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1

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Analyzing Tradeoffs Between the Threat of Invasion by Brook Trout and Effects of Intentional Isolation for Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

who fund these projects. A consistent decision process would include an analysis of the relative risks or exacerbate the other. A consistent decision process would include a systematic analysis of when and where) as a tool for such analyses. We focused on native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi

3

Development of a Database to Support a Multi-Scale Analysis of the Distribution of Westslope Cutthroat Trout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a Database to Support a Multi-Scale Analysis of the Distribution of Westslope ....................................................................................................................................5 Database Development expression of life history, and no hybridization) comprise only 22% of this total (Thurow et al. 1997

4

DOE/BP-00005043-1 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Department of Energy, as part of BPA's program to protect, mitigate Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Project Number represent the views of BPA. Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 #12;South

5

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

An analysis of spatial and environmental factors influencing hybridization between native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the absence of timely management intervention, the genetic integrity of WCT populations in the heart (*Corresponding author: Present address: Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Manage- ment Reservoir, suggesting that the reservoir acts as a RBT source. We found no evidence that stream order

Taylor, Eric B. "Rick"

11

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Robertson, Shawn W.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Squeezer Creek.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20-acre conservation easement in northwest Montana to protect critical habitat for bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout in a reach of Squeezer Creek in Lake County. Squeezer...

16

Microsoft Word - WCT_CX_draft1_5.18.11.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Action: Reintroduction of westslope cutthroat trout in the Pend Orielle basin. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2007-149-00, Contract BPA-52530 Categorical Exclusion...

17

Microsoft Word - WCT_CX_5.4.12.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Action: Reintroduction of westslope cutthroat trout in the Pend Orielle basin. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2007-149-00, Contract BPA-57129 Categorical Exclusion...

18

County, Idaho.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

part due to the potential to restore altered riparian habitats for wildlife, resident fish species (i.e., rainbow trout, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, kokanee) and the...

19

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve protection, preservation, enhancement, and restoration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Melton Valley Watershed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

watershed. Wastes disposed in Melton Valley reside at a variety of locations, including solid waste landfills, trenches, liquid waste tanks and pipelines, surface structures,...

22

The Texas Watershed Steward Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATERSHED PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT · Importance of Local Watershed Involvement · Forming and Sustaining: ­ 7 AICP CM hours (planners) ­ 7 TBPE CPEs (engineers) ­ 7 CCA CEUs (soil & water management) ­ 7Life Extension Service Watershed Protection Planning Short Course January 1216, 2009 WATERSHED MANAGEMENT · Local

23

Watershed Modeling for Biofuels | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watershed Modeling for Biofuels Argonne's watershed modeling research addresses water quality in tributary basins of the Mississippi River Basin Argonne's watershed modeling...

24

Southern Region Watershed Management Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

25

The Texas Watershed Steward Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

San Antonio Bay Other April 2011 Victoria Victoria Urban Watersheds in City of Temple Other May 2011 Pecos River 1 WPP August 2011 Pecos Reeves Pecos River 2 WPP August 2011 Sheffield Pecos Concho River

26

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

Geist, David R.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

30

WATERSHED EDUCATION PROGRAM The Watershed Education Program (WEP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of watershed hydrology Lake and river systems Urban and rural runoff Best management practices Aquatic leaders, citizens, and natural resource professionals with knowledge and tools to make informed water and land use decisions to protect and restore the integrity of Minnesota's lakes, rivers, streams

Netoff, Theoden

31

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

Water Quality Monitoring in the Buck Creek Watershed and Facilitation of Buck Creek Watershed Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around well-publicized events in the watershed including the two watershed partnership meetings and the announcement of the Texas Environmental Excellence Award winners. www.buckcreek.tamu.edu Educational Programming Providing educational...

Gregory, L.; Dyer, P.

33

SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA Biniam Biruk Ashagre #12;ABSTRACT Ethiopia is known for its wealth of natural resources. These result Basin, Ethiopia) #12;iv This study is dedicated to my

Walter, M.Todd

34

Texas Watershed Planning Short Course Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effectiveness of NPS outreach in Texas to reduce NPS and stormwater pollution, improve water quality on a priority watershed basis, and facilitate greater NPS TMDL and watershed-based plan implementation. #30;e Key EPA Internet Tools for Watershed Management... of protecting and restoring water quality from NPS pollution by providing training to water resource professionals in Texas, which will provide those individuals with knowledge and tools to 1) support the implementation of state, regional, and local programs...

Wagner, Kevin

35

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA) P.O. Box 2065 integrity of the White River ecosystem. To successfully accomplish the vision of UWRWA, a 16-county was formed. It exists to improve and protect water quality on a watershed basis in the larger Upper White

36

Watershed Analysis1 Alan Gallegos2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed Analysis1 Alan Gallegos2 Abstract Watershed analyses and assessments for the Kings River delivery attributable to roads indicate concern for several stream reaches as well. The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project area is located in Fresno County, approximately 32 air miles northeast

Standiford, Richard B.

37

Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721://www.ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/watershedresources/graduatestudies.html University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616 Program: Hydrologic Sciences http://www.warnercnr.colostate.edu/frws/watershed/graduate/index.html University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 326118140 Programs: Hydrologic Science http

38

Agriculture and Natural Resources Arkansas Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide the natural catchment boundaries for isolating geographical areas with similar hydrological Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines a watershed as "the area of land where all of the waterAgriculture and Natural Resources FSA9521 Arkansas Watersheds Mike Daniels Professor

39

Watershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30% of ponds, lakes and reservoirs 40% of estuaries #12;Watershed Management And Modeling Sources-transpiration Elemental responses are integrated to determine system response #12;Watershed Management And ModelingWatershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of Watershed Models for Simulation

Sukop, Mike

40

Historical narratives of Big Chico Creek Watershed Alliance and Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

King and Mike Matz LA227 December 19, 2003 Abstract This study analyzes the histories of two non-governmental watershed organizations in Butte County, California:

King, Mary Ann; Matz, Mike

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A watershed blueprint: Partners work together  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Watershed,? he said. ?The storm drain markers and road signs are part of the partnership?s ongoing efforts to restore and protect the watershed.? A recently finished project, Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado... projects directed toward carrying out the WPP and restoring the arroyo. In addition to the implementation project, other projects monitor agricul- tural runoff to evaluate effects of implementing best management practices; educate farmers...

Wythe, Kathy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Techniques for remotely sensing watershed runoff potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Techniques for Remotely Sensing Watershed Runoff Potential. (August 1978) Jerry Don Walker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. Bruce J. Blanchard The Soil Conservation Service runoff equation is widely used for predicting the watershed runoff... cases, no outflow occurs through the spillway of an overdes1gned structure. Since evaporation losses are high 1n these areas, the salinity of the water stored in the structure gradually increases with time. With insufficient flow through...

Walker, Jerry Don

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers...

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

45

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley The faculty invites applications for a tenure-track, academic year appointment in Wildland Watershed Hydrology recognized research program in landscape-scale watershed hydrology related to the fields of climatology

Silver, Whendee

47

Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

Connolly, Patrick J.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Pesticide use in Kentucky reservoir watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes information on the types, uses, and amounts of pesticides applied to Kentucky Reservoir and its immediate watershed. Estimates for the quantities and types of the various pesticides used are based primarily on the land uses in the watershed. A listing of commonly used pesticides is included describing their uses, mode of action, and potential toxicological effects. This report will inform the the public and the Kentucky Reservoir Water Resources Task Force of the general extent of pesticide usage and is not an assessment of pesticide impacts. 10 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Butkus, S.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed are coordinated with the Clearwater National Forest and Potlatch Corporation. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed of the Clearwater River in 1996. Fencing to exclude cattle for stream banks, stream bank stabilization, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts are the primary focuses of this effort. The successful completion of the replacement and removal of several passage blocking culverts represent a major improvement to the watershed. These projects, coupled with other recently completed projects and those anticipated in the future, are a significant step in improving habitat conditions in Lolo Creek.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed project was developed in response to the creeks listing on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List due to a bacterial impairment and subsequent total maximum daily load (TMDL...

51

BEE 473. Watershed Engineering Fall Semester 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering requirements for Engineering Laboratory and Design Elective Prerequisites: Fluid Mechanics (eBEE 473. Watershed Engineering Fall Semester 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description representative of real-life engineering problems and will involve as much hands-on experience as possible. Some

Walter, M.Todd

52

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Kalispel Resident Fish Project, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) implemented a new enhancement monitoring project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) enhancement projects were also monitored. Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River.

Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Kalispel Resident Fish Project Annual Report, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2003, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented.

Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

SECTION 5 Table of Contents 5 Coeur d' Alene Subbasin Overview................................................................2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Spokane River, which flows westerly to its confluence with the Columbia River. Water levels in Coeur d emphasis on harvesting big game and resident fish such as westslope cutthroat trout. Adfluvial and fluvial, and over-harvesting has contributed to their declines. Currently bull trout are listed as threatened under

56

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Preliminary Review to ISRP comments requested Report Page # 24001 Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research Idaho Fish and Game No and conserve high priority bull and westslope cutthroat trout habitat in Trestle Creek. Idaho Department

57

Kalispel Resident Fish Project, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) monitored its current enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) enhancement projects were also monitored. Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in East River and several of its tributaries.

Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd (Kalispel Natural Resource Department, Usk, WA)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1 Environmental Conservation Graduate Program Water, Wetlands want scientific training in the multi-disciplinary field of water, wetlands and watershed conservation such as wetlands, hydrology, nonpoint source pollution, modeling, ecosystems, water resource management, watershed

Schweik, Charles M.

59

Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6.25 acre habitat acquisition in Montana's Jocko River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Lake County in northwestern Montana, this property was selected...

60

Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Crop Production: Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity of Dedicated Energy Crop and Woody Biomass Operations DOE Bioenergy Technologies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Understanding Nutrient Loading to the Coastal Zone from Urban Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Land Use in the Carpinteria Valley, California.TIONS: Speaker: Carpinteria Creek Watershed Coalition annualand Forecasts for Carpinteria Creek", Lions' Club,

Robinson, Timothy H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - area watershed management Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: area watershed management Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Environmental and Resource Studies Program Department of Geography Summary: Watershed...

63

Production System Planning for Natural Resource Conservation in a Micro-Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production System Planning for Natural Resource Conservationa case study watershed. Production Systems Planning (PSP) isWatershed Management, Production Systems Planning (PSP)

Ramakrishna, Nallathiga

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Increasing Bare Ground Indicates Poor Watershed Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; the more variable the landscape within a unit, the more tran- sects are needed. There will be obvious seasonal changes in vegetative cover because of plant growth and death Increasing Bare Ground Indicates Poor Watershed Health K. Brian Hays, Barron S...

Hays, K. Brian

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Coming to a watershed near you!: Texas Watershed Steward educates stakeholders across the state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, assistant professor and AgriLife Extension water resources specialist. ] Story by Leslie Jordan tx H2O | pg. 12 The TWS team created the program in response to federal and state strategies regarding watersheds. According to the U.S. Environmental...

Jordan, Leslie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicatedENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2004-2005 by Michael A Hanover County Tidal Creeks Project and Year 7 of the Wilmington Watersheds Project. Water quality data

Mallin, Michael

67

Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that connects the pump, distribution tank and holding ponds. As of April 15, 2013, three of the ponds were completed and have been lined with a synthetic liner to prevent seepage and leakage as this was a major problem in early projects. Pecos River WPP...Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update Funding Provided by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board through a Clean Water Act 319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant from the U.S Environmental Protection Agency TR-447 October 2013 Pecos River...

Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Bethel Valley Watershed | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchTheMarketing,Energy and NaturalBethel Valley Watershed. Topics include: * The

69

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Trout Creek, Oregon Watershed Assessment; Findings, Condition Evaluation and Action Opportunities, 2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the assessment is to characterize historical and current watershed conditions in the Trout Creek Watershed. Information from the assessment is used to evaluate opportunities for improvements in watershed conditions, with particular reference to improvements in the aquatic environment. Existing information was used, to the extent practicable, to complete this work. The assessment will aid the Trout Creek Watershed Council in identifying opportunities and priorities for watershed restoration projects.

Runyon, John

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: balance equations for mass,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: balance equations for mass, momentum, energy Hassanizadehb a Centre for Water Research, Department of Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 6907 Nedlands, Australia b Department of Water Management, Environmental and Sanitary Engineering

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

74

Quantification of NPS Pollution Loads Within Pennsylvania Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantification of NPS Pollution Loads Within Pennsylvania Watersheds Final Report for Task 9 - BLWC for Atmospheric Deposition .................................... 2.4.5 Data Analyses for Urban Storm Runoff-Agricultural Fertilization ...................................................... 3.4 Atmospheric Deposition

Guiltinan, Mark

75

Modeling Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are a commonly used means of wastewater treatment in the Dickinson Bayou watershed which is located between Houston and Galveston. The Dickinson Bayou is classified as "impaired" by the Texas Commission...

Forbis-Stokes, Aaron

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

76

Pinole Creek Watershed Sediment Source Assessment: A sediment budget approach highlighting watershed-scale sediment-related processes and supply to the Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pinole Creek Watershed Sediment Source Assessment: A sediment budget approach highlighting watershed-scale sediment-related processes and supply to the Bay Pearce,S.1 ,McKee,L.1 ,Arnold,C.2 ,and,landowners,stakeholders,agencies and regula- tors are facing many watershed-scale sediment-related issues such as erosion,degraded water

77

Lesson 1: Data Types and Watershed Populations In this first lesson, you will discover some information about each of the two watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of people per block. This is a good summary of how many people are in the watershed and where they live the condition of the watersheds regarding how people are currently living on and using the land. We will use Arc watershed (2000 census), the population density (average number of people per hectare), and to visualize how

78

An economic evaluation of the Green Creek Watershed Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can never be given their true value. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page INTRODUCTION Statement of the Problem Purpose of the Study Objectives II. BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS III DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA AND THE FLOOD PROBLEH IV. PROCEDURE AND NETEODOLOGY...: DISCOUNTING PROCEDURES 64 74 VITA LlST CF TABLES Table Page Completion Schedule of Flood Water Retarding Structures 17 Design Features of Flood Mater Retarding Structures Green Creek Watershed Project 18 3. Rainfall Record - Green Creek Watershed...

Gray, Roy Mack

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

A postdevelopmental evaluation of Langford Creek Watershed Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Benefits and Costs Viewpoint of the Analysis 7 8 9 11 III DESCRIPTION OF T?. 'AREA AND THE FLOOD PROBLEM ~ ~ 12 PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGY ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 24 Determination of Costs Determination of Benefits Comparison of Results... of small watershed projects by providing informa- tion beneficial for planning procedures and tools for project evaluation. Multiple purpose watersheds . (agricultural land and water management; fish, wildlife and recreational development; municipal...

Rico, Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-396 2011 Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report By T. Allen Berthold Texas Water Resources Institute Prepared... for Texas General Land Office March 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 396 Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed By T...

Berthold, Allen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

Coty, J

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

82

Emerald Lake Watershed study: Introduction and site description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Emerald Lake Watershed study was organized to investigate the effects of acidic deposition on high-elevation watersheds and surface waters of the Sierra Nevada, California. Some of the results of this comprehensive study of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at a small, headwater basin are presented in four papers in this series. The watershed study site is in Sequoia National Park, on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. This glacial cirque is located in the upper Marble Fork of the Kaweah River. This 120-ha watershed ranges from Alta Peak (3,416 m) down to Emerald Lake (2,400 m). Most of the watershed surface area is exposed granite and granodiorite rocks, with limited coverage (about 20%) by thin, acidic soils. The hydrology of the basin is dominated by snowmelt runoff during March-June. Emerald Lake, a glacial tarn, is 2.72 ha in area, with a maximum depth of 10.5 m. Surface waters are poorly buffered and dominated by calcium and bicarbonate. Most of the yearly precipitation falls as dilute snow (pH5.2-5.4), with acidic rain storms sampled during May-October.

Tonnessen, K.A. (California Air Resources Board, Sacramento (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Investigation of Coupled Hydrologic and Geochemical Impacts of Wildfire on Southern California Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is routed through the reach network to the watershed outlet using storage routing, or kinematic wave

Burke, Megan Patricia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Nine Elements of Watershed Based Plans for EPA Section 319  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed Protection Plan Feb 2008 #12;a.) Identify sources and causes for impairment (load duration curve of concern Uhland sub-area Confidence intervals from regression analysis of load duration curve Management knowledge of: the nature and source of the WQ problem, the pollutant load reductions needed to meet WQS

85

Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

Elliott, Emily M.

86

Watershed Management: An Evaluation of the Mullen Slough Capital Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Action Plan King County, Washington, USA by Fiona Murray McNair B.Sc. McGill University 1995 RESEARCH Capital Improvement Project Study and Action Plan, King County, Washington, USA Examining Committee:_______________________________ #12;iii Abstract A watershed management process, for a sub-basin in King County, WA is examined

87

Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) provides a summary of major scientific reports on air pollution and public health. The reports includeAIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Annual Progress Report for FY 2005 through the US Department of Interior #12;PROGRESS REPORT: AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER

District of Columbia, University of the

89

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a significant increase in total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicated a subsequent worseningENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2005-2006 by Michael A: The City of Wilmington, New Hanover County and the US EPA 319 Program (through NC Division of Water quality

Mallin, Michael

90

University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Tennessee Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wshed1.htm Watts Bar Watershed McMinn Monroe Pond Creek #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Water Quality in Pond Creek 35.6 miles of Mud Creek, Greasy Branch and Pond Creek listed on 2002? #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Pond Creek · Pasture based beef and dairy

91

CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA? Oloro V. McHugh, Amy S, Ethiopia Gete Zeleke ARARI, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Abstract: In the food insecure regions, short annual. Ethiopia's agricultural sector is driven by the subsistence strategies of smallholder farmers

Walter, M.Todd

92

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued assessing habitat and population enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in recommendations from the 1996, 1997, and 1998 annual reports, were monitored during field season 1999, 2000, and 2001. Post assessments were used to evaluate habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations where enhancement projects were implemented.

Andersen, Todd

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sustainability of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership and Continued Implementation of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership (ACWP) to address these impairments over a 10-year implantation period. The ACWPP primarily addresses the low DO levels in the tidal segment of the AC. The goal of the ACWPP is to reduce the addition of pollutants...

Flores, J.; Berthold, A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-2001 Report : Populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan and Methow River Drainages.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project was to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-2001 was year three (and final year) of a project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-2001 we worked in collaboration with the Wenatchee National Forest to catalog populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan, and Methow River drainages of Washington State.

Trotter, Patrick C.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Techniques for estimating flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clark Method, modified slightly, was used to develop a synthetic dimensionless hydrograph that can be used to estimate flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds. Application of the technique results in a typical (average) flood hydrograph for a given peak discharge. Input necessary to apply the technique is an estimate of basin lagtime and the recurrence interval peak discharge. Equations for this purpose were obtained from a recent nationwide study on flood frequency in urban watersheds. A regression equation was developed which relates flood volumes to drainage area size, basin lagtime, and peak discharge. This equation is useful where storage of floodwater may be a part of design or flood prevention. 6 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Stricker, V.A.; Sauer, V.B.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course... AgriLife Research, the River Systems Institute at Texas State University, Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research at Tarleton State University, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create the Texas Watershed Planning...

Jensen, Ric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

Browne, Dave

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC SEDIMENTS. A smaller organic contaminant database indicates sediment PAH levels exceed probable effect level criteria

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek watershed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: ForemanCreek Manson Creek Mill Creek Malosky Creek...

100

Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

None available

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis Achanges may impact the hydrology of the Tijuana Riverclimate changes might impact hydrology in the Tijuana River

Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Assessment of Park Water Resources.......................................................................25 resources........................................................................15 Biological resources

Mallin, Michael

103

Urban Retrofit: A Whole-Watershed Approach to Urban Stormwater Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rainwater catchment cisterns Derby/Po)er Creek Watershed: Urban Stormwater for managing stormwater. Rainwater catchment can be Stormwater Management. Capturing rainwater runoff

Lithander, Becky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed A Thesis Presented Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed," has been reviewed in final form ____________________________________Date____________ Margrit von Braun #12;iii iii A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment

Fiedler, Fritz R.

105

Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb, sinkholes and other drainage features control the temporal and spatial pattern of sediment storage across the landscape. However, studies dealing with sedimentation in karst watersheds are scarce and the sediment

Hart, Evan

106

Seasonal controls on sediment delivery in a small coastal plain watershed, North Carolina, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seasonal controls on sediment delivery in a small coastal plain watershed, North Carolina, USA of drainage ditch sedimentation and suspended sediment transport were used to construct a simple sediment to sediment dynamics in a small agricultural watershed in North Carolina. Results indicate that seasonal

Lecce, Scott A.

107

Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified contaminated sediments, urban runoff and storm sewers there are no integrated spatially distributed physically based watershed-scale hydrological/water quality models available

108

Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Undergraduates, 2006 #12;Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Urban Hydrology Water's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) Solves differential and algebraic equations involved in calculatingModeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water: Detailed Modeling

Petta, Jason

109

Restore McComas Meadows; Meadow Creek Watershed, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed are coordinated and cost shared with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, planting trees in riparian areas within the meadow and its tributaries, prioritizing culverts for replacement to accommodate fish passage, and decommissioning roads to reduce sediment input. During this contract period work was completed on two culvert replacement projects; Doe Creek and a tributary to Meadow Creek. Additionally construction was also completed for the ditch restoration project within McComas Meadows. Monitoring for project effectiveness and trends in watershed conditions was also completed. Road decommissioning monitoring, as well as stream temperature, sediment, and discharge were completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Relative Importance of Road Density and Physical Watershed Features in Determining Coastal Marsh Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with overall Water Quality Index scores. Road density also showed positive correlations with total nitrate Marsh Water Quality in Georgian Bay Rachel DeCatanzaro ? Maja Cvetkovic ? Patricia Chow-Fraser Received and physical watershed features (watershed size, wetland cover, and bedrock type) on water quality in coastal

McMaster University

111

Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrogen and Baseflow in Urban Watersheds of Metropolitan Atlanta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrogen and Baseflow in Urban Watersheds 2401, Miller Plant Sciences Building Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are widely used Septic Wastewater-Treatment Systems on Base Flow in Selected Watersheds in Gwinnett County, Georgia

Arnold, Jonathan

112

Ecological Impacts of Contaminants in an Urban Watershed DOE FRAP 1998-25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of metals on a "pristine" stream community. The Brunette watershed has concentrations of heavy metals largely absent from the Brunette River watershed were also those species most sensitive to heavy metal (Burnaby, BC) was studied as an example. We studied sediment chemistry, direct toxicity of sediments

113

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

114

Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession-flow analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession 2002; accepted 23 April 2003 Abstract Insufficient sub-surface hydraulic data from watersheds often and in watersheds with low population densities because well-drilling to obtain the hydraulic data is expensive

Walter, M.Todd

115

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 14 Laboratory Procedures ........................................................................................ 14 Results ................................................................................................................. 15 Known... forming units (CFU) per 100 mL .................................................................................... 15 Table 6 Known source fecal samples collected in the Lampasas River Watershed . 17 Table 7 City, volume, and discharge location...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Enviro n me n t a l Protec t i o n Agency (EPA). Since the progra m? s incept i o n in 2005, Extens i o n educat e d agricu l t u r a l produc e r s on proper nutrien t manageme n t and product i o n techniq u e s , pr omot e d progra ms associ a t e... and mercury and PCBs in edible fish tissue. Figure 3. Land use in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed. In 1998 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) initiated an effort to develop a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for pollutants causing low...

117

Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten peoples awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

Maurakis, Eugene G

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream table education--at every opportunity. We continue to seek ideas to guide us as we grow. We want to enlarge that sense of ownership that the river does indeed run through it, and belongs to us all. Through a continued and common effort, we hope to carry forward the good work and the momentum that underscores our intent. We are proud to report our accomplishments of this past year because they reflect our renewed sense of purpose. In alliance with diverse citizen groups, individuals, business, industry and tribal and government water resource management agencies, we strive to continue to protect and restore the beauty and integrity that is the Kootenai River watershed.

Kruse, Gretchen (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Urbanizing Watersheds and Changing River Flood Dynamics: Implications for Urban Wetland Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urbanization alters river hydrology, morphology, water quality, and habitat and ecology. Most of these associated changes are due to an increase in impervious surface cover (ISC) throughout the watershed. But the spatial location of urban areas...

Simmons, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Minimization of Cost, Sediment Load, and Sensitivity to Climate Change in a Watershed Management Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

caused by non-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs management practice (BMP) plans for entire watersheds. Each of these alternative BMP configurations are non: multiobjective, differential evolution, robustness to uncertainty, stormwater management, best management

Eppstein, Margaret J.

122

Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county...

Vyavahare, Nilesh

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

NIFA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (formerly NRI): Water and Watershed Competitive Grants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking to Identify Nonpoint Fecal Pollution in Agricultural Watersheds Principal Investigator: Nachabe, M of Award: Grant 2002-35102-12383; $204,862; 3 Years Title of Award: Variable-Frequency Acoustic Profiling

124

Dr. Lee MacDonald, a professor of Watershed Science, is retiring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 Dr. Lee MacDonald, a professor of Watershed Science, is retiring from active teaching after 22.f., MacDonald, 1993). Teaching field-based courses is expensive in terms of equipment and time

MacDonald, Lee

125

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemistry of Watersheds Along the Western Slope of the Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both EML and Pear Lake (PRL) (J. Sickman, unpublished data),hypolimnetic O 2 concentrations. PRL is a 8.0 ha 591,000 m 3hypolimnetic anoxia. The PRL watershed is 142 ha of which

Homyak, Peter Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume I of III Reports A thru E, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the ongoing efforts to document life history strategies of steelhead in the Wind River watershed and to formulate criteria for ranking restoration needs and proposed projects.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

200206100 Restoration Potlatch River Watershed/Request for Expanded SOW 1 Table 1. Proposal Metadata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restore steelhead to a robust, self-sustaining population in the Potlatch River watershed (Chapter 7, page, farming, or housing, and these uses continue, which precludes natural or passive rehabilitation from

128

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages...

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

129

Achieving TMDL Goals in Imparied Watersheds through Manure Export in Turfgrass Sod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Model Calibration: Flow: Sediment: Phosphorous Organic: Mineral: Future and Ongoing Research: References of Turfgrass Production Sites for Phosphorous Removal from an Impaired Watershed. Unpublished. M.S. Texas A

Mukhtar, Saqib

130

Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

Palmer, Margaret A.

131

Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

Tarboton, David

132

A watershed blueprint: Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Watershed,? he said. ?The storm drain markers and road signs are part of the partnership?s ongoing efforts to restore and protect the watershed.? A recently finished project, Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado... projects directed toward carrying out the WPP and restoring the arroyo. In addition to the implementation project, other projects monitor agricul- tural runoff to evaluate effects of implementing best management practices; educate farmers...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A watershed blueprint: partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Watershed,? he said. ?The storm drain markers and road signs are part of the partnership?s ongoing efforts to restore and protect the watershed.? A recently finished project, Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado... projects directed toward carrying out the WPP and restoring the arroyo. In addition to the implementation project, other projects monitor agricul- tural runoff to evaluate effects of implementing best management practices; educate farmers...

Wythe, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Assessment of intensive silvicultural practices and livestock grazing on watershed parameters, Kisatchie National Forest, Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSMENT OF INTENSIVE SILVICULTURAL PRACTICES AND LIVESTOCK GRAZING ON WATERSHED PARAMETERS, KISATCHIE NATIONAL FOREST, LOUISIANA A Thesis by THOMAS KENNETH HUNTER JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Range Science ASSESSMENT OF INTENSIVE SILVICULTURAL PRACTICES AND LIVESTOCK GRAZING ON WATERSHED PARAMETERS, KISATCHIE NATIONAL FOREST, LOUISIANA A Thesis...

Hunter, Thomas Kenneth

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation of inorganic phosphate content of overland runoff from a rural watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Tests and Phosphate Potential Curves. . 71 Storm Events Encountered. Runoff Water Iluality. . . CONCLUSION REFERENCES APPENDICIES Appendix A. Variables Used in Text Appendix B. Phosphate Model Subroutines Listing. VITA 81 88 99 101 106... the watershed under consideration had undergone change such as urbanization or a shift from forested to cleared. Lawson identified 18 watershed modifications which would change water- shed characteristics and subsequently model empirical constants. He...

Cepeda, William Lohr

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). One suggested Best Management... Practice (BMP) is the export of phosphorus (P) through turfgrass sod produced with composted dairy manure from an impaired rural watershed to an urban watershed. The manure-grown sod releases P slowly and would not require additional P fertilizer for up...

Richards, Chad Edward

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Idaho Model Watershed Project : Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Model Watershed Project was initiated in the fall of 1992 with a grant from Bonneville Power Administration. The objective of this project is to protect, enhance and restore anadromous and resident fish habitat and achieve and maintain a balance between resource protection and resource use on a holistic watershed basis.

Bradbury, Allen; Slavin, Katie

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Community Perceptions and Priorities for Managing Water and Environmental Resources in the River Njoro Watershed in Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Njoro Watershed in Kenya M. W. Jenkins1 , F. K. Lelo2 , L.W. Chiuri2 , W. A. Shivoga2 and S. N. Miller3, respectively, in Environmental Science, Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya; Tel (+254) 51 62085, emails: lelo@uwyo.edu Abstract The Njoro Watershed, typical of the semi-arid basins in the Rift Valley of Kenya, is undergoing

Richner, Heinz

140

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patterns of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Brush Management/Water Yield Feasibility Study for Four Watersheds In Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2000) in which 8 watersheds were analyzed. Landsat 7 satellite imagery was used to classify land use, and the 1:24,000 scale digital elevation model (DEM) was used to delineate watershed boundaries and subbasins. SWAT was calibrated to measured stream... modeling by the USDA-ARS, including development of CREAMS (Knisel, 1980), SWRRB (Williams et al., 1985; Arnold et al., 1990), and ROTO (Arnold et al., 1995b). SWAT was developed to predict the impact of climate and management (e.g. vegetative changes...

Bednarz, Steven T.; Dybala, Tim; Amonett, Carl; Muttiah, Ranjan S.; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Arnold, Jeff G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Water Resources Institute TR 441 April 2013 Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers L. Gregory, E. Casarez, J. Truesdale, G. Di Giovanni, R... Oxygen E. coli Escherichia coli EPA Environmental Protection Agency ERIC-PCR Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Polymerase Chain Reaction ERIC-RP ERIC-PCR and RiboPrinting Composite DNA Fingerprints LRW Leon River...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T.; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

Diurnal evapotranspiration estimates in the Walnut River Watershed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evapotranspiration is an essential component of the surface hydrological balance, but obtaining accurate estimates of the water vapor flux over large terrestrial areas can be difficult because of the substantial temporal and spatial variability in surface moisture conditions that can occur. This variability is often very large in the Great Plains and other portions of the Mississippi River Basin. Nevertheless, variations in soil moisture content, groundwater levels, and runoff in streams and rivers cannot be fully assessed without some knowledge of evapotranspiration rates. Here, observations made at the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), which is near Wichita, Kansas, and has an area of approximately 5000 km{sup 2}, are used to improve and test a modeling system that estimates long-term evapotranspiration with use of satellite remote sensing data with limited surface measurements. The techniques may be applied to much larger areas. As is shown in Fig. 1, the WRW is located in the Red River Basin and is enclosed by the southern Great Plains Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) of the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The functional relationships involving the satellite data, surface parameters, and associated subgrid-scale fluxes are modeled in this study by the parameterization of subgrid-scale surface (PASS) fluxes scheme (Gao, 1995; Gao et al., 1998), which is used in a modified and improved form (PASS2). The advantage of this modeling system is that it can make effective use of satellite remote sensing data and can be run for large areas for which flux data do not exist and surface meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. In this study, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) or simple ratio (SR) and surface brightness temperature at each pixel for the WRW were derived from advanced very high resolution radiometers data collected by a ground station at Argonne National Laboratory from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's NOAA-12 and NOAA-14 satellites. The satellite data were subjected to atmospheric corrections for three intensive observation days of the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) experiment, which was conducted in cooperation with the Argonne Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) effort and the ARM Program.

Song, J.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

145

Urban Stormwater and Watershed Management: A Case Study James P. Heaney, Len Wright, and David Sample  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

classified as Decision Support Systems (DSS) (Loucks 1995). Contemporary DSS's contain a mixture9-1 Chapter 9 Urban Stormwater and Watershed Management: A Case Study James P. Heaney, Len Wright. The concept of integrated water and land management was first articulated in the western U.S. by John Wesley

Pitt, Robert E.

146

Calibration of Watershed Models using Cloud Computing Marty Humphrey, Norm Beekwilder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e. runoff from agricultural and urban lands to water bodies. This difference in scope introduces-- Understanding hydrologic systems at the scale of large watersheds and river basins is critically important to society when faced with extreme events, such as floods and droughts, or with concerns about water quality

Humphrey, Marty

147

Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo Immersive Real/Virtual Watershed Experiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo Immersive Real/Virtual Watershed Experiences * SMITHSONIAN LATINO VIRTUAL MUSEUM (proprietary and open source) Games (standalone game quests in Unity 3D- Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo) Interactive Game Website (microsite for Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo) Delete text and place photo here. LVMinteractive.org/3dgames

Mathis, Wayne N.

148

Coupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Such models lack the capacity to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality processes of larger waterCoupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models (SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2) for better water resources management in complex river basins B. Debele & R. Srinivasan

149

IMPACT OF MINE DRAINAGE AND DISTRIBUTION OF METAL LOADING SOURCES IN THE JAMES CREEK WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creek watershed contributes directly to the water supply for Jamestown, Colorado, a town the past several decades has led to widespread concern about the adverse effects that heavy mining has had on the environment. These effects are felt particularly in the form of water contamination from acid mine drainage

Ryan, Joe

150

4. Lower Oregon Columbia Gorge Tributaries Watershed 4.1 Subbasin Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Weather The watershed lies in the transition zone between the wet marine climate to the west and the dry continental climate to the east. Precipitation amounts vary dramatically from east to west and with elevation, wet meadows, dryland balds, riparian woodlands, and subalpine communities on the higher peaks

151

SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO Belanger, Laura (M.S., Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering) Source and Effect of Acid Rock (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters

152

Modeling Sediment and Wood Storage and Dynamics in Small Mountainous Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

85 Modeling Sediment and Wood Storage and Dynamics in Small Mountainous Watersheds Stephen T controls on supply and transport of sediment and wood in a small (approximately two square kilometers) basin in the Oregon Coast Range, typical of streams at the interface between episodic sediment and wood

153

Report on the Watershed Monitoring Program at the Paducah Site January-December 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Watershed Monitoring of Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks has been conducted since 1987. The monitoring was conducted by the University of Kentucky between 1987 and 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of monitoring are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for DOE protect and maintain the use of Little Bayour and Big Bayou creeks for frowth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota. The watershed (biological) monitoring discussed in this report was conducted under DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. Future monitoring will be conducted as required by the Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) in March 1998. A draft Watershed Monitoring Program plan was approved by the Kentucky Division of Water and will be finalized in 1999. The DOE permit also requires toxicity monitoring of one continuous outfall and of three intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The Watershed Monitoring Program for the Paducah Site during calendar year 1998 consisted of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of fish communities. This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from january 1998 to December 1998, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Determining watershed response in data poor environments with remotely sensed small reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthetic aperture radar satellite images. The model is based on the Thornthwaite-Mather procedure of water supplies at the local level, but may reduce the overall yield from a watershed. In the Volta basin by remotely measuring their surface areas and converting these measure- ments to volume estimates

Walter, M.Todd

155

An Analysis of Microbial Pollution in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet Watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment of fecal coliform sources and pathways in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets is part of the Project ENVironmental InVESTment (ENVVEST) being conducted by the Navy's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, the Suquamish Tribe, Kitsap County, the City of Bremerton, the City of Port Orchard, and other local stakeholders. The goal of this study was to identify microbial pollution problems within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and to provide a comprehensive assessment of fecal coliform (FC) contamination from all identifiable sources in the watershed. This study quantifies levels of contamination and estimated loadings from known sources within the watersheds and describes pollutant transport mechanisms found in the study area. In addition, the effectiveness of pollution prevention and mitigation measures currently in place within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed are discussed. This comprehensive study relies on historical data collected by several cooperating agencies, in addition to data collected during the study period from spring 2001 through summer 2005. This report is intended to provide the technical information needed to continue current water quality cleanup efforts and to help implement future efforts.

May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fine Sediment Sources in Coastal Watersheds with Uplifted Marine Terraces in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County, California Stephen Sungnome Madrone1 and Andrew P. Stubblefield1 Abstract Erosion in the Mill and Luffenholtz Creek watersheds in Humboldt County, California, with their extensive clay soils, can lead to high) there is still the potential for creation of a dangerous by-product, chloro-tri- halomethanes that can remain

Standiford, Richard B.

157

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1 Xixi Wang, Assefa M. Melesse, Michael E. McClain, and Wanhong Yang2 ABSTRACT: Coalbed methane (CBM the Powder River. (KEY TERMS: coalbed methane, produced water; Montana; natural gas; pattern analysis

McClain, Michael

158

Urban Influences on Stream Chemistry and Biology in the Big Brushy Creek Watershed, South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and rural sites. Discharge of wastewater treatment plant effluent at one rural location caused an increase land cover. wastewater treatment plant 1 Introduction The expansion of urban land areas affects between urban and rural sites may indicate that urban development in the Big Brushy Creek watershed has

159

Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed in Patagonia, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed and analyzed for major ions, trace metals, and rare earth elements (REE). The concentrations of REE in the Rio to oxidation of sulfide minerals. D 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Rare earth elements

Royer, Dana

160

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira; McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

San Francisco Estuary Institute Regional Watershed Program Concentrations and Loads of Mercury,  

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San Francisco Estuary Institute Regional Watershed Program Concentrations and Loads of Mercury #12;McKee, Leatherbarrow, and Oram, 2005 i CONCENTRATIONS AND LOADS OF MERCURY, PCBs, AND OC. Concentrations and loads of mercury, PCBs, and OC pesticides in the lower Guadalupe River, San Jose, California

162

The British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hillslopes to stream channels are restored, a also low-level treatment, where only hillslope restoration work a restoration program would be over a 4-8 year period, using 8-16 experimental stream triplets. AppropriateThe British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring

Keeley, Ernest R.

163

Risk assessment of watershed erosion at Naesung Stream, South Korea Un Ji a,*, Mark Velleux b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulated runoff, channel flow, soil erosion, and stream sediment transport in the Naesung Stream watershed is a significant river management issue and critical environmental problem (Kane and Julien, 2007). Typically, land for analysis of precipitation, overland runoff, channel flow, soil erosion, and stream sediment transport

Julien, Pierre Y.

164

Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

Perfect, Ed

165

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod  

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.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clyde L. Munster The Upper North Bosque River (UNBR) watershed is under a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) mandate to reduce Phosphorus (P) due to excess nutrients in the watershed. To address... of the manure applied P. Plot and field scale research has demonstrated the effectiveness of turfgrass to remove manure phosphorus (P). In order to assess the impact of the turfgrass BMP on a watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used...

Stewart, George Russell

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Erosion and Sediment Damages and Economic Impacts of Potential 208 Controls: A Summary of Five Watershed Studies in Texas  

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This report summarizes results of economic analyses of erosion and sedimentation in five agricultural watersheds in Texas (see fig. 1). Economic analyses of the study areas considered both the on-farm economics of soil conservation and the economic...

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

170

Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project  

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of the Paso del Norte Watershed Council The Coordinated Water Resources Database Technical Committee with funding support provided by the El Paso Water Utilities http://www.pdnwatershed.org The work documented in this report was supported in part...

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

171

Runoff sources and land cover change in the Amazon: an end-member mixing analysis from small watersheds  

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watersheds Christopher Neill · Joaquin E. Chaves · Trent Biggs · Linda A. Deegan · Helmut Elsenbeer · Ricardo 02543, USA e-mail: cneill@mbl.edu T. Biggs Department of Geography, San Diego State University, San

172

Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban Expansion  

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Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban the upward limit of geographical features such as pediments, fans and depositional features of ice and wind

173

Wigwam River McNeil Substrate Sampling Program : 1998-2002 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream in the East Kootenay region of British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). The river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning steam in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000), and thus has been the focus of numerous studies in the last ten years (Cope 1998; Cope and Morris 2001; Cope, Morris and Bisset 2002; Kohn Crippen Consultants Ltd. 1998; Westover 1999a; Westover 1999b; Westover and Conroy 1997). Although bull trout populations in the East Kootenay region remain healthy, bull trout populations in other parts of British Columbia and within their traditional range in northwestern United States have declined. Thus, bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Centre (Cannings 1993) and remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the north-western United States, within the Columbia River watershed, were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1999, the Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection applied and received funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. The purpose of this report is to summarize one of the many studies undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00). Three permanent sampling sites were established on the Wigwam River in April 1998. At each site, substrate samples were obtained using a McNeil Core sampler in April of each year from 1998 to 2002. The objectives of this study were to assess the quality of stream-bed substrates used by bull trout for spawning prior to major resource development in the Wigwam watershed, thus providing one potential measure of future impact to bull trout spawning habitat.

Tepper, Herb

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Identification of sediment sources in forested watersheds with surface coal mining disturbance using carbon and nitrogen isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediments and soils were analyzed using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry and carbon and nitrogen elemental analyses to evaluate the their ability to indicate land-use and land management disturbance and pinpoint loading from sediment transport sources in forested watersheds disturbed by surface coal mining. Samples of transported sediment particulate organic matter were collected from four watersheds in the Southern Appalachian forest in Kentucky. The four watersheds had different surface coal mining history that were classified as undisturbed, active mining, and reclaimed conditions. Soil samples were analyzed including reclaimed grassland soils, undisturbed forest soils, geogenic organic matter associated with coal fragments in mining spoil, and soil organic matter from un-mined grassland soils. Statistically significant differences were found for all biogeochemical signatures when comparing transported sediments from undisturbed watersheds and surface coal mining disturbed watersheds and the results were attributed to differences in erosion sources and the presence of geogenic organic matter. Sediment transport sources in the surface coal mining watersheds analyzed using Monte Carlo mass balance un-mixing found that: {delta}{sup 15}N showed the ability to differentiate streambank erosion and surface soil erosion; and {delta} {sup 13}C showed the ability to differentiate soil organic matter and geogenic organic matter. This suggests that streambank erosion downstream of surface coal mining sites is a significant source of sediment in coal mining disturbed watersheds. The results suggest that the sediment transport processes governing streambank erosion loads are taking longer to reach geomorphologic equilibrium in the watershed as compared with the surface erosion processes.

Fox, J.F. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Factors influencing landowner willingness to enroll in a cost-share brush management program in the Pedernales River watershed, Texas  

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FACTORS INFLUENCING LANDOWNER WILLINGNESS TO ENROLL IN A COST-SHARE BRUSH MANAGEMENT PROGRAM IN THE PEDERNALES RIVER WATERSHED, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK ROBERT TAYS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... WATERSHED, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK ROBERT TAYS Submitted to the Oftice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Urs P. Kreuter...

Tays, Mark Robert

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Watershed characteristics contributing to the 1983-84 debris flows in the Wasatch Range, Davis County, Utah  

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WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS CONTRIBUTING TO THE 3. 983-84 DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE WASATCH RANGE, DAVIS COUNTY ?UTAH A Thesis by WILLIAM KEVIN COLEMAN Submitted to Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Geology WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS CONTRIBUTING TO THE 1. 983 ? 84 DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE WASATCH RANGE, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH A Thesis by WILLIAM KEVIN COLEMAN Approved...

Coleman, William Kevin

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Subtask 1.18 - A Decision Tool for Watershed-Based Effluent Trading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Handling produced water in an economical and environmentally sound manner is vital to coalbed methane (CBM) development, which is expected to increase up to 60% in the next 10-15 years as the demand for natural gas increases. Current produced water-handling methods (e.g., shallow reinjection and infiltration impoundments) are too costly when implemented on a well-by-well basis. A watershed-based effluent credit trading approach may be a means of managing produced water at reduced cost while meeting or surpassing water quality regulations. This market-based approach allows for improved water quality management by enabling industrial, agricultural, and municipal discharge facilities to meet water quality permit requirements by purchasing pollutant reduction credits from other entities within the same watershed. An evaluation of this concept was conducted for the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Montana and Wyoming by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). To conduct this assessment, the EERC collected and evaluated existing water quality information and developed the appropriate tools needed to assess the environmental and economic feasibility of specific trading scenarios. The accomplishments of this study include (1) an exploration of the available PRB water quantity and quality data using advanced statistical techniques, (2) development of an integrated water quality model that predicts the impacts of CBM produced water on stream salinity and sodicity, (3) development of an economic model that estimates costs and benefits from implementing potential trading options, (4) evaluation of hypothetical trading scenarios between select watersheds of the PRB, and (5) communication of the project concept and results to key state and federal agencies, industry representatives, and stakeholders of the PRB. The preliminary results of a basinwide assessment indicate that up to $684 million could be saved basinwide without compromising water quality as a result of implementing a watershed-based credit-trading approach.

Xixi Wang; Bethany A. Kurz; Marc D. Kurz

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Interaction of watershed scale and pollutant transport pathways on pollutant concentrations in rivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive studies of pollutant concentrations during both storm runoff events and non-storm periods have been underway in Ohio tributaries to lake Erie since 1974. More than 60,000 samples have been collected using automatic samplers located at US Geological Survey stream gauging stations. Drainage areas at the collection stations range from 11 km{sup 2} to 16,400 km{sup 2}. Samples have been analyzed for suspended sediments, various particulate pollutants attached to suspended sediments, current generation herbicides, nitrates, and chlorides. In general, for pollutants derived from nonpoint sources, peak concentrations decrease as watershed size increases. However, the duration of exposures to intermediate concentrations increases with increasing watershed size. these effects are most evident for suspended solids and associated particulate contaminants. For pollutants derived primarily from surface runoff but not attached to suspended sediments, the effects of watershed size on peak concentrations are evident, but not as pronounced as for suspended sediments. For compounds such as nitrates, which enter streams largely through interflow or tile drainage, scale effects are least evident. These scale effects are most likely attributable to dilution accompanying storm water routing through drainage networks. Longitudinal dispersion may also affect concentration patterns. These scale effects systematically affect exposure patterns in different positions in drainage networks and must be considered in designing sampling programs to assess impacts of nonpoint pollution on contaminant concentration patterns and loadings.

Baker, D.; Richards, R.P.; Kramer, J.W. [Heidelberg Coll., Tiffin, OH (United States). Water Quality Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This document is the product of more thanForeword This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our topics include overviews of the effects of fuel management on both terrestrial and aquatic watershed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Test of APEX for Nine Forested Watersheds in East Texas X. Wang,* A. Saleh, M. W. McBroom, J. R. Williams, and L. Yin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with best management practices (BMPs) in forested watersheds due to the limited number of and cost and policy alternatives for managing water quality and quantity from intensive silvicultural practices of conducting watershed monitoring. The Agricultural Policy/ Environmental eXtender (APEX) model was field

182

Flood forecasting with the A&M watershed model: a hydrometeorological study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'c 219R'? 67. 6R ' "' 66. 5R'w 204Rc o 205R' " ) 3PPR~? 450R' '" j 184R' '" 278R"'" 240R'""' 176R'" 15 I R "' 179R'" 227n'o 17 8R "c 150R"" 137R' "" 330R'? 298R''" ) 520Rwo 730Rcn ) 255R' " 426R' 'c Sal'man (1957) Shupiatskii (1957... procedure. The rain gage locations reporting valid data within or near the watershed boundary are identified. The rainfall measured by each gage is compared to the amount measured by the radar at the gage location. If the measured rainfall exceeds a...

Robinson, Cedric Glynn

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hangman Restoration Project : Annual Report, August 1, 2001 - July 31, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia Basin resulted in the extirpation of anadromous fish stocks in Hangman Creek and its tributaries within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. Thus, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss garideini), westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) as well as local wildlife populations. Additionally, the Tribe was forced to convert prime riparian habitat into agricultural lands to supply sustenance for their changed needs. Wildlife habitats within the portion of the Hangman Creek Watershed that lies within the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation have been degraded from a century of land management practices that include widespread conversion of native habitats to agricultural production and intensive silvicultural practices. Currently, wildlife and fish populations have been marginalized and water quality is significantly impaired. In the fall of 2000 the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Wildlife Program, in coordination with the Tribal Fisheries Program, submitted a proposal to begin addressing the degradations to functioning habitats within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation in the Hangman Watershed. That proposal led to the implementation of this project during BPA's FY2001 through FY2003 funding cycle. The project is intended to protect, restore and/or enhance priority riparian, wetland and upland areas within the headwaters of Hangman Creek and its tributaries in order to promote healthy self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations. A key goal of this project is the implementation of wildlife habitat protection efforts in a manner that also secures areas with the potential to provide stream and wetland habitats essential to native salmonid populations. This goal is critical in our efforts to address both resident fish and wildlife habitat needs in the Hangman Watershed. All proposed implementation activities are conducted in the headwaters of the system and are expected to prove beneficial to the natural functions of the entire Hangman Watershed. The following is the FY2001 annual report of Project activities and is submitted as partial fulfillment of Operation and Maintenance Task 2.a. The Objectives and Tasks for this first year were designed to position this Project for a long-term habitat restoration effort. As such, efforts were largely directed at information gathering and project orientation. The major task for this first year was development of a Habitat Prioritization Plan (attached) to guide implementation efforts by selecting areas that will be of greatest benefit to the native ecology. Completion of the first year tasks has positioned the project to move forward with implementing restoration activities using the latest information to accomplish the greatest possible results. The Project will be looking to implement on-the-ground protection and restoration efforts in the coming fiscal year using the data and information gathered in the last fiscal year. Continually refining our understanding of the natural watershed functions and fish and wildlife habitats within the Project Area will result in an increase in the efficiency of project implementation. Research and data gathering efforts will remain a strong emphasis in the coming fiscal year, as it will throughout the life of this Project.

Green, Gerald I.; Coeur D'Alene Tribe.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

In 2005, Oregon State University established the Institute for Water and Watersheds as the hub for water-related  

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In 2005, Oregon State University established the Institute for Water and Watersheds as the hub 541-737-4032 The State Water Resources Research Institute for Oregon IWW funded a graduate student Winter Water Film Series to a packed house and to the 2009 State Legislature. It is currently scheduled

Escher, Christine

185

431USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRSP13. 2000 Abstract.--Information and related literature on watershed manage-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Web Site The Internet's World Wide Web (Web) is a major tech- nology transfer vehicle. The Web is a cost-effective way to transfer information between world regions that are chal- lenged by similar components. Each Web page has a search engine and a list of related Web sites on watershed management

186

Governance of the NHD and WBD By design, and in practice, the National Hydrography Dataset and Watershed Boundary Dataset are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dataset and Watershed Boundary Dataset are governed in a collaborative process consisting Agency jointly designed a hydrography feature dataset for nationwide use by all agencies in an effort number of stakeholders to ensure a "best fit" dataset that would meet as many needs as possible

Torgersen, Christian

187

The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed  

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The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

188

Area Study prior to Companion Modelling to Integrate Multiple Interests in Upper Watershed Management of Northern Thailand  

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Management of Northern Thailand C. Barnaud*, G. Trébuil**, P. Dumrongrojwatthana***, J. Marie**** * CU of northern Thailand have long been accused of degrading the upper watersheds of the country's major basins communities and state agencies, calling for the need for adapted participatory methodologies to facilitate

Boyer, Edmond

189

chApter 1. Introduction to Synthesis of Current Science 1 Regarding Cumulative Watershed Effects of Fuel  

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Watershed Effects of Fuel Reduction Treatments Douglas F. Ryan chApter 2. Fire Regimes and Ecoregions 7 Robert G. Bailey chApter 3. Fuel Management in Forests of the Inland West 19 Russell T. Graham, Theresa B. Jain, Susan Matthews chApter 4. Tools for Fuel Management 69 Bob Rummer chApter 5. Fuel Management

190

SOURCES OF FINE-GRAINED SUSPENDED SEDIMENT IN MILL STREAM BRANCH WATERSHED, CORSICA RIVER BASIN, A TRIBUTARY TO THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem (Phillips, 2002). In order to reduce sediment and nutrients Corsica River Basin from the State's impaired water bodies (303D) list (http://www.dnr.state.md.us watershed, the largest estuary in the United States, was listed as an "impaired water body" in 2000 under

191

PROGRESS TOWARD DEVELOPMENT OF A GIS BASED WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT TOOL FOR SMALL RURAL WATERSHEDS: MODIFICATION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Palouse Region of the Pacific Northwest. We apply and modify the Soil Moisture Routing (SMR) model which in the Palouse Region provided that saturated hydraulic conductivities determined in the laboratory are adjusted University are developing a GIS-based problem-solving tool for small rural watersheds in the Palouse Region

Walter, M.Todd

192

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering, UNL Background Concerns about water use have intensified and Republican River Basins, and the implementation of LB 962. To understand water use it is helpful to consider

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

193

Quantification of Water Quality Improvement in Sandy Creek, A Tributary Watershed of Jordan Lake in the Cape Fear River Basin,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Cape Fear River Basin, After Stream and Riparian Restoration and Wetland Treatment Cell Creation: Final to restoration. The Duke Forest Stream and Wetlands Restoration was established to rectify these problems delivery following watershed development, a three-phase stream and floodplain restoration was planned

194

NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach) ACRES: 1.5 acres riparian habitat; 0.3 miles of stream channel-modified, straightened, and downcut channel; relocate the farm road and fences paralleling the stream to provide

US Army Corps of Engineers

195

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) in Rabbit Creek-Cat Creek Watershed, Summer 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is a method for evaluating the health of water bodies and watersheds by analyzing sample catches of fishes. Sites are scored on a numerical scale of 12--60 and on that basis assigned to a ``bioclass`` ranging from ``very poor`` to ``excellent.`` Overall, the major causes of depressed IBI scores in the Rabbit Creek watershed would appear to be: Organic pollution, mostly from livestock, but also from agricultural runoff and possible septic tank failures; sedimentation, principally from stream bank damage by cattle, also possibly from agriculture and construction; toxic pollution from agrochemicals applied to Holly Springs Golf course and agricultural fields` and Warming of water and evaporation loss due to elimination of shade on stream banks and construction of ponds.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Prong Features Detection of a 3D Model Based on the Watershed Algorithm Bing-Yu Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detection, the water level decreases iteratively from the maximum value. The decreas- ing level effects is not in the traversed set, it is a new prong feature. The pseudo code is as follows: e-mail:{joyce, liang}@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw e-mail:robin@ntu.edu.tw e-mail:ming@csie.ntu.edu.tw Function watershed algorithm V =sort (S); //if

Ouhyoung, Ming

199

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND ASSOCIATED MODELS DEVELOPED FOR THE PASO DEL NORTE WATERSHED MODFLOW MODULAR Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Groundwater FLOW Model MODFLOW is a modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference, groundwater flow model that numerically solves... the three-dimensional groundwater flow equation for a porous medium by using a finite-difference method (Harbaugh et al. 2000; McDonald and Harbaugh 1988). MODFLOW simulates steady and transient (nonsteady) flow in an irregularly shaped flow system...

Sheng, Zhuping; Tillery, Sue; King, Phillip J.; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

200

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M University in partial fu! fillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE December 1995 Rangeland Ecology and Management Range Science THE EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURAL LAND USE PATTERNS ON POLLUTANT RUNOFF FROM WATERSHEDS: RANGELAND.../PASTUREI ttND AND ROW CROPPING A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Andrew A. Jayne IV Approved as to style and content by: Way T. amilton (Committee Chair) Thomas L. Thurow (Member) Robert D. Baker (Member) Robert Whitson (Department Head) December 1995...

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

services. Barbier (1994) identified wetland ecosystem services as prevention of storm damage, flood and water flow control, support of fisheries, nutrient and waste absorption, recreation and water transport, agriculture, wildlife products, wood products...CHANGES IN ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND RUNOFF DUE TO LAND USE CHANGE IN THE WATERSHEDS OF SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS A Thesis by HEATHER GRACE HARRIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Harris, Heather Grace

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Persistence of Hydrologic Variables and Reactive Stream Solute Concentrations in an East Tennessee Watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time and frequency domain analyses were conducted on weekly time series of water chemistry (nitrate, sulfate and calcium concentrations) collected from November 1995 to December 2005 at the West Fork of Walker Branch in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to evaluate the extent of their persistence and the relationship of this persistence to discharge and rainfall. In this study, spectral and wavelet analyses provided a theoretical basis for insights into long-term water chemistry behavior. All water chemistry parameters showed some level of persistence that was influenced by rainfall and/or discharge. Short-term persistence (less than a year) was related to the persistence of rainfall and discharge, whereas long-term persistence (more than a year) was related to the persistence of discharge. The Walker Branch conceptual hydrology model is augmented by these results that relate characteristic periodicities with flowpaths through different zones: the vadose zone (< 20 week period), saturated zone (20-50 week period) and bedrock zone (> 50 week period) with implications for reactive chemistries within the watershed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Koirala, Shesh R [ORNL; Gentry, Randall W [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL; Schwartz, John S [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Water quality changes as a result of coalbed methane development in a Rocky mountain watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) development raises serious environmental concerns. In response, concerted efforts have been made to collect chemistry, salinity, and sodicity data on CBM produced water. However, little information on changes of stream water quality resulting from directly and/or indirectly received CBM produced water is available in the literature. The objective of this study was to examine changes in stream water quality, particularly sodicity and salinity, due to CBM development in the Powder River watershed, which is located in the Rocky Mountain Region and traverses the states of Wyoming and Montana. To this end, a retrospective analysis of water quality trends and patterns was conducted using data collected from as early as 1946 up to and including 2002 at four U.S. Geological Survey gauging stations along the Powder River. Trend analysis was conducted using linear regression and Seasonal Kendall tests, whereas, Tukey's test for multiple comparisons was used to detect changes in the spatial pattern. The results indicated that the CBM development adversely affected the water quality in the Powder River. First, the development elevated the stream sodicity, as indicated by a significant increase trend of the sodium adsorption ratio. Second, the development tended to shrink the water quality differences among the three downstream stations but to widen the differences between these stations and the farthest upstream station. In contrast, the development had only a minor influence on stream salinity. Hence, the CBM development is likely an important factor that can be managed to lower the stream sodicity. The management may need to take into account that the effects of the CBMdevelopment were different from one location to another along the Powder River.

Wang, X.; Melesse, A.M.; McClain, M.E.; Yang, W. [Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (USA)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes, for the 12-month period January through December 1994, the available dynamic hydrologic data collected on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed as well as information collected on surface flow systems in the surrounding vicinity that may affect the quality or quantity of surface water in the watershed. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to characterize the quantity and quality of water in the surface flow system, assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities, provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance of these data, and support long-term measures of contaminant fluxes at a spatial scale to provide a comprehensive picture of watershed performance that is commensurate with future remedial actions.

Borders, D.M.; Ziegler, K.S.; Reece, D.K.; Watts, J.A.; Frederick, B.J.; McCalla, W.L.; Pridmore, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

CTUIR Grande Ronde River Watershed Restoration Program McCoy Creek/McIntyre Creek Road Crossing, 1995-1999 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into a contract agreement beginning in 1996 to fund watershed restoration and enhancement actions and contribute to recovery of fish and wildlife resources and water quality in the Grande Ronde River Basin. The CTUIR's habitat program is closely coordinated with the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program and multiple agencies and organizations within the basin. The CTUIR has focused during the past 4 years in the upper portions of the Grande Ronde Subbasin (upstream of LaGrande, Oregon) on several major project areas in the Meadow, McCoy, and McIntyre Creek watersheds and along the mainstem Grande Ronde River. This Annual Report provides an overview of individual projects and accomplishments.

Childs, Allen B.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998.

Donley, Christopher; Lockwoood, Jr., Neil

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluating the Economics of Best Management Practices for Tarrant Regional Water Districts Eagle Mountain Lake Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manag e me n t unit of analys i s is one designated wetland project encompassing 20.6 acres. In-Lake BMPs Based on feedback from TRWD personne l , it was noted that BMP 20 (Hypolimnetic Aeration ) and BMP 21 (P Inactiva t i o n with Alum... years. The manage me n t unit of analysi s is one designa t e d hypol i mn e t i c aerat i o n proj ec t withi n the Eagle Mountai n Lake watersh e d . BMP 21 P Inactivation with Alum. T h e addition of powdered alum at variou s lake depths...

Johnson, Jason L.

214

Wigwam River Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program : 2000 Data Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wigwam River bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat monitoring program is a trans-boundary initiative implemented by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks (MOE), in cooperation with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream located in southeastern British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout (Figure 1.1). This river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000, Cope 1998). In addition, the Wigwam River supports some of the largest Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) in the Kootenay Region. These fish are highly sought after by anglers (Westover 1999a, 1999b). Bull trout populations have declined in many areas of their range within Montana and throughout the northwest including British Columbia. Bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Center (Cannings 1993) and although there are many healthy populations of bull trout in the East Kootenays they remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the United States portion of the Columbia River were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The upper Kootenay River is within the Kootenai sub-basin of the Mountain Columbia Province, one of the eleven Eco-provinces that make up the Columbia River Basin. MOE applied for and received funding from BPA to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. This task is one of many that was undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00).

Cope, R.S.; Morris, K.J.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

Johnson, R.O.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1 and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico Tech 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM, 87801, h2odoc@nmt.edu 2 Jose B. Gallegos.gallegos@arcadis-us.com 3 Jaime Ealey, Graduate Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico

Cal, Mark P.

219

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market opportunities. This is reflected and further substantiated in the results of the forest cover change analysis, which demonstrated a decline in area of land in forest use in the study area for the 1987/88-2001 period. The project team collected data necessary to identify sites for reforestation in the study area, environmental data for the determining site suitability for a range of reforestation alternatives and has identified and addressed potential leakage and additionality issues associated with implementing a carbon sequestration project in the Chesapeake Rivers Conservation Area. Furthermore, carbon emissions reductions generated would have strong potential for recognition in existing reporting systems such as the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b) voluntary reporting requirements and the Chicago Climate Exchange. The study identified 384,398 acres on which reforestation activities could potentially be sited. Of these candidate sites, sites totaling 26,105 acres are an appropriate size for management (> 100 acres) and located in priority conservation areas identified by The Nature Conservancy. Total carbon sequestration potential of reforestation in the study area, realized over a 100 year timeframe, ranges from 58 to 66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, and on the priority sites alone, potential for carbon sequestration approaches or exceeds 4 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the absence of concerted reforestation efforts, coupled with policy strategies, the region will likely face continued declines in forest land.

Andy Lacatell; David Shoch; Bill Stanley; Zoe Kant

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Kalispell (i.e. Kalispel) Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1996.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996 the Kalispell Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). A habitat and population assessment was conducted on Browns Creek a tributary of Cee Cee Ah Creek, one of the priority tributaries outlined in the 1995 annual report. The assessment was used to determine the type and quality of habitat that was limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high amounts of sediment in the stream, low bank cover, and a lack of winter habitat. Data collected from this assessment was used to prescribe habitat enhancement measures for Browns Creek. Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1995 annual report, were conducted during field season 1996. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and in stream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. The construction of the largemouth bass hatchery was started in October of 1995. The KNRD, Contractors Northwest Inc. and associated subcontractors are in the process of constructing the hatchery. The projected date of hatchery completion is summer 1997.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

LEFTHAND WATERSHED Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and municipal water systems in Ward and Jamestown meets all government-mandated standards relative to heavy water supply of the Left Hand Water District, although the District may be able to mitigate some Lefthand Water District Sue Schauffler Rowena Task Force Facilitator: Bruce Swinehart, Mesa Consulting #12

Ryan, Joe

227

Bethel Valley Watershed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

study to find soluble contamination sources that contribute to the contamination of surface and ground waters. Once the remediation activities required by the Bethel Valley...

228

The Watershed Management Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phosphorus loading by 25 percent or to develop a computer model that ac- curately predicts nitrogen and phosphorus loadings for a particular lake. What are water quality models? Water quality models use personal computers and mathematics to represent natural...

Persyn, Russell A.; Griffin, Molly; Williams, Amy T.; Wolfe, Clint

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Flathead River Watershed conservation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

proposing to fund the acquisition of several parcels of land in northwest Montana for fish habitat mitigation (see map). These parcels total about 95 acres and are located within...

230

Watershed Assessment Program Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Proposal to model urban storm-water control practices · Teach advanced graduate course ­ BASINS and SWAT · Monitoring Activities · Modeling Activities · Remote Sensing / GIS · Sources of Funding · What do We Need · Much more monitoring being done by cities and local governments ­ Source water assessment work done

231

Watershed Management & Science Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic compounds, trace metals, and nutrients as indicators of wastewater treatment plant discharge Name Affiliation e-mail Aingworth, Catherine Binghamton wastewater treatment caingworth the Binghamton--to--Catskill urban-rural gradient. Homyak, P.M., Wood Chips: A potential best management practice

Suzuki, Masatsugu

232

Bear Creek Valley Watershed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Highway 95 and the haul road are available to the public during the fall for deer and turkey hunts. All kills made during these hunts are checked for radiation levels prior to...

233

Flathead River Watershed conservation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" | National Hansen 1 , M. R. Harper

234

Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 1 Main Text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Remedial Investigation (RI) report is to present an analysis of the Melton Valley portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, which will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of cost-effective remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. In this RI existing levels of contamination and radiological exposure are compared to levels acceptable for future industrial and potential recreational use levels at the site. This comparison provides a perspective for the magnitude of remedial actions required to achieve a site condition compatible with relaxed access restrictions over existing conditions. Ecological risk will be assessed to evaluate measures required for ecological receptor protection. For each subbasin, this report will provide site-specific analyses of the physical setting including identification of contaminant source areas, description of contaminant transport pathways, identification of release mechanisms, analysis of contaminant source interactions with groundwater, identification of secondary contaminated media associated with the source and seepage pathways, assessment of potential human health and ecological risks from exposure to contaminants, ranking of each source area within the subwatershed, and outline the conditions that remedial technologies must address to stop present and future contaminant releases, prevent the spread of contamination and achieve the goal of limiting environmental contamination to be consistent with a potential recreational use of the site.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Quantification of Hungry Horse Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1985 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act passed in 1980 by Congress has provided a mechanism which integrates and provides for stable energy planning in the Pacific Northwest. The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council and charged the Council with developing a comprehensive fish and wildlife program to protect and enhance fish and wildlife impacted by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Implementation of the plan is being carried out by the Bonneville Power Administration. The Hungry Horse Reservoir study is part of that Council's plan. This study proposes to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance principal gamefish species in Hungry Horse Reservoir. The specific study objects are listed below. (1) Quantify the amount of reservoir habitat available at different water level elevations; (2) Estimate recruitment of westslope cutthroat trout juveniles from important spawning and nursery tributaries; (3) Determine the abundance, growth, distribution and use of available habitat by major game species in the reservoir; (4) Determine the abundance and availability of fish food organisms in the reservoir; (5) Quantify the seasonal use of available food items by major fish species; (6) Develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat used by fish and fish food organisms; and (7) Estimate the impact of reservoir operation on major gamefish species.

May, Bruce

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part II Availability of Flow and Water Quality Data for the Rio Grande Project Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cruces, NM 88003 (575) 646-4337 i i Acknowledgement This document and the underlying pr oject activities detailed in this report reflect the joint efforts of many people working with the Paso del Norte Watershed Council (PdNWC). The authors... wish to acknowledge and extend our grat itude to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the generous financial support extende d to the PdNWC for development of the Coordinated Water Resources Database and Model Developm ent Project (called Project...

Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

TEXAS WATERSHED PLANNING Short Course What's a Watershed Protection Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for achieving water resource goals that provides assessment & management information for a geographically: 5. Plans only succeed if implemented. 6. Partnerships equal power. 7. Good tools are available. 8 B. Estimate of load reductions needed C. Description of mgt measures needed D. Technical & financial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

242

SWAT Modeling of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phosphorus, nitrate nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, total nitrogen, and dissolved oxygen, using data from 20002009. The simulated loads or concentrations of the selected water quality constituents generally matched the measured counterparts available...

Kannan, N.

243

Watershed Academy Webcast on Climate Resilience  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Climate Resilience: What to Expect, How to Prepare, and What you can Learn from Others." This webcast will share findings from the most recent National Climate Assessment report concerning...

244

ANISOTROPIC DIFFUSION USING POWER WATERSHEDS Camille Couprie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimal methods such as graph cuts have received a lot of attention. However not all problems in com are able to optimize this energy quickly and effectively. This study paves the way for using the power and the diffusion time. Practical usage of anisotropic diffusion requires a choice between long compu- tation times

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

245

9 Essential Elements for Watershed Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

733 animal units Horse 45 Human Rural Population with Inadequate Wastewater Treatment* 909 Rural Population with Adequate Wastewater Treatment 271 Municipal Waterwater Treatment Facilities 1 Wildlife Deer in Rural Areas*** 618 * 77% non compliant ** 1550 people / 2.5 people/household, 0.58 dogs/household, .73

246

The Regional Watershed Spreadsheet Model (RWSM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WI Presenting on work developed by: The Small Tributaries Loading Strategy Workgroup BASMAA * SFEI Estimates #12;10. Improved Loads Estimates Small Tribs Small Tribs In-Bay Erosion Large Rivers PCBs Loads of this plan... Hydro Sed Cu Hg PCB Se Diox PBDE OC Pest Hydro Sed Cu Hg PCB Se Diox PBDE OC PestStep 1 2 3 4 5

247

Watershed Protection Plan Development for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.20 Rangeland 0.29 Urban 0.93 Wet land 0.05 North Central Texas Water Quality Project Total P Urban 13 Quality Project Clint Wolfe Project Coordinator Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center - Dallas The Texas A&M University System North Central Texas Water Quality Project · Serves 1.7 million people

248

Gathering Data to Assess Your Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water and Wastewater Planning and Assessments Population Projections Railroad Commission (RRC) Oil Quality Data: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/compliance/monitoring /crp/data/samplequery.html 305b reports (EPA) Enforcement and Compliance History Online Permit Compliance System US Fish and Wildlife Service

249

Gathering Data to Assess Your Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Data from State Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Water Quality Data: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us and Wastewater Planning and Assessments Population Projections TNRIS Data from State Agencies Railroad Commission) Source of Geographic Information of Texas Website: http://www.tnris.state.tx.us/DataCatalog.aspx Aerial

250

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT FOR ENDANGERED AQUATIC AND RIPARIAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are rigorously tested. Some of the fallacies are: single species management works, extrinsic factors cause to T&E species must be founded on the basis of solid science. KEYWORDS: Threatened and endangered of the fallacies are: single species management works, extrinsic factors cause the problems, simple solutions

251

Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off-Site

252

Melton Valley Watershed | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies | DepartmentADVISORYFinalMelton Valley

253

Montana Watershed Coordination Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A.InformationGuide WebpagePermit Fees

254

Bear Creek Valley Watershed | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid-BasicHardware

256

Local Policy Networks and Agricultural Watershed Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of environmental best management practices. Local networks facilitate diffusion of innovations, the development of adopting environmental practices. These findings have important implications for public administration agencies/organizations increase the rate at which pro- ducers adopt environmental ``best management

Lubell, Mark

257

Hydrologic and Ecological Effects of Watershed Urbanization: Implication for Watershed Management in Hillslope Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experienced rapid urbanization. For each study period, an impervious surface map was generated from Landsat TM image by a support vector machine (SVM) with pairwise coupling. SVM more accurately estimated impervious surface than other subpixel mapping methods...

Sung, Chan Yong

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Walker Branch WatershedWalker Branch Watershed LongLong--term hydrology, streamterm hydrology, stream  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980 1990 2000 Precipitation,runoff(cm) 0 50 100 150 200 Precip Runoff + 0.035/y + 0.071/y runoff = 51% of ppt Nflux(kg/ha/y) 0.0 0.4 0.8 4.0 8.0 12.0 Wet N input Total N input DIN output 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Sflux(kg/ha/y) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Wet S input Total S input SO4 output Wet N Input ('81

259

DEFINING PERCEPTIONS OF WATERSHED MANAGEMENT IN A GREAT PLAINS AND IN AN ANDEAN WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in the expansion of this study. The innumerable lessons learned during this thesis project and specifically, the lessons learned from using the Q method, are invaluable as I proceed onward to doctoral studies and research. The goal... statements, and the chapter closes with a short summary found in the conclusion. Chapter 4 presents the thesis conclusion as a reflection of what was learned during the process of writing this thesis. This reflection includes personal lessons involving...

Restrepo-Osorio, Diana L

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Iskuulpa Watershed ProjectIskuulpa Watershed Project BPA Project # 199506001BPA Project # 199506001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with Brazil having the largest share (Figure 2). This has meant that the share of hydroelectric power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Incorporating and Evaluating Environmental Instream Flows in a Priority Order Based Surface Water Allocation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multi-objective optimization model to characterize the tradeoffs between water supply shortages and fish 10 population capacity in a stream on the west-slope of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Harman and Stewardson (2005) evaluated a range...

Pauls, Mark

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

TIMOTHY O. RANDHIR Associate Professor -Watershed Management and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

million USDA-CSREES project (SDSS- Spatial Decision Support System) of Purdue Univ., Texas A&M Univ, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), multi-attribute decision-making, and nonpoint source pollution. M, biodiversity, urbanization, community science, sus- tainable development, GIS, multi-criteria decision making

Schweik, Charles M.

263

Cypress Creek Project Building A Watershed Protection Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projections No regional water/WWTP services Good water quality with some degrading trends Lack on Environmental Quality www.cypresscreekproject.org #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;WHISKEY IS FOR DRINKIN'& WATER 97,589 (2000) 437,000 (2050) Water demand Total water use 17% 1990-2004 Withdrawals from

264

Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest Oregon Watershed Following  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--------------------------------------------- Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest by a high-intensity burn over areas of steep topography. The areal distribution of soil hydraulic of infiltration capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and soil moisture characteristics. Also, measures

Standiford, Richard B.

265

Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawironnental characteristics number Honey Heaquite 15 Upland Poet Oak Post Oak. - Hickory 2 13 4 5 3 14 Transitios Winged Elm Elevation (m) Position Slope (I) Direction of slope Stead sine (ha) Soil classification Soil series 92 flat 0 7... 15 85 eod. wall- sonuwhat pout 7. 2 92 Roebuck C clay 3 24 yh poor 5. 5 91 c slay 2 15 83 poor 6. 7 102 56 52 depression dspresston 0 0 6 4 fcuie Udifltveats 55 deep cb4eucl 0 3 Typic yluvstueat b clay 7 34 59 v4...

Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Progress Report for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Tons?of?sediment?lading?reduced? 76,750? ?? 75,210? Tons?of?total?phosphorus?loading?reduced? 220? ? 90? Algal?blooms?reported? NA? ?? NA? Fish?kills?reported?? NA? ? NA? Abundance?of?aquatic?species?? NA? ?? NA? Diversity?of?aquatic?species? NA...

Bertold, Allen; Flores, Jaime

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Tons?of?sediment?lading?reduced? 76,750? ?? 75,210? Tons?of?total?phosphorus?loading?reduced? 220? ? 90? Algal?blooms?reported? NA? ?? NA? Fish...

Berthold, T. Allen; Flores, Jaime

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Establishment of the Northeast Coastal Watershed Geospatial Data Network (NECWGDN)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of NECWGDN were to establish integrated geospatial databases that interfaced with existing open-source (water.html) environmental data server technologies (e.g., HydroDesktop) and included ecological and human data to enable evaluation, prediction, and adaptation in coastal environments to climate- and human-induced threats to the coastal marine resources within the Gulf of Maine. We have completed the development and testing of a "test bed" architecture that is compatible with HydroDesktop and have identified key metadata structures that will enable seamless integration and delivery of environmental, ecological, and human data as well as models to predict threats to end-users. Uniquely this database integrates point as well as model data and so offers capacities to end-users that are unique among databases. Future efforts will focus on the development of integrated environmental-human dimension models that can serve, in near real time, visualizations of threats to coastal resources and habitats.

Hannigan, Robyn [University of Massachusetts Boston] [University of Massachusetts Boston

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

269

Cattle Production Practices in Grazed Watersheds of the Humid Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, conference proceeding papers, abstracts, magazine articles, and an international award winning web site and rivers The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Water (1998) noted that the most common farm investment in cattle production has to be balanced against the environmental and regulatory

270

Evaluation of SWAT model - subdaily runoff prediction in Texas watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Raghavan Srinivasan Committee Members, Patricia Haan... contributions. I would like to first thank my advisor Dr. Raghavan Srinivasan for his immense support during all these years. He was always there for me to finish my tenure as a student. I would like to thank my committee members Dr. Patricia Haan and Dr...

Palanisamy, Bakkiyalakshmi

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

San Francisquito Watershed Tour Event Date: April 12, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:50: Drive time: PCC àJasper Ridge 30 minutes. Get off bus (10:00) Stop 1: Jasper Ridge:55AM: Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve and Searsville Dam (Topics: Water: Jasper Ridge à Los Trancos 20 minutes. Get off bus (11:25) Stop 2: Los Trancos Fish Ladder

272

Local Perspectives: Watershed Protection for Hickory Creek, Denton, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standards Protect / enhance water quality Lake Lewisville Implement cost-effective practices to manage investments in management practices, based on location, cost effectiveness, and opportunities Design tools to ensure the good returns on investments (in the form of reduced or avoided pollutant loads) Explore market

273

An economic evaluation of the Sulphur Creek Watershed Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!IC CONS IDERATIQNS IN R SOURCE ALI. OCATIOiV 12 Social Choice Benef'ts and Costs ~ The Sulphur Creek Project IV. PROCEDURE AND METHODOLOGy 12 14 16 17 Determination of Co ts Determination of Benefits Comparison of Results with Origina! Study... analyses could be impzoved. A lack of funds and personnel have prevented govern- ment agencies from making studies which would determirte how accurate their forecasts have been. Sevezal economists familiar with the procedures used in benefit...

Burns, Henry Taylor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

Watershed Restoration through Culture-Based Education and Community Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

branched off and traveled to Thames, Canada. Other Oneidas stayed in the homelands. The map in Figure 2 shows the route the Oneidas took. Today there are three Oneida reservations: Oneida, New York; Oneida, Thames in Ontario, Canada; and Oneida... Club. RESTORATION PROJECTS The Duck Creek Fish Passage project involves the removal of two dams on Duck Creek and enhancement of the fish passage barrier at a third dam. This project will enhance the ability of lake fish in Green Bay to access...

Stevens, Margaret Rose

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Integration of stream and watershed data for hydrologic modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-resolution datasets are required, vector datasets have an advantage because they would present the same amount of information that raster would, but the vector file size increase is not as significant as that of raster. The evolution of DEMs suggests... can also be attributed with non-spatial information. Only features of one shape type can be collected together for storage. These storage types can be classified as file- based storage (e.g. shapefiles and coverages) or DBMS (Database Management...

Koka, Srikanth

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Eagle Mountain Watershed: Calibration, Validation, and Best Management Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from WWTP of Boyd Daily Loads Flow (m3) TN (kg) TP (kg) Jan-02 262.22 2.60 0.40 Feb-02 314.26 4.97 0.77 Mar-02 335.74 5.36 1.00 Apr-02 341.79 1.27 1.22 May-02 327.19 1.15 0.29 Jun-02 270.73 0.45 0.24 Jul-02 279.61 1.06 0.19 Aug-02 274.05 0....23 4.52 Mar-02 2923.10 11.67 2.61 Apr-02 2057.62 15.15 1.58 May-02 2143.35 12.97 1.44 Jun-02 2347.75 24.82 6.31 Jul-02 2283.40 40.05 11.17 Aug-02 2211.48 39.17 6.63 Sep-02 2061.02 41.98 4.91 Oct-02 2167.39 29.69 4.36 Nov-02 2164.17 7.46 2...

Lee, Taesoo; Narasimhan, Balaji; Srinivasan, Raqhavan

277

Okanogan Focus Watershed Salmon Creek : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY 1999 the Colville Tribes and the Okanogan Irrigation District (OID) agreed to study the feasibility of restoring and enhancing anadromous fish populations in Salmon Creek while maintaining the ability of the district to continue full water service delivery to it members.

Lyman, Hilary

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?Actualizaci?n del plan maestro para el mejoramiento de los servicios de agua potable, drenaje y saneamiento en Cd. Ju?rez, Chih.? Actual data elements/variables Source(s) of data Research from ?Servicio de Ingenier?a e Inform?tica S.C.? coordinated...

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Rich, Matt

279

The Institute for Water & Watersheds Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

timber and salmon to solar panels and semiconductors. But water supply and demand in the state of the United States. In the academic community there is growing recognition that the solutions to future water

280

A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: constitutive relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Department of Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 6907 Nedlands, Australia b equations for mass, mo- mentum, energy and entropy. These equations have been derived by averaging

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Future Climate Variability and Watershed Response in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active Ground Water Storage Basic Ground Water RecessionActive Ground Water Storage Basic Ground Water RecessionInterception Storage Capacity Fraction of Ground Water to

Lopez, Sonya Rita

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

High-resolution, multi-scale modeling of watershed hydrology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enrique R. Vivoni An Opportunity to Integrate Remote Sensing Observations, Field Data Collection distribution of topography, rainfall, soils, vegetation, meteorology, soil moisture. Field Data and Remote's Hydrologic and Energetic System: Water and Heat Storages and Transports over Many Time and Space Scales P ET

Vivoni, Enrique R.

283

Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management capacity

284

Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" financing · Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management

285

The prediction of sediment yields from small blackland watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pect rainf'all erosion. The equation is as follous'. A = RKLSCP share A = average annual soil loss in tons psr acre~ R = rainfall Pactor, K = soil erodibility Pactor, LS = length and steepness oP slope factor, 0 = cropping and management factor... and summer. The data utilized mere rocords of' recording raingagos~ runofP records, and records oP depth integrated sediment samples taken during sediment producing storms. The 205 storms selected Por the study varied in magnitude Prom 0. 43 0 2a ~g2...

Williams, Jimmy Ray

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Blackland Research Extension Center Temple, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.bilbe@tceq.texas.gov Diane Boellstorff Texas AgriLife Extension Service dboellstorff@tamu.edu Henry Brewer US EPA, Region 6 brewer.henry@epa.gov Gary Bryant Texas Water Resources Institute glbryant@ag.tamu.edu Patricia Carvajal

287

Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Pastures Healthy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape: Are Your Pastures Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian Hays Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor and Extension Range Specialist; and Extension Assistant-Water Conservation; The Texas A&M University...

White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Streams Healthy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heavy rainfall. Determine whether or not they have adequate vegetative cover and whether or not they are eroding. Then classify stream banks into one of four categories (Fig. 1). Are Your Streams Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian...

White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

EPA Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuvalJustice webpage JumpNPDESwebsite

290

Shale Oil and Gas, Frac Sand, and Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Bakken Oil Shale scope · Light, Sweet crude ­ ideal for automotive fuels and mid-size refineries (Midwest

Minnesota, University of

291

ForestRangelandandWatershedStewardship 1472CampusDelivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons From 35 Years of Research on Oil Shale Lands in the Piceance Basin Fort Collins Fort Collins with oil shale extraction. The project involved approximately ten independent field studies, which were established on a 20-ha site located near what was then the focal point of oil shale activity in the Piceance

292

Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demands  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartment of Energy Watch itEnergyOptimization

293

Idaho Watershed Advisory Groups Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia:ISI Solar JumpObtain EPAFormAdvisory Groups Webpage

294

Nitrogen Loading and Attenuation in the West Falmouth Harbor Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in nitrogen loading due to the opening of the wastewater treatment plant and increased septic inputs Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) and septic tanks arrive in the form of plumes of higher nitrogen. The treatment plant provides secondary treatment to the incoming wastewater but is not designed to provide

Vallino, Joseph J.

295

Initiative on Improving Our Watershed Attributes (I in IOWA) (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes a comprehensive water quality program which includes education, monitoring, technical assistance, incentives, and more efficient permitting procedures. The program also...

296

PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

Maxwell, Bruce D.

297

Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed the relationships between specific stream attributes and Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri distribution and biomass at 773 stream reaches (averaging 100 m in length) throughout the Upper Snake River Basin in Idaho, in an effort to identify possible limiting factors. Because limiting factors were expected to vary across the range of cutthroat trout distribution in Idaho, separate logistic and multiple regression models were developed for each of the nine major river drainages to relate stream conditions to occurrence and biomass of cutthroat trout. Adequate stream flow to measure fish and habitat existed at 566 sites, and of those, Yellowstone cutthroat trout were present at 322 sites, while rainbow trout O. mykiss (or rainbow x cutthroat hybrids) and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis occurred at 108 and 181 sites, respectively. In general, cutthroat trout presence at a specific site within a drainage was associated with a higher percentage of public property, higher elevation, more gravel and less fine substrate, and more upright riparian vegetation. However, there was much variation between drainages in the direction and magnitude of the relationships between stream characteristics and Yellowstone cutthroat trout occurrence and biomass, and in model strength. This was especially true for biomass models, in which we were able to develop models for only five drainages that explained more than 50% of the variation in cutthroat trout biomass. Sample size appeared to affect the strength of the biomass models, with a higher explanation of biomass variation in drainages with lower sample sizes. The occurrence of nonnative salmonids was not strongly related to cutthroat trout occurrence, but their widespread distribution and apparent ability to displace native cutthroat trout suggest they may nevertheless pose the largest threat to long-term cutthroat trout persistence in the Upper Snake River Basin.

Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Composition of Salamander SpeciesComposition of Salamander Species Utilizing the Pigeon River WatershedUtilizing the Pigeon River Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to process wood · Toxic byproducts were dumped directly into the Pigeon River ­ Dioxins, furans" by Redmond & Scott documents species in Cocke Co. but no records exist for Pigeon · Know dioxins have for ResearchJustification for Research · Dioxins act as an endocrine disrupter and can cause abnormal

Gray, Matthew

299

Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet B O N N E V I L L E P O W E  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chinook, bull trout and cutthroat trout. The area also is crucial for holding adult fish of all species. How would it be funded? The purchase would be funded as part of the...

300

Joan M. Dukes Rhonda Whiting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proceeding to Step2/3 (i.e., a design/build approach) of this project. This recommendation is conditioned) and Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri). The recovery and long-term sustainability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

Heo, Joonghyeok

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Landowner survey of a cost-share brush management program in two Texas watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Edwards Plateau of Texas. In the Blackland Prairie site, honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) was treated with chemicals, while brush in the Edwards Plateau site, which was a mixture of mesquite, ashe and redberry juniper (Juniperus spp.) and live oak... depressions to store the runoff, which allowed a considerable amount of water to percolate into the soil, thus reducing runoff. A subsequent study conducted in northeast Uvalde County, Texas, reviewed the effects of ashe junipers on the ET and runoff...

Narayanan, Christopher Ram

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Short Outline of Readings for Geog. 549 Chapter 1. Introduction -Watersheds and Water: Essential Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8. Ground-Water Hydrology (omitted) Section II. Water Quality and Treatment Chapter 9. Principles 12. Water Treatment (omitted except definitions of aquatic restoration) Chapter 13. Aquatic Restoration and Natural Water Treatment PART TWO -HUMAN ASPECTS OF WATER RESOURCES Section III. Water

James, L. Allan

304

Sources and Fates of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Rural and Urban Watersheds in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to frequent exposure to high sodium irrigation water. The results indicate that sodium is a major driver of DOC in the system. Sound management decisions concerning irrigation water chemistry and urban development might eventually emerge to protect water...

Cioce, Danielle

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modeling the Effects of Low Impact Development Practices on Streams at the Watershed Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban growth contributes to increasing storm water runoff which in turn causes an increase in the frequency and severity of flooding. Moreover, increased storm water runoff contributes to changing the character and volume of energy inputs...

Shannak, Sa'D A

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

306

Minimization of cost, sediment load, and sensitivity to climate change in a watershed management application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Multiobjective Differential evolution Robustness to uncertainty Stormwater management Best management practices-scale, multiobjective framework for generating a diverse family of stormwater best management practice (BMP) plans-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) such as detention ponds

Eppstein, Margaret J.

307

Simulating and Optimizing Storm Water Management Strategies in an Urban Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and more frequent flooding. Best Management Practices (BMP) and Low Impact development (LID) are a few of the set of measures which are used to mitigate the impact of urbanization. Peak flow, runoff volume are few of the conventional metrics which are used...

Damodaram, Chandana

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

Memo: Estimates of hydrology in small (<80 km2 urbanized watersheds under dry weather and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Johnson, 2004; Hetzel, 2007). The Bay Area Storm Water Management Agencies (BASMAA) that hold National management practices (BMPs) to achieve load reduction and demonstrate at the end of 20 years (2025 Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits have been asked to increase effort and implement best

309

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil and Water Conservation Board pcasebolt@tsswcb.state.tx.us Anju Chalise Texas Commission deliahaak@irwp.org Matt Heinemann love4water@gmail.com Loren Henley Texas State Soil and Water Conservation of Texas at Arlington aditya.khandekar@mavs.uta.edu Brian Koch Texas State Soil and Water Conservation

310

Hydrology of the Texas Blackland Prairie: Riesel Watershed Data and Published Hydrologic Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE MATERIAL FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THAT THE USE OF THE MATERIAL WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, OR ANY OTHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. Hydrology of the Texas..., OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE MATERIAL FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THAT THE USE OF THE MATERIAL WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, OR ANY OTHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. Hydrology of the Texas...

U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service

311

Risk assessment of runoff on a range watershed in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Catchments A and B) at Brazos County, Texas. .................71 Table 16: Vegetation parameters measured along a permanent transect on each catchment on the Brazos County, Texas study site by the Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE... by the current research study (TMG) and the study conducted by the Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE) for during 2002 on the Brazos County, Texas study site- Catchment A & B.................................75 1 INTRODUCTION The continued...

Gwaltney, Tracy Marie

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Sensitivity of Watershed Runoff under Humid Conditions to Potential Climate Variations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Szilagyi1 ; Marc B. Parlange2 ; Jonathan A. Patz3 ; and Thaddeus K. Graczyk4 Abstract: A semidistributed

Szilagyi, Jozsef

313

How do contaminants get into the How do contaminants leave the watershed?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Detachment Transport Deposition Sediment may serve as a transport medium for other constituents Photo: www.nrcs.usda.gov #12;What happens to chemicals when they are in the environment? www.epa.gov Breakdown behave differently in the environment www.visionlearning.com Incorporation of compounds into the tissue

314

Community Interactions In Tropical Forest Restoration And Environmental Governance In The Panama Canal Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications 20:1255-1269. Comita, L. S. and S. P. Hubbell.Lin and Augspurger, 2006; Comita and Hubbell, 2009). RecentClark and Clark, 1984; Comita and Hubbell, 2009; Gilbert et

Schweizer, Daniella

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Impacts of Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in Central California Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bird Treaty Act of 1918 (MBTA; 16 U.S.C.703-712) and theBird Treaty Act of 1918 (MBTA; 16 U.S.C.703-712) and the

Frechette, Danielle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Western Economics Forum, Fall 2013 Wildfire risk and optimal investments in watershed protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and vegetative matter during precipitation events (Parise and Cannon 2012). Streams, in turn, see changes in flow

317

Soil erosion and conservation as affcted by land use and land tenure, El Pital Watershed, Nicaragua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This trend is associated with increased fragmentation of farms associated with the agrarian reform activities of the 1980's, during which many of the large land-holdings were confiscated and redistributed to many peasant families. Also the increasing...

Somarriba-Chang, Matilde de los Angeles

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Multivariate Water Quality Investigation of Select Drainage Ditches in the Arroyo Colorado River Watershed, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Affecting Phosphorus Concentrations in Drainage Ditches The results presented in this study indicate that drainage ditches can receive significant phosphorus loadings during irrigation and high intensity rainfall activities. The TP concentration...

Uddameri, V.; Singaraju, S.

319

African Study Monographs, Suppl.28: 123-141, November 2003 123 WATERSHED, WEDDINGS AND WORKFORCES: MIGRATION,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and timber boom/bust cycles. We superimpose local economic history with demographic data, then using five, timber, conservation and tourism. At first the BaAka were not independent agents in the new colonial and 60s began to pay the BaAka independently of the bilo and so did the logging companies in the 70s

Hardin, Rebecca D.

320

From waterfront to watershed : mapping a big idea in the Greater Toronto Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today, Toronto is revered among Great Lakes' and waterfront cities for its environmental planning: its massive re-investment in water and stormwater infrastructure; protected headwaters of the region's rivers; realized ...

Ciesielski, Linda C. (Linda Claire)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Brush types of the Nueces River watershed as related to soil, climatic and geological factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Acacia tortuosa; guayacan, Porlieria angusti- folia; and leatherstem, Jatropha spathulata. These species were generally found in the common mixture of the remaining vegetational types of the 22 mesquite complex. In specific areas, species which...

Huss, Donald Lee

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Investigations of the cause of fishkills in fish-rearing facilities in Raven Fork watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of fishkills in trout-rearing facilities located adjacent to Raven Fork Creek within the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina. Approximately 50,000 rainbow trout were lost at the Blankenship trout farm-a commercial facility-following eight storm events between March 31 and December 2, 1981. In addition, 524 trophy-size trout died in three ponds operated by the Cherokee tribe for stocking reservation streams. It was found fishkills in the trout farm could be prevented by adding lime to water from the creek as it was pumped into the facility; this strengthened the assumption acidity (H/sup +/) was responsible for the fishkills. Mortality of trophy trout was stopped by routing water from nearby springs to the ponds during and following rain events. Because of concern that these fishkills might be caused by acid rain, TVA was requested by the Cherokee tribe to assist in determining the cause. Limited studies were conducted during March through August 1982 to test two hypotheses: (1) concentrations of H/sup +/ and soluble aluminum in Raven Fork following storm events were high enough to kill rainbow trout and (2) atmospheric deposition was a greater source of stream H/sup +/ than acid-producing geologic formations or the forest soils.

Jones, H.C.; Noggle, J.C.; Young, R.C.; Kelly, J.M.; Olem, H.; Ruane, R.J.; Pasch, R.W.; Hyfantis, G.J.; Parkhurst, W.J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development of an Urban Watershed Rehabilitation Method Using Stakeholder Feedback to Direct Investigation and Restoration Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Technology and Public Policy R-827147-01-0 PRINC IP AL INVESTIG ATORS Charles D. Samuelson, Ph.D. ? Psychology ? Texas A&M University Marty D. Matlock, Ph.D. ? Biological and Agricultural Engineering ? University of Arkansas CO -P RINC IP AL... and Public Policy RESEARCH FUNDED BY U.S. EPA - Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Program, Grant No. R-827147-01-0 ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY The Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy INSTITUTE FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY...

Samuelson; Charles D.; Matlock, Marty D.; Kenimer, Ann L.; Neill, William H.; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Whitten, Guy D.; Vedlitz, Arnold; Alston, Letitia T.

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

324

Estimating Economic and Environmental Impacts At the National, Regional, and Watershed Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The Linked ASM/HUMUS Modeling Systema By Jay D. Atwoodb Verel Benson Chi-Chung Chen Bruce McCarl R Consequences into National Agricultural Policy Analysis: A Regional Perspective" held at the Annual Meeting for the paper and EPIC, respectively); Chi-Chung Chen, chen@scout.tamu.edu, is a Research Associate and Bruce Mc

McCarl, Bruce A.

325

Attachment B: Jamaica Bay Watershed Protection Plan Update 1. WATER QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

excess algae and sea lettuce to reduce nitrogen and produce biodiesel fuels. Design anticipated to begin Reintroduction of Eel Grass (Zostera marina) Pilot Study Fish habitat/Decreased wetland erosion loss. Design and increase fish habitat. Design anticipated to begin Summer 2008. Contractor by mid-2008; initiate pilot

Columbia University

326

Comment on ``Dynamically dimensioned search algorithm for computationally efficient watershed model calibration''  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calibration'' by Bryan A. Tolson and Christine A. Shoemaker Ali Behrangi,1 Behnaz Khakbaz,1 Jasper A. Vrugt,2

Vrugt, Jasper A.

327

Vol5:Ancho/chAquehuiWAtershed LosAlamosNationalLaboratory,NPDESPermitNo.NM0030759  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EP-DIR-PLAN-10007,R.0·March28,2011 site discharge Pollution Prevention Plan (sdPPP) eP2011-0120 eP2011-0120 site discharge Pollution Prevention Plan (sdKown, EP-ET-ER GIS Team, May 11, 2010, Map# 09-0120-08 State Plane Coordinate System New Mexico, Central

328

Economic Incentives and Policies to Improve Quality in a Binational Coastal Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sediment. For Mexico, upstream pollution damages andcontrol in Mexico consists of pollution prevention of runoffpay for pollution control, often in upstream Mexico. Results

Fernandez, Linda M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Descriptions and Expectations of Recommended BMPs for Improving the Bosque River Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- (Al) and iron- (Fe) based compounds to bind P in animal manure. Chemical agents are typically incorporated into the manure or lagoon effluent prior to application, but can also be applied directly to the field. Aluminum sulfate (alum) is one... manure. Zvomuya et al. (2006) demonstrated that alum may be an effective amendment for immobilizing P and reducing P leaching in coarse-textured soils with a long history of waste application. When incorporated with poultry litter, alum is typically...

Meier, Megan; Gregory, Lucas

330

WATERSHED RESTORATION PLAN Big Creek, North Fork of the Flathead River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................................................. 26 2.5 NONPOINT POLLUTION SOURCE INVENTORY AND THE PROPOSED RESTORATION ACTIVITIES .. 27 SECTION 4 4.1 POLLUTANT REDUCTION: The average monthly air temperatures and average monthly precipitation at Glacier International Airport

331

A generalized land use study of the San Jacinto River watershed of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pi ? ? ft o ] 00 I to jco jco j ? co 03 ? 5 ^ O aS ?? ?? ?p U Pi ? ? ft O 4? CQ ? U O aS ?? ?* 43 U Pi ? ? ft O BG uo CM n CM c> o 2 0 t - cr... ?P = Q ?* ^ft ? = -p ? c3 ^ O > T i ? n3 *H ? <35 J i JL, DO * CQ CJ -PCO O ciJ o CO ft O 4= P i ? O O o CO ? Q

Buckley, Frank A.

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

NAME: Salt Creek Estuary Restoration LOCATION: Salt Creek Watershed, Clallam County, Washington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that is completely self sustaining through the creation of bridge openings that allow adequate tidal inundation

US Army Corps of Engineers

333

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sedimentation in Lavon Reservoir Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Law 92-500 - the 1972 Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments - mandates the analysis of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution controls. This report presents the results of a study of the economic impact of implementing...

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

334

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Duck Creek Watershed, Dickens County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and voluntary policies are considered. Economic impacts examined include: (a) impacts of the policies on farm income; (b) government costs associated with the policies, including administration costs; (c) off-site sediment damages that would be abated; and (d...

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R.D.; Mueller, P. E.

335

Impacts of Land Managers' Decisions on Landuse Transition within Missisquoi Watershed Vermont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nutrient loads across the Lake. The exceedingly high nutrient loads, particularly the phosphorous (P) loads sources for increasing phosphorous influxes into the Missisquoi Bay (Ghebremichael et al., 2010[4]; Gaddis

Vermont, University of

336

A distributed converging overland flow model: 3. Application to Natural Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we get Oh ( Xt)'-' h(x, t -T- At)-- h(x, t)-T- Ate- -T- 2 Ot-+ Ho , (3) where Hot denotes higher-order terms. Differentiating (2) with respect to t, we get 021, 0 ( h,,_, Oh ) Oo (x) , Oh a(x)nh\\"-' Oh + Oq(x, t) + - - _-- c-)- at (4) ot... Ox nh\\" Ot + oq,:x, t) l;1 at + - - c ot_] (5) Writing (5) in a compact form, we get I 0 h\\" h, Oa(x) h(x, t + Zt) -- h(x, t) + -- (x) Ox + q( , t) + (Z'Z r)J xt + ( xt)'-' h\\"-' [ 0 ( ) , (x) l} ? 0 (//- i )j + {Oq(x' t)-- a(x) 0...

Singh, Vijay P.

337

attoyac bayou wpp development The bayou is one of many rural watersheds listed as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

body on the Texas Integrated Report for Clean Water Act Sections 305(b) and 303(d) due to high levels to evaluate a water body's ability to support contact recreation. Three monitoring stations managed and Shelby counties before emptying into Sam Rayburn Reservoir. With several rural communities in the area

338

Oregon's Restoration Economy Restoring watersheds is a starting point for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 20 25 30 Restoration: Labor-intensive Restoration: Average Transportation Infrastructure Energy activity in communities around Oregon, today and into the future. "As the restoration economy blossoms in natural assets for the benefit of communities and salmon Oxbow Mine Tailings Restoration Project, Middle

339

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemistry of Watersheds Along the Western Slope of the Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was funneled into plastic bottles for sample collection andinto acid- washed plastic bottles. In order to correct for

Homyak, Peter Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Use of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Indices to Assess Aquatic Health in a Mixed-Landuse Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degradation from storm water runoff and point source discharges (Plafkin et al. 1989), and indicating stream assemblage health in this study were: richness, percent model affinity, family-level biotic index). Urbanization frequently impacts aquatic ecosystems through increases in nonpoint source pollutants

Pennuto, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Estimating Nonpoint Source Pollution Loadings in the Great Lakes Watersheds Chansheng He  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminated sediments, urban runoff, storm sewers, and agriculture impairs Great Lakes shoreline waters will be used as the input to the water quality model for simulating pollutant transport through surface-scale water quality model to estimat

342

Response of discharge, TSS, and E. coli to rainfall events in urban, suburban, and rural watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the storm-period response of E. coli across an urban and rural gradient, but also lays a foundation of urban development during storm events. Identifying potential factors that affect E. coli concen that the water has been polluted by feces associated with pathogens. Simulation models can play an important role

Zhang, Minghua

343

Forecasting land use change and its environmental impact at a watershed scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can also degrade the quality of the storm water runoff. Monitoring and modeling studies have shown: Urbanization; Hydrologic modeling; Runoff; Non-point source pollution; GIS; Forecasting 1. Introduction behavior due to urbanization include increased lake and wetlands water levels (Calder et al., 1995

344

The long-term development of a watershed: spatial patterns, streamflow, and sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for determining developed patches....................................................... 68 18 Maps of the study area showing development patch configuration for roads (Rds) alone and parcels with roads (PWR) for selected years... index for roads and parcels with roads. ..................... 78 27 Landscape division for roads and parcels with roads by year. ....... 79 28 Lacunarity curves for parcels with roads for five time points. ...... 80 29 PWR lacunarity over time...

DeFee, Buren Brooks, II

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis area watersheds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Hardin Hall, University of Nebraska Source: Nebraska-Lincoln, University of - Sand Hills Biocomplexity Project Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 34 Rainfall...

346

Prediction of sediment-bound nutrient delivery from semi-arid California watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1981], or sequestered in terrestrial or offshore deposits [Ritchie, 1989; Stallard, 1998]. The specific in offshore sedimentary deposits represents a net CO2 sink [Berner, 1982]. As with SOC, the erosion of N and P nutrients for plant growth. In addition, the loss of N and P from hillslopes contributes

Gabet, Emmanuel "Manny"

347

Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

run at a daily time step in water balance mode at a 1/8 byBased Model of Land Surface Water and Energy Fluxes forwere obtained from the Surface Water Modeling Group at the

Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

An economic analysis of a large scale ashe juniper clearing project in the Leon River watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................................6 Study Objectives .......................................................................................7 Study Area ................................................................................................7 II LITERATURE REVIEW.......................................................................40 6 Distribution for pasture size (ha) represented by LRRP participants.. ..... 40 7 Percentage of total area for each land use category represented by the LRRP...

Flack, Rebecca Lynn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Effect of a Rainfall Event on Contaminant Levels in the Brunette River Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collected during a rainfall event. Dioxins, furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides objectives for the protection of aquatic life: dioxins/furans, benzo(a)pyrene, DDT, PCBs, trace metals and p'un épisode de pluie. On a mesuré les dioxines, les furanes, les biphényles polychlorés (PCB), les pesticides

351

Managing watershed services of tropical forests and plantations: can meta-analyses help?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is also relevant to reservoirs for drinking water or hydroelectricity production (Guo et al., 2000). Over

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

352

E-Print Network 3.0 - area watersheds 2002-2003 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economics and Statistics 2002-2003... and Professionals from Honduras (areas affected by Hurricane Mitch). ... Source: Schweik, Charles M. - Department of Natural...

353

Developing a Methodology to Prioritize Texas Watersheds for Environmental Restoration Efforts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of non-native plant species, and others (Jensen, 2003a). As a consequence, competition for waters between human uses and environmental purposes has now increased to such an extent that some habitats and ecosystems that rely on water may be in peril...

Srinivasan, R.; Jacobs, Jennifer H.; Jones, C. Allan; Harris, B.L.; Jensen, Ricard W.

354

Changing forest water yields in response to climate warming: results from long-term experimental watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variation in potential ET divided by P (PET/P; dryness index) to interannual variation in the EI ­ high

355

An Economic Analysis of Stream Restoration in an Urban Watershed: Austin, Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County Appraisal District (TCAD), for providing relevant real estate data and making this research analysis possible. Thank you Dr. Ronald Kaiser and Dr. Val Silvy for continuous encouragement and making my study possible in the Water Program. Thank... to the bank stabilization within 600 feet were selected as restoration site. In addition, each housing value was joined with the ArcMap and matched up with housing ID number provided by the TCAD. Figure 10 shows the selection of houses along the Walnut...

Huang, Chi-Ying

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

356

Bark Beetles and Watersheds Workshop: Impacts to the Hydrologic Cycle and Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--Research Approaches and Results: Water Quantity/Hydrologic Impacts Water and energy balance in a forested stand University Union, Parlor A (3rd Floor) University of Utah Salt Lake City, December 1, 2011 Video Conference

Tipple, Brett

357

Impacts of Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in Central California Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

routes because of Hydroelectric power, Habitat degradation,routes because of Hydroelectric power, Habitat degradation,

Frechette, Danielle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Implementing the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan through a Heliborne Electromagnetic (EM) Survey: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing the Pecos River WPP through a Heliborne Electromagnetic (EM) Survey Final Report Lucas Gregory, Zhuping Sheng, Almoutaz El Hassan, Alyson K. McDonald, Amy Porter Texas Water Resources Institute TR-470 March 2014 Implementing....S. Environmental Protection Agency Authors Lucas Gregory1, Zhuping Sheng2, Almoutaz El Hassan2, Alyson K. McDonald3, & Amy Porter4 1Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas Water Resources Institute 2Texas A&M AgriLife Research, El Paso Research...

Gregory, L.; Sheng, Z.; Hassan, A.; McDonald, A.; Porter, A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemistry of Watersheds Along the Western Slope of the Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mediterranean-type ecosystems. Future climate changeclimate change and elevated N deposition may work synergistically to increase NO emissions from soils in semiarid environments and those experiencing a Mediterranean

Homyak, Peter Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pesticide Education in the Coastal Zone of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute Contributors Dr. Ruben Salda?a, Texas AgriLife Extension Service Brad Cowen, Texas AgriLife Extension Service Dr. Enrique Perez, Texas AgriLife Extension Service #31;is publication was produced by the Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI..., and tofu. Biodiesel can be produced from soybean oil, which burns cleaner than petroleum-based diesel oil. Other industrial products that soybeans are used in include cleaning solvents, lubricants, soy-based foams for use in cool- ers, refrigerators...

Berthold, Allen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Simulated Atmospheric Deposition of Pollutants into Watersheds in the Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A biosphere relevant earth system model (BioEaSM) is needed to integrate features of atmospheric, terrestrial

Collins, Gary S.

362

Effects of Small Impoundments on Total Watershed Sediment Yield in Northeast Kansas, April through August 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-area and elevation-storage table for Dam 38 .......................... 47 10. Table 10: Rating table for LDMD 5 applying weir, orifice, and full pipe flow discharges depending on elevation above riser.......................................................................................... 58 11. Table 11: Rating table for LDMD 17 applying weir, orifice, and full pipe flow discharges depending on elevation above riser....................................................................................... 59 6 Chapter 1...

Foster, Guy M.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

A Watershed Approach to Urban River Restoration: A Conceptual Restoration Plan for Sausal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be sustainable considering the hydrologic processes remainprocess of applying the WFD to Sausal Creek, we identified opportunities to improve the sustainable

Ippolito, Teresa; Podolak, Kristen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Meeting Attendees January 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@ag.tamu.edu Mike Bira EPA Bira.Mike@epamail.epa.gov Diane Boellstorff Texas AgriLife Extension Service dboellstorff.henry@epa.gov Chuck Brown Upper Colorado River Authority chuckb@ucratx.org Gary Bryant Texas Water Resources Institute

365

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable January 25, 2012 # First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bira US EPA Region 6 bira.mike@epamail.epa.gov 8 Diane Boellstorff Texas AgriLife Extension Service.S. EPA Region 6 brewer.henry@epa.gov 13 Gary Bryant Texas Water Resources Institute glbryant

366

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Participants July 27, 2011 First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@ag.tamu.edu Mike Bira US EPA Region 6 Bira.Mike@epamail.epa.gov Diane Boellstorff Texas AgriLife Extension Service@ucratx.org Gary Bryant Texas AgriLife Extension glbryant@ag.tamu.edu Monica Burrell US EPA Region 6 burrell

367

Habitat relationships of seven breeding bird species in the Leon River Watershed investigated at local scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past 100?150 years Texas rangelands have dramatically changed from native open savannahs to dense woodlands. On the Edwards plateau, a major management concern is the increasing encroachment of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei). Preceding...

Juarez Berrios, Edwin Alfredo

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Geographical Approach to Tracking Escherichia coli and Nutrients in a Texas Coastal Plains Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that phosphate was correlated with mixed urban land use and multi-family residential areas (p=0.003, p=0.009, respectively; R2=0.739), while total phosphorus flux was correlated with single-family residential land use (p=0.019; R2=0.409). Nonpoint sources...

Harclerode, Cara

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

369

Characterization of Section 404 Permit Mitigation Plans, Coastal Margin and Associated Watersheds, Upper Texas Coast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Corps) is directed to enforce Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (1975 amendment) by administering permits for development. Furthermore, a 1990 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Corps and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a...

Conkey, April A.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Pathways Toward Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production in the Mississippi River Watershed  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652Grow Your EnergyTechnology to Market »PathPathways

371

Application of the Green-Ampt infiltration equation to watershed modeling with estimated parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1988) John Storrs Warinner, B. S. , Oregon State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wesley P. James A computer model was developed, based upon the Green-Ampt infiltration equation, to compute cumulative rainfall excess for a single, given...

Warinner, John Storrs

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Impacts of Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in Central California Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

afforded by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 (MBTA; 16afforded by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 (MBTA; 16

Frechette, Danielle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Effect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt-dominated watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restoration activities often seek to directly modify stream channel and riparian zone surface and subsurface: Cookhouse Meadow stream restoration project, 2004). Recently, bio- technical restoration techniquesEffect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt

Kotchen, Matthew J.

374

Promoting Successful Restoration through Effective Monitoring in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for their assistance in arranging the web-based reviews. #12;3 Stream Restoration from stream restoration. Since most restoration is at the reach scale1 Promoting Successful Restoration through Effective Monitoring

Palmer, Margaret A.

375

A Watershed Approach to Urban River Restoration: A Conceptual Restoration Plan for Sausal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forum: Evaluating Stream Restoration Projects. EnvironmentalR. Ladson. 2005. Stream restoration in urban catchmentsECONOMICS OF LID COMPARED TO IN- STREAM RESTORATION

Ippolito, Teresa; Podolak, Kristen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Sources and Fate of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in the Arctic Ocean and Surrounding Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drift UHW Upper halocline water layer WGC West Greenland Current ix TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... .................................................................................................. vii TABLE OF CONTENTS .......................................................................................... ix LIST OF FIGURES ................................................................................................... xii LIST...

Walker, Sally Annette

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

High-resolution characterization of a semiarid watershed: Implications on evapotranspiration estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, United States b and fluxes. Results from this study indicate a strong seasonality in water and energy fluxes U.S. and northwest Mexico (e.g., Douglas et al., 1993; Gochis et al., 2006; Vivoni et al., 2008a

Johnson, Eric E.

378

Quantifying E. coli Discharge from Failing Onsite Sewage Facilities in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality samples were obtained for sixteen rainfall events at the site with OSSFs and twelve events at the site with no OSSFs. Nearly all sampling events had at least one sample with an E. coli concentration greater than the state boundary. However...

Morrison, Derek

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

Surrounding the Consequences of Watershed Disasters in the Periphery of the IndianTriangle1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brahmaputra embrace t h e l a n d s a n d t h e p e o p l e s o f Nepal*, I n d i a * a n d Bangladesh* b e f .resource i s s u e s . Depending on how t h e dominant r u r a l s o c i a l b a s e a d j u s t t o i m p working i n t h e Water Branch o f t h e Land Resources D i v i s i o n i n t h e Department of Primary I

Standiford, Richard B.

380

Fact Sheet - Acquisition of wildlife habitat in the St. Joe river watershed - March 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES6FYRANDOM DRUG TESTING TheMay 2012 B O N

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity of Dedicated Energy Crop and Woody Biomass Operations  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartment of Energy Watch itEnergyOptimization of

382

Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat in Montana - FACT SHEET  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson LabJeffersonStandards andJianzhiAbout

383

Acquisition of Wildlife Habitat in the Calispell Creek Watershed - FACT SHEET- November 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuide the Calispell Creek

384

Acquisition of Wildlife Habitat in the Lower Pack River Watershed - Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuide the Calispell

385

Acquisition of Wildlife Habitat in the Pack River Watershed - Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuide the CalispellPack

386

Understanding the Occurrence and Transport of Current-use Pesticides in the San Francisco Estuary Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water and Sediment from Yolo Bypass, California 20042005.sediment, and soil from the Yolo Bypass, California. SanGuo and others 2007), the Yolo Bypass (Figure 2) (Smalling

Kuivila, Kathryn; Hladik, Michelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach Proposed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Mark David project will combine research, education, and extension on using tile-fed constructed wetlands and wood of wetlands using three constructed in 1994, while at the same time install two additional wetlands in other

David, Mark B.

388

Northwest Sustainability Initiative Learn and Serve America Grant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Awarded to: Mary Ann Schmidt Director Student Watershed Research Project Environmental Science Watershed Research project in cooperation with the Environmental Science and management (ESM) Department and Management Department (ESM) Student Watershed Research Project The Student Watershed Research Project (SWRP

389

Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER Watershed Zones of Intervention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Central Intelligence Agency (US-CIA), data 9.7 million Haitians live within the borders of the 27,750 km2. In contrast, only 3.4% of the Haitian population is 65 and 51% is 20 (US-CIA, 2011). Forty seven percent of the population of Haiti lives in urban areas according to recent data (US-CIA, 2011); however, the city of Port

Ma, Lena

390

NAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay and Tolay Creek Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of estuarine habitat comprised of deep and shallow water habitat, mudflats, salt marsh, and wetlandNAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Sears Point, the proposed project site, consists of approximately 960 acres of diked

US Army Corps of Engineers

391

An Assessment of the Natural and Anthropogenic Geochemistry of the Red Mountain Creek Watershed: Ironton Mining District, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

re-vegetation of the deposits. This remediation was required as a result of National laws, which mandated the state of Colorado and the Idarado Mining Company develop a Remedial Action Plan (RAP). Interestingly, the tailings were assumed...

Litt, Joshua

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

Role of snow and glacier melt in controlling river hydrology in Liddar watershed (western Himalaya) under current and future climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] Snowmelt and icemelt are believed to be important regulators of seasonal discharge of Himalayan rivers. To analyze the long term contribution of snowmelt and glacier/icemelt to river hydrology we apply a water budget model to simulate hydrology...

Jeelani, G.; Feddema, Johannes J.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Stearns, Leigh

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Vol1:LosALAmos|PuebLoWAtershed LosAlamosNationalLaboratory,NPDESPermitNo.NM0030759  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-DIR-PLAN-10003,R.0April18,2011 site discharge Pollution Prevention Plan (sdPPP) eP2011-0116 591 Vol1:Los discharge Pollution Prevention Plan (sdKown, EP-ET-ER GIS Team, May 11, 2010, Map# 09-0120-08 State Plane Coordinate System New Mexico, Central

394

Development of a Decision Support Geographic Information System for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and livestock production these historically predominant grasslands provide. The result has been an interest and public investment in land restoration programs such as the removal and management of brush via landowner cost-share. Implementation of a publicly...

Jones, Jason Samuel

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development and application of the spatially explicit load enrichment calculation tool (select) to determine potential E. coli loads in watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the USEPA National Section 303(d) List Fact Sheet, bacterial pathogens are the leading cause of water quality impairments in Texas. The automated Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) uses spatially variable...

Riebschleager, Kendra Jean

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Evaluation and Performance of Rapid Methods for Identifying and Tracking Sources of Fecal Pollution in Coastal Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

does not include service contracts, many materials that arevalidation may be included with a service contract if oneis purchased (service contract costs are not included in

Thulsiraj, Vanessa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

In-stream processes have been implicated as important for watershed scale nitrogen (N) retention and export (Bernhardt et  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and concerns over deleterious impacts on receiving water bodies have grown (Rabalais et al. 2009). Stream reach nutrient export is impacted by both bio- logical (i.e., uptake) and physical (i.e., hydrologic loss administered by the Montana Department of Enviro

Covino, Tim

398

Sources of large wood in the main stem of a fourth-order watershed in coastal Oregon1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lo- cated primarily in the middle stream reaches and in the zones of influence that had the most for the decline of large wood in streams in the Pacific Northwest. Résumé : Nous avons comparé la contribution de cours d'eau du Nord-Ouest du Pacifique. [Traduit par la Rédaction] Reeves et al. 1370 Introduction Large

399

An economic analysis of conservation and management measures carried out on the Blacklands Experimental Watershed, Riesel, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? NO too ? c^\\ vO ON C"? cv cncv ? LT\\ S B B c\\i s **4 CV rH C M ON CV cn... the technical and economic assistance to farmers in establishing a soil conservation system. 3 Thornton, M. K., Soils and How to Improve Them. Texas Agricultural Extension Service, College Station, Texas, Bulletin No. 189, p. 11. U Southern, John H., Whv...

Decker, Robert David

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The science and politics of increasing nitrogen pollution from human activity : case study of the Aberjona watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen has critical implications for all life on earth. The Haber-Bosch process (1909) paved the way for the industrial fixation of NH3 from unreactive atmospheric dinitrogen, a phenomenon ...

Orosz, Matthew S. (Matthew Sndor), 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Landscape, vegetation characteristics, and group identity in an urban and suburban watershed: why the 60s matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

predictors of front-yard landscape in an anthropogenicenvironment. Landscape Ecol 15:357371 Note *PRIZM is aand planted them. The landscapes we see today are therefore

Boone, Christopher G.; Cadenasso, Mary L.; Grove, J. Morgan; Schwarz, Kirsten; Buckley, Geoffrey L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Evaluating runoff simulations from the Community Land Model 4.0 using observations from flux towers and a mountainous watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land Model (CLM) is the land component within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) (formerly known earth system model b

403

Encouraging low-impact-development stormwater-management practices / Assabet River Watershed sub-basin case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory codes and ordinances create a framework that guide stormwater management decision processes. These regulations are designed to protect the health and safety of the public and to preserve the natural integrity ...

Brown, James E. (James Edward), 1969-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Economic and ecological implications of alternative brush management and restoration scenarios designed to improve water yield in two Texas watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Costs of additional water are lower for sub-basins within the Edwards study area (ranging from $32 to $70 per acre-foot of water added) than in the Twin Buttes (ranging from $63 to $218 per acre-foot), meaning that brush management efforts are more...

Olenick, Keith Layne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Understanding wood-pool dynamics using long-term monitoring data from the Gualala River Watershed: What can we learn?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of riparian and stream restoration in the western UnitedA. Grant. 2010. Do in-stream restoration structures enhanceuse of large wood in stream restoration: experiences from 50

Church, Tamara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

QUANTIFICATION OF POTENTIAL ARSENIC BIOAVAILABILITY IN SPATIALLY VARYING GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS AT THE WATERSHED SCALE USING CHELATING RESINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an evaluation process of potential ecological effects that may occur or may be occurring due to exposure to stressors (Gregorich et al., 2001). Stressors can be a result of natural geologic processes and/or, most often, results of anthropogenic activities... to be weathered and eroded, or erosion of undisturbed sediments containing metals such as arsenic, 9 sulfur, or iron. These eroded sediments can then be transported by wind, subjected to runoff, and/or anthropogenically relocated to areas of harsh...

LAKE, GRACIELA ESTHER

407

Quantification of potential arsenic bioavailability in spatially varying Geologic Environments at the Watershed Scale Using Chelating Resins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to stressors (Gregorich et al., 2001). Stressors can be a result of natural geologic processes and/or, most often, results of anthropogenic activities such as industry, urbanization, and agricultural practices. Risk evaluators must consider the industrial... to runoff, and/or anthropogenically relocated to areas of harsh climatic conditions where they have the potential to cause health problems. Another possible source of geologic transport is through sorption processes. If the contaminate was released...

Lake, Graciela Esther

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fact Sheet - Acquisition of 0.5 acre wildlife habitat in the Pack River watershed - March 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES6FYRANDOM DRUG TESTING TheMay 2012 B O N N

409

Occurrence, Prevalence, and Disinfection Potential of Tetracycline Resistance Genes and Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in a Subtropical Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discharges, such as wastewater treatment plants. . ....................................................... 12 Figure 2.2. Three dimensional PCA score plot of all samples. The sediment samples...). Consequently, human and animal waste containing antibiotics and ARB are transported to wastewater treatment plants, lagoons, lakes, or streams. This can create environments that increase the development and spread of antibiotic resistance (Jury et al...

Sullivan, Bailey Ann

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

A modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented in a watershed in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

best management practices (BMPs) have been implemented through Water Quality Management Plans (WQMPs; Best management practices Software availability Name of the software: Soil and Water Assessment Tool. doi:10.1016/j.envsoft.2005.05.013 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft Environmental Modelling & Software

411

EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOEs Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon River subbasin and Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Upper Snake River subbasin on Fort Hall Reservation.

412

Full text access provided via ACS AuthorChoice Environmental Science & Technology is published by the American Chemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regions and all streams, concentrations of total Hg (THg) in top predator fish and forage fish, and Me position within seven of eight individual streams, Hg concentrations in top predator fish (including cutthroat, rainbow, and brown trout; green sunfish; and largemouth bass) were not strongly influenced

413

Volume II, Chapter 5 Elochoman Subbasin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.2 Fall Chinook--Elochoman Subbasin (Mill/Abernathy/Germany)....................... 5-7 5.2.3 Coho (Mill/Abernathy/Germany) ................................. 5-13 5.2.5 Chum--Elochoman Subbasin.2.7 Winter Steelhead--Elochoman Subbasin (Mill/Abernathy/Germany) .............. 5-21 5.2.8 Cutthroat Trout

414

A shallow water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow on surfaces with ridges and furrows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

induces problems at watershed scale for soil conservation (decrease of soil thickness by erosion, nutrient (drinking water) and sustainability of aquatic ecosystems (chemical pollution). These troubles can be prevented by watershed management. Improving watershed management in relationships with overland flow

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne chemical emissions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Applied Science Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 7 AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Summary: watershed. The combustion of aviation fuel...

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne organic acids Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder Collection: Geosciences 2 AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Summary: watershed. The combustion of aviation fuel...

417

Getting Our Feet Wet: Water Management at Mt. Laguna in Cleveland National Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Quality Control Board, Watershed Managementof Land Management (BLM) Tests preserve water quality, whichRegional Water Quality Control Board. Watershed Management

Mumby, William Cade

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator produced nuclides Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Livermore, CA... watershed. In situ- produced cosmogenic 10 Be was measured in 24 sediment samples to estimate the background... small tributary watersheds (<10 km2 ) to...

419

factsheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

92-acre conservation easement in the Jocko River watershed in northwestern Montana for fish habitat mitigation. Located in Sanders County, this property is part of a watershed...

420

northeastern Washington's Okanogan County. The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7.31 acre habitat acquisition in Washington's Okanogan River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). The Okanogan River Watershed was selected as a focus for restoration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne nitrogen load Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: airborne nitrogen load Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Summary: watershed. The...

422

CTAHR Faculty Research Portfolio 200954 Dr. Carl Evensen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.), Sustainability Science for Watershed Landscapes, ISEAS Publishing, Singapore, In Press. Bruland, G., C

423

Change in Urban Land Use and Associated Attributes in the Upper San Francisco Estuary, 1990-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay watershed. Environmental Management Water Plan Land andwater quality in Georgian Bay. Environmental Management 44(

Stoms, David M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source water quality impacts. Environmental Management 17:water quality in agricultural watersheds. Environmental Management.

Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

18 Rare Freshwater Fish of British Columbia Salvelinus confluentus Suckley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lowland Western Muskwa Ranges Cassiar Ranges Teslin Plateau Tuya Range MAJOR WATERSHEDS South Coast Rivers

426

February 14, 2013 1 College: CLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and quarries on watershed health, management of their own companies, and instruction at all educational levels

Veerman, J. J. P.

427

EIS-0265-SA-57: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Watershed Management Program - Idaho Fish Screening Improvement (Champion, Iron, Fourth of July, Goat Creeks)

428

The Karjat Drinking Water Project GISE (CSE)-CTARA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ 11 #12;Analysis Project- since 2008 Rs. 1500 crores in watershed development. Planning of small hydro

Sohoni, Milind

429

Lake Baikal in southeastern Siberia,the "Sacred Sea,"incites strong emotions and action in Russia. In March 2006,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Putin announced the pipeline would be rerouted outside the lake's watershed (Cullison 2007).In July 2007

Dever, Jennifer A.

430

Traditional and Host-Associated Fecal Indicator Bacterial Patterns in Southern California Watersheds: Field Source Identification Studies and Laboratory Microcosms Investigating Presence and Persistence in Water and Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of eutrophication and sediment resuspension in the largeM.J. ( 2007) Beach sand and sediments are temporal sinks andin Santa Monica Bay beach sediments. Water Research 40(14),

Mika, Kathryn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Integrating Historical Imagery and Sediment Radioisotopes to Shed Light on Long-Term Rangeland Dynamics and Ecosystem Services at the Watershed Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and respond to natural processes as well as varying degrees of human impact. In the southern Great Plains, land cover and land use have changed dramatically over the last century. However, there is tremendous uncertainty as to the timing and magnitude...

Berg, Matthew

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cumulative watershed effects (CWEs) result from the overlapping effects of management activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from forest management range from the short-term variability of sediment transport rates to the variability in annual sediment data indicated that 13-95% of the variation in sediment transport rates could be explained by discharge

MacDonald, Lee

433

Modeling Impacts of Land-Use/Land-Cover Change and Variable Precipitation on Hydrology and Water Quality of a Coastal Watershed in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

delivered total phosphorus load to Copano Bay from the Aransas River for the historical (Hist) baseline (1990-1999) and each scenario (2030-2039). b) Average monthly delivered total phosphorus load to Copano Bay from the Aransas River for the historical...

Castillo, Cesar Ricardo

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Rain Garden construction in Monmouth County has accelerated consid-erably since the early planning days in 2003 with our local Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and shore tour- ism industry came from people pollution Sunny Days for Rain Gardens -- Progress towardsRain Garden construction in Monmouth County has accelerated consid- erably since the early planning

Goodman, Robert M.

435

Traditional and Host-Associated Fecal Indicator Bacterial Patterns in Southern California Watersheds: Field Source Identification Studies and Laboratory Microcosms Investigating Presence and Persistence in Water and Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federation 57(5), 384-389. Sinton, L. ; Finlay, R. ; Lynch,solar inactivation (Sinton, 1999) or increased protectionsunlight inactivation (Sinton et al. , 1999), protection

Mika, Kathryn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Bacterial Source Tracking in Impaired Watersheds: Evaluation of Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods for Increased Source Specificity and Improved Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the isolates unidentified (Hauck, 2006). Trinity River An urban BST project was sponsored by TCEQ in the Trinity River Basin in Dallas in 2005. The TMDL project is currently close to the implementation plan phase, but BST was conducted in the early..., and dogs in pets (Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research, 2006). Assessment of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco and Belton Lake The Lake Waco and Belton Lake study was a significant collaboration of the Texas Farm Bureau, TSSWCB...

Martin, Emily C

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D. [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico)] [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico); Huq, M.V. [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States)] [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States); Meyers-Schone, L.J. [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany)] [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany); Mohrbacher, D.A. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olsen, C.R. [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.] [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Stout, J.G. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)] [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Uganda Manafwa River early flood warning system development hydrologic watershed modeling using HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS, ArcGIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Manafwa River basin spans several districts in Eastern Uganda. Over the years, frequent floods have constantly posed a great threat to the local communities in these districts. The Uganda Red Cross Society (URCS) intends ...

Ma, Yan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

A diversion is any transfer of water across watershed boundaries through a man-made pipeline or canal. Diversions of Great Lakes water provide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that evaporates, is incorporated into products, or for other rea- sons is not returned as treated wastewater challenges can help us protect clean, abundant water for generations to come. Diversions of Great Lakes WaterLakeMichigan ·Completedin1900 ·ReversedtheflowoftheChicagoRivertocarry wastewater and shipping traffic toward

Saldin, Dilano

440

Inferring denudation variations from the sediment record; an example of the last glacial cycle record of the Golo Basin and watershed, East Corsica,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effect of climate change on mountain building and on sedimentary basin models insu-00717276,version1-4Jan-2117.2012.00556.x #12;2 1. Introduction Tectonic forces (uplift or subsidence), and climate changes (green or ice and physical properties allow us to constrain three periods of sedimentation during the last climatic cycle

Brest, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Impact of Geologic and Geomorphic Characteristics on Drainage Efficiency and Discharge; Uncompahgre, San Miguel, and Animas River Watersheds, Colorado, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, John R. Giardino Co-Chair of Committee, John D. Vitek Committee Members, Steven M. Quiring Hongbin... to extend my gratitude to my committee: Dr. John D. Vitek, Dr. Steven M. Quiring, and Dr. Hongbin Zhan for providing guidance, thought provoking discussion, and encouragement. Thanks also go to my friends and colleagues of the High Alpine and Arctic...

Gamache, Garrett

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Third Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds, 8-11 September 2008, Estes Park, CO 155 Using a Coupled Groundwater/Surface-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-located and NSF-funded North Temperate Lakes LTER project, includes snowpack, solar radiation, potential. Hay, John Doherty Abstract A major focus of the U.S. Geological Survey's Trout Lake Water, Energy in northern Wisconsin is underlain by a highly conductive outwash sand aquifer. In this area, streamflow

443

Implementing the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan through Invasive Species Control and by Providing Technical and Financial Assistance to Reduce Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leaf beetle Successful defoliation of saltcedar continued in 2013 as well and with the extensive distribution of beetles from their release sites, beetle collections were kept to a minimum. In some locations, beetles have been observed about 50.../salt-cedar-bugs-found-eddy- county; https://today.agrilife.org/2013/07/29/theres-a-new-bug-in-town/). [9] Figure 6: Saltcedar biological release sites and chemical control distribution south of I-10 Figure 7: Saltcedar biological release...

Gregory, L.; Porter, A.; Knutson, A.; Muegge, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Longitudinal and seasonal variation of stream N uptake in an urbanizing watershed: effect of organic matter, stream size, transient storage and debris dams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when tar- geting stream restoration efforts and land-use2001), while urban stream restoration can signi?- cantlyAJ (2008) Effects of stream restoration on denitri- ?cation

Claessens, Luc; Tague, Christina L.; Groffman, Peter M.; Melack, John M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

ABSTRACT: The time to hydrograph peak of a watershed basin has been found to correlate with various statistical attributes (e.g.,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and John M. Harlin, 2003. A Theoretical Travel Time Based on Water- shed Hypsometry. J. of the American-Iturbe and Valdes, 1979; Gupta et al., 1980). However, the empirical approach produced largely inconclusive

Luo, Wei

446

Changes in Flood Management along the Pajaro River: A Transition to Watershed Management Approaches and Lessons from the Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

human actions causing environmental damage and the full-costand include the environmental damage and recovery costs (

Jagger, Stacie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Impact of Harvesting and Site Preparation on Stormflow and Water Quality in East Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were lower, the sheared watersheds still had a significantly higher concentration. Nitrate concentrations in 1983 remained low at 54, 20 and 10 ppb for the sheared, chopped and control watersheds, respectively. Total nitrogen concentration...

DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

448

Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities, Hydrology, Models Descriptors: Drinking Water, Source Water, Pollution Sources, Watershed Management Supply Descriptors: Drinking water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI

449

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions Appendix II The unique geology, hydrology and instream habitat. This chapter examines how environmental conditions in the Deschutes watershed affect, the discussion characterizes the environmental conditions within three watershed areas: the Lower Deschutes

450

The Departments of Biological Sciences and Geography jointly offer instruction leading to a post-diploma major in Environmental Science for students who have completed the Diploma in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management or in Environmental Assessment and Restoration (formerly Watershed Management) at Lethbridge Lethbridge Community College Environmental Assessment and Restoration (formerly Watershed Management and Reclamation Soil and Water Conservation Selkirk College Integrated Environmental Planning Technology

Seldin, Jonathan P.

451

Bosque River Environmental Infrastructure Improvement Plan: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

watershed health. This report is the first phase of a project that is focused on developing and employing a strategic approach to identifying priority areas in the watershed where field investigations should begin to investigate the need to reduce pollution...

Srinivasan, Raghavan

452

Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a 35-acre tract in the Lower Jocko River watershed to protect and restore fish habitat. This property was selected because the Jocko River watershed is designated as...

453

Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tribes of a 9-acre parcel in the Lower Jocko River watershed to protect and restore fish habitat. This property was selected because the Jocko River watershed is designated as...

454

Hydrology and channel form of an urban creek : Rheem Creek in the context of restoration efforts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the upper watershed 3) Wanlass Park, in the middle watershedin the upper watershed, 4) Wanlass Park and the adjacentBalazs and Micah Lang Wanlass Park Downstream of the

Balazs, Carolina; Lang, Micah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Shrink-Swell Dynamics of Vertisol Catenae under Different Land Uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because of the dynamic nature of shrinking and swelling of soils that are classified as Vertisols, partitioning of rainfall into infiltration and runoff in a Vertic watershed is more temporally and spatially unique than in most other watersheds...

Dinka, Takele Mitiku

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

456

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared See Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, & Swan River Valleys Appendix 29 #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared

457

The Value of Small-Scale Projects in Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Rural Development in the Ecuadorian Choc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

household consumption, the use of composting for sustainabletechnicians, offered composting workshops to those farmerstraining adults in composting, waste management, watershed

Fernndez, Sarah Haide

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Sent: Friday, October 11, 2002 8:31 PM To: comment@bpa.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as pioneers for a clean, sustainable watershed with real, viable salmon run options. I thank you in advance

459

September 10, 2007 Annotated Bibliography of Urban Wet Weather Flow Literature from 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency Wet-Weather Flow Program Urban Watershed Management Branch Water Supply & Water Resources Division........................................................................................................................................................................ 21 Heavy metals

Pitt, Robert E.

460

Hillslope Hydrological Processes in a Costa Rican Rainforest: Water Supply Partitioning Using Isotope Tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blancas Hydroelectric Project, and for improved predictions in similar, ungauged watersheds (ICE 2002). Study Watershed The study watershed is located in San Juan de Peas Blancas, east of the Cordillera de Tilarn mountain range backing up... peaks. These goals were accomplished by supplementing hydraulic and physical data already available at the site with use of isotope tracers. Methods Study Site The 2.2 ha watershed used in this research is located in Peas Blancas, Costa Rica...

DuMont, Andrea Lyn

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Watershed Management Program - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin

462

Provenance of Corexit-related chemical constituents found in nearshore and inland Gulf Coast waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the watershed including Orange Beach), upland forest, and agriculture. There are major timber companies Company. Additionally, fa

Clement, Prabhakar

463

Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, economic modeling, bio-enrgy, and crop modeling at field, watershed, and regional scales. The selected Ph

465

E-Print Network 3.0 - asynchronous parallel iterative Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

computations for image analysis... .Y., Parallel asynchronous watershed algorithm-architecture. IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed... ., An asynchronous cellular...

466

A Master Plan for Sustainable Tourism Development Koh Lanta Yai, Krabi Province  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rainwater flows over the surface of exposed soil Figure 8. Watershed Threats Impervious Surface Solid Waste Stormwater

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Christina River Basin CZO Spatial and temporal integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

watershed approach to quantifying anthropogenic modification of critical zone carbon sequestration Anthony K Hypothesis · Processes that mix minerals and carbon are rate limiting to watershed-scale carbon sequestration & Preservation 4. Watershed Integration of Erosion-Driven Carbon Sequestration Spa$al Scaling #12;Physically

Sparks, Donald L.

468

Input-output analysis as a method of evaluation of the economic impact of water resources development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acre Foot of Water Used, Watershed Study Area, 1958 4. 1 Interindustry Flows of Goods and Services, Dollar Values, by Sector of Origin and Destination, Watershed Study Area, 1958 4. 2 Technical Coefficients, Watershed Economy, Watershed Study Area...-Added per Acre Foot, by Sectors, Watershed Study Area, 1958 and 1963 39 45 46 56 58 60 64 65 70 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Among the basic resources essential to the develop- ment of other resources, as well as to life itself, is water. Being...

Canion, Robert Larry

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Impact of nutrient loading from point and non-point sources on water quality and lotic ecosystem health in Texas' north-Bosque watershed using a bio-indicator response approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 1999. Periphytic chlorophyll a production from the Matlock Periphytometer was used as an indicator of baseline primary productivity and of maximum primary productivity (MPP) in response to nutrient enrichment (nitrogen and phosphorus). Dissolved...

Rodriguez, Angela Dean

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part I Lower Rio Grande Flood Control Model [LRGFCM] RiverWare Model Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Anthony Bridge 1986-1989 (d), 1990-2000 (n), 2001-5/2005 (d) WW #32 (La Union East Lateral) 1979-1992 (d), 1993-1996 (n), 1997-1999 (d), 2000 (n) 2001-6/2003 (d) WW #23A (Texas Lateral) 1985-1992 (d), 1993-1996 (n), 1997-1999 (d), 2000 (n) 2001...-6/2003 (d) Mesquite/Anthony/East Drain 1975-1980 (m), 1981-1992 (d), 1993 (n), 1994-5/2005 (d) Rio Grande at Vinton Bridge 1985-1992 (d) WW #32B (Vinton Cutoff Lateral) 1985-1992 (d), 1993-1996 (n), 1997-2002 (d) WW #34 (Canutillo Lateral) 1983 (d), 1984...

Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Archaeological investigations in the Elm Creek Watershed, Runnels County, Texas: sites 41RN61, 41RN64, 41RN65, 41RN72, 41RN74, 41RN76  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Data recovery, based on geomorphic investigations to resolve potential for subsurface cultural deposits, resulted in retrieval of representative samples of lithic assemblages from four sites (41RN61, 41RN64, 41RN65, 41RN74). These lithic assemblages...

Sanders, Calvin B

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part III GIS Coverage for the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, Mxico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Zhuping Sheng, Texas A&M University System J. Phillip King, New Mexico State University Bobby Creel, New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Christopher Brown, New Mexico State University Ari Michelsen and Raghavan Srinivasan, Texas A...&M University System Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 359, Part III Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Technical Completion Report No. 348, Part III...

Granados, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

watersheds soils, leaches readily to surface waters. Manure can contribute a significant amount of phosphorus loading into adjacent streams from livestock agriculture (James et al. 2007). Contributions from dairy cattle in a watershed in southeastern... New York showed that in-stream fecal deposits from pastured cattle represented 10% of watershed phosphorus loadings (James et al. 2007). Additionally, it was found that livestock grazing along streams and riparian zones can also have adverse...

Watson, Eliza

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

474

Corps Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed... The Big Fossil Watershed Study will address flood damage reduction, while identifying associated water quality, ecosystem restoration and recreational opportunities within the basin. The watershed is located in northern Tarrant County, encompasses 73...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Historic treasures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than 70 years, scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have collected hydrologic data such as rainfall, evaporation, runoff, and soil erosion at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS)?s Grass- land Soil and Water Research... Laboratory?s watershed near Riesel, Texas, making it one of the longest continuous, intensively monitored hydrological research sites in the country. The Riesel experimental watershed, part of the larger Brushy Creek watershed, has approximately 800...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Environment - Giant outdoor lab ... | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment - Giant outdoor lab ... With the recent completion of a 40-meter observation tower in the nearby Walker Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are...

477

Machine learning and the quantitative analysis of confocal microscopy with an application to the embryogenesis of drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

image segmentations: from machine to expert Watershed overwith active learning. Machine Learning, 15:201221.The boosting approach to machine learning: An overview. In

Beaver, William Matthew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A Comparison of AMSR-E/Aqua Snow Products with in situ Observations and MODIS Snow Cover Products in the Mackenzie River Basin, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alpine watershed of western Canada inferred from spatially-Basin, British Columbia, Canada. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci.Mackenzie River Basin, Canada. Adv. Water Resour. Derksen,

Tong, Jinjun; Velicogna, Isabella

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Inventory and Sediment Modeling of Unpaved Roads for Stream Conservation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Mapping and Inventory of Riparian Areas in the Upperstudy watershed using the road inventory geodatabase. Oncebe compared to species inventory data, stream bank erosion

Inlander, Ethan; Clingenpeel, Alan; Crump, Michael A.; Van Epps, Matthew; Formica, Sandi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne hazard prediction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Collection: Engineering 13 AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Summary: to a numerical algorithm to predict the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed westslope cutthroat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment jefferson proving Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

university of georgia odum school of ecology City of Jefferson Curry Creek Water Supply Watershed... Estimate of Existing and Projected Impervious Cover and Assessment of...

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - abernathy creek washington Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Kings Creek (7770 Acres) 35,920 Hectares 4th Field HUC 3304120102 Castlerock Falls (7371...

483

E-Print Network 3.0 - area battlement creek Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Area Hydrologic Units Calwater Subbasins --- (Planning...

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - arroyo mocho boulder Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Field Calwater 3304120203 Boulder Creek (7342 Acres)...

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - area battle creek Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Area Hydrologic Units Calwater Subbasins --- (Planning...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - allens creek nuclear Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Kings Creek (7770 Acres) 35,920 Hectares 4th Field HUC...

487

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek fencing Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Kings Creek (7770 Acres) 35,920 Hectares 4th Field HUC 3304120102 Castlerock Falls (7371...

488

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek instream Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Creek Malosky Creek Spring Creek Silver Creek San...

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek model Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Kings Creek (7770 Acres) 35,920 Hectares 4th Field HUC...

490

Knowledge-based modeling using GIS: nonpoint source pollution application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loss over the watershed ANSI (2 inch event). . 58 V. l 1 Simulated effect of recommended BMPs on actual soil loss (2 inch event). 59 V. 12 Spatial distribution of the actual soil loss over the watershed ANSI (3 inch event) . . 60 V. 13 Simulated... Modeling Environment 29 IV MATERIALS AND METHODS 1 Inputs from AGNPS/GRASS Interface 33 2 Knowledge-based Approa. ch 35 2. 1 Study Area: Animal Science Watershed (ANSI) 35 2. 2 Identification 2. 3 Watershed Management using Best Management Practices...

Mohite, Mahendra P.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

491

Stormwater Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy and purpose of this act is to encourage planning and management of storm water runoff in each watershed consistent with sound water and land use practices.

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - amhara regional states Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the three SCRP watersheds ... Source: Cornell University, Soil and Water Laboratory Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 22 Author's personal copy...

493

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

494

Multiobjective calibration and sensitivity of a distributed land surface water and energy balance model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification and energy balance models on a tallgrassdata for surface energy balance evaluation of a semiaridWatershed. We are energy balance components over a semiarid

Houser, Paul R; Gupta, Hoshin V; Shuttleworth, W. James; Famiglietti, James S

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

al gen env: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renaissance AL Massachusetts at Amherst, University of 7 ENVE 415 HYDROLOGY TOPIC SYLLABUS Engineering Websites Summary: Chapters 4, 14 Watershed Delineation, Characteristics...

496

Change in Urban Land Use and Associated Attributes in the Upper San Francisco Estuary, 1990-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay watershed. Environmental Management Water Plan Land andwater quality in Georgian Bay. Environmental Management 44(water quality in a coastal river and lagoonal estuary. Environmental Management

Stoms, David M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Environmental Decision Analysis: Meeting the Challenges of Making Good Decisions at CALFED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Water Account, Drinking Water Quality, Watershed Management,environmental collaborations, formed with the express goal of improving ecological health and water management

Tomkins, Claire D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Jefferson Lab Offers Science Enrichment Program for 5th, 6th...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

will include matter, atomic structure, energy transfer, force and motion, magnetism and electricity, waves and sound, simple machines, and watershed and optics. Program...

499

alder alnus acuminata: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fixation in the watershed soils and the associated N flux to the lake Hu, Feng Sheng 10 Multivariate analysis of allozymic and quantitative trait variation in Alnus rubra...

500

(Baron, 2009) Importance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Excess N reduces natural buffering chemicals in lakes and soils Leads to eutrophication in aquatic species in high elevation watersheds leads to eutrophication and acidification of water sources

Toohey, Darin W.