Model Watershed Plan is intended to be a dynamic plan that helps address these two tasks. It is not intended to be the final say on either. It is also not meant to establish laws, policies, or regulations for the agencies, groups, or individuals who participated in the plan development.

Swift, Ralph

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Grays River Watershed Restoration Status Report 2007, May 1, 2007 - October 30, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-013-00, 'Grays River Watershed Restoration', began in FY04 and continues into FY09. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during the period 1 May 2007 through 30 October 2008. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with the Columbia River Estuary Task Force (CREST) on implementation of the Grays River Restoration Project. The Grays River is vitally important to the recovery of Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon because it currently has the most viable population remaining in the LCR region. The Grays River watershed is also important to the recovery of salmon and steelhead in the LCR ecosystem. Today, numbers of naturally spawning salmon and steelhead have declined to levels far below historical numbers because of habitat limiting factors that include but are not limited to the lack of habitat connectivity, diversity, channel stability, riparian function and altered stream flow conditions. The objective of this project is to restore habitat-forming processes to enhance salmon and steelhead populations in the Grays River, following recommendations developed during the FY04-06 BPA-sponsored Grays River Watershed Assessment (BPA Project No. 2003-013-00). Specifically, this project will be the first step in restoring channel structure and function that will increase instream habitat diversity, channel stability, and riparian integrity in the critical response reach upstream and adjacent to critical salmon spawning areas of the Grays River. The major component of this strategy is the planning, design, installation, and monitoring of engineered logjams (ELJ) that will rejuvenate historic channel and floodplain processes. Additional restoration measures include reforesting the riparian corridor to enhance future large woody debris recruitment and investigation of conservation activities within ecologically critical areas. These activities include land acquisition and levee removal to protect critical areas and reconnect floodplain areas. Finally, monitoring integrated with restoration activities is proposed to evaluate restoration effectiveness and allow for adaptive management of future restoration treatments in the project area as well as other degraded watersheds in the Lower Columbia River.

Hanrahan, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2003-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Lapwai Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District). Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period December 1, 2003 through February 28, 2004 include; seven grade stabilization structures, 0.67 acres of wetland plantings, ten acres tree planting, 500 linear feet streambank erosion control, two acres grass seeding, and 120 acres weed control.

Rasmussen, Lynn

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Watershed modeling using large-scale distributed computing in Condor and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models are increasingly being used to quantify the effects of best management practices (BMPs) on water quality. While these models offer the ability to study multiple BMP scenarios, and to analyze impacts of various management decisions on watershed ... Keywords: Condor, Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Program, Lincoln Lake, Soil and Water Assessment Tool Model, TeraGrid, best management practices

Margaret W Gitau; Li-Chi Chiang; Mohamed Sayeed; Indrajeet Chaubey

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Searching for simplified farmers' crop choice models for integrated watershed management in Thailand: A data mining approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study used the C4.5 data mining algorithm to model farmers' crop choice in two watersheds in Thailand. Previous attempts in the Integrated Water Resource Assessment and Management Project to model farmers' crop choice produced large sets of decision ... Keywords: Data mining, Decision support system, Decision trees, Farmers' crop choice

Benchaphun Ekasingh; Kamol Ngamsomsuke

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Scenario development for water resources planning and watershed management: Methodology and semi-arid region case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilizing the scenario development framework from Mahmoud et al. (2009), a set of scenarios were developed for and applied in the Verde River Watershed in Arizona, USA. Through a scenario definition exercise, three dimensions of future change with respective ... Keywords: Scenario development, Scenario planning, Scenarios, Water resources management, Water resources planning

Mohammed I. Mahmoud; Hoshin V. Gupta; Seshadri Rajagopal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Development and application of the spatially explicit load enrichment calculation tool (select) to determine potential E. coli loads in watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the USEPA National Section 303(d) List Fact Sheet, bacterial pathogens are the leading cause of water quality impairments in Texas. The automated Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) uses spatially variable factors such as land use, soil condition, and distance to streams to characterize pathogen sources across a watershed. The results support development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) where bacterial contamination is of concern. SELECT calculates potential E. coli loads by distributing the contributing source populations across suitable habitats, applying a fecal production rate, and then aggregating the potential load to the subwatersheds. SELECT provides a Graphical User Interface (GUI), developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) within ArcGIS 9.X, where project parameters can be adjusted for various pollutant loading scenarios. A new approach for characterizing E. coli loads resulting from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) was incorporated into the SELECT methodology. The pollutant connectivity factor (PCF) module was created to identify areas potentially contributing E. coli loads to waterbodies during runoff events by weighting the influence of potential loading, runoff potential, and travel distance. Simulation results indicate livestock and wildlife are potentially contributing large amounts of E. coli in the Lake Granbury Watershed in areas where these contributing sources are not currently monitored for E. coli. The bacterial water quality violations near Lake Granbury are most likely the result of malfunctioning OWTSs and pet waste in the runoff. The automated SELECT was verified by characterizing the potential E. coli loading in the Plum Creek Watershed and comparing to results from a prior study (Teague, 2007). The E. coli potential load for the watershed was lower than the previous study due to major differences in assumptions. Comparing the average ranked PCF estimated by physical properties of the watershed with the statistical clustering of watershed characteristics provided similar groupings. SELECT supports the need to evaluate each contributing source separately to effectively allocate site specific best management practices (BMPs). This approach can be used as a screening step for determining areas where detailed investigation is merited. SELECT in conjunction with PCF and clustering analysis can assist decision makers develop Watershed Protection Plans (WPPs) and determine TMDLs.

Riebschleager, Kendra Jean

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development and implementation of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution control plans was mandated by the 1972 Federal Pollution Control Act Amendments, Public Law 92-500. The purpose of this particular report is to present the results of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages in the watershed; (c) the costs of administering and enforcing alternative erosion controls, and (d) on-farm economics of soil conservation practices. Erosion controls considered include the traditional voluntary programs combined with economic incentives as well as possible regulatory programs. The focus of the study is on erosion and sedimentation because sediment is a potential transporter of pollutants. Practices to control agricultural non-point source pollution would probably be aimed at reducing soil loss. Conservation and conservation related practices are, at present, considered the best technical practices to abate agricultural non-point source pollution. This is a study of both conservation and environmental economics, two areas that tend to be closely related. For this project, the concern was over potential pollution (an off-site problem), but because of long-run farm income consequences, this concern cannot be separated from conservation problems (an on-farm problem). Accordingly, the report contains substantial information on the short and long-run on-farm benefits and costs of various soil conservation practices for the specific soil mapping units in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The results of this study are applicable to the majority of the soils in the High Plains Land Resource Area. Only sheet and rill erosion are considered in the study. The first section of the report describes the selected "Best Management Practices" and examines the on-farm economics of soil conservation. The second section postulates various sediment damage control options and models the economic consequences of implementation, both to agricultural producers as a group, and to society.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

M-FISH Karyotyping - A New Approach Based on Watershed Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Karyotyping is a process in which chromosomes in a dividing cell are properly stained, identified and displayed in a standard format, which helps geneticist to study and diagnose genetic factors behind various genetic diseases and for studying cancer. M-FISH (Multiplex Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization) provides color karyotyping. In this paper, an automated method for M-FISH chromosome segmentation based on watershed transform followed by naive Bayes classification of each region using the features, mean and standard deviation, is presented. Also, a post processing step is added to re-classify the small chromosome segments to the neighboring larger segment for reducing the chances of misclassification. The approach provided improved accuracy when compared to the pixel-by-pixel approach. The approach was tested on 40 images from the dataset and achieved an accuracy of 84.21 %.

Sreejini, K S; Govindan, V K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-83)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2002 19, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-83) John Baugher Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Bear Creek Irrigation Siphon Project Project No: 1993-066-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bio Engineering Techniques; 1.10 Structural Bank Protection using Engineering Structures; 1.14 Reduce Scour and Deposition at Hydraulic Structures; 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement-Fishways; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements; 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities; 2.4 Provide Filter Strips to

173

NETL: IEP - Water-Energy Interface: In-House Watershed Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-House Watershed Science & Technology R&D In-House Watershed Science & Technology R&D The Geosciences Division of the NETL Office of Science and Technology conducts ongoing in-house research and development pertaining to water issues related to energy production. The division provides skill, expertise, and technical support for NETL programs in areas of environmental and energy technologies that are consistent with the mission of the NETL. Geophysical Investigations NETL is continuously developing new geophysical technologies that address environmental issues associated with the extraction and utilization of fossil fuels. Specifically, NETL has used helicopter electromagnetic and night-time thermal infrared surveys to detect and map contaminated groundwater at abandoned coal mines in north-central Pennsylvania and at an abandoned mercury mine in California. Also, NETL has used helicopter electromagnetic surveys to identify potentially hazardous conditions (unconsolidated slurry pockets, high phreatic zones, and shallow underground mines) at 14 coal waste impoundments in southern West Virginia with a moderate to high hazard potential. In the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, helicopter electromagnetic surveys were flown to determine the best management strategy for water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. Hazards posed by abandoned wells has prompted NETL to develop airborne and ground-based well finding strategies for surveying both large, open areas and small, highly developed areas. The intent of this research is to develop cost-effective airborne geophysical technologies that rapidly gather needed information from large areas, especially areas that might otherwise be inaccessible. Ground surveys from mobile platforms have been developed for use where airborne surveys are not possible or practical.

174

Assessing Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimates in Semiarid Watersheds Using the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Gauge Network and TRMM PR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rain gauge network associated with the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona provides a unique opportunity for direct comparisons of in situ measurements and satellite-based instantaneous rain rate estimates like ...

Eyal Amitai; Carl L. Unkrich; David C. Goodrich; Emad Habib; Bryson Thill

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Spatially Distributed Sensible Heat Flux over a Semiarid Watershed. Part I: Use of Radiometric Surface Temperatures and a Spatially Uniform Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially distributed radiometric surface temperatures over a semiarid watershed were computed using remotely sensed data acquired with an aircraft-based multispectral scanner during the Monsoon ’90 Large Scale Field Experiment. The multispectral ...

K. S. Humes; W. P. Kustas; D. C. Goodrich

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Supplement Analysis 3: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks that proposes to block migrating rainbow trout during spawning to prevent the production and recruitment of approximately 2,500 rainbow trout into the Flathead River system annually. This action will reduce the opportunity for hybridization between rainbow and native westslope cutthroat trout; a species currently under consideration for threatened status under the Endangered Species Act. The project will be accomplished by replacing an existing culvert and retrofitting a fish passage barrier to the bayou. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and Montana Fish, Wildlife,

177

EIS-0246-SA-27: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Supplement Analysis 7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-27: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana BPA proposes to fund a fishery enhancement project where a fish passage barrier will be installed in Abbot Creek to remove introduced rainbow trout and prevent hybridization with westslope cutthroat trout. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) will operate a fish trap downstream of the barrier for 6-10 consecutive years to manually remove the rainbow trout and hybrid spawners from the population. Removal of rainbow trout and hybrids from the stream will eradicate the existing hybrid population spawning in Abbot Creek and ultimately reduce the threat of hybridization in the Flathead River system. Pending completion of a successful disease screening and

178

Microsoft Word - WCT_CX_draft1_5.18.11.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lee Watts Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Reintroduction of westslope cutthroat trout in the Pend Orielle basin. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2007-149-00, Contract #BPA-52530 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.20 Small-scale activities undertaken to protect, restore, or improve fish and wildlife habitat, fish passage facilities (such as fish ladders or minor diversion channels), or fisheries. Location: Four Creeks will be included in the project: ď‚· Cee Cee Ah Creek: Township 34 North, Range 44 East, Section 28, Pend Oreille County, WA ď‚· Middle Creek: Township 35 North, Range 44 East, Section 15, Pend Oreille County, WA ď‚· Upper West Branch: Township 35 North, Range 45 East, Section 25, Pend Oreille

179

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 6150 of 28,560 results. 41 - 6150 of 28,560 results. Download CX-003642: Categorical Exclusion Determination Removal of the Building 370 Felix Magnet CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/02/2010 Location(s): DuPage County, Illinois Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003642-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008722: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reintroduction of Westslope Cutthroat Trout in the Pend Orielle basin CX(s) Applied: B1.20 Date: 05/07/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008722-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008832: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hills Creek-Lookout Point No. 1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2012

180

Microsoft Word - WCT_CX_5.4.12.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Lee Watts Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Reintroduction of westslope cutthroat trout in the Pend Orielle basin. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2007-149-00, Contract #BPA-57129 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.20 Small-scale activities undertaken to protect, restore, or improve fish and wildlife habitat, fish passage facilities (such as fish ladders or minor diversion channels), or fisheries. Location: Two Creeks would be included in the project: ď‚· Cee Cee Ah Creek: Township 34 North, Range 44 East, Section 28, Pend Oreille County, WA ď‚· East Fork Smalle Creek: Township 33 North, Range 43 East, Section 6, Pend Oreille County, WA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CX-006293: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006293: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes for Purchase of the Pistol Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/26/2011 Location(s): Lake County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 20 acre Pistol Creek property by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT). The property is being acquired as partial mitigation for the construction and operation of the Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River, and because of its riparian and natural resource values. The property includes approximately one-quarter mile of Pistol Creek, which is largely important for providing habitat to westslope cutthroat trout and

182

EIS-0246-SA-27: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46-SA-27: Supplement Analysis 46-SA-27: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-27: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana BPA proposes to fund a fishery enhancement project where a fish passage barrier will be installed in Abbot Creek to remove introduced rainbow trout and prevent hybridization with westslope cutthroat trout. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) will operate a fish trap downstream of the barrier for 6-10 consecutive years to manually remove the rainbow trout and hybrid spawners from the population. Removal of rainbow trout and hybrids from the stream will eradicate the existing hybrid population spawning in Abbot Creek and ultimately reduce the threat of hybridization in the Flathead River system. Pending completion of a successful disease screening and

183

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-168: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed - Jim Brown Creek Streambank Stabilization (08/10/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-168) Sabrina Keen Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed - Jim Brown Creek Streambank Stabilization Project No: 1996-077-02 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bioengineering Methods Location: Clearwater County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Nez Perce Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration, Nez Perce Tribe, and Potlatch Corporation are proposing to stabilize streambanks along Jim Brown Creek near

184

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-03): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/16/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3) 3) Dorothy Welch, KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Couse/Tenmile Creeks Six-Year Direct Seed Program Project No: 2002-050-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 3.2 Conservation Cropping Sequence, 3.3 Conservation Tillage, 3.8 Delayed Seed Bed Preparation, 3.9 Grasses and Legumes in Rotation, 3.26 Evaluate Field Limitations, 3.27 Equipment Calibration and Use Location: Various properties in Anatone, Asotin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a six-year direct seed program

185

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-95): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/21/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21, 2002 21, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-95) Ron Morinaka (KEWU - 4) TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, COTR Proposed Action: Libby Creek Channel Stabilization Project Project No: 199500400 Watershed Management Program (See App. A : Available Management Techniques): 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures; 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bioengineering Methods; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements; 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities. Location: On Libby Creek, located about 18 miles southwest of the town of Libby, Montana

186

Erosion and Sediment Damages and Economic Impacts of Potential 208 Controls: A Summary of Five Watershed Studies in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of economic analyses of erosion and sedimentation in five agricultural watersheds in Texas (see fig. 1). Economic analyses of the study areas considered both the on-farm economics of soil conservation and the economic consequences of various sedimentation control options. These topics were joined in the studies because they deal with different facets of the same problem. Unlike some potential pollutants, soil particles transported from a farmer's field that may become a problem downstream are a valuable resource, not a waste product. Because soil is valuable in itself, some level of soil conservation is going to be economically desirable even if downstream damages are not present or are not considered by the farmer. Results of the studies show that soil conservation does indeed pay in many situations and that its value is greater the longer the planning horizon of a farmer. This suggests that an educational program in this regard may reduce sediment damage while increasing farm income at the same time . Sediment can cause environmental damage (off-site costs) both directly and indirectly. Directly, the soil particles can cause environmental damage by filling up reservoirs and flood control structures and by deposition in other places. Indirectly, sediment can cause environmental costs by carrying plant nutrients that are potential pollutants. For the study watersheds, no evidence was found that the concentration of plant nutrients in the water posed health hazards to livestock or humans, nor caused undue eutrophication in the watersheds. Consequently, the study focused on off-site sediment damages resulting from shortened economic lives of reservoir and flood control structures and from sediment deposition in the watershed. Annualized off-site sediment damages ranged from a high of 26 cents per ton of gross erosion in Lake Lavon watershed to 14 cents per ton of gross erosion in Duck Creek, to 13.5 cents per ton of gross erosion in Lower Running Water Draw, to a negligible amount in Turkey Creek and Cameron County. These estimates are considerably lower than off-site sediment damages in corn belt watersheds (Lee & Guntermann). Policy Options for Controlling Sediment Public policies that can be implemented to abate off-site sediment damages include direct regulation, provision of economic incentives, education, and public investment. For point sources of pollutants, regulations are typically directed toward the pollutant at or near the point of emission into waterways. However, this is infeasible with non-point sources such as sediment because they enter waterways at an infinite number of points. Hence, regulations must be directed toward the practices that cause erosion and thus sedimentation. The economic incentive option includes alternatives such as Federal or State cost-sharing for adoption of conservation practices, and disincentives such as taxes or penalties on erosion. Education is a viable policy option in situations where producers are not adopting soil conservation practices that would be profitable. In these situations a successful education program would increase producer's income as well as reducing off-site sediment damages. Public investment could be used to pay for dredging sediment from reservoirs and flood control structures to prevent loss of flood control, water supply and recreational benefits. Social benefits and costs of various policy options based on direct regulation, taxation, and provision of economic incentives were estimated for three watersheds: Lake Lavon, Duck Creek, and Lower Running Water Draw. Items considered in the benefit-cost analysis were: (a) farm income consequences; (b) off-site sediment damages abated; (c) governmental cost or revenue; and (d) administration and enforcement costs associated with each policy. The major conclusion of this social benefit and cost analysis is that off-site damages are not large enough to warrant controls on agricultural activities in any of the watersheds; that i

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) in Rabbit Creek-Cat Creek Watershed, Summer 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is a method for evaluating the health of water bodies and watersheds by analyzing sample catches of fishes. Sites are scored on a numerical scale of 12--60 and on that basis assigned to a ``bioclass`` ranging from ``very poor`` to ``excellent.`` Overall, the major causes of depressed IBI scores in the Rabbit Creek watershed would appear to be: Organic pollution, mostly from livestock, but also from agricultural runoff and possible septic tank failures; sedimentation, principally from stream bank damage by cattle, also possibly from agriculture and construction; toxic pollution from agrochemicals applied to Holly Springs Golf course and agricultural fields` and Warming of water and evaporation loss due to elimination of shade on stream banks and construction of ponds.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Variation in foliar [sup 15]N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

SciTech Connect

Spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance ([sigma][sup 15]N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N[sub 2]-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O[sub 1]-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar [sup 15]N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil. 34 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

Garten, C.T. Jr. (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Pesticide Education in the Coastal Zone of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arroyo Colorado is an ancient channel of the Rio Grande River that extends eastward for about 90 miles from near the city of Mission, Texas through southern Hidalgo County to the city of Harlingen in Cameron County, eventually discharging into the Laguna Madre near the Cameron-Willacy County line. The tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado, as classified by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), is between the confluence with Laguna Madre in Cameron/Willacy County to a point 100 meters (110 yards) downstream of Cemetery Road, south of Port Harlingen in Cameron County. This part of the river is also defined as a coastal natural resource area (CNRA) and a coastal wetland in the Coastal Coordination Act. Water quality monitoring over the past decade has confirmed low oxygen levels and escalated ammonia and nitrate concentrations that have contributed to multiple fish kills in the tidal segment. These sub-optimal aquatic conditions resulted in this portion of the Arroyo Colorado being placed on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for high aquatic life use impairment in 2002. Numerous urban sources, such as point source wastewater discharges, have contributed to this impairment; however, according to the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan (ACWPP), nonpoint source agricultural runoff accounts for much of the water quality issues in the tidal segment. These coastal issues and other water quality issues in the watershed have been addressed by the more than 715-member Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership in the ACWPP. The plan identifies needs specific to water quality protection and improvement for the agricultural community as well as addressing nonpoint source pollution from the urban environment such as landscapes. In response to the ACWPP, Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) proposed to work with the Texas AgriLife Extension Service to implement an educational program aimed at agricultural producers, which included turfgrass producers and local independent school districts that manage athletic fields. The agricultural effort was an integrated farm management program focused on pesticide education and proper nutrient management for Cameron and Willacy counties to address water quality issues related to agricultural production in the tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado. While the turfgrass and athletic field managers were invited to the educational programs provided through the agricultural effort, a separate educational workshop was held for turf producers and managers to increase awareness of how nutrient, pesticide and irrigation management can reduce the amount of nonpoint source pollution. This education plan helps fulfill two goals of the Texas Coastal Management Program. First, agricultural and turfgrass producers and managers in Cameron and Willacy county were educated on water quality issues and how the proper application of pesticides meets current laws and regulations, and can improve the water quality and fish community in the Arroyo Coastal Natural Resources Area (CNRA). Second, the producers and managers were taught that implementing proper pesticide application practices will reduce the potential for nonpoint source pollution, which will improve the water quality in the Arroyo CNRA. This project also enhances the area's ability to continue to support valuable aquatic life and meet water quality goals outlined in the ACWPP. An additional environmental success for this area, given the over-allocation and availability of clean surface waters, will be the added water savings attributed to the irrigation management educational program provided through this effort.

Berthold, Allen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sources and Fates of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Rural and Urban Watersheds in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bryan/College Station (B/CS) region has been reported to have elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface water. Increased DOC concentrations are worrisome as DOC has been shown to be an energy source for the recovery and regrowth of E. coli and many watersheds are impaired by high bacteria levels. To examine the sources and fates of DOC in rural and urban regions to better understand DOC movement though the environment, seven watersheds were studied. To investigate source, streams were analyzed using diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy (DR-NIR) and carbon isotopes. Fate of DOC was determined through monthly streams samples, gathered between March 2011 and February 2012, which were incubated for biodegradable DOC (BDOC). Soil in the region was sampled based on land use categories. Soil was analyzed for DOC and BDOC as well as DOC adsorption, the other major fate of DOC. Above ground vegetation was sampled in conjunction with soil and analyzed for BDOC. Data indicated that fecal matter from cliff swallows provided considerable organic material to streams in the B/CS region as shown through DR-NIR. Carbon isotope values in streams ranged from -23.5 +/- 0.7% to -26.8 +/- 0.5%. Stream spectra may be able to predict carbon isotope values in streams (Adj. R2 = 0.88). Mean annual stream DOC concentrations ranged from 11 +/- 3 mg/L to 31 +/- 12 mg/L, which represents a significant decrease in DOC between 2007 and 2011. Concurrent increases in pH and conductivity were also recorded. The decrease in DOC and the increases in pH and conductivity may be due to impacts of high sodium irrigation tap water. Biodegradable DOC was low in streams, which is likely due to DOC being present in streams in refractory forms that are resistant to microbial breakdown. Soil chemistry, including soil adsorption, was greatly influenced by sodium. The elevated adsorption coefficients and release values seen in highly developed and urban open areas can be attributed to frequent exposure to high sodium irrigation water. The results indicate that sodium is a major driver of DOC in the system. Sound management decisions concerning irrigation water chemistry and urban development might eventually emerge to protect water quality as a result of this research.

Cioce, Danielle

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume II of III Reports F and G, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report here their on-ground restoration actions. Part 1 describes work conducted by the Underwood Conservation District (UCD) on private lands. This work involves the Stabler Cut-Bank project. Part 2 describes work conducted by the U.S. Forest Service. The Stabler Cut-Bank Project is a cooperative stream restoration effort between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the UCD, private landowners, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The Stabler site was identified by UCD during stream surveys conducted in 1996 as part of a USFWS funded project aimed at initiating water quality and habitat restoration efforts on private lands in the basin. In 1997 the Wind River Watershed Council selected the project as a top priority demonstration project. The landowners were approached by the UCD and a partnership developed. Due to their expertise in channel rehabilitation, the Forest Service was consulted for the design and assisted with the implementation of the project. A portion of the initial phase of the project was funded by USFWS. However, the majority of funding (approximately 80%) has been provided by BPA and it is anticipated that additional work that is planned for the site will be conducted with BPA funds.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Kalispell (i.e. Kalispel) Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1996 the Kalispell Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). A habitat and population assessment was conducted on Browns Creek a tributary of Cee Cee Ah Creek, one of the priority tributaries outlined in the 1995 annual report. The assessment was used to determine the type and quality of habitat that was limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high amounts of sediment in the stream, low bank cover, and a lack of winter habitat. Data collected from this assessment was used to prescribe habitat enhancement measures for Browns Creek. Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1995 annual report, were conducted during field season 1996. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and in stream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. The construction of the largemouth bass hatchery was started in October of 1995. The KNRD, Contractors Northwest Inc. and associated subcontractors are in the process of constructing the hatchery. The projected date of hatchery completion is summer 1997.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-170: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS--Tapteal Bend Riparian Corridor Restoration Project (8/11/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2004 1, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-170) Jonathan McCloud Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Tapteal Bend Riparian Corridor Restoration Project Project No: 2002-018-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities Location: Benton County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Tapteal Bend Greenway Association Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the

200

Evaluating the SWAT Model for Hydrological Modeling in the Xixian Watershed and A Comparison with the XAJ Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Already declining water availability in Huaihe River, the 6th largest river in China, is further stressed by climate change and intense human activities. There is a pressing need for a watershed model to better understand the interaction between land use activities and hydrologic processes and to support sustainable water use planning. In this study, we evaluated the performance of SWAT for hydrologic modeling in the Xixian River Basin, located at the headwaters of the Huaihe River, and compared its performance with the Xinanjiang (XAJ) model that has been widely used in China

Shi, Peng; Chen, Chao; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Zhang, Xuesong; Cai, Tao; Fang, Xiuqin; Qu, Simin; Chen, Xi; Li, Qiongfang

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Occurrence, Prevalence, and Disinfection Potential of Tetracycline Resistance Genes and Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in a Subtropical Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Antibiotics are an important method for protecting human health. Unfortunately, the development of antibiotic resistance has decreased the effectiveness of antibiotics in treating disease and preventing deaths associated with bacterial infection. The objective of this dissertation research was to gain a better understanding of anthropogenic influences on occurrence of tetracycline resistance and use of traditional disinfection methods for the reduction of tetracycline resistant bacteria and genes. Culture based and molecular methods were used to evaluate the occurrence of tetracycline resistance in a rapidly urbanizing watershed, identify the dominant resistant organisms and resistance genes in the watershed, and evaluate the use of UV and chlorine to reduce the concentration of resistant bacteria and resistance genes. Results from this research showed that tetracycline resistance was prevalent and is maintained in this study area. Several bacterial species (Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, Chryseobacterium, E. coli, Pseudomonas, and Serratia) made up the resistant population. The results also indicated that tet(W) was the major resistance gene in this watershed and that a majority of the resistant bacteria were capable of transferring their resistance. Landuse did not cause a difference in occurrence of resistant bacteria or resistance genes which suggests that a rapidly urbanizing watershed could experience resistance. It was also identified that environmental media (sediment and water) influence the occurrence and prevalence of resistant bacteria and resistance genes. The results indicate that streambed sediment may act as a reservoir for resistance and resistance might be transported in the water. Finally, the results showed that neither UV nor chlorine disinfection were effective in reducing tet(W) concentrations though the results varied greatly among species. Results from this research indicate that preventing the occurrence and distribution of resistance gene in the environment is difficult, and resistance will most likely be maintained. Therefore, in order to prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance, it will be important to prevent antibiotic resistance from becoming established in the environment. This can be done by educating the public about the importance of misusing and mismanaging antibiotics. Additionally, classifying antibiotics for either human or veterinary use may help slow the development of resistance. This should prevent clinically important antibiotics from being used in sub-therapeutic doses, which could decrease the selective pressure in the environment. Also clinically relevant bacteria can be prevented from interacting with resistant bacteria in the environment by disinfecting human waste.

Sullivan, Bailey Ann

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Surface mining and reclamation effects on flood response of watersheds in the central Appalachian Plateau region - article no. W04407  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km{sup 2} watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

Ferrari, J.R.; Lookingbill, T.R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P.A.; Eshleman, K.N. [University of Maryland, Frostburg, MD (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Grande Ronde Model Watershed Project; Dark Canyon Riparian Exclosure, Completion Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baker Field Office, Vale District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) submitted a project proposal for funding in 2002 through the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP). The project consisted of constructing two riparian exclosures to prevent livestock grazing in the riparian areas of Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek. The BLM completed the NEPA documentation and supplied the fencing materials. Funding from BPA through the GRMWP was used to complete the construction of the two exclosures. This project was completed in the fall of 2002. The project area is located in Union County, Oregon on BLM managed land adjacent to Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek, T. 3. S., R. 35 E., Section 24 and 25. Section 24 is along Dark Canyon Creek and section 25 is along Meadow Creek. Approximately 0.4 miles of stream would be protected from grazing with the construction of the two exclosures. A two person crew was hired to construct a four-strand barbed wire fence. The fence enclosed the riparian area on both sides of each creek so that no grazing would occur within the riparian area on BLM managed land. Total fence length is approximately 1.25 miles. Materials consisted of metal fence posts, barbed wire, rockjacks, fence stays, and 2 x 4's. The fence was constructed in the fall of 2002. The riparian area is effectively excluded from livestock grazing at this time. The construction of the exclosures should enhance riparian vegetation, increase bank stability, and improve riparian and in-stream habitat by exclusion of livestock in the riparian areas. Monitoring will ensure that the exclosures continues to be effective. Annual monitoring will include photo-points and compliance checks during the grazing season by BLM personnel. The BLM will submit a monitoring report, which includes the results of the annual monitoring, to the GRMWP in years 2005 and 2007. The exclosures do cross the creeks so maintenance may be needed on occasion, especially after high flow events in the creeks. Material such as logs which are mobilized during high stream flows may damage the exclosures requiring maintenance to keep cattle from grazing in the riparian areas. The BLM spent approximately $4,000 on fencing materials and $1,375 on NEPA compliance. In addition, the estimated cost of the monitoring over five years is expected to be approximately $1,600. The $5,050 that the BLM received from the BPA for the project was used to hire two temporary employees to construct the exclosures.

Kuck, Todd

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ensemble Evaluation of Hydrologically Enhanced Noah-LSM: Partitioning of the Water Balance in High-Resolution Simulations over the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of two versions of the Noah land surface model (LSM) to simulate the water cycle of the Little Washita River experimental watershed is evaluated. One version that uses the standard hydrological parameterizations of Noah 2.7 (STD) is ...

Enrique Rosero; Lindsey E. Gulden; Zong-Liang Yang; Luis G. De Goncalves; Guo-Yue Niu; Yasir H. Kaheil

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C  

SciTech Connect

This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Assessment of erosion hotspots in a watershed: Integrating the WEPP model and GIS in a case study in the Peruvian Andes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study in assessment of erosion hotspots in an Andean watershed. To do this, we made use of an interface called Geospatial Modelling of Soil Erosion (GEMSE): a tool that integrates Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with ... Keywords: Andes, GIS, Geospatial modeling, Runoff, Soil loss, WEPP

Guillermo A. Baigorria; Consuelo C. Romero

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-72)(12/3/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 3, 2001 December 3, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-72) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase II. Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources. Location: Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase 2 privately owned parcels

210

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) (10/4/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2001 4, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) Jay Marcotte Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin. Project No: 2001-039-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways. Location: Various Walla Walla River Basin Irrigation Diversions, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Walla Walla County Conservation District. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to provide cost share for a program that

211

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-71) (10/29/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2001 29, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-71) Alan Ruger Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Duncan Creek Channel Rehabilitation Project Project No: 2001-053-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.11 Remove Debris Functioning as Barrier to Passage, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.9 Mechanical Vegetation Control. Location: Skamania County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW)

212

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-70) (10/23/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2001 23, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-70) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase I. Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources. Location: Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase 4 privately owned parcels totaling

213

Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

Conley, Will

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-162: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS -Libby Creek Lower Cleveland Stabilization Project (07/29/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2004 29, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-162) Ron Morinaka (KEWU - 4) Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - COTR Proposed Action: Libby Creek (Lower Cleveland) Stabilization Project Project No: 199500400 Watershed Management Program (See App. A : Available Management Techniques): 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures; 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bioengineering Methods; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements; 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities. Location: On Libby Creek, located about 18 miles southwest of the town of Libby, Montana

215

Surface mine pollution abatement and land use impact investigation. Volume III. Considerations of post mining land use, mine inventory and abatement plan for the quicksand watershed. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five volume series primarily presents three general topics. The first of these is a discussion of considerations relating to post-mining land use. Following this discussion, an evaluation of factors relating to more important environmental and land use impacts of the surface mining industry in Eastern Kentucky is presented. The last topic presents a mine inventory of the 33 surface mines located in the Quicksand Watershed in Breathitt County, Kentucky. Surface mines have several environmental and land use impacts. Those considered in the discussion which are of special importance to Eastern Kentucky are hydrologic influence, sedimentation, spoil bank stability, the impact on the public road system and mine access roads, and haul road abandonment. A number of major conclusions of general applicability are given along with some conclusions specifically related to the Quicksand Watershed.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data in the Paso del Norte region for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations and flood control. Tasks accomplished in Phase II include the complete migration of the Project Website and related databases to the ArcIMS software, which provides a better spatial query capacity. The database was enhanced by incorporating more gauge stations, limited groundwater data (well information, water levels, water quality, and pumpage) and other new data, and strengthened data sharing by implementing FGDC classic metadata. Protocols were explored for data sharing and spatial queries and opportunities for more active participation of volunteer regional data providers in the Project. The linkage of the PdNWC database with future groundwater and surface water model development was also assessed. Based on the experiences gained in the Project, the following recommendations for future Project work include: * Continued compilation of new data sources not yet included in the Project to enhance data sharing, * Installation of additional new monitoring stations and equipment and inclusion of these monitoring sites in future ArcIMS map products to fill data gaps and provide additional real-time data, * Strengthening the links with the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) being advanced by the USACE. Special focus will be given to serving DEM and orthophoto data recently transferred from the USACE to NMWRRI and enhancing direct Web linkages with USACE and URGWOM project activities to improve model development capacity and enhance sharing of modeling results, * Development and implementation of a user needs survey focusing on new data sets of interest, enhanced access mechanisms, and other suggestions to improve the Project Website, * Development and making available online for download a Microsoft Access database of Project water resource data to provide search and query functions, * Development of an online help tutorial that would support online searches of the database, making the site easier for end users to navigate and utilize, and * Continuity in the exploration of future funding opportunities for Project activities, especially through linkages with other regional data compilation and modeling projects. Part I of this report presents major historical and technical components of the Phase II development of the Database and GIS prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon. Groundwater elements of interest, relevant to the development of the coordinated database and to the integral comprehension of the watershed’s mission and planning are also included as Part II of this report. This part, prepared by Z. Sheng and others, presents the sources of regional groundwater resources data compiled by different federal and state entities and outlines suggestions for regional groundwater data to be implemented with an ArcIMS interface so that this data can be shared and accessed by all Paso del Norte Watershed Council stakeholders. Part III, prepared by R. Srinivasan, presents the technical challenges posed to data sharing by multiple data collectors and sources and summarizes the different protocols available for an effective transfer and sharing of data through a GIS ArcIMS interface. Part IV, prepared by Z. Sheng and D. Zhang, explores the possibility to link the Database Project to a comprehensive development of regional hydrological models within the Rio Grande reach between Elephant Butte Dam, in New Mexico, and Fort Quitman, Texas. Finally, Part V, prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon, presents closing comments as well as a summary of the recommendations made throughout the document. Dr. Hanks provided assistance in summarizing preliminary user survey results

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

BPA Riparian Fencing and Alternative Water Development Projects Completed within Asotin Creek Watershed, 2000 and 2001 Asotin Creek Fencing Final Report of Accomplishments.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35. According to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Priority WRIA's by ''At-Risk Stock Significance Map'', it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern Washington. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve; no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe, Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps members from the Nez Perce Tribe have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred and seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, the ACCD has been securing and administering funding for endangered salmonids since 1994. The ''Asotin Creek Riparian Planting 2000-053-00 and Asotin Creek Riparian Fencing 2000-054-00'' teamed BPA and the Governor's Salmon Recovery Funding to plant approximately 84,191 trees and shrubs in the Asotin Creek Watershed. In addition BPA and private cost-share dollars were utilized to drill 3 wells, provide 15 off-site alternative water developments (troughs), 5 spring developments, and 9,100 feet of riparian fencing. The trees will provide shade and long-term LWD recruitment to the stream. The wells, alternative water developments, springs and fencing will reduce direct animal impacts on the stream. In one area alone, a well, 3,000 ft of riparian fence with 5 alternative water developments will exclude 300 head of cattle from using the stream as a source of drinking water during the winter months.

Johnson, B.J. (Bradley J.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evaluating runoff simulations from the Community Land Model 4.0 using observations from flux towers and a mountainous watershed  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies using the Community Land Model (CLM) focused on simulating landatmosphere interactions and water balance at continental to global scales, with limited attention paid to its capability for hydrologic simulations at watershed or regional scales. This study evaluates the performance of CLM 4.0 (CLM4) for hydrologic simulations, and explores possible directions of improvement. Specifically, it is found that CLM4 tends to produce unrealistically large temporal variation of runoff for applications at a mountainous catchment in the Northwest United States where subsurface runoff is dominant, as well as at a few flux tower sites. We show that runoff simulations from CLM4 can be improved by: (1) increasing spatial resolution of the land surface representations; (2) calibrating parameter values; (3) replacing the subsurface formulation with a more general nonlinear function; (4) implementing the runoff generation schemes from the Variability Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. This study also highlights the importance of evaluating both the energy and water fluxes application of land surface models across multiple scales.

Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Aihui; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS and the Hood River Fisheries Project Final EIS(DOE/EIS-0241) (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-62) (9/14/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2001 4, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-62) and the Hood River Fisheries Project Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0241). Thomas Morse Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Hood River Fish Habitat Project Project No: 1998-021-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.16 and 1.17 Spawning and rearing habitat enhancements; 2.1 Maintain healthy riparian plant communities; 4.9 Water conveyance: ditch and canal lining; 4.23 Intake and return diversion screens; 1.13 Culvert removal and replacement. Location: Odell, Hood River County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Confederated Tribes of the Warms

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Quantification of Hungry Horse Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews activities of the Hungry Horse Reservoir fisheries study from May 16-October 14, 1983. The first six months of the project were concerned with testing of equipment and developing methodologies for sampling physical-chemical limnology, fish food availability, fish food habits, seasonal distribution and abundance of fish, migration patterns of westslope cutthroat trout and habitat quality in tributary streams. Suitable methods have been developed for most aspects of the study, but problems remain with determining the vertical distribution of fish. Catch rates of fish in vertical nets were insufficient to determine depth distribution during the fall. If catches remain low during the spring and summer of 1984, experimental netting will be conducted using gang sets of standard gill nets. Purse seining techniques also need to be refined in the spring of 1984, Sample design should be completed in 1984. A major activity for the report period was preparation of a prospectus which reviewed: (1) environmental factors limiting gamefish production; (2) flexibility in reservoir operation; (3) effects of reservoir operation on fish populations and (4) model development. Production of westslope cutthroat trout may be limited by spawning and rearing habitat in tributary streams, reservoir habitat suitability, predation during the first year of reservoir residence and fish food availability. Reservoir operation affects fish production by altering fish habitat and food production through changes in reservoir morphometrics such as surface area, volume, littoral area and shoreline length. The instability in the fish habitat caused by reservoir operation may produce an environment which is suitable for fish which can utilize several habitat types and feed upon a wide variety of food organisms. Analysis of factors governing reservoir operation indicated that some flexibility exists in Hungry Horse operation. Changes in operation to benefit gamefish populations would have little impact on total power production, but would entail shifts in the generation schedule. We hope to develop, in cooperation with the USGS, a model which will predict the effects of reservoir operation on fish production. The model will have a food component based on energy flow through successive trophic levels to fish and a habitat component based on habitat availability and habitat preferences of species by life-stage.

May, Bruce

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Environ Monit Assess DOI 10.1007/s10661-013-3256-6 Evaluation of stream chemistry trends in US Geological Survey reference watersheds, 1970–2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a long-term monitoring program established by the US Geological Survey in the 1960s to track changes in the streamflow and stream chemistry in undeveloped watersheds across the USA. Trends in stream chemistry were tested at 15 HBN stations over two periods (1970– 2010 and 1990–2010) using the parametric Load Estimator (LOADEST) model and the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test. Trends in annual streamflow and precipitation chemistry also were tested to help identify likely drivers of changes in stream chemistry. At stations in the northeastern USA, there were significant declines in stream sulfate, which were consistent with declines in sulfate deposition resulting from the reductions in SO2 emissions mandated under the Clean Air Act Amendments. Sulfate declines in stream water were smaller than declines in deposition suggesting sulfate may be accumulating in watershed soils and thereby delaying the stream response to improvements in deposition. Trends in stream chemistry at stations in other part of the country generally were attributed to climate variability or land disturbance. Despite declines in sulfate deposition, increasing stream sulfate was observed at several stations and appeared to be linked to periods of drought or declining streamflow. Falling water tables might have

M. Alisa Mast; M. A. Mast

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Modeling the potential role of a forest ecosystem in phytostabilization and phytoextraction of 90Sr at a contaminated watershed  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of {sup 90}Sr at forest sites in the White Oak Creek watershed, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was simulated with a simple, site-specific, multicompartment model that linked biomass and element cycling dynamics. The model was used to predict the role of forest cover in mitigating hydrologic losses of {sup 90}Sr from contaminated soils (i.e. phytostabilization) under conditions where contaminant transport is governed mainly by shallow subsurface flow. The model was also used to predict the removal of {sup 90}Sr from soil (i.e. phytoextraction) through the growth and harvest of short rotation woody crops over a period of 30 years. Simulations with the model indicated that (1) forest preservation on the watershed is a form of phytostabilization because forest cover helps to minimize hydrologic losses of {sup 90}Sr and (2) an attempt to significantly reduce amounts of {sup 90}Sr in soil through phytoextraction would be unsuccessful. Over a period of 30 years, and under various management strategies, the model predicted that <15% of the {sup 90}Sr initially present in soil at a contaminated site was lost through hydrologic transport and <53% was lost by radioactive decay. Phytostabilization may be important in the management of radioactive land when issues like waste minimization and pollution prevention affect the selection of technologies to be used in environmental restoration.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quantification of Hungry Horse Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1985 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, passed in 1980 by Congress, has provided a mechanism which integrates and provides for stable energy planning in the Pacific Northwest. The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council and charged the Council with developing a comprehensive fish and wildlife program to protect and enhance fish and wildlife impacted by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is one of the many agencies implementing the Council's program. The Hungry Horse Reservoir (HHR) study is part of the Council's program. This study proposes to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance principal gamefish species in Hungry Horse Reservoir. The specific study objectives are: (1) Quantify the amount of reservoir habitat available at different water level elevations; (2) Estimate recruitment of westslope cutthroat trout juveniles from important spawning and nursery areas; (3) Determine the abundance, growth, distribution and use of available habitat by major game species in the reservoir; (4) Determine the abundance and availability of fish food organisms in the reservoir; (5) Quantify the seasonal use of available food items by major fish species; (6) Develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat use by fish and fish food organisms; and (7) Estimate the impact of reservoir operation on major gamefish species.

May, Bruce

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Flathead Lake Angler Survey; Monitoring Activities for the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Plan, 1992-1993 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A roving creel survey was conducted on Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana from May 17, 1992 to May 19, 1993. The primary objective of the survey was to quantify the baseline fishery and exploitation rates existing prior to Hungry Horse Dam mitigation efforts. Anglers were counted on 308 occasions, comprising 5,618 fishing boats, 515 shore anglers, and 2,191 ice anglers. The party interviews represented 4,410 anglers, made up of 2,613 boat anglers, 787 shore anglers, and 1,010 ice anglers. A total of 47,883 angler days (190,108 angler hours) of pressure and a harvest of 42,979 fish (including lake trout, lake whitefish, yellow perch, bull trout, and westslope cutthroat trout) were estimated. Pressure was distributed between shore, boat, and ice anglers as 4%, 87%, and 9%, respectively. Seventynine percent of the total effort was directed at lake trout during the study period. Limited comparisons were made to previous creel surveys on Flathead Lake due to differences in methods and radical changes in the fishery. Potential sources of bias are explained in detail. Future creel surveys must employ methods consistent with this survey to obtain estimates that are statistically distinguishable.

Evarts, Les; Hansen, Barry; DosSantos, Joe (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Population Structure, Status and Life Histories of Upper Columbia Steelhead, Spring and Summer/fall Chinook, Sockeye, Coho Salmon, Bull Trout, Westslope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the state of Washington's effort to identify larger groups of populations (or stocks), Busack and Marshall, Edson 1958), just as they are irregularly distributed now in the Hanford Reach (Swan et al. 1988 from the Hanford Reach and downstream from Chief Joseph Dam except in the Okanogan River. Summer

227

Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January--December 1993)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes, for the 12-month period (January through December 1993), the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily, on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed along with information collected on the surface flow systems which affect the quality or quantity of surface water. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data, an activity that contributes to the Site Investigations (SI) component of the ERP. This report provides and describes sources of hydrologic data for Environmental Restoration activities that use monitoring data to quantify and assess the impact from releases of contaminants from ORNL WAGs.

Borders, D.M.; Frederick, B.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Reece, D.K.; McCalla, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watts, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Ziegler, K.S. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Simulation of Net Infiltration and Potential Recharge Using a Distributed-Parameter Watershed Model of the Death Valley Region, Nevada and California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the development and application of the distributed-parameter watershed model, INFILv3, for estimating the temporal and spatial distribution of net infiltration and potential recharge in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California. The estimates of net infiltration quantify the downward drainage of water across the lower boundary of the root zone and are used to indicate potential recharge under variable climate conditions and drainage basin characteristics. Spatial variability in recharge in the Death Valley region likely is high owing to large differences in precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, bedrock permeability, soil thickness, vegetation characteristics, and contributions to recharge along active stream channels. The quantity and spatial distribution of recharge representing the effects of variable climatic conditions and drainage basin characteristics on recharge are needed to reduce uncertainty in modeling ground-water flow. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, developed a regional saturated-zone ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system to help evaluate the current hydrogeologic system and the potential effects of natural or human-induced changes. Although previous estimates of recharge have been made for most areas of the Death Valley region, including the area defined by the boundary of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, the uncertainty of these estimates is high, and the spatial and temporal variability of the recharge in these basins has not been quantified.

J.A. Hevesi; A.L. Flint; L.E. Flint

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Alteration of As-bearing Phases in a Small Watershed Located on a High Grade Arsenic-geochemical Anomaly (French Massif Central)  

SciTech Connect

At a watershed scale, sediments and soil weathering exerts a control on solid and dissolved transport of trace elements in surface waters and it can be considered as a source of pollution. The studied subwatershed (1.5 km{sup 2}) was located on an As-geochemical anomaly. The studied soil profile showed a significant decrease of As content from 1500 mg kg{sup -1} in the 135-165 cm deepest soil layer to 385 mg kg{sup -1} in the upper 0-5 cm soil layer. Directly in the stream, suspended matter and the <63 {micro}m fraction of bed sediments had As concentrations greater than 400 mg kg{sup -1}. In all these solid fractions, the main representative As-bearing phases were determined at two different observation scales: bulk analyses using X-ray absorption structure spectroscopy (XAS) and microanalyses using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and associated electron probe microanalyses (EPMA), as well as micro-Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron-based micro-scanning X-ray diffraction ({micro}SXRD) characterization. Three main As-bearing phases were identified: (i) arsenates (mostly pharmacosiderite), the most concentrated phases As in both the coherent weathered bedrock and the 135-165 cm soil layer but not observed in the river solid fraction, (ii) Fe-oxyhydroxides with in situ As content up to 15.4 wt.% in the deepest soil layer, and (iii) aluminosilicates, the least concentrated As carriers. The mineralogical evolution of As-bearing phases in the soil profile, coupled with the decrease of bulk As content, may be related to pedogenesis processes, suggesting an evolution of arsenates into As-rich Fe-oxyhydroxides. Therefore, weathering and mineralogical evolution of these As-rich phases may release As to surface waters.

A Bossy; C Grosbois; S Beauchemin; A Courtin-Nomade; W Hendershot; H Bril

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part III GIS Coverage for the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, México  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report fulfills the deliverables required by the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES/03-PL- 02: Modification No. 3) on behalf of the Paso del Norte Watershed Council. Tasks accomplished in this phase include (a) assessment of data availability for expansion of the URGWOM model, identification of data gaps, generation of data needed from historic data using empirical methods, compilation and verification of the water quality data for reaches between the Elephant Butte Reservoir, New Mexico and Fort Quitman, Texas; (b) development of the RiverWare physical model for the Rio Grande flow for the selected reaches between Elephant Butte Reservoir and El Paso, beginning with a conceptual model for interaction of surface water and groundwater in the Rincon and Mesilla valleys, and within the limits of available data; and (c) implementation of data transfer interface between the coordinated database and hydrologic models. This Project was conducted by researchers at Texas A&M University (TAMU) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) under the direction of Zhuping Sheng of TAMU and J. Phillip King of New Mexico State University. It was developed to enhance the coordinated database, which was originally developed by the Paso del Norte Watershed Council with support of El Paso Water Utilities to fulfill needs for better management of regional water resources and to expand the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) to cover the river reaches between Elephant Butte Dam, New Mexico and Fort Quitman, Texas. In Phases I and II of this Project (TAES/03-PL-02), hydrological data needed for flow model development were compiled and data gaps were identified and a conceptual model developed. The objectives of this phase were to develop a physical model of the Rio Grande flow between Elephant Butte Dam and American Dam by using data collected in the first development phase of the PdNWC/Corps Coordinated Water Resources Database and to enhance the data portal capabilities of the PdNWC Coordinated Database Project. This report is Part III of a three part completion report for Phase III and provides information on water sources, uses, and GIS of the canals and ditches of the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009 (ID 009) in the Juárez Lower Valley, Chihuahua, México. The author explains that the water needs of this region have changed in recent years from being primarily for agricultural purposes to domestic and industrial uses currently. Also, the United States wanted to assess and identify new data sources on a GIS format for the Mexican side. Therefore, this project produced several maps with the location of channels and ditches along the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District. This information also will support water planning of the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009. The maps were produced from existing digital data regarding water resources and by adding thematic layers such as soil salinity and soil texture from analog maps. ASTER satellite imagery and official panchromatic aerial photography were used to produce the maps.

Granados, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Gathering Data to Assess Your Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Funding Programs Data from State Agencies Texas State Soil & Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) Water Response Data from State Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Water Quality Data: http://www.tceq.state and Wastewater Planning and Assessments Population Projections TNRIS Data from State Agencies Railroad Commission

234

Gathering Data to Assess Your Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from State Agencies Texas Parks and Wildlife Data (TPWD) Wildlife Data, Deer Counts and Endangered and Gas Well Data, Orphaned/Abandoned Wells #12;Data from State Agencies Texas State Soil & Water and Emergency Response #12;Data from State Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Water

235

Flood Control and Watershed Management (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Counties and towns are required to issue permits for development within the 100-year floodplain. Development is broadly defined to include any man-made change to land, including grading, filling,...

236

Watershed Perspective on Bioenergy Sustainability Participant Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

encompasses research projects at all points along the bioenergy supply chains. As an ecosystem ecologist who and developing supply chain models of cellulosic ethanol production. hilliardmr@ornl.gov Ice, George NCASI 541 of biomass/biofuels in forests, looking at nutrient cyclinc and effects on soil and water. mbadams

237

Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disability access Accessible versions of this document in Microsoft Word are available at www For accessible (word, pdf and html) versions of this document, see: www Research Areas 152Applying for admission to Honours 152Bioinformatics 152First Year 152Second Year 152Third

238

Watershed Councils East and West: Advocacy, Consensus and Environmental Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RIVERS: A DIRECTORY OF CITIZEN-BASED ORGANIZATIONS WORKINGorganization trends sweeping the United States in the 1990s. According to the 2001 directory

Lavigne, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hood River Watershed Action Plan Updated Publication: April 22, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would be the application of some form of automated mitigation procedures (AMP). These measures apply

240

A climate-hydrology scenario library approach to watershed management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 and an azole-type corrosion inhibitor is used to protect the copper-based admiralty brass metallurgy of the main condenser. 6 Calcium sulfate is the limiting scale-forming salt...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fresno River Watershed Assessment Project Draft Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basin has a temperate semiarid climate characterized by cool wet winters and warm dry summers. Soils Lewis Creek, Nelder Creek (including Redwood Creek), China Creek, Miami Creek (including Petersen and Hensley Lake, the Madera County Engineering Department, the Fresno office of the California Regional Water

Wang, Zhi

242

Topography and Radiation Exchange of a Mountainous Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report deals with the radiation exchange of a complex terrain. A relatively simple network for computing topographic parameters global radiation, and net radiation of a mountainous terrain was developed and applied to a forested Appalachian ...

Hailiang Fu; Stanislaw J. Tajchman; James N. Kochenderfer

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Okanogan Focus Watershed Salmon Creek : Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During FY 1999 the Colville Tribes and the Okanogan Irrigation District (OID) agreed to study the feasibility of restoring and enhancing anadromous fish populations in Salmon Creek while maintaining the ability of the district to continue full water service delivery to it members.

Lyman, Hilary

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

WATERSHED INVESTIGATION FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF SOURCES OF INAPPROPRIATE DISCHARGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ultrafast technologically important processes, including fuel sprays, magnetic switching, and biological as it is injected. Argonne researchers are using the APS to look inside liquid sprays from fuel injectors to help the height of the Willis (Sears) Tower in Chicago (1,454 ft). Experiment hall construction required 56

Pitt, Robert E.

245

Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2005 through March 2006 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 22095. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2005 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

Jezorek, Ian G.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Munz, Carrie [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2006 through March 2007 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 26922. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). Funding from USFWS was for work to contribute to a study of potential interactions between introduced Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and wild steelhead O. mykiss. Funding from LCFEG was for work to evaluate the effects of nutrient enrichment in small streams. A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2006 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G.; Munz, Carrie S. [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

Texas connects watershed protection and erosion through compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND EROSION THROUGH COMPOST Barrie Cogburn (Phone: 512-416-saw the benefits of utilizing compost as an erosion-controltool. The compost alternative, which is comparable in cost

Cogburn, Barrie; McCoy, Scott

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the possibility of expanding the program to measure more parameters is discussed. The estimated cost of expanding schedule for one season and includes the cost of lab analyses, equipment, courier service and miscellaneous volunteers, processing samples, and compiling data. Based on this estimate, a Co-op student could monitor

249

ForestRangelandandWatershedStewardship 1472CampusDelivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lessons From 35 Years of Research on Oil Shale Lands in the Piceance Basin Fort Collins Fort Collins with oil shale extraction. The project involved approximately ten independent field studies, which were established on a 20-ha site located near what was then the focal point of oil shale activity in the Piceance

250

Shallow infiltration processes in arid watersheds at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model of shallow infiltration processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was developed for use in hydrologic flow models to characterize net infiltration (the penetration of the wetting front below the zone influenced by evapotranspiration). The model categorizes the surface of the site into four infiltration zones. These zones were identified as ridgetops, sideslopes, terraces, and active channels on the basis of water-content changes with depth and time. The maximum depth of measured water-content change at a specific site is a function of surface storage capacity, the timing and magnitude of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and the degree of saturation of surficial materials overlying fractured bedrock. Measured water-content profiles for the four zones indicated that the potential for net infiltration is higher when evapotranspiration is low (i.e winter, cloudy periods), where surface concentration of water is likely to occur (i.e. depressions, channels), where surface storage capacity is low, and where fractured bedrock is close to the surface.

Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L. Hevesi, J.A. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The proposed fence will meet or exceed BPA's minimum requirement of a 35-foot setback from the stream. Fence posts will be driven into the ground with a post ponder. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing.

N /A

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

252

Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An integrated monitoring/modeling framework for assessing human-nature interactions in urbanizing watersheds: Wappinger and Onondaga Creek watersheds, New York, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In much of the world, rapidly expanding areas of impervious surfaces due to urbanization threaten water resources. Although tools for modeling and projecting land use change and water quantity and quality exist independently, to date it is rare to find ... Keywords: Impervious surface, Remote sensing, Socio-economic factors, Uncertainty, Urbanization, Water resources

Bongghi Hong; Karin E. Limburg; Myrna H. Hall; Giorgos Mountrakis; Peter M. Groffman; Karla Hyde; Li Luo; Victoria R. Kelly; Seth J. Myers

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

An economic analysis of a large scale ashe juniper clearing project in the Leon River watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ashe Juniper (Juniperus ashei) is native to the Edwards Plateau in central Texas. In the past 150 years, however, this species has rapidly increased in abundance within its range. Reduced fire frequency and increased livestock grazing, are two factors attributed to the rapid rate of juniper encroachment. While the losses associated with brush encroachment are recognized, many ranchers lack the funds necessary to implement management practices to reduce juniper densities on their property. The high cost associated with clearing brush has led to the creation of cost-share programs, which help offset the expenses incurred by participating landowners. The Leon River Restoration Project (LRRP), implemented on private lands within Coryell and Hamilton Counties, Texas, is one such cost-share program. Funding for the LRRP is received through non-programmatic sources, in the form of grants, from various state and federal organizations and agencies. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides a second source of funding through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). Participants contracted through LRRP funds receive 85% cost-share benefits, up to a maximum of $15,000. Landowners participating in the LRRP under EQIP funds receive 50% cost-share incentives, up to a maximum of $250,000. The purpose of this study was to record changes that occurred on land enrolled in the LRRP, following juniper removal, and the economic benefits recognized by this work. Thirty landowners scheduled to participate in the LRRP were interviewed in 2003, prior to juniper control work. In 2006, 23 of the original 30 landowners participated in a second interview, following their completion of brush removal work. Changes attributed to juniper removal were recorded during these post-clearing interviews. Stocking rate changes were used as the basis for measuring economic benefits recognized by the clearing efforts. Changes in hunting or grazing lease rates resulting from juniper clearing were also used to monitor economic benefits of the brushwork. A second component of the study tested for differences in landowner satisfaction between LRRP participants enrolled under LRRP funds, and those contracted under EQIP funds. Importanceperformance matrixes were created to display satisfaction differences.

Flack, Rebecca Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Effect of Wildfire on Soil Mercury Concentrations in Southern California Watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. J. (2007). Release of mercury from Rocky Mountain forestSlemr, F. (2001). Gaseous mercury emissions from a fire inMontesdeoca, M. R. (2008). Mercury transport in response to

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Estimating Watershed Evapotranspiration with PASS. Part I: Inferring Root-Zone Moisture Conditions Using Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model framework for parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) has been modified and applied as PASS1 to use satellite data, models, and limited surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture (RAM) content with high spatial ...

J. Song; M. L. Wesely; R. L. Coulter; E. A. Brandes

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Holocene Climates and Connections between the San Francisco Bay Estuary and its Watershed: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressures within the Aleutian Low atmospheric-pressurewinters, pressures in the Aleutian Low are not as low and

Malamud-Roam, Frances; Dettinger, M; Ingram, B. Lynn; Hughes, Malcolm K.; Florsheim, Joan L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A watershed-scale design optimization model for stormwater best management practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency developed a decision-support system, System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis Integration (SUSTAIN), to evaluate alternative plans for stormwater quality management and flow abatement techniques in urban ... Keywords: BMP modeling, Best management practices (BMPs), Cost-effectiveness, Decision-support system, Design optimization model, Green infrastructure (GI), Low impact development (LID), Stormwater management

Joong Gwang Lee; Ariamalar Selvakumar; Khalid Alvi; John Riverson; Jenny X. Zhen; Leslie Shoemaker; Fu-Hsiung Lai

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Duck Creek Watershed, Dickens County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, Public Law 92-500, established a national goal of eliminating the discharge of pollutants into the nation's waterways by 1985. As a step toward that goal an interim water quality standard of "fishable, swimmable waters nationwide" by July 1, 1983 was determined. Under section 208 of this law, each state was required to establish a "continuing planning process" to define controls for agricultural non-point sources of water pollution. Section 208 calls for the development of state and area-wide water quality management plans The plans are to include "a process to (i) identify if appropriate? agriculturally and silviculturally related non-point sources of pollution, including runoff from manure disposal areas, and from land used for livestock and crop production, and (ii) set forth procedures and methods (including land use requirements) to control to the extent feasible such sources." The water quality issue of concern in this study is fertilizer and pesticide residuals carried into waterways by sediment. Since sediment is a potential transporter of pollutants, practices to control agricultural non-point source pollution would probably be aimed at reducing soil loss. Conservation and conservation related practices are, at present, considered the best technical practices to abate agricultural non-point source pollution. This study examines the economic impact of various policies that could be used to reduce soil loss. Both regulatory and voluntary policies are considered. Economic impacts examined include: (a) impacts of the policies on farm income; (b) government costs associated with the policies, including administration costs; (c) off-site sediment damages that would be abated; and (d) social desirability of the policies. The first section of the report describes the selected "Best Management Practices" and examines the on-farm economics of soil conservation. Then, the second section postulates various sediment damage control options and models the economic consequences, both to agricultural producers as a group? and to society of implementing them.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R.D.; Mueller, P. E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting for the Tennessee and Cumberland River Watersheds Using the NCEP Regional Spectral Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A limited-area spectral model—the Regional Spectral Model—developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction is used to prepare daily quantitative precipitation forecasts out to 48 h for the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins in ...

Qi Mao; Stephen F. Mueller; Hann-Ming Henry Juang

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Impact of Watershed Geomorphic Characteristics on the Energy and Water Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GEOtop model makes it possible to analyze the short- and long-term effects of geomorphic variation on the partitioning of the lateral surface and subsurface water and surface energy fluxes. The topography of the Little Washita basin (Oklahoma)...

Giacomo Bertoldi; Riccardo Rigon; Thomas M. Over

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

WATERSHED RESTORATION IN THE NORTHERN SIERRA NEVADA: A BIOTECHNICAL APPROACH1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- dustrial, recreational, and energy-producing uses in the state. This trend is reflected in the growing Pollution Control Act, and the amended Clean Water Act of 1987. Califor- nia is presently developing, and research papers. Institutional incentives for riparian restoration lag far behind available technology

Standiford, Richard B.

263

The Use of an Automated Nowcasting System to Forecast Flash Floods in an Urban Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flash flooding represents a significant hazard to human safety and a threat to property. Simulation and prediction of floods in complex urban settings requires high-resolution precipitation estimates and distributed hydrologic modeling. The need ...

Hatim O. Sharif; David Yates; Rita Roberts; Cynthia Mueller

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Impacts of Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in Central California Watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of landfills to nesting herring gulls. The Condor 95:817-1991. Diet choice in the herring gull: constraints imposedthe reproductive success of Herring Gulls. Ecology 53: 1051-

Frechette, Danielle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

From waterfront to watershed : mapping a big idea in the Greater Toronto Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, Toronto is revered among Great Lakes' and waterfront cities for its environmental planning: its massive re-investment in water and stormwater infrastructure; protected headwaters of the region's rivers; realized ...

Ciesielski, Linda C. (Linda Claire)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER): Scientific Objectives and Experimental Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major research plan entitled “Integrated research on the ecohydrological process of the Heihe River Basin” was launched by the National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2010. One of the key aims of this research plan is to establish a research ...

Xin Li; Guodong Cheng; Shaomin Liu; Qing Xiao; Mingguo Ma; Rui Jin; Tao Che; Qinhuo Liu; Weizhen Wang; Yuan Qi; Jianguang Wen; Hongyi Li; Gaofeng Zhu; Jianwen Guo; Youhua Ran; Shuoguo Wang; Zhongli Zhu; Jian Zhou; Xiaoli Hu; Ziwei Xu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Water quality trends in the Blackwater River watershed Canaan Valley, West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Blackwater River, historically an excellent brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) fishery, has been affected by logging, fires, coal mining, acid rain, and land development. Trends… (more)

Smith, Jessica M., M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discharge water in associated retention ponds moving from the south to the north. Further, Hulin (2003). LOWESS was used because it is usually superior to the parametric ordinary least squares regression sug

McClain, Michael

269

Flash Flood Forecasting for Small Urban Watersheds in the Baltimore Metropolitan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility of distributed hydrologic models in combination with high-resolution Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) rainfall estimates for flash flood forecasting in urban drainage basins is examined through model simulations of 10 ...

Julie Rose N. Javier; James A. Smith; Katherine L. Meierdiercks; Mary Lynn Baeck; Andrew J. Miller

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Significance of Pre-Industrial and Older Anthropogenic Sources of Mercury in Ichawaynochaway Creek Watershed, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns about elevated levels of mercury in fish tissue, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed mercury Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL), which is a calculation of the maximum amount of mercury a waterbody can assimilate without exceeding the applicable water quality standard. These calculations assume that >99% of mercury load to the aquatic systems is derived from recent atmospheric deposition and that older anthropogenic mercury or mercury from terrestrial sources...

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Statistical Methodology to Discover Precipitation Microclimates in Southeast Louisiana: Implications for Coastal Watersheds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study quantifies the spatial distribution of precipitation patterns on an annual basis for southeast Louisiana. To compile a long-term record of 24-h rainfall, rainfall reports collected by National Weather Service (NWS) cooperative ...

Suzanne Van Cooten; Kimberly L. Elmore; Donald E. Barbé; J. Alex McCorquodale; Denise J. Reed

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Simulation of vegetation and hydrology for climate change analysis of a mountain watershed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate change is expected to have both direct and indirect effects on water resources. Hydrologic impacts of two indirect effects, vegetation density and stomata! conductance,… (more)

[No author

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sensitivity of Hydrological Simulations of Southeastern United States Watersheds to Temporal Aggregation of Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the sensitivity of the performance of hydrological models to certain temporal variations of precipitation over the southeastern United States (SEUS). Because of observational uncertainty in the estimates of rainfall ...

Satish Bastola; Vasubandhu Misra

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Area Hydrologic Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 425,411 Acres 18050004 2204200400 Oakland (20805 Acres)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acres) 665 Square Miles 2204300102 Lost Canyon (3325 Acres) 2204 2204300103 Beauregard Creek (5018 Acres

275

Tucannon River Temperature Study, Prepared for : Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a temperature analysis of the Tucannon River completed for the WRIA 35 Planning Unit. The Tucannon River is located in southeastern Washington and flows approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) from the Blue Mountains to the Snake River. High water temperature in the Tucannon River has been identified as a limiting factor for salmonid fish habitat (Columbia Conservation District, 2004). Several segments of the Tucannon River are included on Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) 303(d) list of impaired waterbodies due to temperature. Ecology is currently conducting scoping for a temperature Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) study of the Tucannon River. The WRIA 35 Planning Unit retained HDR Engineering to evaluate water temperature in the Tucannon River. The project objectives are: (1) Review recent and historic data and studies to characterize temperature conditions in the river; (2) Perform field studies and analyses to identify and quantify heating and cooling processes in the river; (3) Develop and calibrate a computer temperature model to determine the sources of heat to the Tucannon River and to predict the temperature of the river that would occur with increased natural riparian shading assuming the current river morphology; (4) Evaluate differences in river temperatures between current and improved riparian shading during the 'critical' period - low river flows and high temperatures; and (5) Determine the potential benefits of riparian shading as a mechanism to decrease river temperature.

HDR Engineering.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Response Requested via ISRP regarding Proposed Scope Expansion of the Project Restore Potlatch River Watershed (#200206100)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Riparian plantings and/or channel restoration on pasture and rangelands (Objective B, page 23) Coordinate are driven primarily by air temperature, solar insolation, pool depth, and geographic aspect. Waters

277

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE TERRESTRIAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL SILICON CYCLE AT A FORESTED WATERSHED IN NORTHERN VERMONT .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The importance of the global silicon cycle is becoming increasingly recognized because of its role in the consumption of atmospheric CO2. However, the terrestrial component… (more)

Garvin, Christopher J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Genetics of Central Valley O. mykiss populations: drainage and watershed scale analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USFWS Crystal Hatchery strain JLN Feather River HatcheryAverage Crystal Hatchery strain (2 loci only) Feather River

Nielsen, Jennifer L; Pavey, Scott A; Wiacek, Talia; Williams, Ian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Global Nutrient Export from WaterSheds 2 (NEWS 2): Model development and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global NEWS is a global, spatially explicit, multi-element and multi-form model of nutrient exports by rivers. Here we present NEWS 2, the new version of Global NEWS developed as part of a Millennium Ecosystem Assessment scenario implementation from ... Keywords: Basin models, Coastal inputs, Global NEWS, Global river exports, Millennium ecosystem assessment scenarios, Nutrients

Emilio Mayorga; Sybil P. Seitzinger; John A. Harrison; Egon Dumont; Arthur H. W. Beusen; A. F. Bouwman; Balazs M. Fekete; Carolien Kroeze; Gerard Van Drecht

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Downscaling Future Climate Projections to the Watershed Scale: A North San Francisco Bay Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and simulation characteristics. Journal of Climate FlintLE, Flint AL. 2007. Regional analysis of ground- water2 Fs10584-007-9377-6. Flint LE, Flint AL. 2012a. Simulation

Micheli, Elisabeth; Flint, Lorraine; Flint, Alan; Weiss, Stuart; Kennedy, Morgan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Estimating Watershed Evapotranspiration with PASS. Part II: Moisture Budgets during Drydown Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second part of the parameterization of subgrid-scale surface fluxes model (PASS2) has been developed to estimate long-term evapotranspiration rates over extended areas at a high spatial resolution by using satellite remote sensing data and ...

J. Song; M. L. Wesely; M. A. LeMone; R. L. Grossman

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

An Examination of Radar and Rain Gauge–Derived Mean Areal Precipitation over Georgia Watersheds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared to conventional rain gauge networks, the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler provides precipitation estimates at enhanced spatial and temporal resolution that River Forecast Centers can use to improve streamflow forecasts. This study ...

Keith M. Stellman; Henry E. Fuelberg; Reggina Garza; Mary Mullusky

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Relationship of Soil Respiration to Crop and Landscape in the Walnut Creek Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil respiration is an important component of the carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems. Many factors exert controls on soil respiration, including temperature, soil water content, organic matter, soil texture, and plant root activity. This ...

T. B. Parkin; T. C. Kaspar; Z. Senwo; J. H. Prueger; J. L. Hatfield

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mercury contamination in non-fish-eating birds from a polluted watershed  

SciTech Connect

Mercury levels in birds collected along the mercury-contaminated Cheyenne river system in South Dakota were analyzed. The study dealt with small birds which feed mainly on insects, aquatic insect larvae and seeds. The levels found are not lethal, but may be hindering reproduction.

Brown, R.L.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modeling the Effects of Fire on Streamflow in a Chaparral Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constant in days. Soil K s _Sandy Loam: Saturated hydraulicconductivity for the Sandy Loam soil type. Ks_Loam:for the Loam soil type. n_Sandy Loam: exponent in the

McMichael, Christine E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume III of III Report H, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess fish passage at Trout Creek's Hemlock Dam and prescribe options for restoring fish passage.

Wieman, Kenneth

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Understanding the occurrence and transport of current-use pesticides in the San Francisco Estuary watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Program, Sacramento, CA. Report No. EH 89-1 1.Control Board, Sacramento, CA. Foe C. 1995. InsecticideQuality Control Board, Sacramento, CA. Crepeau KL, Kuivila

Kuivila, Kathryn; Hladik, Michelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Joan M. Dukes Rhonda Whiting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#2008-906-00. Crystal Springs Fish Hatchery and Programs for Snake River Chinook Salmon and Yellowstone for Snake River Chinook Salmon and Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout, as part of Project #2008-906-00, Crystal Implementation Manager SUBJECT: Step 1 review of the Crystal Springs Planning and Operations/Maintenance, Project

289

Linking farmer, forest and watershed: Understanding forestry and soil resource management along the upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenya is generally considered to be poor, and that in the UCRN, because of the cold and overcast weather,

Krupnik, Timothy J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Linking Farmer, Forest and Watershed: Agricultural Systems and Natural Resources Management Along the Upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crop Maize, UCRN Maize, Kenya Drybeans, UCRN Drybeans, SubSaharan Africa Pyrethrum, UCRN Pyrethrum, Kenya Potato,UCRN Potato, Kenya 9 M ' #H H # H H 6:? B # H H # H H

Krupnik, Timothy J.; Jenkins, Marion W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Linking farmer, forest and watershed: Understanding forestry and soil resource management along the upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Soil Analysis. Nairobi, Kenya. , Ministry of Agriculture,P. 702. Ogot, B. A. 1978. Kenya Before 1990. Nairobi: EastLake NakuruNational Park, Kenya. The Professional Geographer

Krupnik, Timothy J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 27, NO. 7, PAGES 1541-1552,JULY 1991 Snow Accumulationand Distributionin an Alpine Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,SWE measurementsat a givenlocationarenot difficultto obtain [U.S. Army ('orps o./'Engineers,1956; Dunneand

Dozier, Jeff

293

Geophysical and sedimentological assessment of urban impacts in a Lake Ontario watershed and lagoon: Frenchman's Bay, Pickering, Ontario.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

levels. At these times, river flow is dependent on surface water contributions from surrounding streets reaches of Amberlea Creek below Bayly Street but are deeply buried by younger glacial sediments elsewhere and results in its characteristic muddy brown colour (Figure 11D). In turn, suspended sediment reduces light

McMaster University

294

From molecule, watershed and environment, to wastewater, remediation and related impacts and government policies, The University of Western  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in air, water and soil by advanced oxidation processes. · The biogas facility at Western's Institute

Ma, Bin

295

The science and politics of increasing nitrogen pollution from human activity : case study of the Aberjona watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen has critical implications for all life on earth. The Haber-Bosch process (1909) paved the way for the industrial fixation of NH3 from unreactive atmospheric dinitrogen, a phenomenon ...

Orosz, Matthew S. (Matthew Sándor), 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ninety-Nine-Year Sediment Yield Record of the Middle Cuyahoga River Watershed Contained Within the Ohio Edison Dam Pool.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The 17.4 m tall Ohio Edison Dam was constructed in 1912 on the Cuyahoga River near the city of Akron, Ohio. The dam was installed… (more)

Mann, Kristofer Clayton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Encouraging low-impact-development stormwater-management practices / Assabet River Watershed sub-basin case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory codes and ordinances create a framework that guide stormwater management decision processes. These regulations are designed to protect the health and safety of the public and to preserve the natural integrity ...

Brown, James E. (James Edward), 1969-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Carbon dynamics following landscape fire: influence of burn severity, climate, and stand history in the Metolius Watershed, Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fire is a fundamental disturbance that drives terrestrial and atmospheric carbon dynamics. Previous studies have quantified fire effects on carbon cycling from local to global… (more)

[No author

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Watershed-Scale Response to Climate Change through the Twenty-First Century for Selected Basins across the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrologic response of different climate-change emission scenarios for the twenty-first century were evaluated in 14 basins from different hydroclimatic regions across the United States using the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), a ...

Lauren E. Hay; Steven L. Markstrom; Christian Ward-Garrison

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Understanding wood-pool dynamics using long-term monitoring data from the Gualala River Watershed: What can we learn?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. R. Montgomery. 2003. Wood in river rehabilitation andPatterns and process of wood debris accumulation in theand S. V. Gregory. 2002. Large wood and fluvial processes.

Church, Tamara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

RBF Neural Networks Combined with Principal Component Analysis Applied to Quantitative Precipitation Forecast for a Reservoir Watershed during Typhoon Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forecast of precipitations during typhoons has received much attention in recent years. It is important in meteorology and atmospheric sciences. Hence, the study on precipitation nowcast during typhoons is of great significance to operators of ...

Chih-Chiang Wei

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-18) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/17/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: October 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-18) Charlie Craig - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Eugene Wetlands Acquisition Phase II Project No: 1992-059-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques - 1.1 Fee- Title Acquisition, 1.2 Easement Acquisition. Location: Lane County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Nature Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition and preservation of approximately 99 acres of native wet prairie and oak woodland habitat in Lane County, Oregon.

303

A COMPARISON OF LIDAR GENERATED CHANNEL FEATURES WITH GROUND-SURVEYED CHANNEL FEATURES IN THE LITTLE CREEK WATERSHED.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Detecting change in stream channel features over time is important in understanding channel morphology and the effects of both natural and anthropogenic influences. Channel features… (more)

Hilburn, Ryan M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Linking Farmer, Forest and Watershed: Agricultural Systems and Natural Resources Management Along the Upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Number Texture density pH (PPM) (meg/100g) (%) Sandy SiltLoam Sandy SiltLoam Sandy Silt Loam Sandy Silt Loam Sandy Silt Loam Clay

Krupnik, Timothy J.; Jenkins, Marion W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much attention is being focused on water quality in rivers, lakes and streams. One of the contributors of pollution to rivers, lakes and streams is runoff from agriculture in the form of nutrients, pesticides and suspended solids. This study was designed to look at the amount of these substances produced in subwatersheds from corn, grain sorghum and cotton farming along the Colorado River in Travis and Bastrop counties. The study also looked at rangeland and row cropped familand to estimate which land use type produced more runoff and pollution to receiving streams. Best management practices were also looked at as a means of limiting the amount of runoff and pollution transport from row cropped areas. Three automated sampling sites were set up to collect water samples after rainfall events. Two of the sites were set up to sample from streams that drained subwatersheds of a tributary to the Colorado River. The land use at one subwatershed consisted primarily of rangeland and pastureland while the land use at the other site consisted mainly of row cropped farmland. The third site was set up to sample on a row cropped farm that employed certain best management practices. The accepted convention is that rangeland produces less runoff @ row cropped areas and therefore contributes less pollutants to receiving waters. The findings from this project generally support this. Additionally, it was found, through computer modeling, that best management practices in the form of terracing, contour plowing and filter strips significantly reduced the amount of runoff and pollutants that move off site from row cropped areas during rainfall events. The implications of these findings are that, where possible, efforts should be made to implement best management practices to reduce the amount of runoff and pollution to receiving waters. Producers also need to be educated as to how to implement and maintain best management practices to obtain optimal benefits.

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

EIS-0265: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

watershed management projects. Watershed Management Program Record of Decision, DOEEIS-0265 (August 1997) More Documents & Publications EIS-0246: Record of Decision...

307

Fisheries Habitat Evaluation in Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : Annual Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1987 the Northwest Power Planning Council amended the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, directing the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund, ``a baseline stream survey of tributaries located on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation to compile information on improving spawning habitat, rearing habitat, and access to spawning tributaries for bull trout, cutthroat trout, and to evaluate the existing fish stocks. ff justified by the results of the survey, fund the design, construction and operation of a cutthroat and bull trout hatchery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation; necessary habitat improvement projects; and a three year monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. If the baseline survey indicates a better alternative than construction of a fish hatchery, the Coeur d`Alene Tribe will submit an alternative plan for consideration in program amendment proceeding.`` This report contains the results of the third year of the study and the Coeur d`Alene Indian Tribes` preliminary recommendations for enhancing the cutthroat and bull trout fishery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation. These recommendations are based on study results from year three data and information obtained in the first two years of the study.

Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Skillingstad, Tami; Scholz, Allan T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Stream restoration case studies in North Carolina utilizing natural channel design techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Watershed land uses are inventoried to determine pollutionwatershed land uses to determine sources of pollution and

Harman, William A.; Jennings, Gregory D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

GEOLOGICAL CONTROLS IN THE FORMATIONS AND EXPANSIONS OF GULLIES OVER HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Northern Blue Nile River source region shallow depth highly weathered and fractured flood basalt watershed. Geologic features of the watershed include shallow depth, highly weathered and fractured basalt of the watershed. The basalt is exposed in the upper slope area and underlies most of the watershed, forming

310

Arizona Water Atlas Volume 3 San Rafael Basin References and Supplemental Reading References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cover, received January 2006. _____, 2004, Water quality exceedences by watershed: Data file, received June 2004.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Landscape Ecology vol. 11no. 1pp 51-64 (1996) SPB Academic F'ublishingbv, Amsterdam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of simulated grizzlies (41%) dispersed from Anaconda Pintler Wilderness, which is near Trail Creek Watershed

Boone, Randall B.

312

On the uses of hyperspectral data analysis and watershed analytical methods to evaluate the extent of riparian vegetation and habitat in the Navarro River, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Space Administration; Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Viers,and Space Administration; Jet Propulsion Laboratory.and Space Administration - Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA –

Viers, Joshua H.; Ramirez, Carlos; Quinn, James F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Uganda Manafwa River early flood warning system development hydrologic watershed modeling using HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS, ArcGIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Manafwa River basin spans several districts in Eastern Uganda. Over the years, frequent floods have constantly posed a great threat to the local communities in these districts. The Uganda Red Cross Society (URCS) intends ...

Ma, Yan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Validation and Use of a Semidistributed Hydrological Modeling System to Predict Short-Term Effects of Clear-Cutting on a Watershed Hydrological Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gestion Intégrée des Bassins versants ŕ l'aide d'un Systčme Informatisé (GIBSI), a semidistributed hydrological modeling system, was evaluated for its ability to simulate the impact of deforestation on the hydrological regime of the Famine ...

Martin-Pierre Lavigne; Alain N. Rousseau; Richard Turcotte; Anne-Marie Laroche; Jean-Pierre Fortin; Jean-Pierre Villeneuve

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The 1960s Drought and the Subsequent Shift to a Wetter Climate in the Catskill Mountains Region of the New York City Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The precipitation history over the last century in the Catskill Mountains region that supplies water to New York City is studied. A severe drought occurred in the early to mid-1960s followed by a wet period that continues. Interannual variability ...

Richard Seager; Neil Pederson; Yochanan Kushnir; Jennifer Nakamura; Stephanie Jurburg

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

doi:10.1155/2012/760108 Research Article Impact of Summer Cattle Grazing on the Sierra Nevada Watershed: Aquatic Algae and Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2012 Robert W. Derlet et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Introduction. We evaluated periphytic algal and microbial communities to assess the influence of human and cattle impact on Sierra water quality. Methods. 64 sites (lakes and streams from Lake Tahoe to Sequoia National Park, California) were sampled for suspended indicator bacteria and algae following standardized procedures. The potential for nonpoint pollution was divided into three categories: cattle-grazing areas (C), recreation use areas (R), or remote wildlife areas (W). Results. Periphyton was found at 100 % of C sites, 89 % of R sites, but only 25 % of W sites. Eleven species of periphytic algae were identified, including Zygnema,

Robert W. Derlet; John R. Richards; Lidia L. Tanaka; Curtis Hayden; K. Ali Ger; Charles R. Goldman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Changes in Flood Management along the Pajaro River: A Transition to Watershed Management Approaches and Lessons from the Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000).  Water Framework Directive.  E.  Parliment, Official 2007).  Flood Risk Directive.  E.  Parliment, Official the Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive Stacie

Jagger, Stacie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Framework to Evaluate Water Demands and Availability for Electrical Power Production Within Watersheds Across the United States: Dev elopment and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A framework to evaluate the water resources available to sustain present and projected electrical power production is under development and has been applied to four case studies around the United States. Those case studies are: the Lower Coosa River Basin (AL), the Muskingum River Basin (OH), the San Juan River Basin (CO, UT, AZ, NM), and the Platte River Basin (NE, CO, WY). The river basins were chosen for the case studies because of the difference among these basins, including climatic conditions, wate...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

319

Comparison of PMP-driven Probable Maximum Floods with Flood Magnitudes due to Increasingly Urbanized Catchment: The Case of American River Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since historical (pre-dam) data is traditionally the sole criterion for dam design, future (post-dam) meteorological and hydrological variability due to land use land cover change cannot be considered for assessing design robustness. For example, ...

Wondmagegn Yigzaw; Faisal Hossain; Alfred Kalyanapu

320

In: Management of Wet-Weather Flow in the Watershed (Edited by Dan Sullivan and Richard Field). CRC Press, Boca Raton. Publication in 2002.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source areas (especially vehicle service areas) and critical land uses (especially manufacturing if present in the stormwater (likely for some industrial and commercial facilities and vehicle service. #12;5-18 4. Runoff from manufacturing industrial areas should also be diverted from infiltration

Pitt, Robert E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Montana contains the headwaters for three continental watersheds-the St. Mary's River, the Columbia River, and the Missouri River. The St. Mary's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Kansas #12;Konza Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Kansas #12;Agricultural Research Service ­ Wind Erosion endless stories about the Blackfeet. We heard firsthand about how the Blackfeet used to live on the land the Blackfeet and how the co!ege is educating their people with history and information for today." Simon Chavez

Dratz, Edward A.

322

PII S0016-7037(00)00610-X Transport of U-and Th-series nuclides in a Baltic Shield watershed and the Baltic Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA 2 Swedish Museum of Natural History, Laboratory for Isotope Geology, Box 50007, 104 of the Charles Arms Laboratory, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology 05 Stockholm, Sweden 3 Department of Geology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 USA (Received

Baskaran, Mark

323

Pesticide transfer dynamics and fluxes in the stream of a small vineyard watershed -Assessing the effect of sampling strategy on fluxes estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategy, Pesticides fluxes, Surface water, Vineyard Introduction The intensive use of pesticides for crop on the mobilisation of pesticides and total fluxes in surface water. Moreover, the effect of the sampling strategy ranged from 1.0 to 60 g. Effect of sampling strategy on the estimation of pesticides fluxes in the river

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

Effects of Averaging and Separating Soil Moisture and Temperature in the Presence of Snow Cover in a SVAT and Hydrological Model for a Southern Ontario, Canada, Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy and water balances at the earth's surface are dramatically influenced by the presence of snow cover. Therefore, soil temperature and moisture for snow-covered and snow-free areas can be very different. In computing these soil state ...

S. R. Fassnacht; Z-L. Yang; K. R. Snelgrove; E. D. Soulis; N. Kouwen

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve protection, preservation, enhancement, and restoration of the state's valuable groundwater and surface water resources. Chapter 103D establishes Watershed Districts across the state to implement watershed management plans. This chapter also provides procedures for construction projects proposed in watershed management districts. October 16, 2013 Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) This rule states regulations for water withdrawals, permits required for withdrawals and water use during water droughts and emergencies. Self-supplied business and industrial water users subject to the water

326

AUGUST 2013 TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multidisciplinary study on instrumented reclaimed watersheds on mine waste at oilsands mines near Fort Mc methane wells and the long-term evolution of reclaimed watersheds over oil-sand mine waste sites

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

327

Simulations of Historical and Future Trends in Snowfall and Groundwater Recharge for Basins Draining to Long Island Sound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional watershed model was developed for watersheds contributing to Long Island Sound, including the Connecticut River basin. The study region covers approximately 40 900 km2, extending from a moderate coastal climate zone in the south to a ...

David M. Bjerklie; Thomas J. Trombley; Roland J. Viger

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Flooding in Western Washington: The Connection to Atmospheric Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study utilizes multiple decades of daily streamflow data gathered in four major watersheds in western Washington to determine the meteorological conditions most likely to cause flooding in those watersheds. Two are located in the Olympic ...

Paul J. Neiman; Lawrence J. Schick; F. Martin Ralph; Mimi Hughes; Gary A. Wick

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Restoration And Management Strategies Of Wetlands In Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changing land use in the watershed area, pollution fromland use management, has also led to problems of pollution,

Ramachandra, T. V.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

TEN YEARS OF CHANGE IN SIERRAN STRINGER MEADOWS: AN EVALUATION OF RANGE CONDITION MODELS1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-watersheds of the intermoun- tain region. Ogden, UT: Agriculture Hdbk. #19. In- termountain Forest and Range Experiment

Standiford, Richard B.

331

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Implementation Work Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, at a minimum: · A watershed assessment providing a description of historical and existing conditions; · A clear

332

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 10, 2004 August 10, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 10, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-168: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 9, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-167: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 6, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-166: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 4, 2004 EIS-0310-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States August 4, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence August 4, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 2, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-164: Supplement Analysis

333

Evaluation of Fish Movements, Migration Patterns, and Population Abundance with Streamwidth PIT Tag Interrogation Systems, Final Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two remote Streamwidth PIT tag Interrogation systems (SPIs) were operated continuously for over one year to test the feasibility of these systems for generating movement, migration, survival and smolt production estimates for salmonids. A total of 1,588 juvenile (< 100 mm FL) naturally produced salmonids (7 coho salmon, 482 cutthroat trout, and 1,099 steelhead) were PIT tagged above the upstream-most SPI (9 sites approximately 1 linear km each) in Fall 2001. Age at tagging for wild caught cutthroat and steelhead was 1 year. SPIs were operating before any PIT tagged fish were released in the creek. Over 390,000 detections were recorded from October 2001 to 31 July 2002. Efficiencies were site dependent, but overall detection efficiency for the creek was 97% with 95% confidence intervals of 91-100%. PIT tag detection efficiency ranged from 55-100% depending on the SPI and varied throughout the year with average efficiencies of 73% and 89%. SPI efficiency of PIT tag detection was not completely dependent on electronics noise levels or environmental conditions. Fish from all tagging locations were detected at the SPIs. Steelhead and cutthroat trout were primarily detected moving in the Spring (April-June) coincident with the anticipated smolt migration. Steelhead were also detected moving past SPIs at lower numbers in the Fall and Winter. Travel time between SPIs (downstream movement) was highly dependent on time of year. Travel time in the Spring was significantly faster (34.4 {+-} 7.0 hours) for all species than during any other time of year (763.1 {+-} 267.0 hours). Steelhead and cutthroat migrating in the Spring were the same age as those that did not migrate in the Spring. Peak of steelhead migration recorded at the two SPIs was 5/11 and 5/12 and the peak in the screw trap was recorded on 5/17. Steelhead smolt production estimates using SPIs (3,802 with 95% confidence intervals of 3,440 - 4,245) was similar to those using more standard screw trap methods (approximately 5,400). All species used the faster moving/deeper section of the creek at both SPIs. A backpack PIT tag detector was also developed and used as another remote 'recapture' for additional accuracy in estimating population survival and recapture probability. This unit was used at an approximate efficiency of 24% to survey the creek after the Spring migration. Twenty-five individual fish were re-located. All PIT tag data were used to calculate survival and recapture probabilities using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber population model. Survival for steelhead was high and recapture probability depended greatly on season. Probability of recapture was highest in Spring (29.5%) and relatively low in all other seasons (< 7% in Fall, Winter, and Summer). Wild steelhead PIT tagged in the field and returned to the laboratory had a tag retention rate of 97.6%. A laboratory study was designed to determine the effects of 3-sized PIT tags (12 mm, 20 mm, and 23 mm) on survival and growth of individuals. Survival from surgical implantation of 23 mm PIT tags was > 98% for fish (coho salmon and steelhead). Retention of 23 mm PIT tags was 100% for coho salmon and 89% for steelhead. For both coho and steelhead, growth rates during the first month were affected by tagging, but by the end of 2 months growth effects equalized for all tag sizes. Life history characteristics quantified with SPI techniques are comparable to standard techniques. For example, peaks of Spring migration for steelhead and cutthroat were amazingly similar to those reported from the screw trap. These techniques will enable application of less laborious methods which are more accurate at estimating life history parameters.

Zydlewski, Gayle; Winter, Christiane; McClanahan, Dee

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Archaeological investigations in the Elm Creek Watershed, Runnels County, Texas: sites 41RN61, 41RN64, 41RN65, 41RN72, 41RN74, 41RN76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes results of archaeological investigations and material analysis associated with six prehistoric sites in Runnels County, Texas that lie within a proposed Soil Conservation Service floodwater retarding structure and reservoir. Data recovery, based on geomorphic investigations to resolve potential for subsurface cultural deposits, resulted in retrieval of representative samples of lithic assemblages from four sites (41RN61, 41RN64, 41RN65, 41RN74). These lithic assemblages, along with lithic collections from previous testing by SMU within the project area (41RN72, 41RN76), were analyzed with an emphasis on the diversity in assemblage characteristics from quarry or primary lithic procurement sites as contrasted with sites in which further lithic reduction and utilization related to subsistence prevails, such as habitation sites. Inferences with regard to site activity and function are made based on results of lithic analysis and trends revealed in the data.

Sanders, Calvin B

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Groundwater protection EIS: Existing environment: Savannah River  

SciTech Connect

Per Groundwater Protection EIS commitments, a baseline of surface water hydrology and chemistry of each onsite stream is needed to define the existing environment of each watershed so that environmental impacts associated with the various waste site closure options can be assessed. This report summarizes the existing water quality of the Savannah River; lists the various waste sites encompassing this watershed; and summarizes the availability of surface water and floodplain sediment monitoring data, both radiochemical and physiochemical, collected from this watershed.

Stejskal, G.F.

1985-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Environmental Management (2008) 41:367–377 DOI 10.1007/s00267-007-9033-y Headwater Influences on Downstream Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We investigated the influence of riparian and whole watershed land use as a function of stream size on surface water chemistry and assessed regional variation in these relationships. Sixty-eight watersheds in four level III U.S. EPA ecoregions in eastern Kansas were selected as study sites. Riparian land cover and watershed land use were quantified for the entire watershed, and by Strahler order. Multiple regression analyses using riparian land cover classifications as independent variables explained among-site variation in water chemistry parameters, particularly total nitrogen (41%), nitrate (61%), and total phosphorus (63%) concentrations. Whole watershed land use explained slightly less variance, but riparian and whole watershed land use were so tightly correlated that it was difficult to separate their effects. Water chemistry parameters sampled in downstream reaches were most closely correlated with riparian land cover adjacent to the smallest (first-order) streams of watersheds or land use in the entire watershed, with riparian zones immediately upstream of sampling sites offering less explanatory power as stream size increased. Interestingly, headwater effects were evident even at times when these small streams were unlikely to be flowing. Relationships were similar among ecoregions, indicating that land use characteristics were most responsible for water quality variation among watersheds. These findings suggest that nonpoint pollution control

Walter K. Dodds; Ć Robert; M. Oakes; Ó Springer; W. K. Dodds; R. M. Oakes; R. M. Oakes

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Don Pedro Project and the integrated licensing process: a process analysis of stakeholder participation in reservoir relicensing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Numerous dams in Sierra Nevada watersheds are due for relicensing, now and in the upcoming years. The relicensing process is an opportunity to assess the… (more)

Shakal, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Idaho | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home United States Idaho Idaho August 4, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program...

339

EIS-0397: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project To Improve Fish Passage to Habitat in the Upper Part of the Watershed,...

340

EIS-0265-SA-91: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis EIS-0265-SA-91: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Hood River Fish Habitat (Evans Creek Culvert Replacement) Bonneville Power Administration and the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE Solar Decathlon: University of Maryland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and is a model for how a house can help preserve watersheds everywhere by managing storm water onsite, filtering pollutants from greywater, and minimizing water use. Photo...

342

NIST Big Data Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Training a self-driving car could take 100 million images at megapixel ... genomics of the microbes in the soil to watershed hydro-biogeochemistry. ...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

NIST Big Data Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Training a self-driving car could take 100 ... in the soil to watershed hydro- biogeochemistry. ... Rather people, cars, stocks are “macroscopic quantities ...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE/ID  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials, often expressed as Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), from 1 Figure 1. Thermal stratification of a hydropower reservoir the watershed...

345

Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ERP–01–C07. 515 p. [NRC] National Research Council.estuary & watershed science [NRC] National Research Council.Delta. Aquatic Toxicology [NRC] National Research Council.

Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Tracing the Flow of Organic Matter from the Musekgon River Estuary System to Nearshore Lake Michigan: a Stable Isotope Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The fate of inputs of organic matter from individual watersheds to the Great Lakes is poorly known. The goal of this study was to track… (more)

Marko, Katharine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EIS-0265-SA-57: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis EIS-0265-SA-57: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Idaho Fish Screening Improvement (Champion, Iron, Fourth of July, Goat Creeks) Bonneville Power...

348

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

analysis * Watershed-based management * Constraints analysis * Spatial modeling * Spatial statistics * Map making 4 Argonne Develops and Uses Geospatial Technology and Spatial Data...

349

STATE OF NEW MEXICO Report of the Legislative Finance Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.sas.upenn.edu/lps/event. 9 MES Lecture Series: Fracking in the Upper Delaware Watershed: How Safe is Our Drinking Water

Smirnov, Sergei N.

350

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

351

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relating to hydroelectricity generation, irrigation water,resources to generate hydroelectricity Managing watershedsFor example, micro-hydroelectricity generation may be an

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Economic Costs and Adaptations for Alternative Regulations of California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATERSHED SCIENCE water operations models (Yeh 1985; Draperof Water Resources Planning and Management 135:303–313. YehWater Management. Draft documentation. Becker L, Yeh WWG,

Tanaka, Stacy K; Connell-Buck, Christina R.; Madani, Kaveh; Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R; Hanak, Ellen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Inventory and Sediment Modeling of Unpaved Roads for Stream Conservation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Mapping and Inventory of Riparian Areas in the Upperstudy watershed using the road inventory geodatabase. Oncebe compared to species inventory data, stream bank erosion

Inlander, Ethan; Clingenpeel, Alan; Crump, Michael A.; Van Epps, Matthew; Formica, Sandi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EIS-0265-SA-90: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis EIS-0265-SA-90: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program Naches River Water Treatment Plant Intake Screening Project (September 2002) Supplement Analysis for...

355

Indiana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 30, 2010 CX-004860: Categorical Exclusion Determination Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demand CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1...

356

Factors controlling streambed coverage of Didymosphenia geminata in two regulated streams in the Colorado Front Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of dissolved substances from a Colorado mountain watershed.11: CDOT, 2009. Colorado Department of Transportation.two regulated streams in the Colorado Front Range Matthew P.

Miller, Matthew P.; McKnight, Diane M.; Cullis, James D.; Greene, Alicia; Vietti, Kristin; Liptzin, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Stormwater Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy and purpose of this act is to encourage planning and management of storm water runoff in each watershed consistent with sound water and land use practices.

358

Jim Cochran: Swanton Berry Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were a couple people (Dale Coke was one, and a couple ofthe oral history with Dale Coke in this series. “A watershed

Farmer, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

CX-006574: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Categorical Exclusion Determination 74: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006574: Categorical Exclusion Determination Purchase of the Diamond B Conservation Easement CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/16/2011 Location(s): Flathead County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to acquire a conservation easement of 192-acres along the mainstream Flathead River. The Diamond B property conservation easement will help protect one mile of important migratory habitat for bull trout, which are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, as well as resident west slope cutthroat trout, which are considered a species of concern by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the 192-acres. Funding this conservation easement will provide BPA with credits

360

Biological and Environmental Engineering Soil & Water Research Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is soil transmissivity of the soil surface layer of grid cell i of the watershed, and i is the topographic transmissivity). We will use the TI map of Townbrook created in an earlier exercise watershed as an example for generating maps of soil topographic index (STI) from TI maps and soil data. The procedure for generating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

362

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;6-2 #12;APPENDIX 6: Cumulative Watershed Effects Analysis for the Biomass to Energy Project 1. Principal the findings or recommendations of the study. Cumulative watershed effects (CWE) of the Biomass to Energy (B2E

363

Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge Addressing Phytophthora ramorum in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as watershed, vegetation, and aerial surveys of high-risk terrain in and surrounding California's 14 infested monitoring is carried out via aerial survey, watershed, and ground-based vegetation survey. In 2004 the following projects were implemented: 1. Aerial Survey (Jeff Mai, USDA Forest Service, and Walter Mark, Cal

Standiford, Richard B.

364

Effectiveness of a participatory modeling effort to identify and advance community water resource goals in St. Albans, Vermont  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural resource managers face complex challenges in addressing non-point source water pollution. A participatory modeling approach was applied in the St. Albans Bay watershed to identify the most effective phosphorus control options to achieve the load ... Keywords: Lake Champlain, Natural resource planning, Participatory modeling, Social dynamics, Watershed model

Erica J. Brown Gaddis; Hilary Harp Falk; Clare Ginger; Alexey Voinov

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Analysis of Scalar Maps for the Segmentation of the Corpus Callosum in Diffusion Tensor Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a powerful technique for imaging axonal anatomy in vivo and its automatic segmentation is important for quantitative analysis and visualization. Application of the watershed transform is a recent approach for robustly ... Keywords: Corpus Callosum, Diffusion scalar maps, Diffusion tensor imaging, Mathematical morphology, Segmentation, Watershed

Leticia Rittner; Jennifer S. Campbell; Pedro F. Freitas; Simone Appenzeller; G. Bruce Pike; Roberto A. Lotufo

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 14, 2001 December 14, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-35: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program December 3, 2001 EIS-0265-SA-72: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase II December 3, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-34: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program November 15, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-32: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Walla Walla County, Washington November 15, 2001 EIS-0265-SA-69: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program October 29, 2001 EIS-0265-SA-71: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Duncan Creek Channel Rehabilitation Project October 23, 2001 EIS-0265-SA-70: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter

367

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-87): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS Cowlitz Tap-Olympia White River 7/23/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2002 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-87) Mark Shaw TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Protect and Restore the Asotin Creek Watershed - Upper Charley Subwatershed Ecosystems Restoration Projects (road obliteration) Project No: 2002-054-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 7.18 Road Closure Location: Charley Creek Subwatershed, Umatilla National Forest, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a project that will address

368

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK AK Program or Field Office: TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM Project Title AK-TEP-YUKON RIVER INTER-TRIBAL WATERSHED COUNCIL Location: Tribal YUKON RIVER INTER-TRIBAL WATERSHED COUNCIL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Descriptio The Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC) proposes to conduct energy efficiency upgrades to four buildings (Nunamiut Village Store, Nunamiut Corporation Office, Nunamiut Village Restaurant, and Nunamiut Corporation Manager's Dwelling) located in Anaktuvuk Pass, Alaska. The YRITWC proposes to conduct 7 energy efficiency activities. Task 1 is to educate the local community members, elders, and youth on the environmental and economic benefits of energy efficiency. Task 2 is to

369

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 3, 2011 October 3, 2011 The University of Maryland's "WaterShed" won the 2011 Solar Decathlon. The school from College Park, Maryland competed against 18 other collegiate teams to build an aesthetically pleasing, architecturally innovative and well-engineered energy efficient living space that generates its energy from solar power. | Courtesy of University of Maryland Solar Decathlon Team University of Maryland's "WaterShed" Wins 2011 Solar Decathlon The University of Maryland's "WaterShed" won the 2011 Solar Decathlon. The school from College Park, Maryland competed against 18 other collegiate teams to build an aesthetically pleasing, architecturally innovative and well-engineered energy efficient living space that generates its energy

370

Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2001 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated factors affecting the distribution and abundance of Yellowstone cutthroat trout (YCT), the abundance of all trout, and species richness in several drainages in the upper Snake River basin in Idaho. A total of 326 randomly selected sites were visited within the four study drainages, and of these, there was sufficient water to inventory fish and habitat in 56 of the sites in the Goose Creek drainage, 64 in the Raft River drainage, 54 in the Blackfoot River drainage, and 27 in the Willow Creek drainage. Fish were captured in 36, 55, 49, and 22 of the sites, respectively, and YCT were present at 17, 37, 32, and 13 of the sites, respectively. There was little consistency or strength in the models developed to predict YCT presence/absence and density, trout density, or species richness. Typically, the strongest models had the lowest sample sizes. In the Goose Creek drainage, sites with YCT were higher in elevation and lower in conductivity. In the Raft River drainage, trout cover was more abundant at sites with YCT than without YCT. In the Blackfoot River drainage, there was less fine substrate and more gravel substrate at sites with YCT than at sites without YCT. In the Willow Creek drainage, 70% of the sites located on public land contained YCT, but only 35% of private land contained YCT. The differences in variable importance between drainages suggests that factors that influence the distribution of YCT vary between drainages, and that for the most part the variables we measured had little influence on YCT distribution. n sites containing YCT, average cutthroat trout density was 0.11/m{sup 2}, 0.08/m{sup 2}, 0.10/m{sup 2}, and 0.08/m{sup 2} in the Goose Creek, Raft River, Blackfoot River, and Willow Creek drainages, respectively. In sites containing trout in general, average total trout density in these same drainages was 0.16/m{sup 2}, 0.15/m{sup 2}, 0.10/m{sup 2}, and 0.10/m{sup 2}. Models to predict YCT density, total trout density, and species richness were either weak (i.e., explained little variation) or contained small sample sizes. Based on our results, it appears that factors other than those we measured are affecting fish populations in these drainages.

Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume I of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

In fulfillment of the NWPPC's 3-Step Process for the implementation of new hatcheries in the Columbia Basin, this Step 1 submission package to the Council includes four items: (1) Cover letter from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Interdisciplinary Team Chair, and the USFWS; (2) References to key information (Attachments 1-4); (3) The updated Master Plan for the Tribe's native cutthroat restoration project; and (4) Appendices. In support of the Master Plan submitted by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe the reference chart (Item 2) was developed to allow reviewers to quickly access information necessary for accurate peer review. The Northwest Power Planning Council identified pertinent issues to be addressed in the master planning process for new artificial production facilities. References to this key information are provided in three attachments: (1) NWPPC Program language regarding the Master Planning Process, (2) Questions Identified in the September 1997 Council Policy, and (3) Program language identified by the Council's Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP). To meet the need for off-site mitigation for fish losses on the mainstem Columbia River, in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of a trout production facility located adjacent to Coeur d'Alene Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The updated Master Plan (Item 3) represents the needs associated with the re-evaluation of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Trout Production Facility (No.199004402). This plan addresses issues and concerns expressed by the NWPPC as part of the issue summary for the Mountain Columbia provincial review, and the 3-step hatchery review process. Finally, item 4 (Appendices) documents the 3-Step process correspondence to date between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and additional relevant entities. Item 4 provides a chronological account of previous ISRP reviews, official Coeur d'Alene fisheries program responses to a series of ISRP reviews, master planning documentation, and annual reports dating back to 1990. Collectively, the materials provided by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in this Step-1 submission package comprehensively assesses key research, habitat improvement activities, and hatchery production issues to best protect and enhance native cutthroat trout populations and the historically and culturally important tribal fisheries they support.

Anders, Paul

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

EIS-0265-SA-75: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0265-SA-75: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-75: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Gourlay Creek Fish Ladder Project Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund the construction of a fish passage facility at the Gourlay Creek Dam/water reservoir in Columbia County, Oregon. The City of Scappoose owns and manages close to half of the Gourlay Creek Watershed including high quality habitat above and below the Gourlay Creek Dam. Gourlay Creek Dam has been identified as a key limiting factor in the re-generation of salmon and trout in the Gourlay Creek Watershed. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-75) - Gourlay Creek Fish Ladder Project (February 2002) More Documents & Publications EIS-0265-SA-59: Supplement Analysis

373

The impact of over 100 years of wildfires on mercury levels and accumulation rates in two lakes in southern California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 years of wild?res on mercury levels and accumulationbe an important source of mercury (Hg) to local watersheds.transport of gaseous mercury from a large scale Canadian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Entiat Subbasin Plan Prepared for the Northwest Power and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

funds. In 1998 the CRMP group led a successful effort to secure funding from the Washington Department is provided from the Entiat Planning Unit, assembled under the direction of the Washington State Watershed

375

Systems of valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 1972 publication of The Limits to Growth marked a watershed moment in ongoing environmental debates among politicians, economists, scientists, and the public in the postwar period. Sponsored by the Club of Rome, an ...

Chernyakova, Irina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Proposed Standard Fog Collector for Use in High-Elevation Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The collection of fog droplets by vegetation is an important wet deposition process. It can, in fact, dominate the chemical and hydrological input to certain high elevation watersheds. However, measurements of fog deposition are rarely made and, ...

Robert S. Schemenauer; Pilar Cereceda

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Modeling the Effects of Lakes and Wetlands on the Water Balance of Arctic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes, ponds, and wetlands are common features in many low-gradient arctic watersheds. Storage of snowmelt runoff in lakes and wetlands exerts a strong influence on both the interannual and interseasonal variability of northern rivers. This ...

Laura C. Bowling; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Red-Headed Woodpecker and Brown-Headed Nuthatch on the Oak...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was listed as one of the species utilizing the White Oak Creek watershed (Krumholz 1954) on the ORR. We could find nothing in the literature regarding these woodpeckers on the...

379

The role of negative buoyancy in surface-based convection and its representation in cumulus parameterization schemes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several warm-season, late-afternoon precipitation events are simulated over the Chesapeake Bay watershed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model at three different resolutions. The onset and peak of surface-based convection is ...

Manisha Ganeshan; Raghu Murtugudde; John Strack

380

EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65-SA-165: Supplement Analysis 65-SA-165: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS, - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence, DOE/EIS-0265-SA-165 (August 2004) More Documents & Publications EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-57: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-58: Supplement Anlalysis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type Publications Website http://www.worldagroforestry.o Country Philippines UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed[1] Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Screenshot This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

382

Forecasting the Anomalous Discharge of the Caroní River, Venezuela  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops methods for the extended-range forecasting of the February–March minimum of water discharge of the Caroní River in eastern Venezuela, a watershed providing more than 70% of the hydroelectric power for the country. The ...

Stefan Hastenrath; Lawrence Greischar; Esperanza Colón; Alfredo Gil

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Physically Based Daily Hydrometeorological Model for Complex Mountain Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the continued development of the physically based hydrometeorological model Generate Earth Systems Science input (GENESYS) and its application in simulating snowpack in the St. Mary (STM) River watershed, Montana. GENESYS is ...

Ryan J. MacDonald; James M. Byrne; Stefan W. Kienzle

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

An Evaluation of Multiscalar Drought Indices in Nevada and Eastern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nevada and eastern California are home to some of the driest and warmest climates, most mountainous regions, and fastest growing metropolitan areas of the United States. Throughout Nevada and eastern California, snow-dominated watersheds provide ...

Daniel J. McEvoy; Justin L. Huntington; John T. Abatzoglou; Laura M. Edwards

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tell us and we'll fix it. Or maybe you meant to go somewhere else? Use the search box or links below to help guide you. Enter terms sites prod files Fig4 1 6 1CoastalWatersheds...

386

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

meant to go somewhere else? Use the search box or links below to help guide you. Enter terms sites prod files Fig4 1 6 1CoastalWatersheds Search Showing 41 - 50 of 22,690 results....

387

Arctic Precipitation and Evaporation: Model Results and Observational Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational estimates of precipitation and evaporation over the Arctic Ocean and its terrestrial watersheds are compared with corresponding values from the climate model simulations of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir Kattsov; Diane Portis; Valentin Meleshko

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

River Flow Response to Precipitation and Snow Budget in California during the 1994/95 Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study of precipitation and river flow from November 1994 to May 1995 at two California basins is presented. The Hopland watershed of the Russian River in the northern California Coastal Range and the headwater of the North Fork ...

Jinwon Kim; Norman L. Miller; Alexander K. Guetter; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Enhancing Water Cycle Measurements for Future Hydrologic Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc., established the Hydrologic Measurement Facility to transform watershed-scale hydrologic research by facilitating access to advanced instrumentation and expertise ...

H. W. Loescher; J. M. Jacobs; O. Wendroth; D. A. Robinson; G. S. Poulos; K. Mcguire; P. Reed; B. P. Mohanty; J. B. Shanley; W. Krajewski

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Two-Tier Statistical Forecast Method for Agricultural and Resource Management Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple phase schemes to predict seasonal climate based on leading ENSO indicators can be used to estimate the value of forecast information in agriculture and watershed management, but may be limited in predictive skill. Here, a simple two-tier ...

Steven A. Mauget; Jonghan Ko

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NIST Big Data Working Group (NBD-WG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Training a self-driving car could take 100 million images. ... N/A, N/A, From 'omics of the microbes in the soil to watershed hydro-biogeochemistry. ...

392

Hydrometeorology and Variability of Water Discharge and Sediment Load in the Inner Gulf of Honduras, Western Caribbean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrological and meteorological characteristics of the watersheds of the inner Gulf of Honduras in the western Caribbean, including runoff, sediment load and yield, and the effects of the El Nińo–La Nińa cycle, are examined using available ...

Deeptha Thattai; Björn Kjerfve; W. D. Heyman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Developing a Performance Measure for Snow-Level Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The snow level, or altitude in the atmosphere where snow melts to rain, is an important variable for hydrometeorological prediction in mountainous watersheds; yet, there is no operational performance measure associated with snow-level forecasts ...

Allen B. White; Daniel J. Gottas; Arthur F. Henkel; Paul J. Neiman; F. Martin Ralph; Seth I. Gutman

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Decadal-Timescale Estuarine Geomorphic Change Under Future Scenarios of Climate and Sediment Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and freshwater flow changes of 2030; (3) sea-level rise andwatershed sediment supply of 2030; and (4) sea-level rise,watershed sediment supply of 2030. Sea-level rise increased

Ganju, Neil K.; Schoellhamer, David H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Land Surface Heterogeneity in the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97). Part I: Comparing Modeled Surface Flux Maps with Surface-Flux Tower and Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface heterogeneity over an area of 71 km × 74 km in the lower Walnut River watershed, Kansas, was investigated using models and measurements from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) field experiment. As an ...

Fei Chen; David N. Yates; Haruyasu Nagai; Margaret A. LeMone; Kyoko Ikeda; Robert L. Grossman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Precipitation Estimation in Mountainous Terrain Using Multivariate Geostatistics. Part I: Structural Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Values of average annual precipitation (AAP) are desired for hydrologic studies within a watershed containing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. Reliable values of AAP are not yet available for ...

Joseph A. Hevesi; Jonathan D. Istok; Alan L. Flint

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Identification of Thermally Homogeneous Subunits in a Steep Appalachian Pasture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pasture improvement in the central Appalachian region is facilitated by knowledge of spatial relationships in microclimate attributable to complex topography. A small, steep horseshoe-shaped pasture watershed, with aspects encompassing 210°, in ...

Douglas G. Boyer; Charles M. Feldhake

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Uncertainty Analysis of Runoff Simulations and Parameter Identifiability in the Community Land Model – Evidence from MOPEX Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we applied version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4) integrated with an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to 20 selected watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) spanning a wide range of climate ...

Maoyi Huang; Zhangshuan Hou; L. Ruby Leung; Yinghai Ke; Ying Liu; Zhufeng Fang; Yu Sun

399

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*...............................................3:40 pm Watershed Planning in Arkansas by Floyd Watson*, Kevin Bennoch*, Sandi Formica*, Jennifer of Arkansas, Fayetteville A Community Approach to Handling and Utilizing Dairy Manure by Sandi Formica*, Mc

Soerens, Thomas

400

Horizontal Variability of 2-m Temperature at Night during CASES-97  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface-station, radiosonde, and Doppler minisodar data from the Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface Exchange Study-1997 (CASES-97) field project, collected in a 60-km-wide array in the lower Walnut River watershed (terrain variation 150 m) southeast ...

Margaret A. LeMone; Kyoko Ikeda; Robert L. Grossman; Mathias W. Rotach

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Uncertainty Analysis of Runoff Simulations and Parameter Identifiability in the Community Land Model: Evidence from MOPEX Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors applied version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4) integrated with an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to 20 selected watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) spanning a wide range of ...

Maoyi Huang; Zhangshuan Hou; L. Ruby Leung; Yinghai Ke; Ying Liu; Zhufeng Fang; Yu Sun

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Planning for an Uncertain Future: Climate Change Sensitivity Assessment towards Adaptation Planning for Public Water Supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing climate change risk to municipal water supplies is often conducted by hydrologic modeling specific to local watersheds and infrastructure to ensure that outputs are compatible with existing planning frameworks and processes. This study ...

Tim Bardsley; Andrew Wood; Mike Hobbins; Tracie Kirkham; Laura Briefer; Jeff Niermeyer; Steven Burian

403

The CI-FLOW Project: A System for Total Water Level Prediction from the Summit to the Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Coastal and Inland Flooding Observation and Warning (CI-FLOW) project is to prototype new hydrometeorologic techniques to address a critical NOAA service gap: routine total water level predictions for tidally influenced watersheds. ...

Suzanne Van Cooten; Kevin E. Kelleher; Kenneth Howard; Jian Zhang; Jonathan J. Gourley; John S. Kain; Kodi Nemunaitis-Monroe; Zac Flamig; Heather Moser; Ami Arthur; Carrie Langston; Randall Kolar; Yang Hong; Kendra Dresback; Evan Tromble; Humberto Vergara; Richard A Luettich Jr.; Brian Blanton; Howard Lander; Ken Galluppi; Jessica Proud Losego; Cheryl Ann Blain; Jack Thigpen; Katie Mosher; Darin Figurskey; Michael Moneypenny; Jonathan Blaes; Jeff Orrock; Rich Bandy; Carin Goodall; John G. W. Kelley; Jason Greenlaw; Micah Wengren; Dave Eslinger; Jeff Payne; Geno Olmi; John Feldt; John Schmidt; Todd Hamill; Robert Bacon; Robert Stickney; Lundie Spence

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Dynamic parameterization to simulate DIN export due to gypsy moth defoliation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A module of dynamic parameterization is added into the HSPF watershed software for simulation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export from forest associated with gypsy moth defoliation. It simulates a changing ecosystem following the breakout of ...

Ping Wang; Lewis C. Linker; Keith N. Eshleman

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Impacts of Polarimetric Radar Observations on Hydrologic Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall estimated from the polarimetric prototype of the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler [WSR-88D (KOUN)] was evaluated using a dense Micronet rain gauge network for nine events on the Ft. Cobb research watershed in Oklahoma. The ...

Jonathan J. Gourley; Scott E. Giangrande; Yang Hong; Zachary L. Flamig; Terry Schuur; Jasper A. Vrugt

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Quantitative Precipitation Forecast Techniques for Use in Hydrologic Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative hydrologic forecasting usually requires knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. First, it is important to accurately measure the precipitation falling over a particular watershed of interest. Second, ...

Konstantine P. Georgakakos; Michael D. Hudlow

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Relationships between Evaporative Fraction and Remotely Sensed Vegetation Index and Microwave Brightness Temperature for Semiarid Rangelands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the microwave brightness temperature (TB) with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed were made on selected days during the MONSOON 90 field campaign. The PBMR is an L-band ...

W. P. Kustas; T. J. Schmugge; K. S. Humes; T. J. Jackson; R. Parry; M. A. Weltz; M. S. Moran

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Modeling the Global Water Resource System in an Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework: IGSM-WRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of water resources affects energy, agricultural and environmental systems, which are linked together as well as to climate via the water cycle. As such, watersheds and river basins are directly impacted ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

409

Organ Trade : sea level rise adaptation strategies for the San Francisco Bay Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is not only coastal conditions, but inland ones, that can inform an approach to and process of wetland adaptation in the face of sea level rise. A particular watershed clip in Alameda County, located in South San Francisco ...

Ungureanu, Cristina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ASSESSMENT AND POTENTIAL ADJUSTMENTS TO THE SNOW-RELATED ALGORITHMS IN BIOME-BGC, v4.2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many watersheds throughout the mountain west are snow-melt dominated. Recent studies suggest that climatic shifts throughout the 20th century have diminished snowpack around the west,… (more)

DeWire, Deana Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Rocky Great Mountains Southwest Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of snags and cavities for wildlife can utilize the existing tree species composition, which varied. Study Area The study was conducted on a 160-ha area, in the eastern portion of Hotel Creek Watershed

412

DEPARTMENT OF LAND RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but are not limited to, topics such as hydrology, watershed analysis, integrated management.S. degree in Land Resources and Environmental Sciences. This program is designed to provide outstanding graduate training opportunities across a substantial breadth

Lawrence, Rick L.

413

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy December 30, 2010 CX-004860: Categorical Exclusion Determination Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demand CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1...

414

Streamflow Characteristics and Changes in Kolyma Basin in Siberia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study documents major changes in streamflow hydrology over the Kolyma watershed due to climatic variations and human impacts. Streamflow seasonal cycles over the basin are characteristic of the northern region, with the lowest runoff in ...

Ipshita Majhi; Daqing Yang

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO{sub 2} increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

Schell, D.M.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO[sub 2] increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

Schell, D.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Doe Water Cycle Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multilaboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the ...

N. L. Miller; A. W. King; M. A. Miller; E. P. Springer; M. L. Wesely; K. E. Bashford; M. E. Conrad; K. Costigan; P. N. Foster; H. K. Gibbs; J. Jin; J. Klazura; B. M. Lesht; M. V. Machavaram; F. Pan; J. Song; D. Troyan; R. A. Washington-Allen

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The NOAA Hydrometeorology Testbed Soil Moisture Observing Networks: Design, Instrumentation, and Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NOAA Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT) program has deployed soil moisture observing networks in the watersheds of the Russian River and the North Fork (NF) of the American River in northern California, and the San Pedro River in southeastern ...

Robert J. Zamora; F. Martin Ralph; Edward Clark; Timothy Schneider

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Spatiotemporal Variability of Summer Precipitation in Southeastern Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Southeastern Arizona covers ~150 km2 and receives the majority of its annual precipitation from highly variable and intermittent summer storms during the North American monsoon. In this study the ...

Susan Stillman; Xubin Zeng; William J. Shuttleworth; David C. Goodrich; Carl L. Unkrich; Marek Zreda

420

Estimation of E. coli Concentrations from Non Point Sources Using GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When developing a Watershed Protection Plan (WPP) or a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), it is often difficult to accurately assess the pollutant load for a watershed because not enough water quality monitoring data are available. According to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), there are 274 bacteria impairments in Texas water bodies out of 386 impaired water bodies. Bacteria water quality data are often more sparse than other types of water quality data, which hinders the development of WPPs or TMDLs. The Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) was used to develop watershed protection plans for four rural watersheds in Texas that are impaired due to E. coli bacteria. SELECT is an automated Geographical Information System (GIS) tool that can assess pathogen loads in watersheds using spatial factors such as land use, population density, and soil type. WPPs were developed for four rural Texas watersheds: Buck Creek, Lampasas River, five sub watersheds of the Little Brazos River, and Geronimo Creek. A spatial watershed model was developed to simulate bacteria concentrations in streams resulting from non point sources using SELECT combined with a simple rainfall-runoff model and applied to the Geronimo Creek watershed. The watershed model applies a rainfall-driven loading function to the potential E. coli loads calculated by the output of SELECT. The simulated runoff volumes and E. coli concentrations from the model were compared to actual monthly E. coli data collected at two sampling sites near the outlet of a subwatershed. The results show how SELECT methodology was applied to each watershed and adapted based on stakeholder concerns and data availability. The highest potential contributors were identified and areas of concern were highlighted to more effectively apply best management practices (BMPs). The runoff volumes were predicted with very good agreement (E = 0.95, RSR = 0.21 to 0.22) for both sampling sites. The predicted E. coli concentrations did not agree with measured concentrations for both sites using eight different methods. The results indicate that the model does not include significant factors contributing to the transport of E. coli bacteria but can be modified to include these factors.

Mckee, Kyna

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Water Prism, Volume 2: Prototype Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water Prism is a decision support system (DSS) that evaluates alternative management plans to obtain water resource sustainability at the regional, watershed, or local levels. It considers surface, ground, and impoundment waters and all water-using sectors (industrial, agricultural, municipal, electric power, and the environment). This technical update illustrates how Water Prism is used by applying it to two large watersheds: the Muskingum River Basin (Ohio) and the Green River Basin ...

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1999 Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) EM Program adopted a watershed approach for performing Remedial Investigations (RIs) and characterizations for ORR because it is an effective system for determining the best methods for protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems and protecting human health. The basic concept is that water quality and ecosystem problems are best solved at the watershed level rather than at the individual water-body or discharger level. The watershed approach requires consideration of all environmental concerns, including needs to protect public health, critical habitats such as wetlands, biological integrity, and surface and ground waters. The watershed approach provides an improved basis for management decisions concerning contaminant sources and containment. It allows more direct focus by stakeholders on achieving ecological goals and water quality standards rather than a measurement of program activities based on numbers of permits or samples. The watershed approach allows better management strategies for investigations, therefore maximizing the utilization of scarce resources. Feasibility studies (FSs) evaluate various alternatives in terms of environmental standards, the protection of human health and the environment, and the costs of implementation to find the optimum solution among them. Society has to decide how much it is willing to spend to meet the standards and to be protective. Conducting FSs is the process of trading off those criteria to pick that optimum point that society wants to achieve. Performing this analysis at the watershed scale allows those trade-offs to be made meaningfully. In addition, a Land Use Control Assurance Plan for the ORR was prepared to identify the strategy for assuring the long-term effectiveness of land use controls. These land use controls will be relied upon to protect human health and the environment at areas of the ORR undergoing remediation pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and/or the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This plan will be implemented by means of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) incorporating its terms with the United States EPA and TDEC. The majority of projects described in this report are grouped into five watersheds. They are the East Tennessee Technical Park (ETTP) Watershed (formerly the K-25 Site), the Melton Valley (MV) and Bethel Valley (BV) Watersheds at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watersheds at the Y-12 Plant.

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Garfield County Habitat for Fall Chinook and Steelhead, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives and tasks outlined in detail in this project report were implemented during calendar year 2006 in all the watersheds of Garfield County. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). In the years since 1993, other watersheds in Garfield County have been designated as salmon bearing streams and have received numerous practices formerly just designated for the Pataha Creek Watershed. The following sections show the individual practices, quantity of practices implemented, total costs, BPA costs and tons of soil saved for all the BPA funds used to protect and enhance the natural resources in the salmon bearing watersheds of Garfield County. In the year 2006, 55% of the funding received from BPA went into cost share practices. Of all the cost share received in the county, 22% came from BPA. This is largely due to other funding programs becoming available to address livestock influenced water quality problems and riparian health improvement. Over 95% of the sediment entering the streams can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek, Deadman Creek, and Alpowa Creek have had steelhead runs in the past. The Pataha Creek has native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow, and shiners inhabit the lower portion of Pataha Creek because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat through the CREP, CCRP, and DOE grants has improved habitat for all the fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek is slowly developing into spawning and rearing habitat for Chinook salmon. With the future removal of some migration barriers on the lower portion of the Deadman and Pataha, more stream miles will become useful spawning and rearing habitat. The upland projects completed during 2006 were practices that significantly reduce the erosion and resulting sedimentation from these croplands. Runoff studies conducted by WSU have shown a direct impact on reducing soil erosion by the implementation of these practices. The tree planting projects conducted under the CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) and CRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) programs have helped reduce sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone in desired locations inside the Pataha, Deadman, and Alpowa Creek watersheds. The CREP and the CCRP programs continue with enrollment in the watersheds and are protecting the riparian areas along these three streams at an increasing level every year. Currently, over 1,100 acres of riparian habitat have been enrolled in the CREP program within these three watersheds.

Bartels, Duane

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Determination of Fishery Losses in the Flathead System Resulting from the Construction of Hungry Horse Dam, 1986 Final Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's residential fish and wildlife plan, which is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife resources caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River basin. The major goal of this study was to provide estimates of fishery losses to the Flathead system as a result of the completion of Hungry Horse Dam and to propose mitigation alternatives for enhancing the fishery. Construction of Hungry Horse Dam had the greatest adverse impacts on cutthroat and full trout from Flathead Lake and mitigative measures should be taken to offset these losses, if biologically and economically feasible. Also, other losses to fish and wildlife have been documented in the Flathead basin due to hydroelectric facilities and their operation. Some of these research projects will not be completed until 1989, when mitigation will be recommended using a basin-wide approach. Since HHR is at the headwaters of the Columbia system, mitigative measures may also affect downstream projects. Therefore, we presented an array of possible mitigation alternatives for consideration by decision-makers, with suggestions on the ones we feel are the most cost effective. Possible mitigation measures are included.

Zubik, Raymond J.; Fraley, John

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1986 Interim Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We believe our results have clearly shown Kerr hydroelectric operations and operational constraints have negatively affected Flathead River trout and northern pike populations and the aquatic habitat which support them. Even so, it is possible to mitigate many of these impacts and develop a very important fishery. Trout abundance in the lower Flathead averaged only 19 fish per kilometer, the lowest abundance of trout for a river of this size in Montana. Little main channel spawning by trout was observed and most spawning probably occurs in tributaries. Lower river tributaries support resident populations of brook, rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout; and a small resident population of bull trout is present in the South Fork of the Jocko River. Using weirs, spawning runs of rainbow and brown trout from the main river were monitored entering the Jocko River and the Post/Mission Creek system. Utilization of Crow Creek by main river trout stocks of trout was limited to the 6 km segment below Crow Dam. Evaluations of tributary spawning gravels showed high levels of silt which would suggest poor survival of trout eggs. Excessive harvest in the tributaries was indicated by analysis of age class structure and abundance of trout greater than 200 mm.

Bradshaw, William H.; DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James M.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Numerical Modeling of Coupled Groundwater and Surface Water Interactions in an Urban Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dominguez Channel Watershed (DCW), located in the southern portion of Los Angeles County (Figure A.1), drains about 345 square miles into the Los Angeles Harbor. The cities and jurisdictions in DCW are shown in Figure A.2. The largest of these include the cities of Los Angeles, Carson, and Torrance. This watershed is unique in that 93% of its land area is highly developed (i.e. urbanized). The watershed boundaries are defined by a complex network of storm drains and flood control channels, rather than being defined by natural topography. Table (1) shows a summary of different land uses in the Dominguez Channel Watershed (MEC, 2004). The Dominguez Watershed has the highest impervious area of all watersheds in the Los Angeles region. The more impervious the surface, the more runoff is generated during a storm. Storm water runoff can carry previously accumulated contaminants and transport them into receiving water systems. Point sources such as industrial wastewater and municipal sewage as well as urban runoff from commercial, residential, and industrial areas are all recognized as contributors to water quality degradation at DWC. Section 303(d) of the 1972 Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) requires states to identify and report all waters not meeting water quality standards and to develop action plans to pursue the water quality objectives. These plans specify the maximum amount of a given pollutant that the water body of concern can receive and still meet water quality standards. Such plans are called Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). TMDLs also specify allocations of pollutant loadings to point and non-point sources taking into account natural background pollutant levels. This demonstrates the importance of utilizing scientific tools, such as flow and transport models, to identify contaminant sources, understand integrated flow paths, and assess the effectiveness of water quality management strategies. Since overland flow is a very important component of the water balance and hydrology of DCW, a parallel, distributed watershed model that treats flow in groundwater and surface water in a dynamically coupled manner will be used to build a flow model of the watershed. This coupled model forms the basis for modeling and understanding the transport of contaminants through the Dominguez Channel Watershed, which can be used in designing and implementing TMDLs to manage the water quality in this basin. In this report, the coupled surface water-groundwater flow model of DCW will be presented. This flow model was calibrated against a storm that occurred in February 21st, 2004. The model and approach are explained further in the following sections.

Rihani, J F; Maxwell, R M

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

428

Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement  

SciTech Connect

We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 20970 of 28,905 results. 61 - 20970 of 28,905 results. Download ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT http://energy.gov/downloads/arizona-recovery-act-snapshot Download EIS-0265-SA-79: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Eisminger/ CREP Dike Relocation http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0265-sa-79-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0265-SA-164: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - L-9 Irrigation Diversion Modification http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0265-sa-164-supplement-analysis Article DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects U.S. Projects Total $318 Million and Further President Bush's Initiatives to Advance Clean Energy Technologies to Confront Climate Change http://energy.gov/articles/doe-awards-first-three-large-scale-carbon-sequestration-projects

430

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 12690 of 29,416 results. 81 - 12690 of 29,416 results. Rebate Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) This rule states regulations for water withdrawals, permits required for withdrawals and water use during water droughts and emergencies. Self-supplied business and industrial water users subject... http://energy.gov/savings/water-use-registration-and-allocation-north-carolina Rebate Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve protection, preservation, enhancement, and restoration... http://energy.gov/savings/watershed-management-policy-minnesota Rebate Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear

431

NETL: Educational Initiatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT: STREAM ANALYSIS WITH RELATION TO ACID MINE DRAINAGE GRADES 9 to 12 DURATION: 5 DAYS 40 min Periods LESSON PLAN CREATED BY: Joy L. Wyler (Grades 9-12) Science Instructor South Allegheny School District Phillip A. Lovejoy (Grades 7-12) Technology Education Pittsburgh Public School District IN COLLABORATION WITH: D. Harrison T. Ackman What is Acid Mine Drainage (AMD)? A watershed is the line of division between two adjacent rivers or lakes with respect to the flow of water by natural channels into them and the natural boundary of a basin. The Clean Water Action Plan was established to monitor and remediate the quality of water in our nations watersheds. It establishes standards for a watersheds nutritional and dissolved metals

432

EIS-0265-SA-99: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Supplement Analysis 9: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program The overall objective of the project is to restore as much as possible, the natural character and function of the Longley Meadows wetland complex. This project is a joint partnership among the CTUIR, Grand Rhonda Model Watershed Program, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Natural Resource Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and BPA. This project involves several separate components that are part of a regionwide effort to protect and restore anadromous fish habitat in the Grand Ronde Basin Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (November 2002), DOE/EIS-0265-SA-99 More Documents & Publications EA-1173-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

433

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 11, 2012 [Education, Facility News] May 11, 2012 [Education, Facility News] Fairbanks Middle Schoolers Enjoy Field Trip to Barrow Bookmark and Share Watershed School's bundled-up 8th grade class and their chaperones stop for a quick photo in front of the U.S. flag near the Arctic sea ice. With its consistently chilly temperatures, student visits to the ARM site in Barrow are somewhat rare, but always welcome! Watershed School's bundled-up 8th grade class and their chaperones stop for a quick photo in front of the U.S. flag near the Arctic sea ice. With its consistently chilly temperatures, student visits to the ARM site in Barrow are somewhat rare, but always welcome! In April, the 8th grade class from Watershed School in Fairbanks, Alaska, made the long trek to the North Slope for a week-long field trip filled

434

University of Maryland's "WaterShed" Wins 2011 Solar Decathlon | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of Maryland's "WaterShed" Wins 2011 Solar Decathlon University of Maryland's "WaterShed" Wins 2011 Solar Decathlon University of Maryland's "WaterShed" Wins 2011 Solar Decathlon October 3, 2011 - 2:02pm Addthis The University of Maryland's “WaterShed” won the 2011 Solar Decathlon. The school from College Park, Maryland competed against 18 other collegiate teams to build an aesthetically pleasing, architecturally innovative and well-engineered energy efficient living space that generates its energy from solar power. | Courtesy of University of Maryland Solar Decathlon Team The University of Maryland's "WaterShed" won the 2011 Solar Decathlon. The school from College Park, Maryland competed against 18 other collegiate teams to build an aesthetically pleasing, architecturally innovative and

435