Sample records for watershed management techniques

  1. Southern Region Watershed Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

  2. Techniques for remotely sensing watershed runoff potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jerry Don

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for Remotely Sensing Watershed Runoff Potential. (August 1978) Jerry Don Walker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. Bruce J. Blanchard The Soil Conservation Service runoff equation is widely used for predicting the watershed runoff... cases, no outflow occurs through the spillway of an overdes1gned structure. Since evaporation losses are high 1n these areas, the salinity of the water stored in the structure gradually increases with time. With insufficient flow through...

  3. Watershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    30% of ponds, lakes and reservoirs 40% of estuaries #12;Watershed Management And Modeling Sources-transpiration Elemental responses are integrated to determine system response #12;Watershed Management And ModelingWatershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of Watershed Models for Simulation

  4. SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA Biniam Biruk Ashagre #12;ABSTRACT Ethiopia is known for its wealth of natural resources. These result Basin, Ethiopia) #12;iv This study is dedicated to my

  5. area watershed management: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which is defi ned as a coordinated environmental management framework that focuses public and private efforts on a watershed?s highest- priority problems. In the past, such an...

  6. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Know Your Plants to Protect Your Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rector, Barron S.

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plants are the foundation of the range ecosystem. The plant species growing on a property can indicate the health of the watershed and the success of the land manager. Learn how to "read your plants to understand the effect of your management....

  7. Watershed Management: An Evaluation of the Mullen Slough Capital Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Management: An Evaluation of the Mullen Slough Capital Improvement Project Study MANAGEMENT in the School of Resource and Environmental Management Report No. 321 © Fiona Murray McNair 2003 SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY July 2003 All rights reserved. This work may not be reproduced in whole

  8. CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA? Oloro V. McHugh, Amy S, Ethiopia Gete Zeleke ARARI, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Abstract: In the food insecure regions, short annual. Ethiopia's agricultural sector is driven by the subsistence strategies of smallholder farmers

  9. Minimization of Cost, Sediment Load, and Sensitivity to Climate Change in a Watershed Management Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, Margaret J.

    caused by non-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs management practice (BMP) plans for entire watersheds. Each of these alternative BMP configurations are non: multiobjective, differential evolution, robustness to uncertainty, stormwater management, best management

  10. REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

  11. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county...

  12. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Increasing Bare Ground Indicates Poor Watershed Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, K. Brian

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ; the more variable the landscape within a unit, the more tran- sects are needed. There will be obvious seasonal changes in vegetative cover because of plant growth and death Increasing Bare Ground Indicates Poor Watershed Health K. Brian Hays, Barron S...

  13. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian enclosure. This structure would include up to four wood fence posts and two deadman anchors buried in the ground. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat by preventing livestock from entering the riparian area via the river. The NEPA compliance checklist for this project was completed by Carl Rudeen with the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District (August 4, 2004) and meets the standards and guidelines for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed species that may occur in the general vicinity of the project area are gray wolf, Canada lynx, bald eagle, Ute ladies'Tresses, Snake River chinook salmon, Snake River steelhead trout, and Columbia River Basin bull trout. It was determined that the proposed fence crossing construction project would have no effect on these species. Bald eagle, gray wolf and Canada lynx are not known to occur in the immediate project vicinity. Since the site is used primarily as livestock pasture it does not lend itself to the presence of Ute ladies'Tresses. ESA listed fish may be present in the project vicinity but will not be affected because the project does not involve instream work. Soil disturbance will be limited to the livestock pasture and to two holes that will be used to bury anchors for the suspended portion of the fence. Required river crossings will be made on foot. Requirements associated with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act were handled by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), in cooperation with staff from the U.S. Forest Service (Boise National Forest), under their existing Programmatic Agreement with the Idaho State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). A description of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project and site information was reviewed by a qualified archaeologist and it was determined that an archaeological survey was needed. Bruce Blackmere with NRCS conducted an intensive-complete survey of the project site and cultural resources were not identified (July 30, 2004). Based on these findings, it was recommended that the project proceed as planned. All survey findings were provided to the Idaho SHPO. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is discovered during project implementation, an archaeologist should be notified immediately and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Standard water quality protection procedures and Best Management Practices should be followed during the implementation of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project. No construction is authorized to begin until the proponent has obtained all applicable local, state, and federal permits and approvals. Public involvement has occurred as part of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project. This project was coordinated through the Upper Salmon Basin Technical Team and Advisory Committee composed of representatives from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA Fisheries, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, and Idaho Department of Fish and Game. In addition, the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District holds monthly meetings that are open to the public in which this project was discussed.

  14. Urban Stormwater and Watershed Management: A Case Study James P. Heaney, Len Wright, and David Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    classified as Decision Support Systems (DSS) (Loucks 1995). Contemporary DSS's contain a mixture9-1 Chapter 9 Urban Stormwater and Watershed Management: A Case Study James P. Heaney, Len Wright. The concept of integrated water and land management was first articulated in the western U.S. by John Wesley

  15. Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

  16. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - John Day Watershed Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the John Day Watershed Restoration Program, which includes projects to improve watershed conditions, resulting in improved fish and wildlife habitat. The project was planned and coordinated by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs through the John Day Basin Office in Prairie City, Oregon. A variety of activities will be implemented, described below. The project will involve the installation of four permanent lay flat diversions (structures) to replace temporary diversions. Two structures would be constructed in Beech Creek, one in Little Beech Creek and one in the John Day River. The structures will replace temporary pushup dams, which were constructed annually of various materials. Installation of the permanent diversion structures eliminates the stream-disturbing activities associated with annual installation of temporary structures. They also will enable fish passage in all flow conditions, an improvement over the temporary structures which can obstruct fish passage under some conditions. Five scour chains will be installed in six sites within the John Day River. The chains will be 3 feet long and consist of 1/4 inch chain. They will be buried within the streambed to monitor the movement of material in the streambed. Other activities that will be implemented include: Installation of off-site water systems in areas where fencing and revegetation projects are implemented, in order to restrict livestock access to waterways; construction of facilities to return irrigation flows to the Johns Day River, including the installation of pipe to replace failing drains or return ditches; installation of pumps to replace temporary diversions; and removal of junipers from approximately 500 acres per year by hand felling.

  17. Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

  18. Urban Retrofit: A Whole-Watershed Approach to Urban Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lithander, Becky

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rely  impervious   Derby/Po)er  Creek  Watershed:  Urban  cisterns     Derby/Po)er  Creek  Watershed:  Urban  of  impermeability   Derby/Po)er  Creek  Watershed:  Urban  

  19. Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Enviro n me n t a l Protec t i o n Agency (EPA). Since the progra m? s incept i o n in 2005, Extens i o n educat e d agricu l t u r a l produc e r s on proper nutrien t manageme n t and product i o n techniq u e s , pr omot e d progra ms associ a t e... and mercury and PCBs in edible fish tissue. Figure 3. Land use in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed. In 1998 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) initiated an effort to develop a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for pollutants causing low...

  20. The Texas Watershed Steward Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERSHED PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT · Importance of Local Watershed Involvement · Forming and Sustaining: ­ 7 AICP CM hours (planners) ­ 7 TBPE CPEs (engineers) ­ 7 CCA CEUs (soil & water management) ­ 7Life Extension Service Watershed Protection Planning Short Course January 1216, 2009 WATERSHED MANAGEMENT · Local

  1. Restoration in the Anacostia river watershed: An ecosystem management case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, L.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses various aspects of an ecosystem approach to watershed restoration as illustrated by the Anacostia River Watershed Restoration initiative. This information was derived from a case study conducted as part of the Interagency Ecosystem Management Initiative (IEMI), an outgrowth of a recommendation in the National Performance Review. The purpose of this study was to identify components of the ecosystem approach used in the Anacostia initiative that may be useful to other ecosystem restoration and management initiatives in the future. Water quality and ecological conditions within the Anacostia River watershed have become degraded due to urban and suburban development and other activities in the watershed over the last two centuries. An intergovernmental partnership has been formed to cooperatively assess the specific problems in the basin and to direct and implement restoration efforts. The Anacostia initiative includes a number of cooperative efforts that cross political boundaries, and involves numerous states, local agencies, civic groups, and private individuals in addition to the Federal players. In contrast with some of the other case studies in the IEMI, the Anacostia restoration effort is primarily driven by state and local governments. There has, however, been Federal involvement in the restoration and use of Federal grants. In addition, the establishment of a forum for setting goals, priorities and resolving differences was viewed as essential. Closer relationships between planning and regulatory functions can help advance the restoration goals. Public participation, including education, outreach and involvement, is essential to viable ecosystem initiatives. Comprehensive planning and modeling must be balanced with continuous visible results in order to sustain administrative and public support for the initiative.

  2. QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS* Paul Embrechts Department of Mathematics ETH Zurich www.math.ethz.ch/~embrechts #12;QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES Theorems of Quantitative Risk Management · PE's Desert-Island Copula · Example 1: Credit Risk · Example 2

  3. This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This document is the product of more thanForeword This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our topics include overviews of the effects of fuel management on both terrestrial and aquatic watershed

  4. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

  5. In: Management of Wet-Weather Flow in the Watershed (Edited by Dan Sullivan and Richard Field). CRC Press, Boca Raton. Publication in 2002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    1 In: Management of Wet-Weather Flow in the Watershed (Edited by Dan Sullivan and Richard Field...........................................................................................................................................................................14 Prevention of Dry-Weather Pollutant Entries into Sewerage Systems

  6. Evaluating the Economics of Best Management Practices for Tarrant Regional Water District’s Eagle Mountain Lake Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason L.

    manag e me n t unit of analys i s is one designated wetland project encompassing 20.6 acres. In-Lake BMPs Based on feedback from TRWD personne l , it was noted that BMP 20 (Hypolimnetic Aeration ) and BMP 21 (P Inactiva t i o n with Alum... years. The manage me n t unit of analysi s is one designa t e d hypol i mn e t i c aerat i o n proj ec t withi n the Eagle Mountai n Lake watersh e d . BMP 21 P Inactivation with Alum. T h e addition of powdered alum at variou s lake depths...

  7. Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

  8. Power Modeling and Thermal Management Techniques for Manycores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Power Modeling and Thermal Management Techniques for Manycores Rajib Nath Computer Science number of cores in manycore archi- tectures, along with technology scaling, results in high power densities and thermal issues on the die. To explore innovative thermal management techniques

  9. Hydrologic Modeling of a Canal-Irrigated Agricultural Watershed with Irrigation Best Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a hydrologic perspective. In this study, an approach is developed to model canal irrigation systems understanding of irrigation systems and a proper represen- tation of them in watershed models are required it for modeling purposes. Therefore, the next alternative is to use a model to simulate irrigation systems

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS--Tapteal Bend Riparian Corridor Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the restoration of approximately 500 feet of streambank along the Yakima River at river mile 8, upstream of the Van Giesen Bridge on SR 224, in and between Richland and West Richland, Washington. This project will also result in the acquisition of Fox Island, a 12-acre island directly across the river from the restoration area. There is no development planned for the island. The proposed project includes: The installation of a bio-engineered streambank that incorporates barbs to capture silt and deflect flow, roughened rock or log toes, a riparian buffer, soil reinforcement, and bank grading. Long-term photo-point and plot sampling will also be implemented to evaluate the effectiveness and success of the restoration project. The NEPA compliance checklist for this project was completed by Darrel Sunday, a contractor with Sunday and Associates, Inc. (April 4, 2004), and meets the standards and guidelines for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed species that may occur in the general vicinity of the project area are the pygmy rabbit, bald eagle, bull trout, Ute ladies'-tresses, and mid-Columbia Steelhead. The pygmy rabbit, bald eagle, and Ute ladies'Tresses are not known to occur in the immediate project vicinity, and it was determined that the proposed restoration project would have no effect on these species. It is difficult to determine if bull trout occur within the Tapteal project area and Dave Carl of the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife was contacted and concurred with this assumption. It was determined that the project may affect, but is not likely to adversely affect bull trout, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has concurred with that determination (July 28, 2004). For the mid-Columbia Steelhead, an anadromous fish species, BPA has determined that if conducted in accordance with the applicable terms and conditions identified in the ESA Consultation Biological Opinion (BO) and Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Essential Fish Habitat Consultation, for BPA's Habitat Improvement Program (HIP), the Tapteal Bend Restoration Project meets the requirements of consistency and no further consultation is required. ESA listed fish may be present in the project vicinity but will not be affected because the project does not involve instream work. In complying with the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, BPA contracted with the Cultural Resources Protection Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) for cultural resource survey work. Shawn Steinmetz prepared a report (December 15, 2002) concluding that there were only two isolated finds in the project area. BPA and the Washington Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation have concurred with the conclusions and recommendations set out in the report and the determination that no historic properties will be affected by the current project as proposed (January 31, 2003). It was recommended that a cultural resource monitor be present during ground disturbing activities. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is discovered during project implementation, an archaeologist should be notified immediately and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Standard water quality protection procedures and Best Management Practices should be followed during the implementation of the Tapteal Bend Restoration project. No construction is authorized to begin until the proponent has obtained all applicable local, state, and federal permits and approvals.

  11. Simulating and Optimizing Storm Water Management Strategies in an Urban Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damodaram, Chandana

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    watershed scenarios are described based on land use coverage characteristics and implementation of a detention pond ............................ 23 4 No. of Parking Lots and Rooftops being retrofit based on the percentage of area... ecosystems (USEPA 2000; Coffman 2000). Low Impact Development (LID) practices are an alternative approach for controlling storm water at the source like rooftops, parking lots and sidewalks. LID technologies include permeable pavements, rainwater...

  12. Minimization of cost, sediment load, and sensitivity to climate change in a watershed management application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, Margaret J.

    : Multiobjective Differential evolution Robustness to uncertainty Stormwater management Best management practices-scale, multiobjective framework for generating a diverse family of stormwater best management practice (BMP) plans-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) such as detention ponds

  13. Brush Management/Water Yield Feasibility Study for Four Watersheds In Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bednarz, Steven T.; Dybala, Tim; Amonett, Carl; Muttiah, Ranjan S.; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Arnold, Jeff G.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,942,859.17 2,013.01 15,704.92 11.31 18 166,110.60 556,785,852.99 1,708.71 13,330.85 12.46 19 1,029,797.78 2,823,542,988.67 8,665.14 67,602.72 15.23 20 886,216.09 2,440,216,220.39 7,488.75 58,424.91 15.17 21 364,992.01 1,015,478,003.63 3,116.39 24,313.10 15... for Arrowhead (Figure 1-4) was likely due to the higher percentage of hydrologic group “D” soils in this watershed (54 percent vs. 39, 21, 38 for Brownwood, Phantom Hill, and Palo Pinto, respectively) that produced a greater difference in annual runoff volume...

  14. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  15. Community Perceptions and Priorities for Managing Water and Environmental Resources in the River Njoro Watershed in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Njoro Watershed in Kenya M. W. Jenkins1 , F. K. Lelo2 , L.W. Chiuri2 , W. A. Shivoga2 and S. N. Miller3, respectively, in Environmental Science, Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya; Tel (+254) 51 62085, emails: lelo@uwyo.edu Abstract The Njoro Watershed, typical of the semi-arid basins in the Rift Valley of Kenya, is undergoing

  16. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-68)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA provides funds to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program which cooperates with local agencies and landowners to plan, fund, and implement anadromous fish habitat restoration projects in the Grande Ronde Basin. The GRMWP has agreed to partially fund three bridge replacement projects with the Union County Public Works Department. This Supplement Analysis covers those bridge replacement activities that will take place at the Mill Creek crossing and the Little Creek crossing. The Union County Public Works Department is responsible for replacing structurally deficient bridges with structures able to pass 50-year peak flow events. The UCPWD replacement structures of choice, due to budget limitations, are large 8-10 foot corrugated metal pipes. These pipes would meet peak flow requirements but would be less than ideal for fish passage. The GRMWP proposes to provide funding assistance to UCPWD to upgrade replacement structures to full-channel spanning stringer bridges. These full-channel spanning structures will provide the best possible conditions for fish passage, water quality, and accommodation of peak flows.

  17. Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands are important ecosystems that contain a vast array of plants and animals. Wetlands perform a variety of vital functions, such as purifying water. This publication explains the role of wetlands and how to construct and manage them....

  18. Advanced interference management techniques for future wireless networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razavi, Seyed Morteza

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we design advanced interference management techniques for future wireless networks under the availability of perfect and imperfect channel state information (CSI). We do so by considering a generalized ...

  19. Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Documenting a No Action Alternative in an EA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting...

  20. Interference management techniques in large-scale wireless networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Yi

    2015-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, advanced interference management techniques are designed and evaluated for large-scale wireless networks with realistic assumptions, such as signal propagation loss, random node distribution and ...

  1. A Study of Approximate Data Management Techniques for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    the monitoring operation of sensor nodes by efficiently using their limited energy, bandwidth and computation. The network can therefore be treated as a distributed sensor data management system. Sensor networks differA Study of Approximate Data Management Techniques for Sensor Networks Adonis Skordylis, Niki

  2. Increase Productivity - Implement Energy Management Systems with Project Management Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spinner, M. P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering Manager of this small but active division, I devote a big part of my time on justifying energy expenditures and the means to reduce these costs. Ten years ago energy costs were one tenth of today's costs and just about three percent of the division...

  3. PROGRESS TOWARD DEVELOPMENT OF A GIS BASED WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT TOOL FOR SMALL RURAL WATERSHEDS: MODIFICATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    for the Palouse Region of the Pacific Northwest. We apply and modify the Soil Moisture Routing (SMR) model which in the Palouse Region provided that saturated hydraulic conductivities determined in the laboratory are adjusted University are developing a GIS-based problem-solving tool for small rural watersheds in the Palouse Region

  4. Power Management Techniques for Data Centers: A Sparsh Mittal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    become essential. In this paper, we highlight the need of achieving energy efficiency in data centers insights into the techniques for improving energy efficiency of data centers and encourage the designers, Power Management, Low-power Design, Energy Efficiency, Green Computing, DVFS, Server Consolidation I

  5. The Watershed Management Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persyn, Russell A.; Griffin, Molly; Williams, Amy T.; Wolfe, Clint

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    phosphorus loading by 25 percent or to develop a computer model that ac- curately predicts nitrogen and phosphorus loadings for a particular lake. What are water quality models? Water quality models use personal computers and mathematics to represent natural...

  6. WATERSHED EDUCATION PROGRAM The Watershed Education Program (WEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    of watershed hydrology Lake and river systems Urban and rural runoff Best management practices Aquatic leaders, citizens, and natural resource professionals with knowledge and tools to make informed water and land use decisions to protect and restore the integrity of Minnesota's lakes, rivers, streams

  7. Power management adaptation techniques for video transmission Christos Bouras1,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouras, Christos

    Power management adaptation techniques for video transmission over TFRC Christos Bouras1 of the communicating nodes, most notably their transmission power. While increased power generally correlates, Greece SUMMARY In this paper, we describe power management adaptation techniques for wireless video

  8. A dynamic slack management technique for real-time distributed embedded systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, Subrata

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a novel slack management technique, the Service Rate Based Slack Distribution Technique, for dynamic real-time distributed embedded systems targeting the reduction and management of energy consumption. Energy minimization...

  9. Management and Labor Relations Techniques of Japanese-Owned Automotive Assembly Plants in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitney, Paul

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This field project involves a study of the Japanese-owned automotive assembly plants, or “transplants,” in the United States and the management and labor-relations techniques that have made them successful. The management and labor...

  10. Encouraging low-impact-development stormwater-management practices / Assabet River Watershed sub-basin case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James E. (James Edward), 1969-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulatory codes and ordinances create a framework that guide stormwater management decision processes. These regulations are designed to protect the health and safety of the public and to preserve the natural integrity ...

  11. Getting Our Feet Wet: Water Management at Mt. Laguna in Cleveland National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, William Cade

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Water Quality Control Board, “Watershed Managementof Land Management (BLM) Tests preserve water quality, whichRegional Water Quality Control Board. “Watershed Management

  12. Economic and ecological implications of alternative brush management and restoration scenarios designed to improve water yield in two Texas watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olenick, Keith Layne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Costs of additional water are lower for sub-basins within the Edwards study area (ranging from $32 to $70 per acre-foot of water added) than in the Twin Buttes (ranging from $63 to $218 per acre-foot), meaning that brush management efforts are more...

  13. anesthetic management techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Ozsu-Valduriez textbook Principles of Distributed Database Systems 10 reflects the evolution of distributed data management and distributed database systems. In this new...

  14. Evaluating the Economics of Best Management Practices for Tarrant Regional Water District’s Eagle Mountain Lake Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics Texas A&M University and Texas AgriLife Extension Service Executive Summary The object i ve of this asses s me n t was to identi f y the most cost-e f f e c t i v e means of reduci n g (and/o r preven t i n g ) tota l phosph o r u s (TP...) inflow s into the Eagle Mountain Lake from a compr e h e n s i v e set of Best Manag e me n t Pract i c e s (BMPs ) . Additi o na l l y , the reduce d total nitrog e n (TN), and sedime n t inflow s result i n g from adoption of these BMPs was also...

  15. A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: balance equations for mass,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: balance equations for mass, momentum, energy Hassanizadehb a Centre for Water Research, Department of Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 6907 Nedlands, Australia b Department of Water Management, Environmental and Sanitary Engineering

  16. A Survey Of Techniques for Managing and Leveraging Caches in GPUs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initially introduced as special-purpose accelerators for graphics applications, graphics processing units (GPUs) have now emerged as general purpose computing platforms for a wide range of applications. To address the requirements of these applications, modern GPUs include sizable hardware-managed caches. However, several factors, such as unique architecture of GPU, rise of CPU–GPU heterogeneous computing, etc., demand effective management of caches to achieve high performance and energy efficiency. Recently, several techniques have been proposed for this purpose. In this paper, we survey several architectural and system-level techniques proposed for managing and leveraging GPU caches. We also discuss the importance and challenges of cache management in GPUs. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers insights into cache management techniques for GPUs and motivate them to propose even better techniques for leveraging the full potential of caches in the GPUs of tomorrow.

  17. Watershed Modeling for Biofuels | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Watershed Modeling for Biofuels Argonne's watershed modeling research addresses water quality in tributary basins of the Mississippi River Basin Argonne's watershed modeling...

  18. Using supply chain management techniques to make wind plant and energy storage operation more profitable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saran, Prashant

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our research demonstrates that supply chain management techniques can improve the incremental gross profits of wind plant and storage operations by up to five times. Using Monte-Carlo simulation we create and test scenarios ...

  19. A Simple Swap Technique and Enhanced GTT Location Database Management Kuo-Hsing Chiang Nirmala Shenoy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Nirmala

    implemented in the current mobile networks are ETSI GSM MAP [1] and EIA/TIA IS-41 [2]. The two- level databaseA Simple Swap Technique and Enhanced GTT Location Database Management Scheme Kuo-Hsing Chiang and provides comparison results with other location database management schemes. The performance results

  20. Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

  1. Applying Data Mining Techniques to Address Disaster Information Management Challenges on Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    Applying Data Mining Techniques to Address Disaster Information Management Challenges on Mobile a collaborative solution on a mobile platform using advanced data mining and information retrieval techniques.8 [Database Applications]: Data mining; H.3.3 [Information Search and Retrieval]: Clustering; H.3.5 [Online

  2. Substation based data interpretation techniques for improved power system management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, C.; McDonald, J.R. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Centre for Electrical Power Engineering] [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Centre for Electrical Power Engineering; Laycock, W.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now considerable pressure on electric utilities to operate their systems in the most efficient manner possible and to provide increased quality of service to customers. This pressure, coupled with the decreasing availability of reserve margins dictates that there is a requirement for comprehensive system operation support through, among other things, the provision of quality information relating to the behavior of the primary and secondary systems. This paper will show how the data available within modern substation control and management systems can be exploited in a cost-effective manner, through the implementation of advanced substation functions in an open systems environment. Certain functions which are presently carried out at the control center could be distributed (or partially distributed) to the substation. These functions may provide the utility staff with quality information, which can in turn be used to satisfy the objectives of increasing quality and security of supply, in addition to optimizing the utility`s information, maintenance and asset management functions.

  3. Subtask 1.18 - A Decision Tool for Watershed-Based Effluent Trading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xixi Wang; Bethany A. Kurz; Marc D. Kurz

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Handling produced water in an economical and environmentally sound manner is vital to coalbed methane (CBM) development, which is expected to increase up to 60% in the next 10-15 years as the demand for natural gas increases. Current produced water-handling methods (e.g., shallow reinjection and infiltration impoundments) are too costly when implemented on a well-by-well basis. A watershed-based effluent credit trading approach may be a means of managing produced water at reduced cost while meeting or surpassing water quality regulations. This market-based approach allows for improved water quality management by enabling industrial, agricultural, and municipal discharge facilities to meet water quality permit requirements by purchasing pollutant reduction credits from other entities within the same watershed. An evaluation of this concept was conducted for the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Montana and Wyoming by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). To conduct this assessment, the EERC collected and evaluated existing water quality information and developed the appropriate tools needed to assess the environmental and economic feasibility of specific trading scenarios. The accomplishments of this study include (1) an exploration of the available PRB water quantity and quality data using advanced statistical techniques, (2) development of an integrated water quality model that predicts the impacts of CBM produced water on stream salinity and sodicity, (3) development of an economic model that estimates costs and benefits from implementing potential trading options, (4) evaluation of hypothetical trading scenarios between select watersheds of the PRB, and (5) communication of the project concept and results to key state and federal agencies, industry representatives, and stakeholders of the PRB. The preliminary results of a basinwide assessment indicate that up to $684 million could be saved basinwide without compromising water quality as a result of implementing a watershed-based credit-trading approach.

  4. Evaluation of Segmentation Techniques for Inventory Management in Large Scale Multi-Item Inventory Systems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossetti, Manuel D.

    1 Evaluation of Segmentation Techniques for Inventory Management in Large Scale Multi-Item Inventory Systems1 Manuel D. Rossetti2 , Ph. D., P. E. Department of Industrial Engineering University of their inventory policies in a large-scale multi-item inventory system. Conventional inventory segmentation

  5. PDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems -Part I: SOC Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    - cles and renewable energy resources is battery energy storage. Advanced battery systems representPDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems - Part I: SOC Estimation S. J sensing and actuation exists to monitor and control the internal state of these systems. As such, battery

  6. PDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems -Part II: SOH Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    vehi- cles and renewable energy resources is battery energy storage. Advanced battery systems representPDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems - Part II: SOH Identification S sensing and actuation exists to monitor and control the internal state of these systems. As such, battery

  7. An Interactive Context-aware Power Management Technique for Optimizing Sensor Network Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    An Interactive Context-aware Power Management Technique for Optimizing Sensor Network Lifetime an important event with desired fidelity). To that end, in this paper we propose a novel interactive power sensor data and system specifications (battery and solar panel specs, sensing and communication costs

  8. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

    2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  9. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  10. Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    for Undergraduates, 2006 #12;Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Urban Hydrology Water's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) Solves differential and algebraic equations involved in calculatingModeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water: Detailed Modeling

  11. M.S. ABDULLAH, I. BENEST, A. EVANS, and C. KIMBLE, Knowledge Modelling Techniques For Developing Knowledge Management Systems, 3rd European Conference on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimble, Chris

    modelling, knowledge management, knowledge management system, knowledge, knowledge engineering. 1M.S. ABDULLAH, I. BENEST, A. EVANS, and C. KIMBLE, Knowledge Modelling Techniques For Developing Knowledge Management Systems, 3rd European Conference on Knowledge Management, Dublin, Ireland, September

  12. A Power-Aware Technique to Manage Real-Time Database Transactions in Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks **

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruenwald, Le

    1 A Power-Aware Technique to Manage Real-Time Database Transactions in Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks ** Le@ou.edu; smbanik@ou.edu) ** This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation grant No. EIA connectivity is required. Techniques that manage database transactions in MANET need to address additional

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

  14. Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual Report, August 1990-December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Abbott, W.A.; Arsenault, J.W.; Jones, R.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to investigate production management strategies through a field study approach. The initial task was to prepare a summary of industry experience with water-drive gas and water-drive gas storage reservoirs. This activity was necessary to define the variety of reservoir situations in which water influx occurs, to identify those cases where alternative production practices will increase ultimate recovery, and to develop techniques to better characterize these reservoirs for further analysis. Four fields were selected for study: 1 onshore Gulf Coast gas reservoir, 2 offshore Gulf Coast reservoirs, and 1 mid-continent aquifier gas storage field. A modified material balance technique was developed and validated which predicts the pressure and production performance of water-drive gas reservoirs. This method yields more accurate results than conventional water influx techniques.

  15. Nine Elements of Watershed Based Plans for EPA Section 319

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Protection Plan Feb 2008 #12;a.) Identify sources and causes for impairment (load duration curve of concern Uhland sub-area Confidence intervals from regression analysis of load duration curve Management knowledge of: the nature and source of the WQ problem, the pollutant load reductions needed to meet WQS

  16. Low level waste management: a compilation of models and monitoring techniques. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosier, J.E.; Fowler, J.R.; Barton, C.J. (comps.)

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Science Applications, Inc., conducted a survey of models and monitoring techniques associated with the transport of radionuclides and other chemical species from LLW burial sites. As a result of this survey, approximately 350 models were identified. For each model the purpose and a brief description are presented. To the extent possible, a point of contact and reference material are identified. The models are organized into six technical categories: atmospheric transport, dosimetry, food chain, groundwater transport, soil transport, and surface water transport. About 4% of the models identified covered other aspects of LLW management and are placed in a miscellaneous category. A preliminary assessment of all these models was performed to determine their ability to analyze the transport of other chemical species. The models that appeared to be applicable are identified. A brief survey of the state-of-the-art techniques employed to monitor LLW burial sites is also presented, along with a very brief discussion of up-to-date burial techniques.

  17. Cumulative watershed effects (CWEs) result from the overlapping effects of management activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from forest management in the amount of sediment transport along a downstream gradient, and the interbasin variability in annual issues are particularly important in terms of the downstream delivery of sediment and the reliability

  18. Historical narratives of Big Chico Creek Watershed Alliance and Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Mary Ann; Matz, Mike

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passage on Upper Butte Creek: An Assessment of the NaturalHistorical Narratives of Big Chico Creek Watershed Allianceand Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy Mary Ann King and Mike

  19. The Texas Watershed Steward Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Antonio Bay Other April 2011 Victoria Victoria Urban Watersheds in City of Temple Other May 2011 Pecos River 1 WPP August 2011 Pecos Reeves Pecos River 2 WPP August 2011 Sheffield Pecos Concho River

  20. ACM Computing Survey, Vol. X, No. X, Article X, Pub. date:. Recent Thermal Management Techniques for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    /compiler techniques, liquid cooling techniques, and thermal reliability/security. Temperature monitoring include thermal-aware task scheduling and instruction scheduling techniques. Liquid cooling techniques are higher- capacity alternatives to conventional air cooling techniques. Thermal reliability/security issues

  1. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  2. Organizational structure : management techniques and lessons learned in aligning technical and program management resources in engineering-intensive organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Talha, 1969-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The roles of systems engineering, program and project management, and engineering management are continuously blurred and challenged in complex engineering organizations. The demands made of each of these functions can ...

  3. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  4. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  5. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  6. Development of Fuzzy Logic-Based Lead Acid Battery Management Techniques with Applications to 42V Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Pritpal

    on changing battery conditions. Finally, the fuzzy logic methodology lends itself well to rapid system designDevelopment of Fuzzy Logic-Based Lead Acid Battery Management Techniques with Applications to 42V volt systems is being phased into commercial vehicles, the battery technology is being developed

  7. A model for performance management in real properties using statistical techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deolalikar, Jyoti

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within Real Property Portfolio Management. there is a conscious search for new methodologies to improve building management practice, particularly for facilities in use. An approach in this direction is realized by the ...

  8. Flood Control and Watershed Management (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Counties and towns are required to issue permits for development within the 100-year floodplain. Development is broadly defined to include any man-made change to land, including grading, filling,...

  9. chApter 1. Introduction to Synthesis of Current Science 1 Regarding Cumulative Watershed Effects of Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Effects of Fuel Reduction Treatments Douglas F. Ryan chApter 2. Fire Regimes and Ecoregions 7 Robert G. Bailey chApter 3. Fuel Management in Forests of the Inland West 19 Russell T. Graham, Theresa B. Jain, Susan Matthews chApter 4. Tools for Fuel Management 69 Bob Rummer chApter 5. Fuel Management

  10. Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, George Russell

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    these problems, Texas A&M University researchers have developed a turfgrass sod Best Management Practice (BMP) to remove excess nutrients from impaired watersheds. Turfgrass harvest of manure fertilized sod removes a thin layer of topsoil with most... of the manure applied P. Plot and field scale research has demonstrated the effectiveness of turfgrass to remove manure phosphorus (P). In order to assess the impact of the turfgrass BMP on a watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used...

  11. New techniques in project portfolio management don't stifle innovation with excessive phasing and gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Cameron (Cameron Ardell Mayhew)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing multiple ideas, candidate initiatives and in-flight projects across diverse business units is a large challenge for major organizations. Overseeing global demand for projects as well as resource needs, risks, ...

  12. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, Dave

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

  13. Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721://www.ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/watershedresources/graduatestudies.html University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616 Program: Hydrologic Sciences http://www.warnercnr.colostate.edu/frws/watershed/graduate/index.html University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 326118140 Programs: Hydrologic Science http

  14. Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan (WPP) began in November 2009 upon acceptance of the WPP by EPA. The primary goals of implementing the plan are to improve the health of the Pecos River watershed and instream water quality...

  15. Agriculture and Natural Resources Arkansas Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provide the natural catchment boundaries for isolating geographical areas with similar hydrological Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines a watershed as "the area of land where all of the waterAgriculture and Natural Resources FSA9521 Arkansas Watersheds Mike Daniels Professor

  16. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  17. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  18. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  19. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  20. Coupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Such models lack the capacity to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality processes of larger waterCoupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models (SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2) for better water resources management in complex river basins B. Debele & R. Srinivasan

  1. Risk assessment of watershed erosion at Naesung Stream, South Korea Un Ji a,*, Mark Velleux b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    simulated runoff, channel flow, soil erosion, and stream sediment transport in the Naesung Stream watershed is a significant river management issue and critical environmental problem (Kane and Julien, 2007). Typically, land for analysis of precipitation, overland runoff, channel flow, soil erosion, and stream sediment transport

  2. Power Management Techniques for Mobile Communication Robin I{mvets P. I{rishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    translate to a 6-9% savings in the energy consumed by an entire high end laptop or a savings of up to 40 to be prop erly managed to conserve energy. In this paper, we prment the design and implementation of an innovative trartspori level protocol capable of significantly reduc- ing the power usage of the communication

  3. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

  4. Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifer drawdown from vegetation and irrigation often reduce stream flow; however, several large pools and stretches of the stream retain water throughout the year, except during extreme drought. Base flow in the stream is typically sustained by small... map of the Buck Creek watershed 7 Major aquifers in Texas (Source: Texas Water Development Board) Groundwater Two aquifers, the Seymour and Blaine, underlie the Buck Creek watershed and supply the bulk of available groundwater. The Seymour...

  5. Managing the Yellowstone River System with Place-based Cultural Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Damon M.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    resource management (NRM) and planning (e.g., community-based planning, watershed-based and collaborative management, others). By examining one decentralized riparian management planning effort along the Yellowstone River (Montana), this study finds...

  6. Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

    . Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers...

  7. Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-13 Ryan Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program. Using a Secchi disk, volunteers collected water transparency data from 22 lakes in the Bridge Creek watershed. Secchi depth readings were collected between May

  8. State of the Watershed: Water Quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of the Watershed: Water Quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado By Sheila F. Murphy Prepared of the watershed : water quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado / by Sheila Murphy. p. cm. ­(USGS Circular ; 1284) Includes bibliographic references. 1. Water quality -- Colorado -- Boulder Creek Watershed (Boulder

  9. Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley The faculty invites applications for a tenure-track, academic year appointment in Wildland Watershed Hydrology recognized research program in landscape-scale watershed hydrology related to the fields of climatology

  10. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, Gretchen (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream table education--at every opportunity. We continue to seek ideas to guide us as we grow. We want to enlarge that sense of ownership that the river does indeed run through it, and belongs to us all. Through a continued and common effort, we hope to carry forward the good work and the momentum that underscores our intent. We are proud to report our accomplishments of this past year because they reflect our renewed sense of purpose. In alliance with diverse citizen groups, individuals, business, industry and tribal and government water resource management agencies, we strive to continue to protect and restore the beauty and integrity that is the Kootenai River watershed.

  11. The AmeriFlux Data Activity and Data System: An Evolving Collection of Data Management Techniques, Tools, Products and Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Krassovski, Misha B [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the U.S. Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Over this period, climate change science has expanded from research focusing on basic understanding of geochemical cycles, particularly the carbon cycle, to integrated research addressing climate change impacts, vulnerability, adaptation, and mitigation. Interests in climate change data and information worldwide have grown remarkably and, as a result, so have demands and expectations for CDIAC s data systems. To meet the growing demands, CDIAC s strategy has been to design flexible data systems using proven technologies blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. CDIAC development teams are multidisciplinary and include computer science and information technology expertise, but also scientific expertise necessary to address data quality and documentation issues and to identify data products and system capabilities needed by climate change scientists. CDIAC has learned there is rarely a single commercial tool or product readily available to satisfy long-term scientific data system requirements (i.e., one size does not fit all and the breadth and diversity of environmental data are often too complex for easy use with commercial products) and typically deploys a variety of tools and data products in an effort to provide credible data freely to users worldwide. Like many scientific data management applications, CDIAC s data systems are highly customized to satisfy specific scientific usage requirements (e.g., developing data products specific for model use) but are also designed to be flexible and interoperable to take advantage of new software engineering techniques, standards (e.g., metadata standards) and tools and to support future Earth system data efforts (e.g., ocean acidification). CDIAC has provided data management support for numerous long-term measurement projects crucial to climate change science. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We share our approaches in satisfying the challenges of delivering AmeriFlux data worldwide to benefit others with similar challenges handling climate change data, further heighten awareness and use of an outstanding ecological data resource, and highlight expanded software engineering applications being used for climate change measurement data.

  12. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  13. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the underlying principles of Software Project Management, and of established techniques for the management of software projects. By introducing students to key concepts and techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    and management systems; quality models and metrics Content Formal lectures: 24 hours (2 hours/week) Tutorial, and to requirements, risk and quality management, the module lays the foundation for their future contribution, assessment, control, resolution Quality management: characterisation of quality; quality control, assurance

  14. "Certainly the Proper Business of Woman": Household and Estate Management Techniques of Eighteenth-Century French Noblewomen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utech, Sally

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project explores the legal, economic, and social aspects of household and estate management in eighteenth-century France. It investigates two paradoxes surrounding noblewomen and household management. The first involves ...

  15. Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The “Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed” project was developed in response to the creek’s listing on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List due to a bacterial impairment and subsequent total maximum daily load (TMDL...

  16. The Regional Watershed Spreadsheet Model (RWSM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Metals Recycling 11) Auto Recycling 12) Old Industrial Areas 13) Power Plants Land Use Mean Concentration of watershed concentrations Output: *Land use specific runoff concentrations Optimization #12;3. Simple User of this plan... Hydro Sed Cu Hg PCB Se Diox PBDE OC Pest Hydro Sed Cu Hg PCB Se Diox PBDE OC PestStep 1 2 3 4 5

  17. UniFI: Leveraging Non-Volatile Memories for a Unified Fault Tolerance and Idle Power Management Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, David A.

    dissipation but also to make power - proportional to performance by managing idle power. The twin challenges noise margins and thermal cycling [42]. Technology scaling and power management both impact systemUniFI: Leveraging Non-Volatile Memories for a Unified Fault Tolerance and Idle Power Management

  18. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  19. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  20. Acquisition of Wildlife Habitat in the Calispell Creek Watershed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Calispell Creek watershed in Pend Oreille County, Wash. BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key...

  1. Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Crop Production: Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity of Dedicated Energy Crop and Woody Biomass Operations DOE Bioenergy Technologies...

  2. Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6.25 acre habitat acquisition in Montana's Jocko River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Lake County in northwestern Montana, this property was selected...

  3. Understanding Nutrient Loading to the Coastal Zone from Urban Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Timothy H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Land Use in the Carpinteria Valley, California.TIONS: Speaker: Carpinteria Creek Watershed Coalition annualand Forecasts for Carpinteria Creek", Lions' Club,

  4. DEFINING PERCEPTIONS OF WATERSHED MANAGEMENT IN A GREAT PLAINS AND IN AN ANDEAN WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo-Osorio, Diana L

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    interest in the expansion of this study. The innumerable lessons learned during this thesis project and specifically, the lessons learned from using the Q method, are invaluable as I proceed onward to doctoral studies and research. The goal... statements, and the chapter closes with a short summary found in the conclusion. Chapter 4 presents the thesis conclusion as a reflection of what was learned during the process of writing this thesis. This reflection includes personal lessons involving...

  5. Hydrologic and Ecological Effects of Watershed Urbanization: Implication for Watershed Management in Hillslope Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Chan Yong

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    experienced rapid urbanization. For each study period, an impervious surface map was generated from Landsat TM image by a support vector machine (SVM) with pairwise coupling. SVM more accurately estimated impervious surface than other subpixel mapping methods...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    , total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicatedENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2004-2005 by Michael A Hanover County Tidal Creeks Project and Year 7 of the Wilmington Watersheds Project. Water quality data

  7. Sources and transport of nitrogen in arid urban watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Rebecca L.; Turnbull, Laura; Earl, Stevan; Grimm, Nancy B.; Riha, Krystin M.; Michalski, Greg; Lohse, Kathleen; Childers, Daniel L.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban watersheds are often sources of nitrogen (N) to downstream systems, contributing to poor water quality. However, it is unknown which components (e.g., land cover and stormwater infrastructure type) of urban watersheds contribute to N export and which may be sites of retention. In this study we investigated which watershed characteristics control N sourcing, biogeochemical processing of nitrate (NO3–) during storms, and the amount of rainfall N that is retained within urban watersheds. We used triple isotopes of NO3– (?15N, ?18O, and ?17O) to identify sources and transformations of NO3– during storms from 10 nested arid urban watersheds that varied in stormwater infrastructure type and drainage area. Stormwater infrastructure and land cover—retention basins, pipes, and grass cover—dictated the sourcing of NO3– in runoff. Urban watersheds can be strong sinks or sources of N to stormwater depending on the proportion of rainfall that leaves the watershed as runoff, but we found no evidence that denitrification occurred during storms. Our results suggest that watershed characteristics control the sources and transport of inorganic N in urban stormwater but that retention of inorganic N at the timescale of individual runoff events is controlled by hydrologic, rather than biogeochemical, mechanisms.

  8. Management of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)-associated Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy by Shunt Reduction Using the Parallel Technique: Outcomes of a Retrospective Case Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cookson, Daniel T., E-mail: danielthomascookson@yahoo.co.uk; Zaman, Zubayr; Gordon-Smith, James; Ireland, Hamish M. [Royal Infirmary, Departments of Radiology (United Kingdom); Hayes, Peter C., E-mail: p.hayes@ed.ac.uk [Royal Infirmary, Departments of Hepatology (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the reproducibility and technical and clinical success of the parallel technique of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) reduction in the management of refractory hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Materials and Methods: A 10-mm-diameter self-expanding stent graft and a 5-6-mm-diameter balloon-expandable stent were placed in parallel inside the existing TIPS in 8 patients via a dual unilateral transjugular approach. Changes in portosystemic pressure gradient and HE grade were used as primary end points. Results: TIPS reduction was technically successful in all patients. Mean {+-} standard deviation portosystemic pressure gradient before and after shunt reduction was 4.9 {+-} 3.6 mmHg (range, 0-12 mmHg) and 10.5 {+-} 3.9 mmHg (range, 6-18 mmHg). Duration of follow-up was 137 {+-} 117.8 days (range, 18-326 days). Clinical improvement of HE occurred in 5 patients (62.5%) with resolution of HE in 4 patients (50%). Single episodes of recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred in 3 patients (37.5%). These were self-limiting in 2 cases and successfully managed in 1 case by correction of coagulopathy and blood transfusion. Two of these patients (25%) died, one each of renal failure and hepatorenal failure. Conclusion: The parallel technique of TIPS reduction is reproducible and has a high technical success rate. A dual unilateral transjugular approach is advantageous when performing this procedure. The parallel technique allows repeat bidirectional TIPS adjustment and may be of significant clinical benefit in the management of refractory HE.

  9. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

  10. Proceedings of the Conference on Coastal Watersheds:The Caspar Creek Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Proceedings of the Conference on Coastal Watersheds:The Caspar Creek Story May 6, 1998 Ukiah. 1998. Proceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: theProceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: theProceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: theProceedings of the conference

  11. Low-Intrusion Techniques and Sensitive Information Management for Warhead Counting and Verification: FY2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; Gilbert, Andrew J.; White, Timothy A.; Pitts, W. Karl; Misner, Alex C.; Seifert, Allen

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the second year of this project is described by the series of technical reports and manuscripts that make up the content of this report. These documents summarize successes in our goals to develop our robust image-hash templating and material-discrimination techniques and apply them to test image data.

  12. Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem Not on local agricultural need for nutrients Thus, solutions will need to account for these drivers #12

  13. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Pastures Healthy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape: Are Your Pastures Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian Hays Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor and Extension Range Specialist; and Extension Assistant-Water Conservation; The Texas A&M University...

  14. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Streams Healthy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy rainfall. Determine whether or not they have adequate vegetative cover and whether or not they are eroding. Then classify stream banks into one of four categories (Fig. 1). Are Your Streams Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian...

  15. TIMOTHY O. RANDHIR Associate Professor -Watershed Management and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    million USDA-CSREES project (SDSS- Spatial Decision Support System) of Purdue Univ., Texas A&M Univ, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), multi-attribute decision-making, and nonpoint source pollution. M, biodiversity, urbanization, community science, sus- tainable development, GIS, multi-criteria decision making

  16. Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & grain insect forecast, cotton market outlook, biofuel production in the Valley, boll weevil eradication, and new developments from industry 102 2/8/2007 Pesticide Safety Training CH The training taught principles of IPM, non-chemical alternatives..., Worker Protection Standards, record keeping, personal protection, application equipment, calibration and continuing education units. 12 6/5/2007 Grain Sorghum Field Day CH Sorghum varieties, sorghum insects, sorghum plant physiology, sorghum outlook...

  17. FSM 2500 Watershed and Air Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolis Energy JumpFAC 04-08-DOECategorical|FSM 2500

  18. Water Quality Monitoring in the Buck Creek Watershed and Facilitation of Buck Creek Watershed Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Dyer, P.

    feral hog management, grazing management, nutrient management, riparian and stream ecosystem health, septic system operation and maintenance, soil and water testing, wildlife management, and well head protection and management. Utilizing existing...

  19. Trout Creek, Oregon Watershed Assessment; Findings, Condition Evaluation and Action Opportunities, 2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runyon, John

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the assessment is to characterize historical and current watershed conditions in the Trout Creek Watershed. Information from the assessment is used to evaluate opportunities for improvements in watershed conditions, with particular reference to improvements in the aquatic environment. Existing information was used, to the extent practicable, to complete this work. The assessment will aid the Trout Creek Watershed Council in identifying opportunities and priorities for watershed restoration projects.

  20. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

  1. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A. [JAYCOR, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trettin, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  2. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Evaluation, interpretation, and data summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions.

  3. ELEMENT C: Management Measures Necessary to Achieve Your Load Reductions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , public education, ordinances, pet waste programs, erosion control plans. Regulatory Tools as Management · Identify new management opportunities · Identify critical areas in watershed where additional measures1 ELEMENT C: Management Measures Necessary to Achieve Your Load Reductions, Along with the Critical

  4. Query Optimization Techniques Class Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Query Optimization Techniques Exploiting Class Hierarchies Sophie Cluet 1 Guido Moerkotte 2 1 INRIA Since the introduction of object base management systems (OBMS), many query optimization techniques tailored for object query languages have been proposed. They adapt known optimization techniques

  5. Lesson 1: Data Types and Watershed Populations In this first lesson, you will discover some information about each of the two watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of people per block. This is a good summary of how many people are in the watershed and where they live the condition of the watersheds regarding how people are currently living on and using the land. We will use Arc watershed (2000 census), the population density (average number of people per hectare), and to visualize how

  6. Modeling Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbis-Stokes, Aaron

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are a commonly used means of wastewater treatment in the Dickinson Bayou watershed which is located between Houston and Galveston. The Dickinson Bayou is classified as "impaired" by the Texas Commission...

  7. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by DIl 5~ HARRIET ?GELL ALLEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1974 Major Subject: Range Science WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by HARRIET GELL ALLEN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1974...

  8. Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold, Allen

    COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-396 2011 Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report By T. Allen Berthold Texas Water Resources Institute Prepared... for Texas General Land Office March 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 396 Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed By T...

  9. Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold, T. Allen; Flores, Jaime

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project Final Report August 2011 By T. Allen Berthold and Jaime Flores Texas Water Resources Institute Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 411 Texas A&M University... System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-411 2011 Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project Final Report By T. Allen Berthold and Jaime Flores Texas Water Resources...

  10. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  11. Risk assessment of runoff on a range watershed in Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwaltney, Tracy Marie

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A drip type rainfall simulator and an existing watershed study were used to assess relationships between runoff, infiltration, erosion and associated risk thresholds on a range watershed in Brazos County, Texas. The focus ...

  12. An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sedimentation in Lavon Reservoir Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

    potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in the watershed above Lavon Reservoir. The study focuses on: (a) effects of erosion controls on farm income, (b) off-side sediment damages in the watersheds; (c) costs of administering and enforcing alternative...

  13. Emerald Lake Watershed study: Introduction and site description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonnessen, K.A. (California Air Resources Board, Sacramento (United States))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Emerald Lake Watershed study was organized to investigate the effects of acidic deposition on high-elevation watersheds and surface waters of the Sierra Nevada, California. Some of the results of this comprehensive study of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at a small, headwater basin are presented in four papers in this series. The watershed study site is in Sequoia National Park, on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. This glacial cirque is located in the upper Marble Fork of the Kaweah River. This 120-ha watershed ranges from Alta Peak (3,416 m) down to Emerald Lake (2,400 m). Most of the watershed surface area is exposed granite and granodiorite rocks, with limited coverage (about 20%) by thin, acidic soils. The hydrology of the basin is dominated by snowmelt runoff during March-June. Emerald Lake, a glacial tarn, is 2.72 ha in area, with a maximum depth of 10.5 m. Surface waters are poorly buffered and dominated by calcium and bicarbonate. Most of the yearly precipitation falls as dilute snow (pH5.2-5.4), with acidic rain storms sampled during May-October.

  14. Investigation of Coupled Hydrologic and Geochemical Impacts of Wildfire on Southern California Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Megan Patricia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is routed through the reach network to the watershed outlet using storage routing, or kinematic wave

  15. Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors chip tile bioreactors to reduce nitrate losses in the upper Embarras River watershed in east. Three tile bioreactors will be installed in various locations in the watershed, again for determining

  16. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

  17. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kootenai River Network, (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network (KRN) was contracted by the Bonneville Power Administration; PPA Project Number 96087200 for the period June 1, 2003 to May 31, 2004 to provide Kootenai River basin watershed coordination services. The prime focus of the KRN is coordinating activities and disseminating information related to watershed improvement and education and outreach with other interest groups in the Kootenai River basin. To this end, the KRN primarily focuses on maintaining communication networks among private and public watershed improvement groups in the Columbia River Basin. The KRN willing shares its resources with these groups. The 2003-2004 BPA contract extended the original Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks contract, which was transferred to the Kootenai River Network through a Memorandum of Understanding in November 2001. The KRN objectives of this contract were carried out through Watershed Coordinator position. The highly successful Kootenai River Network Annual General Meeting in Bonners Ferry in May 2003 demonstrated the tremendous gains that the Kootenai River Network has made in trans-boundary networking of watershed issues and accomplishments. The Annual General Meeting included seventy five participants representing more than forty US and Canadian citizen groups, tribes, first nations, agencies, ministries, businesses and private land owners from Montana, British Columbia, Idaho and Alberta. The International Restoration Tour in July 2004 featured the Grave Creek and Therriault Wetlands restoration projects in Montana and the Sand Creek and Wolf Creek restoration projects in British Columbia. The tour was attended by more than thirty people representing US and Canadian Federal and State/Provincial agencies, schools, colleges, conservation groups, private land owners, consultants, tribes, first nations, and politicians. These exciting trans-boundary successes encouraged the KRN to establish half-time Watershed Coordinator positions in both the United States and Canada. In September 2004 Kim Laub was hired as US-Watershed Coordinator and Jim and Laura Duncan were hired as Canadian Watershed Coordinators. To rejuvenate and revitalize the KRN, the Board conducted a strategic thinking and planning meeting in November 2004. All Board, staff and Advisory members participated in a combined effort to clearly define the goals of the KRN and to design ways of achieving those goals. Affirming and integrating board policy was a primary focus and it included writing accurate job descriptions for all KRN positions. KRN committee goals, the BPA contract and the Statement of Work plan were reviewed to establish future directions for a complex organization.

  18. Optimization Online - Efficient Algorithmic Techniques for Several ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugurel Ionut Andreica

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 23, 2008 ... Efficient Algorithmic Techniques for Several Multidimensional Geometric Data Management and Analysis Problems. Mugurel Ionut ...

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    to a significant increase in total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicated a subsequent worseningENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2005-2006 by Michael A: The City of Wilmington, New Hanover County and the US EPA 319 Program (through NC Division of Water quality

  20. University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Tennessee Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wshed1.htm Watts Bar Watershed McMinn Monroe Pond Creek #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Water Quality in Pond Creek 35.6 miles of Mud Creek, Greasy Branch and Pond Creek listed on 2002? #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Pond Creek · Pasture based beef and dairy

  1. Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T; Wolfe, J.

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    and implementation of watershed protection plans for each watershed. The Leon River is listed as an impaired water body for elevated levels of E. coli and does not support its designated contact recreation use. The Lampasas River was also considered impaired...

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The proposed fence will meet or exceed BPA's minimum requirement of a 35-foot setback from the stream. Fence posts will be driven into the ground with a post ponder. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing.

  4. Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Rich, Matt

    data elements/variables Heavy metals Source(s) of data Field Study Spatial extent El Paso, Cd. Juarez Data gathered or updated 2002-2003 Frequency of data One Time Format of digital file Excel spreadsheet Restrictions on use None...@infolnk.net Contact address 4145 Benjamin Franklin and 4158 Estocolmo Pronaf circuit Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua Contact FAX number (656) 611-1270 Paso del Norte Watershed Council PDNWC Contact: Alfredo Granados Ph.D. Metadata form for USACE and EPWU Coordinated...

  5. Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Assessment of Park Water Resources.......................................................................25 resources........................................................................15 Biological resources

  6. Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis Achanges may impact the hydrology of the Tijuana Riverclimate changes might impact hydrology in the Tijuana River

  7. Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

  8. Innovative Technologies and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samano, R.; Swinford, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2014 Innovative Technologies and Techniques ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 What’s New in Energy Efficient Cooling Systems? ? Director of Energy Management ? Moving Away From... Refrigerants ? LEED ? Reducing the Carbon Footprint ? Improving Indoor Air Quality - IAQ ? High Efficiency Fans and Motors ? Economizers ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Outside Air Management Experts...

  9. Annual hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek Watershed: Water Year 1990 (October 1989--September 1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Moore, G.K.; Watts, J.A.; Broders, C.C.; Bednarek, A.T.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes, for the Water Year 1990 (October 1989-- September 1990), the dynamic hydrologic data collected on the Whiteoak Creek (WOC) Watershed's surface and subsurface flow systems. These systems affect the quality or quantity of surface water and groundwater. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to 1. characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow system, 2. plan and assess remedial action activities, and 3. provide long-term availability of data and assure quality. Characterizing the hydrology of the WOC watershed provides a better understanding of the processes which drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identifying of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. Hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. The majority of the data summarized in this report are available from the Remedial Action Programs Data and Information Management System data base. Surface water data available within the WOC flow system include discharge and runoff, surface water quality, radiological and chemical contamination of sediments, and descriptions of the outfalls to the WOC flow system. Climatological data available for the Oak Ridge area include precipitation, temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. Information on groundwater levels, aquifer characteristics, and groundwater quality are presented. Anomalies in the data and problems with monitoring and accuracy are discussed. 58 refs., 54 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Fritz R.

    A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed A Thesis Presented Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed," has been reviewed in final form ____________________________________Date____________ Margrit von Braun #12;iii iii A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment

  11. COMPLEXITY AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT IN WASHINGTON STATE FOREST POLICY, 1987-2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPLEXITY AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT IN WASHINGTON STATE FOREST POLICY, 1987-2001 by Mark Kepkay BA and Adaptive Management in Washington State Forest Policy, 1987-2001 PROJECT NUMBER: 345 SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE programs within Washington State forest policy. I focus on the Watershed Analysis program, 1992 to 1997

  12. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field number 1, onshore gulf coast over-pressured, high yield condensate reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoirs, the study conducted on an overpressured high yield gas condensate reservoir is reported. The base recovery factor for the field was projected to be only 47.8%, due to high residual gas saturation and a relatively strong aquifer which maintained reservoir pressure.

  13. Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession-flow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession 2002; accepted 23 April 2003 Abstract Insufficient sub-surface hydraulic data from watersheds often and in watersheds with low population densities because well-drilling to obtain the hydraulic data is expensive

  14. The Relative Importance of Road Density and Physical Watershed Features in Determining Coastal Marsh Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    with overall Water Quality Index scores. Road density also showed positive correlations with total nitrate Marsh Water Quality in Georgian Bay Rachel DeCatanzaro Ă? Maja Cvetkovic Ă? Patricia Chow-Fraser Received and physical watershed features (watershed size, wetland cover, and bedrock type) on water quality in coastal

  15. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W912HQ-10-D-0002 Task Order Watershed Ecosystem Restoration at Springville Dam, Draft Detailed Project Report/Environmental Assessment

  16. Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course...

  17. Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

  18. Quantification of glacier melt volume in the Indus River watershed Maria Nicole Asay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Quantification of glacier melt volume in the Indus River watershed Maria Nicole Asay A thesis;ABSTRACT Quantification of glacier melt volume in the Indus River watershed Maria N. Asay Department of Geological Sciences, BYU Master of Science Quantifying the contribution of glaciers to water resources

  19. Image segmentation and analysis via multiscale gradient watershed hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauch, John M.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Machine Intell., vol. 9, pp. 726–741, Nov. 1987. [3] S. Buecher, “Watersheds of functions and picture segmentation,” in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Paris, France, May 1982, pp. 1928–1931. [4] S. Beucher and F. Meyer... based on morphological filtering,” IEEE Trans.Pattern Anal.Machine Intell., vol. 11, pp. 649–700, 1989. [11] J. J. Clark, “Singularities of contrast functions in scale space,” in Proc. 1st Int. Conf. Computer Vision, London, U.K., 1987, pp. 491–495. [12...

  20. Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

  1. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy andAprilWater andWatershed Scale

  2. ESTIMATING POTENTIAL E. COLI SOURCES IN A WATERSHED USING SPATIALLY EXPLICIT MODELING TECHNIQUES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) was incorporated into SELECT along with the Pollutant Connectivity (Karthikeyan), and Research Associate (McKee), Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A Laboratory, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station, TX 77845 (E-Mail / Karthikeyan: karthi

  3. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

  4. BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT (BPMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Process Management is boring Business process management is anything but boring! People who work improvement initiatives work with disciplined project management techniques Related OrganizationsBUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT (BPMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree Business Process Management (BPMA

  5. Single-Center Experience and 1-Year Follow-up Results of 'Sandwich Technique' in the Management of Common Iliac Artery Aneurysms During EVAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio, E-mail: claudiocec@hotmail.it; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Leonini, Sara [Policlinico Santa Maria alle Scotte, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Radiologia Interventistica (Italy); Tommasino, Giulio; Muzzi, Luigi; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Neri, Eugenio [Policlinico Santa Maria alle Scotte, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Chirurgia del Cuore e dei grossi vasi (Italy)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) accompanied by common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms requires a more demanding procedure owing to the difficulties in obtaining an adequate distal landing zone for the stent-graft limb(s), a potential site of endoleak. The 'sandwich technique' is a procedure to increase EVAR feasibility in the setting of adverse or challenging CIA anatomy. Its main advantages include no restrictions in terms of CIA diameter or length or internal iliac artery (IIA) diameter, no need to wait for a specific stent-graft. Our purpose is to describe our single-center experience and one year follow-up results of this new procedure. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to June 2010, the sandwich technique was performed in our institution in 7 patients treated for AAA and unilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 5) or bilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 2). Inclusion criteria were the presence of unilateral or bilateral CIA aneurysm (independently from its diameter), IIA artery measuring up to 9 mm in its maximum diameter, not dilatation of IIA and EIA. Results: The mean follow-up length was 15 months (range: 14-20 months). All stent-implanted iliac branches remained patent on 1 year follow-up and IIA flow was preserved. None of the patients had symptoms of pelvic ischemia. CT scan follow-up showed aneurysm shrinkage in five patients, without any sign of endoleaks in all cases. Conclusions: In selected cases, the 'sandwich technique' showed good outcomes confirming to be a safe and easy to perform way to overcome anatomical constraints and expanding the limits of EVAR.

  6. Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurakis, Eugene G

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten people’s awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

  7. Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques NGSI Research Overview and Update on NDA Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A., V. Mozin, S.J. Tobin, L.W. Cambell, J.R. Cheatham, C.R. Freeman, C.J. Gesh,

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent Fuel Library for Assessing Varied Nondestructive Assay Techniques for Nuclear Safeguards,” Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management

  8. Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

  9. Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management capacity

  10. Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " financing · Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management

  11. John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  12. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids

  13. Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

  14. Urbanizing Watersheds and Changing River Flood Dynamics: Implications for Urban Wetland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urbanization alters river hydrology, morphology, water quality, and habitat and ecology. Most of these associated changes are due to an increase in impervious surface cover (ISC) throughout the watershed. But the spatial location of urban areas...

  15. NIFA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (formerly NRI): Water and Watershed Competitive Grants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracking to Identify Nonpoint Fecal Pollution in Agricultural Watersheds Principal Investigator: Nachabe, M of Award: Grant 2002-35102-12383; $204,862; 3 Years Title of Award: Variable-Frequency Acoustic Profiling

  16. Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

  17. An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

    of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages...

  18. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemistry of Watersheds Along the Western Slope of the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homyak, Peter Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    both EML and Pear Lake (PRL) (J. Sickman, unpublished data),hypolimnetic O 2 concentrations. PRL is a 8.0 ha 591,000 m 3hypolimnetic anoxia. The PRL watershed is 142 ha of which

  19. Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course... Casebolt of Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Lucas Gregory of Texas Water Resources Institute, Vanessa Escobar of the Texas Water Development Board, and Ernest Moran of the San Antonio River Author- ity calculate load duration curves...

  20. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  1. Environmental and Resource Studies -Canadian Studies 250 Environmental and Resource Management: Canadian Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    in the ground, or what level of "harvesting" is the highest that can be sustained without damage to the resource to human beings? The course combines a discussion of theoretical approaches to managing renewable and non-renewable resources: energy, agriculture, parks, forests, water and watersheds, fisheries, and wildlife. The course

  2. Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotation and Land Preparation easures 1. Farm Ponds 2. Water Harvesting Measures 1. Checkdam/Reservoir 2Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann University of Hannover Use & Land Cover TopographyTopography Semi arid/Sub- humid Climatic Watershed Quantitative Water

  3. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  4. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, Will

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

  5. A Framework for Classification of Traffic Management Practices as Reasonable or Unreasonable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Scott

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a survey of traf?c management techniques andsection presents a survey of traf?c management techniques to

  6. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  7. Curve Number and Peakflow Responses Following the Cerro Grande Fire on a Small Watershed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, E. P.; Hawkins, Richard H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Curve Number (CN) method is routinely used to estimate runoff and peakflows following forest fires, but there has been essentially no literature on the estimated value and temporal variation of CNs following wildland fires. In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned the headwaters of the major watersheds that cross Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a stream gauging network presented an opportunity to assess CNs following the fire. Analysis of rainfall-runoff events indicated that the pre-fire watershed response was complacent or limited watershed area contributed to runoff. The post-fire response indicated that the complacent behavior continued so the watershed response was not dramatically changed. Peakflows did increase by 2 orders of magnitude following the fire, and this was hypothesized to be a function of increase in runoff volume and changes in watershed network allowing more efficient delivery of runoff. More observations and analyses following fires are needed to support definition of CNs for post-fire response and mitigation efforts.

  8. Managed pressure drilling techniques and tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Matthew Daniel

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . A subsea mudlift-pump is connected to the riser by a riser-outlet joint. The outlet joint has high-pressure valves that enable it to isolate the pump system from the riser. The pump is connected to the mud pits by a return and a fill line..., the system is designed to adjust to compensate for the change. The subsea BOP would be closed. The mud level in the riser would be increased to compensate for the fact that the pumps are shut down and brought even higher to stop the influx or increase till...

  9. Implementing cutting plane management and selection techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    notation we omit the index i whenever possible and denote a single cut by. ?T x = ? j?N ?jxj ? ? ..... This compression routine efficiently removes all cuts which ...

  10. Challenges and Techniques for Personal Environment Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacchi, Anna 1967-

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    "Dashboard": only shortcuts. ..................... 45 Figure 4. Example of a desktop classified as ?Minimum?. ........................................... 47 Figure 5. Quotes from participants: Quick Launch Bar and Icons personification. ...... 48 Figure 6... tags, flags and comment areas. ....... 78 Figure 14. Box plot with mean for each Likert-style survey question. ........................... 86 Figure 15. Percent of the participants? answers to the Likert-style questions from the final survey...

  11. Managed pressure drilling techniques and tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Matthew Daniel

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of drilling offshore wells is important as we drill more wells in deeper water. Drilling-related problems, including stuck pipe, lost circulation, and excessive mud cost, show the need for better drilling ...

  12. Idaho Model Watershed Project : Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, Allen; Slavin, Katie

    1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Model Watershed Project was initiated in the fall of 1992 with a grant from Bonneville Power Administration. The objective of this project is to protect, enhance and restore anadromous and resident fish habitat and achieve and maintain a balance between resource protection and resource use on a holistic watershed basis.

  13. What is the effect of LiDAR-derived DEM resolution on large-scale watershed model results?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Yang; Daniel B. Ames; Andre Fonseca; Danny Anderson; Rupesh Shrestha; Nancy F. Glenn; Yang Cao

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the effect of raster cell size on hydrographic feature extraction and hydrological modeling using LiDAR derived DEMs. LiDAR datasets for three experimental watersheds were converted to DEMs at various cell sizes. Watershed boundaries and stream networks were delineated from each DEM and were compared to reference data. Hydrological simulations were conducted and the outputs were compared. Smaller cell size DEMs consistently resulted in less difference between DEM-delineated features and reference data. However, minor differences been found between streamflow simulations resulted for a lumped watershed model run at daily simulations aggregated at an annual average. These findings indicate that while higher resolution DEM grids may result in more accurate representation of terrain characteristics, such variations do not necessarily improve watershed scale simulation modeling. Hence the additional expense of generating high resolution DEM's for the purpose of watershed modeling at daily or longer time steps may not be warranted.

  14. Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

  15. Managing Rangeland Watersheds for Agricultural Production, Water Quality, and Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    raw food always safe Salinas River riparian corridors wildlife habitat water quality Juxtaposition of plant agriculture and grazed rangeland Salinas Valley example Chaparral wildlife habitat Year Food flows, retention basins, constructed wetlands, etc. 2012 technical reports on waterborne pathogens

  16. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-66)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund four projects that will enhance instream flow in several subbasins throughout Oregon. The Oregon Water Trust acquires existing water rights on a voluntary basis through purchase, gift and water conservation projects, and converts the rights to instream flow under Oregon state water law. The proposed projects are all related to an on-going program of water rights acquisition in the Columbia Plateau Basin (Deschutes, John Day, Umatilla and Walla Walla subbasins) and the Columbia Gorge Basin (Fifteenmile subbasin) by the Oregon Water Trust (OWT). The current funding cycle extends through fiscal year 2001. Additional funding is currently being sought for fiscal years 2002-2004. Specific acquisition transactions are evaluated throughout the duration of the project, so on-the-ground impacts may only be estimated. The proposed project is an extension of previous water rights acquisition projects within the subject subbasins, dating back to 1994. The objective of the proposed projects in the next cycle, 2002 through 2004, is to acquire a total of approximately 12.6 cfs on tributary streams within the subbasins. The target level of water rights acquired, by subbasin, are as follows: Deschutes subbasin--2.0 cfs; Fifteenmile subbasin--1.4 cfs; John Day subbasin--2.0 cfs; Umatilla subbasin--1.0 cfs; Walla Walla subbasin--4.2 cfs; and newly prioritized streams within the region--2.0 cfs.

  17. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA is proposing to provide cost share for a program that will protect ESA-listed salmonid species in the Walla Walla River Basin through the installation of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) approved fish screens on up to 197 irrigation diversions in the basin. ESA-listed steelhead and bull trout are presently at risk in the Walla Walla Basin as the result of a combination of factors that primarily involve insufficient flow, extensive habitat degradation, and mortality from surface water diversions. Unscreened or improperly screened diversions can damage fish scaling and induce stress, both of which can be lethal. They are also known to cause migration delays and increased predation; impinge fish against screen surfaces; or, in cases where screen mesh size is too large, allow juvenile fish to be drawn directly into functioning irrigation systems resulting in direct mortality. The goal of this project is to eliminate imminent mortality risks to ESA-listed fish arising from inadequate irrigation diversions in the Walla Walla Basin by upgrading screens to current state and federal juvenile fish screen standards. This Supplement Analysis covers only those screen upgrades and/or installations that will meet the NMFS no effect standard (NMFS, January 16, 2001). All other screen upgrades and/or installations in the Walla Walla River Basin associated with this project will require additional NEPA analysis and documentation prior to implementation.

  18. Where does streamwater come from in low-relief forested watersheds? A dual-isotope approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaus, Julian [Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST), Dept. Environmental Research and Innovation, Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time and geographic sources of streamwater in low-relief watersheds are poorly understood. This is partly due to the difficult combination of low runoff coefficients and often damped streamwater isotopic signals precluding traditional hydrograph separation and convolution integral approaches. Here we present a dual-isotope approach involving 18O and 2H of water in a low-angle forested watershed to determine streamwater source components and then build a conceptual model of streamflow generation. We focus on three headwater lowland sub-catchments draining the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, USA.

  19. Where does streamwater come from in low-relief forested watersheds? A dual-isotope approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Klaus, Julian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time and geographic sources of streamwater in low-relief watersheds are poorly understood. This is partly due to the difficult combination of low runoff coefficients and often damped streamwater isotopic signals precluding traditional hydrograph separation and convolution integral approaches. Here we present a dual-isotope approach involving 18O and 2H of water in a low-angle forested watershed to determine streamwater source components and then build a conceptual model of streamflow generation. We focus on three headwater lowland sub-catchments draining the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, USA.

  20. Increase Productivity - Implement Energy Management Systems with Project Management Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spinner, M. P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Glass Division is the second smallest of Ford Motor Company's 20 odd major divisions. It employs four percent of Ford's people, uses but one and one-half percent of the manufacturing space yet it consumes 20 percent of the energy. As Plant...

  1. Stabilized Ultrafast Pulse Generation and Optical Frequency Combs Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Stabilized Ultrafast Pulse Generation and Optical Frequency Combs ­ Techniques and Applications Diodes ­ Review Ultrafast Dynamics ­ Breathing Mode (Dispersion Managed Cavity) · High Pulse Energy to Make Short Pulses - Review Ultrafast Dynamics- - Dispersion Managed (Breathing Mode) MLL #12

  2. Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Lacatell; David Shoch; Bill Stanley; Zoe Kant

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market opportunities. This is reflected and further substantiated in the results of the forest cover change analysis, which demonstrated a decline in area of land in forest use in the study area for the 1987/88-2001 period. The project team collected data necessary to identify sites for reforestation in the study area, environmental data for the determining site suitability for a range of reforestation alternatives and has identified and addressed potential leakage and additionality issues associated with implementing a carbon sequestration project in the Chesapeake Rivers Conservation Area. Furthermore, carbon emissions reductions generated would have strong potential for recognition in existing reporting systems such as the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b) voluntary reporting requirements and the Chicago Climate Exchange. The study identified 384,398 acres on which reforestation activities could potentially be sited. Of these candidate sites, sites totaling 26,105 acres are an appropriate size for management (> 100 acres) and located in priority conservation areas identified by The Nature Conservancy. Total carbon sequestration potential of reforestation in the study area, realized over a 100 year timeframe, ranges from 58 to 66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, and on the priority sites alone, potential for carbon sequestration approaches or exceeds 4 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the absence of concerted reforestation efforts, coupled with policy strategies, the region will likely face continued declines in forest land.

  3. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management`s goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  4. Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T.; Wolfe, J.

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas Water Resources Institute TR 441 April 2013 Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers L. Gregory, E. Casarez, J. Truesdale, G. Di Giovanni, R... Oxygen E. coli Escherichia coli EPA Environmental Protection Agency ERIC-PCR Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Polymerase Chain Reaction ERIC-RP ERIC-PCR and RiboPrinting Composite DNA Fingerprints LRW Leon River...

  5. Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

  6. Machine Learning Techniques for Passive Network Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Machine Learning Techniques for Passive Network Inventory J´er^ome Franc¸ois, Humberto Abdelnur identify running code, is a powerful service for both security assessment and inventory management operator. Index Terms--fingerprinting, inventory management, syntactic tree, SVM. I. INTRODUCTION ASSUMING

  7. Knowledge Engineering Technique for Cluster Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Knowledge Engineering Technique for Cluster Development Pradorn Sureephong1 , Nopasit Chakpitak1 management by using knowledge engineering which is one of the most important method for managing knowledge. This work analyzed three well known knowledge engineering methods, i.e. MOKA, SPEDE and Common

  8. Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Evan

    Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb, sinkholes and other drainage features control the temporal and spatial pattern of sediment storage across storage function of sinkholes and caves has not been investigated using a sediment budget approach

  9. Success of the Melton Valley Watershed Remediation at the ORNL - 12351

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, David; Wilkerson, Laura [DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (United States); Sims, Lynn; Ketelle, Richard; Garland, Sid [Oak Ridge/Restoration Service, Inc. - UCOR/RSI (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The source remediation of the Melton Valley (MV) Watershed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory was completed 5 years ago (September 2006). Historic operations at the laboratory had resulted in chemical and radionuclide contaminant releases and potential risks or hazards within 175 contaminated units scattered across an area of 430 hectares (1062 acres) within the watershed. Contaminated areas included burial grounds, landfills, underground tanks, surface impoundments, liquid disposal pit/trenches, hydrofracture wells, leak and spill spites, inactive surface structures, and contaminated soil and sediments. The remediation of the watershed was detailed in the MV Interim Action Record of Decision (ROD) and included a combination of actions encompassing containment, isolation, stabilization, removal, and treatment of sources within the watershed and established the monitoring and land use controls that would result in protection of human health. The actions would take place over 5 years with an expenditure of over $340 M. The MV remedial actions left hazardous wastes in-place (e.g., buried wastes beneath hydraulic isolation caps) and cleanup at levels that do not allow for unrestricted access and unlimited exposure. The cleanup with the resultant land use would result in a comprehensive monitoring plan for groundwater, surface water, and biological media, as well as the tracking of the land use controls to assure their completion. This paper includes an overview of select performance measures and monitoring results, as detailed in the annual Remediation Effectiveness Report and the Five-Year Report. (authors)

  10. Fine Sediment Sources in Coastal Watersheds with Uplifted Marine Terraces in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    County, California Stephen Sungnome Madrone1 and Andrew P. Stubblefield1 Abstract Erosion in the Mill and Luffenholtz Creek watersheds in Humboldt County, California, with their extensive clay soils, can lead to high) there is still the potential for creation of a dangerous by-product, chloro-tri- halomethanes that can remain

  11. An Analysis of Microbial Pollution in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet Watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of fecal coliform sources and pathways in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets is part of the Project ENVironmental InVESTment (ENVVEST) being conducted by the Navy's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, the Suquamish Tribe, Kitsap County, the City of Bremerton, the City of Port Orchard, and other local stakeholders. The goal of this study was to identify microbial pollution problems within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and to provide a comprehensive assessment of fecal coliform (FC) contamination from all identifiable sources in the watershed. This study quantifies levels of contamination and estimated loadings from known sources within the watersheds and describes pollutant transport mechanisms found in the study area. In addition, the effectiveness of pollution prevention and mitigation measures currently in place within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed are discussed. This comprehensive study relies on historical data collected by several cooperating agencies, in addition to data collected during the study period from spring 2001 through summer 2005. This report is intended to provide the technical information needed to continue current water quality cleanup efforts and to help implement future efforts.

  12. The British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    hillslopes to stream channels are restored, a also low-level treatment, where only hillslope restoration work a restoration program would be over a 4-8 year period, using 8-16 experimental stream triplets. AppropriateThe British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring

  13. Corbicula Biomonitoring in the Anacostia Watershed Final Report to the DC Water Resources Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    1 Corbicula Biomonitoring in the Anacostia Watershed Final Report to the DC Water Resources and estuary sites for eight weeks and tissues analyzed for 21 pesticides, 28 PCB congenors, 18 PAHs and 6 tPAHs were significently increased. Clams placed just above tide in three of five main tributaries

  14. Corbicula Active (ABM) Biomonitoring and Passive (POM) Chlordane Monitoring in the Anacostia River Watershed (MD).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    in the Anacostia River Watershed (MD). Final Report to the DC Water Resources Research Center Dr. Harriette L hydrocarbons (PAHs), 28 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), 6 Aroclors, 21 pesticides, and five metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb) plus technical chlordane, percent water and percent lipid. This ABM study

  15. Active Biomonitoring for PCB, PAH and Chlordane Sources in the Anacostia Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    1 Active Biomonitoring for PCB, PAH and Chlordane Sources in the Anacostia Watershed Final Report to the DC Water Resources Research Center Dr. Harriette L. Phelps June 1, 2008 ABSTRACT In 2007, active's Anacostia River upper tributaries. The contaminated tributaries included Indian Creek (PAHs), Lower

  16. Calibration of Watershed Models using Cloud Computing Marty Humphrey, Norm Beekwilder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Marty

    .e. runoff from agricultural and urban lands to water bodies. This difference in scope introduces-- Understanding hydrologic systems at the scale of large watersheds and river basins is critically important to society when faced with extreme events, such as floods and droughts, or with concerns about water quality

  17. Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake Watershed: Sampling Design, Methods and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opsomer, Jean

    Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake Watershed: Sampling Design, Methods and Results by J Association June 11, 2001 Iowa State University Ames, Iowa #12;2 Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake health assessment, are briefly described in the article. All the selected plots and stream locations were

  18. Evaluation of shrub encroachment and brush control on water availability in the Upper Guadalupe River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afinowicz, Jason David

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................... 99 VITA ........................................................................................................... 102 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 2-1 A comparison of the same area as viewed from (a) a 30-m spatial resolution..., and light brush in the Upper Guadalupe River watershed as determined by remote sensing shown by dark regions?.. ................................................................................... 21 3-1 The location and stream network...

  19. TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    21 TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL, the best location for 1 or 3 dry dams). To take into account the spatial variability of the rainfall, we, following subcatchments delineation. A dry dam can be placed at the outlet of any unit. Such a simple model

  20. NAME: Salt Creek Estuary Restoration LOCATION: Salt Creek Watershed, Clallam County, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Salt Creek Estuary Restoration LOCATION: Salt Creek Watershed, Clallam County, Washington Federal funds $0 PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Salt Creek Estuary Reconnection project will significantly enhance tidal and fluvial hydrology to 22.5 acres of salt marsh, which will return the salt marsh to its

  1. SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO Belanger, Laura (M.S., Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering) Source and Effect of Acid Rock (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters

  2. Report on the Watershed Monitoring Program at the Paducah Site January-December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watershed Monitoring of Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks has been conducted since 1987. The monitoring was conducted by the University of Kentucky between 1987 and 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of monitoring are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for DOE protect and maintain the use of Little Bayour and Big Bayou creeks for frowth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota. The watershed (biological) monitoring discussed in this report was conducted under DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. Future monitoring will be conducted as required by the Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) in March 1998. A draft Watershed Monitoring Program plan was approved by the Kentucky Division of Water and will be finalized in 1999. The DOE permit also requires toxicity monitoring of one continuous outfall and of three intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The Watershed Monitoring Program for the Paducah Site during calendar year 1998 consisted of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of fish communities. This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from january 1998 to December 1998, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  3. LOW-POWER DESIGN AND TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    MANAGEMENT. Moderator's introduction: Kevin Skadron ......In recent years, power dissipation has become-level techniques have been a mainstay for manag- ing power dissipation, architecture-level tech- niques promise additional and synergistic techniques for managing power because they can take advantage of additional

  4. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management's goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  5. A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Chad Edward

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients ...

  6. Microbial Risk Perspective on the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Indicator Bacteria in Texas Urban and Rural Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan Ravichandran, Sriambharrish

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    contaminated waters as indicated by ingestion of Escherichia coli found in surface water for contact recreation scenarios. The watersheds were chosen because many segments were previously placed on the 303 (d) list (published by the TCEQ) for failing...

  7. Development of a Decision Support Geographic Information System for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jason Samuel

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions, and geologic characteristics. This study describes the development, accuracy, and application of a decision support geographic information system (DSGIS) for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River watersheds...

  8. Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Heather Grace

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    service valuation model to each of the land use classes over the discreet time periods. Hydrologic peak flow models using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Method were developed and applied to each watershed for each discreet time period...

  9. Runoff sources and land cover change in the Amazon: an end-member mixing analysis from small watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    watersheds Christopher Neill · Joaquin E. Chaves · Trent Biggs · Linda A. Deegan · Helmut Elsenbeer · Ricardo 02543, USA e-mail: cneill@mbl.edu T. Biggs Department of Geography, San Diego State University, San

  10. Spatially explicit load enrichment calculation tool and cluster analysis for identification of E. coli sources in Plum Creek Watershed, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teague, Aarin Elizabeth

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the 2004 303(d) List, 192 segments are impaired by bacteria in the State of Texas. Impairment of streams due to bacteria is of major concern in several urban watersheds in Texas. In order to assess, monitor ...

  11. Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban the upward limit of geographical features such as pediments, fans and depositional features of ice and wind

  12. Network Management Network Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that pertain to the operation, administration, maintenance, and provisioning of networked systems · Operation deals with keeping the network up (and the service provided by the network) · Administration involvesNetwork Management Pag. 1 Network Management Andrea Bianco Telecommunication Network Group Network

  13. Watershed characteristics contributing to the 1983-84 debris flows in the Wasatch Range, Davis County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, William Kevin

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS CONTRIBUTING TO THE 3. 983-84 DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE WASATCH RANGE, DAVIS COUNTY ?UTAH A Thesis by WILLIAM KEVIN COLEMAN Submitted to Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Geology WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS CONTRIBUTING TO THE 1. 983 ? 84 DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE WASATCH RANGE, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH A Thesis by WILLIAM KEVIN COLEMAN Approved...

  14. A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Chad Edward

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPORT OF TURFGRASS SOD GROWN WITH COMPOSTED DAIRY MANURE INTO A SUBURBAN WATERSHED A Thesis by CHAD EDWARD RICHARDS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... OF TURFGRASS SOD GROWN WITH COMPOSTED DAIRY MANURE INTO A SUBURBAN WATERSHED A Thesis by CHAD EDWARD RICHARDS Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  15. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  16. Integration of stream and watershed data for hydrologic modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koka, Srikanth

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -resolution datasets are required, vector datasets have an advantage because they would present the same amount of information that raster would, but the vector file size increase is not as significant as that of raster. The evolution of DEMs suggests... can also be attributed with non-spatial information. Only features of one shape type can be collected together for storage. These storage types can be classified as file- based storage (e.g. shapefiles and coverages) or DBMS (Database Management...

  17. 15.761 Operations Management, Summer 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenfield, Donald

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This course will introduce concepts and techniques for design, planning and control of manufacturing and service operations. The course provides basic definitions of operations management terms, tools and techniques ...

  18. The prediction of sediment yields from small blackland watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jimmy Ray

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pect rainf'all erosion. The equation is as follous'. A = RKLSCP share A = average annual soil loss in tons psr acre~ R = rainfall Pactor, K = soil erodibility Pactor, LS = length and steepness oP slope factor, 0 = cropping and management factor... and summer. The data utilized mere rocords of' recording raingagos~ runofP records, and records oP depth integrated sediment samples taken during sediment producing storms. The 205 storms selected Por the study varied in magnitude Prom 0. 43 0 2a ~g2...

  19. Developing a Methodology to Prioritize Texas Watersheds for Environmental Restoration Efforts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, R.; Jacobs, Jennifer H.; Jones, C. Allan; Harris, B.L.; Jensen, Ricard W.

    and terrestrial “portfolios” developed by the Nature Conservancy, major rivers, aquifer recharge zones, major reservoirs, and critical stream segments. At the same time, watershed threats were identified by assessing data on such factors as water and wind... by TPWD. The presence of Texas Nature Conservancy (TNC) Aquatic, Terrestrial and Marine Portfolios Finally, for each HUC the percentage of riparian cropland was determined. Those HUCs within the top 20% were determined to be significant...

  20. Implementing the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan through a Heliborne Electromagnetic (EM) Survey: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Sheng, Z.; Hassan, A.; McDonald, A.; Porter, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , completing financial status reports, hosting the program website, developing the project final report, facilitating the acceptance of bids from companies capable of collecting heliborne electromagnetic (HEM) data, awarding the HEM contract, and ultimately..., and the contract was awarded in May 2013. SkyTEM was the company that provided the bid with the best value and met data collection requirements. As a part of the Pecos River WPP Implementation Project (TSSWCB 08-08), public meetings were held in the watershed...

  1. A watershed blueprint: partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 18 A watershed blueprint Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado?s health In 2002 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) set a target of 90 percent reduction of nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand... for the Arroyo Colorado to regain its healthy condition. Eight years later, the Arroyo Colorado, an ancient channel of the Rio Grande in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, has been the focus of multiple projects; educational and outreach efforts...

  2. A watershed blueprint: Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 18 A watershed blueprint Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado?s health In 2002 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) set a target of 90 percent reduction of nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand... for the Arroyo Colorado to regain its healthy condition. Eight years later, the Arroyo Colorado, an ancient channel of the Rio Grande in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, has been the focus of multiple projects; educational and outreach efforts...

  3. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Mulholland, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  4. Remediation of the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Lab: An Accelerated Closure Success Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, R. [U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adams, V. [U.S. DOE, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley (MV) Watershed at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) encompasses approximately 430 hectares (1062 acres). Historic operations at ORNL produced a diverse legacy of contaminated facilities and waste disposal areas in the valley. In addition, from 1955 to 1963, ORNL served as a major disposal site for wastes from over 50 off-site government-sponsored installations, research institutions, and other isotope users. Contaminated areas in the watershed included burial grounds, landfills, underground tanks, surface impoundments, liquid disposal pits/trenches, hydro-fracture wells, leak and spill sites, inactive surface structures, and contaminated soil and sediment. Remediation of the watershed in accordance with the requirements specified in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Actions in Melton Valley, which estimated that remedial actions specified in the ROD would occur over a period of 14 years, with completion by FY 2014. Under the terms of the Accelerated Closure Contract between DOE and its contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, the work was subdivided into 14 separate sub-projects which were completed between August 2001 and September 2006, 8 years ahead of the original schedule. (authors)

  5. Resources for Stormwater Managers throughout the Texas Gulf Coast: An Annotated Bibliography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, John; Jensen, Ric

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 278 2005 Resources for Stormwater Managers throughout the Texas Gulf Coast: An Annotated Bibliography John Jacob Texas Sea Grant Texas Cooperative Extension Texas Coastal Watershed Program and Ric Jensen Texas Water...://tcebookstore.org/tmppdfs/2767908-L5227S.pdf. TWRI Fact Sheet. “Resources to Replace On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems in Texas,” by Ric Jensen. This fact sheet describes resources available to replace failed onsite wastewater treatment systems (OSSFs) and to build install...

  6. Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullinan, Valerie I.; May, Christopher W.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Judd, Chaeli; Johnston, Robert K.

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use, 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.

  7. Program Areas Nutrient Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant University System. For example: · Stream Restoration Training and Demonstration-on experience to plan, design, construct, and evaluate stream restoration projects to improve water quality and Restoration Watershed Assessment and Modeling The Project promotes regional collaboration, enhances delivery

  8. Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

  9. SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0-1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish,...

  10. Hospitality Management Hospitality Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    of the Department of Hospitality Management and to the recorder in the College of Human Ecology. Required HPM 114 Food Safety and Quality Assurance 2 AND HPM 115 Food Science I 3 AND HPM 216 Restaurant and Food Service Operations 4 OR NSD 225 Nutrition in Health 3 12 credits needed: HPM 300 Selected Topics: Advanced

  11. Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nauduri, Anantha S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve...

  12. The Pumpkin Creek Watershed Limited Irrigation and No-Till Demonstration Gary L. Stone, Gary W. Hergert, Dean Yonts, Jim Schild, Rex A. Nielson and James Margheim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    in the Panhandle can fit into limited irrigation cropping systems in the Pumpkin Creek Watershed. The NPNRD allowsThe Pumpkin Creek Watershed Limited Irrigation and No-Till Demonstration Gary L. Stone, Gary W irrigation applies less water than is required to meet full evapotranspiration (ET) or irrigation demand

  13. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

  14. Fuzzy Typing for Document Management Alison HUETTNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dekai

    Fuzzy Typing for Document Management Alison HUETTNER Clairvoyance Corporation 5301 Fifth Avenue method of document analysis and management, based on a combination of techniques from NLP and fuzzy logic typing for document management. The fuzzy typing approach is general in scope and can be applied to many

  15. Achieving Autonomous Power Management Using Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    24 Achieving Autonomous Power Management Using Reinforcement Learning HAO SHEN, Syracuse University University System level power management must consider the uncertainty and variability that come from the environ- ment, the application and the hardware. A robust power management technique must be able to learn

  16. Business Process Management: A Comprehensive Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalst, W.M.P.van der

    Business Process Management: A Comprehensive Survey Wil M.P. van der Aalst Department. Business Process Management (BPM) research resulted in a plethora of methods, techniques, and tools to support the design, enactment, management, and analysis of operational business processes. This survey

  17. Comparative analyses for the prediction of streamflow from small watershed by use of digitized radar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braatz, Dean Thomas

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this study. (Source: ARS, USDA, Chickasha, Oklahoma) N 149 Cy ril 147 154 125 ~ q q ~ ~l. t 124 130 \\ 522 l g 131' ~ 132 $ 133 Ninnekah if l, 134 135 VCement 151 ~+ f 150 14'e 181 144 153 182 r 156 Fletcher 161 160 f59 0 5 Rush Springs Scale..., Agriculture Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Chickasha, Oklahoma, for two small sub-basins within the larger experimen- tal watershed of the Washita River basin. The actual rainfall values collected by the ARS network...

  18. Flood forecasting with the A&M watershed model: a hydrometeorological study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Cedric Glynn

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'c 219R'? 67. 6R ' "' 66. 5R'w 204Rc o 205R' " ) 3PPR~? 450R' '" j 184R' '" 278R"'" 240R'""' 176R'" 15 I R "' 179R'" 227n'o 17 8R "c 150R"" 137R' "" 330R'? 298R''" ) 520Rwo 730Rcn ) 255R' " 426R' 'c Sal'man (1957) Shupiatskii (1957... procedure. The rain gage locations reporting valid data within or near the watershed boundary are identified. The rainfall measured by each gage is compared to the amount measured by the radar at the gage location. If the measured rainfall exceeds a...

  19. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  20. Hybrid Dynamic Energy and Thermal Management in Heterogeneous Embedded Multiprocessor SoCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Hybrid Dynamic Energy and Thermal Management in Heterogeneous Embedded Multiprocessor SoCs Shervin propose a joint thermal and energy management technique specifically designed for heterogeneous MPSo technique simultaneously reduces the thermal hot spots, temperature gradients, and energy consumption

  1. Project Management Plan Resident Management System (RMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 Project Management Plan Resident Management System (RMS) And Quality Control System (QCS Resident Management System.........................................................................................................3 Project Management Plan - Purpose

  2. Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering, UNL Background Concerns about water use have intensified and Republican River Basins, and the implementation of LB 962. To understand water use it is helpful to consider

  3. Erosion and Sediment Damages and Economic Impacts of Potential 208 Controls: A Summary of Five Watershed Studies in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

    and enforcement costs associated with each policy. The major conclusion of this social benefit and cost analysis is that off-site damages are not large enough to warrant controls on agricultural activities in any of the watersheds; that is, the costs to society...

  4. The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

  5. Quantification of Water Quality Improvement in Sandy Creek, A Tributary Watershed of Jordan Lake in the Cape Fear River Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Cape Fear River Basin, After Stream and Riparian Restoration and Wetland Treatment Cell Creation: Final to restoration. The Duke Forest Stream and Wetlands Restoration was established to rectify these problems delivery following watershed development, a three-phase stream and floodplain restoration was planned

  6. NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach) ACRES: 1.5 acres riparian habitat; 0.3 miles of stream channel-modified, straightened, and downcut channel; relocate the farm road and fences paralleling the stream to provide

  7. Design of dry dams at watershed scale : lessons learnt from sensitivity analyses using a simple but consistent rainfall-runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Design of dry dams at watershed scale : lessons learnt from sensitivity analyses using a simple Lyon, FRANCE Abstract We investigate the assessment of the overall efficiency of a set of dry dams of the best locations for a set of dams was previously studied using a simplistic rainfall-runoff model

  8. Deep groundwater flow as the main pathway for chemical outputs in a small headwater watershed (Mule Hole, South India)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Deep groundwater flow as the main pathway for chemical outputs in a small headwater watershed (Mule of a groundwater baseflow located into the active zone of the crystalline aquifer, below the weir. These findings indicate that groundwater contributes to a large part of chemical outputs at the catchment scale

  9. Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER Watershed Zones of Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER degradation dominate the landscape in Haiti and there is little accurate soil-fertility research available in five major watershed regions of Haiti: Gonaives, Archaie/Cabaret, Cul-de-Sac, Kenscoff, and Mirebalais

  10. The watershed depositon tool : a tool for incorporating atmospheric deposition in water-quality analyses {sup 1}.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwede, D. B.; Dennis, R. L.; Bitz, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; NOAA; EPA

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool for providing the linkage between air and water-quality modeling needed for determining the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) and for analyzing related nonpoint-source impacts on watersheds has been developed. Using gridded output of atmospheric deposition from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, the Watershed Deposition Tool (WDT) calculates average per unit area and total deposition to selected watersheds and subwatersheds. CMAQ estimates the wet and dry deposition for all of its gaseous and particulate chemical species, including ozone, sulfur species, nitrogen species, secondary organic aerosols, and hazardous air pollutants at grid scale sizes ranging from 4 to 36 km. An overview of the CMAQ model is provided. The somewhat specialized format of the CMAQ files is not easily imported into standard spatial analysis tools. The WDT provides a graphical user interface that allows users to visualize CMAQ gridded data and perform further analyses on selected watersheds or simply convert CMAQ gridded data to a shapefile for use in other programs. Shapefiles for the 8-digit (cataloging unit) hydrologic unit code polygons for the United States are provided with the WDT; however, other user-supplied closed polygons may be used. An example application of the WDT for assessing the contributions of different source categories to deposition estimates, the contributions of wet and dry deposition to total deposition, and the potential reductions in total nitrogen deposition to the Albemarle-Pamlico basin stemming from future air emissions reductions is used to illustrate the WDT capabilities.

  11. Control Account Manager (CAM) Responsibilities Control Account Manager (CAM) responsibilities are listed in the PPPL Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    and define assumptions, risk, and uncertainty in the project · Assign an Earned Value Technique to resourceControl Account Manager (CAM) Responsibilities Control Account Manager (CAM) responsibilities are listed in the PPPL Project Management System Description (PMSD) and PMSD Appendix E Supporting

  12. Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATIVE TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR INDOOR AIR QUALITY STUDIES Steven R. Kennedy, C.E.P., REM, project Manager I C. Brandon ~uinn, P.E., C.P.G., Project Manager James E. Henderson, Ph. D., Director of ~nalytical services ' Robert G. ~ickery...

  13. Power System load management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, Yu.N.; Semenov, V.A.; Sovalov, S.A.; Syutkin, B.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation in demand nonuniformity is analyzed for the Unified Electric Power System of the USSR and certain interconnected power systems; the conditions for handling such nonuniformity with utilization of generating equipment having differing flexibility capabilities are also considered. On this basis approaches and techniques for acting on user loads, load management, in order to assure a balance between generated and consumed power are considered.

  14. Author Retrospective for Energy Conservation Techniques for Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    Author Retrospective for Energy Conservation Techniques for Disk Array-based Servers Eduardo original paper ti- tled "Energy Conservation Techniques for Disk Array-based Servers", which was published.1145/2591635.2591666 Categories and Subject Descriptors D.4 [Operating systems]: Storage management Keywords Energy conservation

  15. A Survey of Architectural Techniques For Improving Cache Power Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , there has been a significant increase in their leakage energy consumption. For this reason, cache power to invent novel solutions for enabling low- power operation of caches. Index Terms--Cache energy saving techniques, architectural techniques, dynamic energy, leakage energy, power management, low-power, energy

  16. asset management system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    techniques for early error detection and fast recovery in a database management system (DBMS California at Irvine, University of 405 Division of Information Information Systems...

  17. asthma management system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    techniques for early error detection and fast recovery in a database management system (DBMS California at Irvine, University of 302 Division of Information Information Systems...

  18. Applying stochastic programming models in financial risk management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research studies two modelling techniques that help seek optimal strategies in financial risk management. Both are based on the stochastic programming methodology. The first technique is concerned with market risk ...

  19. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  20. An economic analysis of conservation and management measures carried out on the Blacklands Experimental Watershed, Riesel, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, Robert David

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 705 1952 47.2 56.6 2672 35.5 52.0 1846 1953 53.7 60.1 3227 41.6 63.2 2629 1954 57.5 43.8 2519 36.5 31.0 1132 1955 32.0 1885 48.1 30.9 U86 Total 351.0 13847 256.4 9540 7 year weighted avg.39.45 37.21 Difference 2.24 22 LlBP A,?:'v : Jt * CUL i... ON-4- ON {H 03 3o o?H -P0} ? & ON C"? cv ?H O C- ? 2G O' ON ? rV ?*4ON 2G 8 ? O rV OON UA C \\^ CV v...

  1. Position Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

  2. Management Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO) manages efforts to improve performance, lower costs, and accelerate deployment of wind and water power technologies, which can play a...

  3. Quality Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Quality Management, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops policies and procedures to ensure the classification and control of information is effective and...

  4. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  5. Total Energy Management in General Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeKoker, N.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of General Motors' energy management program with special emphasis on energy conservation. Included is a description of the total program organization, plant guidelines, communication and motivation techniques...

  6. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  7. Integrated Modeling and Decision-Support System for Water Management in the Puget Sound Basin: Snow Caps to White Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Voisin, Nathalie; Richey, Jeff; Wang, Taiping; Taira, Randal Y.; Constans, Michael; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Tesfa, Teklu K.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for the EPA-sponsored project Snow Caps to White Caps that provides data products and insight for water resource managers to support their predictions and management actions to address future changes in water resources (fresh and marine) in the Puget Sound basin. This report details the efforts of a team of scientists and engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) to examine the movement of water in the Snohomish Basin, within the watershed and the estuary, under present and future conditions, using a set of linked numerical models.

  8. Environmental Management of Grazing Lands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, K.; Redmon, L.; Gentry, T.; Harmel, D.; Jones, C. A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria levels are the number one cause of water quality impairment in Texas. Several recent Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in Texas, such as those implemented in the Peach Creek and Leon River watersheds, have identified grazing cattle as a...

  9. Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heo, Joonghyeok

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

  10. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  11. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  12. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing conferences sponsored or co-sponsored by the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 110.3. Canceled by DOE N 251.97.

  13. Project Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a project manager in the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the DOE-EERE Office of Transportation responsible for a wide variety of highly...

  14. Management Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Management Analyst in the Strategy Execution group of the Corporate Strategy organization (SE). The Strategy Execution group develops and coordinates...

  15. Managing Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Emily

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and Texas Water --------------------------------------------- Project Managers Cecilia Wagner, Kevin Wagner, Danielle Supercinski, Dr. Bill Fox and Lucas Gregory work to link university researchers and Extension specialists to appropriate funding agen... Irrigators Network. Kevin Wagner, who joined TWRI in 2005 from TSSWCB, has spent several years working with environmental issues. He is currently pursuing his doctorate evaluating best management practices for reducing bacterial runoff from cattle wastes...

  16. Persistence of Hydrologic Variables and Reactive Stream Solute Concentrations in an East Tennessee Watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koirala, Shesh R [ORNL; Gentry, Randall W [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL; Schwartz, John S [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time and frequency domain analyses were conducted on weekly time series of water chemistry (nitrate, sulfate and calcium concentrations) collected from November 1995 to December 2005 at the West Fork of Walker Branch in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to evaluate the extent of their persistence and the relationship of this persistence to discharge and rainfall. In this study, spectral and wavelet analyses provided a theoretical basis for insights into long-term water chemistry behavior. All water chemistry parameters showed some level of persistence that was influenced by rainfall and/or discharge. Short-term persistence (less than a year) was related to the persistence of rainfall and discharge, whereas long-term persistence (more than a year) was related to the persistence of discharge. The Walker Branch conceptual hydrology model is augmented by these results that relate characteristic periodicities with flowpaths through different zones: the vadose zone (< 20 week period), saturated zone (20-50 week period) and bedrock zone (> 50 week period) with implications for reactive chemistries within the watershed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Trace metal and ancillary data in the watersheds and urban embayments of Puget Sound. Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, A.J.; Curl, H.C.; Feely, R.A.; Massoth, G.J.; Krogslund, K.A.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first of three data reports encompassing trace metal and ancillary data obtained by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) of NOAA in Puget Sound, Washington, between 1979 and 1986. The report includes the complete data set from two urban embayments (Elliott and Commencement Bays) and the watersheds discharging into Puget Sound. Building on research then underway at PMEL on estuarine circulation, laboratory scientists began a coordinated study that began with the description of the distribution of properties (salinity, temperature, trace metals and trace organics) in the water column and underlying sediments. The objectives of the Marine Environmental Quality trace metal program were (1) to quantify the sources and sinks of selected trace metals for Puget Sound, (2) to determine geochemical mechanisms that transform trace metals between the dissolved and particulate phases and (3) to determine to what extent these geochemical mechanisms alter the fate of trace metals entering Puget Sound. The text of the data report consists of the sampling and analytical methods with the accompanying quality control/quality assurance data. The text of the data sections are a summary of the data and published literature in which the data are interpreted along with a catalogue of the data available on microfiche located in the back pocket of the data report.

  18. Changes in Flood Management along the Pajaro River: A Transition to Watershed Management Approaches and Lessons from the Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagger, Stacie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human actions causing environmental damage and the full-costand include the environmental damage and recovery costs (

  19. An Overview of Energy-efficient Base Station Management Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    where users tend to exhibit similar behaviors, so that the load profile exhibits large variations. Unfortunately, this is not true: the power versus load profiles of base stations, and of the entire network performance maximization at full load. Indeed, the full load working condition is the most critical

  20. Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda, Washington:Information Resource

  1. Aiken Standard: Japanese company learns management techniques from SRNL |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 20103-03Energy AdvancedJudge | Department ofDepartment

  2. Event-Driven Power Management of Portable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Event-Driven Power Management of Portable Systems Tajana Simunicy Luca Benini Giovanni De Micheliy Bologna, ITALY 40136 Abstract The policy optimization problem for dynamic power management has received. 1 Introduction Dynamic power management is a widely-employed low- power design technique. Dynamic

  3. Low Power Nanoscale Buffer Management for Network on Chip Routers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    Low Power Nanoscale Buffer Management for Network on Chip Routers Suman K. Mandal Texas A power dissipation. We present a novel dynamic power management technique for low power NoC router buffers using nano CMOS SRAMS. A feedback controller was designed for block level power management

  4. Natural resource validation: A primer on concepts and techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulibarri, C.A.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural resource valuation has always had a fundamental role in the practice of cost-benefit analysis of health, safety, and environmental issues. The authors provide an objective overview of resource valuation techniques and describe their potential role in environmental restoration/waste management (ER/WM) activities at federal facilities. This handbook considers five general classes of valuation techniques: (1) market-based techniques, which rely on historical information on market prices and transactions to determine resource values; (2) nonmarket techniques that rely on indirect estimates of resource values; (3) nonmarket techniques that are based on direct estimates of resource values; (4) cross-cutting valuation techniques, which combine elements of one or more of these methods; and (5) ecological valuation techniques used in the emerging field of ecological economics. The various valuation techniques under consideration are described by highlighting their applicability in environmental management and regulation. The handbook also addresses key unresolved issues in the application of valuation techniques generally, including discounting future values, incorporating environmental equity concerns, and concerns over the uncertainties in the measurement of natural resource values and environmental risk.

  5. Business Management Analyst Business Manager Director of Communication Contracts Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    · Business Management Analyst · Business Manager · Director of Communication · Contracts Manager of Sales · President/Owner · Instructor of Business · Senior Buyer · North American Sales Manager · Talent graduation. You will have the skills & knowledge to manage and grow a successful business. You will be able

  6. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  7. Galaxy Redshifts: Improved Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Heavens

    1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyses the effects of random noise in determining errors and confidence levels for galaxy redshifts obtained by cross-correlation techniques. The main finding is that confidence levels have previously been overestimated, and errors inaccurately calculated in certain applications. New formul\\ae\\ are presented.

  8. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Razinkov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [RFNC-VNIIEF

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  9. GARDIENNAGE Help Desk technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    --> Relais vers Garde GTPW ASCENSEURS 1ère impulsion Dispatching UCL (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) Dispatching UCL --> SECURITAS LEW ALARMES CDC (Système EBI -Enterprise Building Integrator -Honeywell GTPW téléphonique ) TECHNIQUES CDC (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) GTPW (Heures ouvrables) CDC (En dehors des heures

  10. Managing asbestos: Ten costly sins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denson, F.A.; Onderick, W.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how to build an ongoing, continuous, and improved asbestos management program. Asbestos management is one of the toughest jobs facing a plant or environmental engineer today; even seasoned engineers can make mistakes. Much confusion exists about how best to manage this issue, especially in plant settings. Whether the company is small, medium, or large, asbestos has the power to steal from profits if not managed properly. To help POWER readers examine their current asbestos management programs, here are 10 common errors that could be stopped or avoided by practicing preventive techniques. The 10 costly sins presented are not mutually exclusive, and they certainly are not all-inclusive. They are offered as a way to stimulate ideas on how to build an ongoing, continuous, and improved asbestos management program. These include Sin 1: No written policy. Sin 2: Lack of corporate guidance. Sin 3: Not complying with regulations. Sin 4: Not worrying about other respirable fibers. Sin 5: Lawsuits--not culpable. Sin 6: No visible emissions, no problems. Sin 7: Managing asbestos manually.

  11. PFP Interface identification and management planning guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of-this planning guide is to present the process used to identify, document, and control PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project interfaces. Revisions to this document will include, as attachments, the most recent version of the Project Interface Management List. A preliminary Interface Management List is included in Appendix A. This document is intended be a Project owned management tool. As such, this document will periodically require revisions resulting from improvements of the information, processes, and techniques as now described. For most revisions that suggest improved processes, PFP management approval is all that will be required.

  12. Memo: Estimates of hydrology in small (<80 km2 urbanized watersheds under dry weather and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Johnson, 2004; Hetzel, 2007). The Bay Area Storm Water Management Agencies (BASMAA) that hold National management practices (BMPs) to achieve load reduction and demonstrate at the end of 20 years (2025 Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits have been asked to increase effort and implement best

  13. An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

  14. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  15. Risk Management Policy Category: Strategic Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Risk Management Policy Category: Strategic Management 1. PURPOSE To support the University will be encouraged to speak openly and honestly. (iii) Managers will monitor risk and will disclose risks identified's risk appetite. 2.3. Risk management standards 2.3.1 The University's risk management framework

  16. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  17. Environmental Management System Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management Program, R-3 • Environmental Management SystemEnvironmental policy 3. Environmental aspects 4. Legal andObjectives, targets, and Environmental Management Programs

  18. Data Management Policy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Management Policy Data Management Policy The data management resource information and data release policies below are provided to help researchers understand the data...

  19. NERSC Data Management Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Management Policies NERSC Data Management Policies Introduction NERSC provides its users with the means to store, manage, and share their research data products. In addition...

  20. Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    ..............................................................................................................19 Bruce Hoagland, Oklahoma Biological Survey and the University of Oklahoma Forest Management Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook E-952 Oklahoma Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma Conservation Commission Management Handbook #12

  1. Office of Legacy Management FY 2009 Energy Management Data Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Legacy Management FY 2009 Energy Management Data Report Office of Legacy Management FY 2009 Energy Management Data Report FY 2009 Energy Management Performance Summary...

  2. White Oak Creek watershed: Melton Valley area Remedial Investigation report, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Appendixes A ``Source Inventory Information for the Subbasins Evaluated for the White Oak Creek Watershed`` and B ``Human Health Risk Assessment for White Oak Creek / Melton Valley Area`` for the remedial investigation report for the White Oak Creek Watershed and Melton Valley Area. Appendix A identifies the waste types and contaminants for each subbasin in addition to the disposal methods. Appendix B identifies potential human health risks and hazards that may result from contaminants present in the different media within Oak Ridge National Laboratory sites.

  3. Jet finding techniques at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet finding techniques at hadron colliders, including pile-up removal tricks, jet deconstruction, etc

  4. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    11 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.) -- Chapter 1 -- Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber. All rights reserved. #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2 #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 3July 29, 2013 Data Mining

  5. Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

  6. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

  7. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL Record of Property Transferred from ______ ___________________________________ 2. DEAN (If Applies) ______ ___________________________________ 5. UNIVERSITY DIRECTOR OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ ___________________________________ 3. HOSPITAL DIRECTOR (If Applies) ______ IF YOU NEED

  8. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Sources and Fates of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Rural and Urban Watersheds in Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cioce, Danielle

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to frequent exposure to high sodium irrigation water. The results indicate that sodium is a major driver of DOC in the system. Sound management decisions concerning irrigation water chemistry and urban development might eventually emerge to protect water...

  10. Habitat relationships of seven breeding bird species in the Leon River Watershed investigated at local scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juarez Berrios, Edwin Alfredo

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 100?150 years Texas rangelands have dramatically changed from native open savannahs to dense woodlands. On the Edwards plateau, a major management concern is the increasing encroachment of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei). Preceding...

  11. Pesticide Education in the Coastal Zone of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold, Allen

    (CNRA). Second, the producers and managers were taught that implementing proper pesticide application practices will reduce the potential for nonpoint source pollution, which will improve the water quality in the Arroyo CNRA. This project also enhances...

  12. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  13. Best Management Practice #1: Water Management Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful water management program starts with developing a comprehensive water management plan. This plan should be included within existing facility operating plans.

  14. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Review Report: Oak Ridge Reservation Review of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge By Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE; William H....

  15. Risk Management in Component-based Development: A Separation of Concerns Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management in Component-based Development: A Separation of Concerns Perspective Awais Rashid development stages. We propose a risk management mechanism based on identifying risk management techniques of the risks involved and their management. In fact component-based development poses significant risks

  16. OS-Directed Power Management for Mobile Electronic Systems Qinru Qiu, Qing Wu and Massoud Pedram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    OS-Directed Power Management for Mobile Electronic Systems Qinru Qiu, Qing Wu and Massoud Pedram management. We model a power-managed system using a continuous-time Markov decision process and solve for the optimal power management policy using a mathematical programming technique. Next we extend the model

  17. Stormwater Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaber, Fouad

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    . Stormwater also may wash bacteria and other pathogens into swimming areas, creating health hazards that often close beaches. Stormwater may carry debris, such as plastic bags, six-pack rings, and cigarette butts, into water bodies; such debris can choke... the development and implementation of best management practices (BMPs) and achievement of measurable goals at levels sufficient to satisfy each of six minimum control measures and an optional seventh control measure: 1. Public education and outreach...

  18. Environmental Management

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  19. Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  20. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

  1. A Survey of Architectural Techniques For Improving Cache Power Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern processors are using increasingly larger sized on-chip caches. Also, with each CMOS technology generation, there has been a significant increase in their leakage energy consumption. For this reason, cache power management has become a crucial research issue in modern processor design. To address this challenge and also meet the goals of sustainable computing, researchers have proposed several techniques for improving energy efficiency of cache architectures. This paper surveys recent architectural techniques for improving cache power efficiency and also presents a classification of these techniques based on their characteristics. For providing an application perspective, this paper also reviews several real-world processor chips that employ cache energy saving techniques. The aim of this survey is to enable engineers and researchers to get insights into the techniques for improving cache power efficiency and motivate them to invent novel solutions for enabling low-power operation of caches.

  2. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  3. Chapter 3 -Basic Water Quality in the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado, During High-Flow and Low-Flow Conditions, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 3 - Basic Water Quality in the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado, During High-Flow and Low of the water quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado, during high-flow and low-flow conditions in the year 2000 constituents in Boulder Creek increased after the creek received wastewater effluent. INTRODUCTION Two programs

  4. Integrating Historical Imagery and Sediment Radioisotopes to Shed Light on Long-Term Rangeland Dynamics and Ecosystem Services at the Watershed Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Matthew

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of such transitions and much more so regarding the effects on hydrology and sediment dynamics in these areas. Using a watershed approach in the Lampasas Cut Plain of Texas, we applied object-oriented classification methods and hand-digitizing of historical aerial...

  5. Montana contains the headwaters for three continental watersheds-the St. Mary's River, the Columbia River, and the Missouri River. The St. Mary's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    -the largest in Montana-drains more than one half of the state's land area, but yields less than one, wind-sailing, and wildlife watching. You can float 207 miles from Montana Power Company's Morony Dam of the state. The major watersheds of Montana are those carved by the Columbia River's tributaries

  6. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

  7. A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1 and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico Tech 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM, 87801, h2odoc@nmt.edu 2 Jose B. Gallegos.gallegos@arcadis-us.com 3 Jaime Ealey, Graduate Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico

  8. A study of participative management programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Robert Arthur

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's, several companies recognized the need for providing new techniques for 17 employee motivation and began to explore the potential value of participative management. The following are condensed. versions of the experiences of several companies...A STUDY OF PARTICIPATIVE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS A. Thesis ROBERT ARTHUR HARMS Submitted. to the Graduate College of Texas ARcN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subject...

  9. Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service (Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management) riskmanagement@uoregon.edu Fax: 541-346-7008 As a volunteer Tort Claims Act, ORS 30.260-300, and Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management

  10. Risk Management Procedures Category: Strategic Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Risk Management Procedures Category: Strategic Management 1. LEGISLATION/ENTERPRISE AGREEMENT/POLICY SUPPORTED Risk Management Policy Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency Act 2011 (TEQSA Act 2011) 2 (a) Advise the Vice-Chancellor on the effective management of the University's risk profile

  11. Landscape Management Systems The Visual Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Landscape Management Systems The Visual Management System of the Forest Service, USDA1 Warren R presentation on how the Visual Management System (VMS) functions. 1/ Presented at the National Conference Manual 2380, Landscape Management, USDA. INTRODUCTION The American people are concerned about the quality

  12. Management 301 Management and Organizational Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    Management 301 Management and Organizational Behavior Section 003 Fall 2013 (8/20-12/3) College approaches management as that process of reaching organizational goals by working with and through people. Course Objectives 1. To understand management and organizational behavior (ob) concepts associated

  13. Cache Energy Optimization Techniques For Modern Processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL] ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern multicore processors are employing large last-level caches, for example Intel's E7-8800 processor uses 24MB L3 cache. Further, with each CMOS technology generation, leakage energy has been dramatically increasing and hence, leakage energy is expected to become a major source of energy dissipation, especially in last-level caches (LLCs). The conventional schemes of cache energy saving either aim at saving dynamic energy or are based on properties specific to first-level caches, and thus these schemes have limited utility for last-level caches. Further, several other techniques require offline profiling or per-application tuning and hence are not suitable for product systems. In this book, we present novel cache leakage energy saving schemes for single-core and multicore systems; desktop, QoS, real-time and server systems. Also, we present cache energy saving techniques for caches designed with both conventional SRAM devices and emerging non-volatile devices such as STT-RAM (spin-torque transfer RAM). We present software-controlled, hardware-assisted techniques which use dynamic cache reconfiguration to configure the cache to the most energy efficient configuration while keeping the performance loss bounded. To profile and test a large number of potential configurations, we utilize low-overhead, micro-architecture components, which can be easily integrated into modern processor chips. We adopt a system-wide approach to save energy to ensure that cache reconfiguration does not increase energy consumption of other components of the processor. We have compared our techniques with state-of-the-art techniques and have found that our techniques outperform them in terms of energy efficiency and other relevant metrics. The techniques presented in this book have important applications in improving energy-efficiency of higher-end embedded, desktop, QoS, real-time, server processors and multitasking systems. This book is intended to be a valuable guide for both newcomers and veterans in the field of cache power management. It will help graduate students, CAD tool developers and designers in understanding the need of energy efficiency in modern computing systems. Further, it will be useful for researchers in gaining insights into algorithms and techniques for micro-architectural and system-level energy optimization using dynamic cache reconfiguration. We sincerely believe that the ``food for thought'' presented in this book will inspire the readers to develop even better ideas for designing ``green'' processors of tomorrow.

  14. Effect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt-dominated watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    restoration activities often seek to directly modify stream channel and riparian zone surface and subsurface: Cookhouse Meadow stream restoration project, 2004). Recently, bio- technical restoration techniquesEffect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt

  15. Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDaniel WoodID Service FirstData

  16. Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDaniel WoodID Service

  17. Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDaniel WoodID ServiceData

  18. SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDERSTATE0-1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT

  19. Management Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'll LoveMail andAbout UsManagement

  20. attoyac bayou wpp development The bayou is one of many rural watersheds listed as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    body on the Texas Integrated Report for Clean Water Act Sections 305(b) and 303(d) due to high levels to evaluate a water body's ability to support contact recreation. Three monitoring stations managed and Shelby counties before emptying into Sam Rayburn Reservoir. With several rural communities in the area

  1. Application of Lean Management Principles to Election Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posner, Tomer

    Lean was first adopted as a management technique for improving results in manufacturing environments. It is based on the 5 principles of identifying the Value to be created, mapping the Value-Stream (incremental addition ...

  2. Application of lean management principles to election systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posner, Tomer

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lean was first adopted as a management technique for improving results in manufacturing environments. It is based on the 5 principles of identifying the Value to be created, mapping the Value-Stream (incremental addition ...

  3. Proper Lagoon Management to Reduce Odor and Excessive Sludge Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper management techniques to reduce odor and excessive sludge accumulation include maintaining pH and salt levels, pumping regularly, maintaining adequate bacteria levels, and designing for efficiency. Definitions of key words are boxed for easy...

  4. Dynamic Power Management of High Performance Network on Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandal, Suman Kalyan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . The addition of intelligent networking on the chip adds to the chip’s power consumption thus making management of communication power an interesting and challenging research problem. While VLSI techniques have evolved over time to enable power reduction...

  5. Demand Control Utilizing Energy Management Systems - Report of Field Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, B. D.; Heller, R. P.; Perry, L. W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Management systems and particularly demand controllers are becoming more popular as commercial and light industrial operations attempt to reduce their electrical usage and demand. Numerous techniques are used to control energy use and demand...

  6. Effective Load Management for the City of College Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hecox, O. D.; Bauer, V.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful electrical demand management program for the City of College Station in 1984 employed techniques proven in the industrial and commercial sectors that have seldom been used at the community level. The program, with technical assistance...

  7. Proper Lagoon Management to Reduce Odor and Excessive Sludge Accumulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper management techniques to reduce odor and excessive sludge accumulation include maintaining pH and salt levels, pumping regularly, maintaining adequate bacteria levels, and designing for efficiency. Definitions of key words are boxed for easy...

  8. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  9. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  10. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and retrieve the required data, and their ability to integrate the data into environmental models using the FRAMES environment.

  11. ULTRASONIC ARRAY TECHNIQUE FOR THE INSPECTION OF COPPER LINED CANISTERS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ULTRASONIC ARRAY TECHNIQUE FOR THE INSPECTION OF COPPER LINED CANISTERS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE FUEL and Waste Management Co.) for encapsulation of nuclear waste. Due to the radiation emitted by the nuclear, and characterization. The applicability of linear array technique for inspection of copper lined canisters for nuclear

  12. 1/5/97 page 1 energy A survey of energy saving techniques for mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havinga, Paul J.M.

    and the operating system must allow a user to control the power management. Remarkably, it appears that some energy review energy reduction techniques in the design of operating systems, including communication protocols regions, and disabling unused peripherals. System- design techniques include minimizing external accesses

  13. Humboldt Bay Initiative: Adaptive Management in a Changing World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, Susan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    annual maintenance dredging (2007-2011). NMFS, Southwestdevelopment, diking, and dredging. The Bay and itsor is directly removed by dredging. Watersheds adjacent to

  14. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  15. IT Project Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the IT Project Management Office (JP). A successful candidate in this position will serve as an IT Program Manager and technical expert responsible for directly managing...

  16. environmental management radiation protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    EHS environmental management biosafety radiation protection industrial hygiene safety Working: Biosafety, Environmental Management, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection and Safety. Each specialized Management Program, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection Program, and the Safety Program. (http

  17. Functional Facilities Management Energy Management Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulliver, Robert

    Functional Facilities Management Energy Management Structure Jerome Malmquist Director Erick Van Controls Systems Jeff Davis Assistant Director, Facilities Engineering & Energy Efficiency Gene Husted Principal Engineer / Commissioning Emily Robin-Abbott St. Paul Energy Engineer & Technicians Supervisor Dan

  18. Energy Management Working Group: Accelerating Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheihing, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Standardization (ISO) published the ISO 50001 energy management standard in 2011. ISO 50001 provides industrial companies with guidelines for integrating energy efficiency into their management practices— including fine-tuning production processes... efficiency. GSEP’s Energy Management Working Group (EMWG) advocates the increased adoption of EnMS or ISO 50001 in industry and commercial buildings. It goal is to accelerate the adoption and use of energy management systems in industrial facilities...

  19. Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy October 2006 The University is committed and promoting recycling and the use of recycled materials. We will actively encourage the recycling of office reduction techniques · Provide facilities for recycling on campus · Give guidance and information to staff

  20. Power Management in Wireless Networks Kevin Klues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    Power Management in Wireless Networks Kevin Klues Abstract This paper presents a survey on the various power saving techniques used in wireless networking today. The work presented covers topics at each layer of a wireless networking protocol stack. The types of wireless networks considered include

  1. Management Information Systems Mexico City EMBA Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    Management Information Systems Mexico City EMBA Program Spring 2012 Professor : Professor Anitesh benefits. The true benefits of IT can be realized only when organizations exploit certain characteristics ISBN-13: 978-0123822291 Data Mining for Business Intelligence: Concepts, Techniques, and Applications

  2. Business Process Management: A Comprehensive Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    . Business Process Management (BPM) research resulted in a plethora of methods, techniques, and tools aims to structure these results and provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in BPM. In BPM the con, the introduction of BPM technology has both managerial and technical ramifications, and may enable significant

  3. Load Management for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konsevick, W. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    customer management programs exist. EPRI Report (EM-1606) loads to beneficially alter a'utility's load curve. (Page 1-2) list them as: Load management alternatives are covered. 1. Direct or voluntary control of customer Load management methods can... and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report energy management programs. (EM-1606) states that "the objective of load manage ment is to alter the real or apparent pattern of Our load management program was designed electricity use in order to...

  4. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  5. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  6. Managing Web Data Managing Web Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davulcu, Hasan

    Managing Web Data Dan Suciu AT&T Labs Managing Web Data Sigmod, 1999 Dan Suciu AT&T Labs 1 #12;How the Web is Today HTML documents all intended for human consumption many are generated automatically by applications Managing Web Data Sigmod, 1999 Dan Suciu AT&T Labs 2 #12;Paradigm Shift on the Web applications

  7. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL NOTICE OF DESIGNATED DEPARTMENTAL OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS 1. Include a copy of any relevant documents. 2. Item MATERIALS COORDINATOR ­ IC-8 Mail, Fax or PDF the entire package to: MC 2010 Fax: 679-4240 REFERENCE # DMC

  8. Physics Department Management Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    ESSH Committee and Work Planning Security Cyber Security Accident and Incident Management was distributed to the ESSH Committee, Group Leaders, Group Safety Coordinators, and Line Management #12;Areas

  9. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by FY12. 95% Line Item 85% Cleanup 97% Line Item 85% Cleanup EVM represents Earned Value Management. FY2011 Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement...

  10. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by FY12. 95% Line Item 85% Cleanup 100% Line Item 88% Cleanup EVM represents Earned Value Management. FY2011 Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement...

  11. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by FY12. 95% Line Item 85% Cleanup 100% Line Item 88% Cleanup EVM represents Earned Value Management. FY2011 First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance...

  12. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by FY12. 95% Line Item 85% Cleanup 97% Line Item 89% Cleanup EVM represents Earned Value Management. FY2011 Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement...

  13. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  14. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

  15. Target Cost Management Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okano, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

  16. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico ‘‘

  17. Principles of Distributed Data Management in 2020?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valduriez, Patrick

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advents of high-speed networks, fast commodity hardware, and the web, distributed data sources have become ubiquitous. The third edition of the \\"Ozsu-Valduriez textbook Principles of Distributed Database Systems [10] reflects the evolution of distributed data management and distributed database systems. In this new edition, the fundamental principles of distributed data management could be still presented based on the three dimensions of earlier editions: distribution, heterogeneity and autonomy of the data sources. In retrospect, the focus on fundamental principles and generic techniques has been useful not only to understand and teach the material, but also to enable an infinite number of variations. The primary application of these generic techniques has been obviously for distributed and parallel DBMS versions. Today, to support the requirements of important data-intensive applications (e.g. social networks, web data analytics, scientific applications, etc.), new distributed data management tech...

  18. CS 525: Advanced Database Organization Study of relational, semantic, and object-oriented data models and interfaces. Database management system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    CS 525: Advanced Database Organization Objectives Study of relational, semantic, and object-oriented data models and interfaces. Database management system techniques for query optimization, concurrency History of database management. Goals of database system development. Relational systems Data models

  19. Energy management handbook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, W.C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 25 chapters of this book. Written by a team of professionals in response to steadily accelerating energy costs, this fact-packed guide is designed as a practical, stand alone reference for those responsible for managing energy costs. The second edition has been completely updated, and is published in an expanded format for easier reference. In it is all the data and information needed to design and implement a successful energy management program for businesses, commercial buildings and industrial plants. By applying the simple principles and techniques contained in the handbook, it is possible to realize a cost savings of 15-30% and some companies have achieved as much as 60% savings.

  20. A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation the Grassland Water District, whose primary function is to supply surface water to private duck clubs and managed wetlands, needs to communicate to local landowners the likely impacts of salinity regulation on the long term health and function of wildfowl habitat. The project described in this paper will also provide this information. The models that form the backbone of the DSS develop salinity balances at both a regional and local scale. The regional scale concentrates on deliveries to and exports from the Grasland Water District while the local scale focuses on an individual wetland unit where more intensive monitoring is being conducted. The design of the DSS is constrained to meet the needs of busy wetland managers and is being designed from the bottom up utilizing tools and procedures familiar to these individuals.

  1. Urban energy management: a course on the administration of public energy programs. An instructor's guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelbaum, Dr., Len; Olsen, Dr., Marvin; Hyman, Dr., Barry; Sheridan, Mimi; Dahlberg, Judy; O'Brien, Jeremy

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The course provides local government administrators, staff, and students with the background knowledge to deal with a broad range of energy management concerns and is not to train technical energy conservation specialists. Section II contains the Instructor's Guide and Section III provides the Student Outlines and Handouts on the following subjects: The Energy Problem; National Energy Politics and Programs; State and Local Energy Programs; Techniques of Energy Planning; Techniques of Energy Conservation; Techniques of Renewable Energy Production; Strategies for Voluntary Energy Management; Strategies for Finan. Energy Management; and Strategies for Mandatory Energy Management. (MCW)

  2. Performance Demonstration Program Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To demonstrate compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste characterization program, each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP serves as a quality control check against expected results and provides information about the quality of data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed by an independent organization to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. There are three elements within the PDP: analysis of simulated headspace gases, analysis of solids for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and analysis for transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Because the analysis for TRU radionuclides using NDA techniques involves both the counting of drums and standard waste boxes, four PDP plans are required to describe the activities of the three PDP elements. In accordance with these PDP plans, the reviewing and approving authority for PDP results and for the overall program is the CBFO PDP Appointee. The CBFO PDP Appointee is responsible for ensuring the implementation of each of these plans by concurring with the designation of the Program Coordinator and by providing technical oversight and coordination for the program. The Program Coordinator will designate the PDP Manager, who will coordinate the three elements of the PDP. The purpose of this management plan is to identify how the requirements applicable to the PDP are implemented during the management and coordination of PDP activities. The other participants in the program (organizations that perform site implementation and activities under CBFO contracts or interoffice work orders) are not covered under this management plan. Those activities are governed by the organization’s quality assurance (QA) program and procedures or as otherwise directed by CBFO.

  3. 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage. 2. What is the storage in the dam (in cu.m.)? 3. What is the length and depth of the dam? What is its structure and cost? How much time did it take to build the dam? 4. Where

  4. Best Environmental Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best Environmental Management Practices Farm Animal Production Comprehensive Nutrient Management with regulatory guidelines by addressing items such as manure management, field crop nutrients, and storm water What is a CNMP? A Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan (CNMP) is a total planning tool that details

  5. Environmental Best Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Environmental Best Management Practices for Virginia's Golf Courses Prepared by Virginia Golf Course Superintendents Association #12;#12;EnvironmEntal BEst managEmEnt PracticEs for virginia's golf III I am pleased to endorse the Environmental Best Management Practices for Virginia's Golf Courses

  6. Sport Management Academic Offerings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    production and programming of events; marketing and public relations; technological operations management including (but not limited to) digital advertising, media law, new media business, operations managementSport Management Academic Offerings M.S. In Sport Venue And Event Management GRADUATE Chad Mc

  7. Chemical Management Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  8. Review : integration of EMI technique with global vibration technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Suteng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade, the development of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been skyrocketing because of the serious consequences that come with structural failure. Traditional damage detection techniques, also known as ...

  9. New Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    preservation and other activities associated with traditional game management. Fortunately, much of the knowledge and techniques developed for game #12;management can be transferred to considerations of wildlifeNew Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1 Tamsie

  10. Risk Management 22:390:670, Fall 2013 Michael B. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Risk Management 22:390:670, Fall 2013 Michael B. Miller Class: Mondays, 6:00 ­ 9:00 PM Office Hours risk management. Emphasis will be on modeling and quantitative techniques. Students will learn how risk management is carried out in today's financial firms and about current challenges in financial risk

  11. Unit 15: Risk Management To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    1 Unit 15: Risk Management Objectives Đ To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role within the software development process Đ To introduce the use of risk management as a means of identifying Ą Techniques & heuristics for the identification, analysis, treatment & monitoring of risk Ą Risk management

  12. RSSI Based Location-Aware PC Power Management Zhong-Yi Jin and Rajesh K. Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    RSSI Based Location-Aware PC Power Management Zhong-Yi Jin and Rajesh K. Gupta University- sideration the locations of computer users, location- aware PC power management techniques can over- come the capabilities to support effi- cient PC power management. In this paper, we present NAPS, a zone based location

  13. Core-Level Activity Prediction for Multi-Core Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    1 Core-Level Activity Prediction for Multi-Core Power Management W. Lloyd Bircher1 and Lizy, University of Texas at Austin Abstract - Existing power management techniques operate by reducing performance generated by the workloads on individual cores. This causes sub-optimal power management and over

  14. Dynamic Power Management of Complex Systems Using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    Dynamic Power Management of Complex Systems Using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets * Qinru Qiu introduce a new technique for modeling and solving the dynamic power management (DPM) problem for systems model a power-managed distributed computing system as a controllable Generalized Stochastic Petri Net

  15. Dynamic Power Management of Complex Systems Using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Dynamic Power Management of Complex Systems Using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets* Qinru Qiu introduce a new technique for modeling and solving the dynamic power management (DPM) problem for systems model a power-managed distributed computing system as a controllable Generalized Stochastic Petri Net

  16. Belgirate, Italy, 28-30 September 2005 A COMPREHENSIVE THERMAL-AWARE POWER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Belgirate, Italy, 28-30 September 2005 A COMPREHENSIVE THERMAL-AWARE POWER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM power techniques due to shortage of battery life. Conventional power management designs focused. In this research, a block-level optimization of comprehensive thermal aware power management is presented

  17. Energy Efficiency: The New Holy Grail of Data Management Systems Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency: The New Holy Grail of Data Management Systems Research Stavros Harizopoulos HP energy-friendly hardware. Despite the growing body of research in power management techniques, there has been little work to date on energy efficiency from a data management software per- spective

  18. An Efficient Energy Management System for Android Phone Using Bayesian Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Sung-Bae

    An Efficient Energy Management System for Android Phone Using Bayesian Networks Young-Seol Lee, proximity, light and orientation sensors for context-awareness. Energy-efficient battery management systems, it becomes an issue to develop the techniques for efficient energy management on a mobile phone [2, 3, 4

  19. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology March...

  20. Acoustic techniques for localizing holdup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vnuk, D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material that does not come out of a process as product or waste is called holdup. When this is fissile material, its location and quantity must be determined to improve safeguards and security as well as safety at the facility. The most common method for detecting and measuring holdup is with radiation based techniques. When using them, one must consider equipment geometry, geometry of holdup, and effects of background radiation when converting the radiation measurement into a fissile material quantity. We are developing complementary techniques that use tiny acoustic transducers, which are unaffected by background radiation, to improve holdup measurements by aiding in determining the above conversion factors for holdup measurements. Thus far, we have applied three techniques, Acoustic Interferometry, Pulse Echo, and bending Wave Propagation, of which the latter appears most effective. This paper will describe each of these techniques and show how they may ultimately reduce costs and personnel radiation exposure while increasing confidence I and accuracy of holdup measurements.

  1. Experimental techniques and measurement accuracies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.; DiIorio, G.; Nakamura, T.; Maekawa, H.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief description of the experimental tools available for fusion neutronics experiments is given. Attention is paid to error estimates mainly for the measurement of tritium breeding ratio in simulated blankets using various techniques.

  2. Management and Program Analyst (Operations Manager)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a Management and Program Analyst in the Office of Strategic Programs in the DOE-EERE.

  3. Correlation of measures of ambient toxicity and fish community diversity in Chesapeake Bay, USA, tributaries -- urbanizing watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, S.I.; Dawson, C.E.; Durell, E.Q. [Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources, Annapolis, MD (United States). Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Div.] [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was performed to evaluate ambient toxicity conditions in Chesapeake Bay tidal tributaries whose watersheds are impacted by urban development and to further evaluate an existing toxicological risk ranking model. A battery of water-column and sediment bioassays were employed with animals and plants. Tests were conducted at five sample sites in each of four tidal tributaries. Mortality, reproduction, and growth rates in the water-column assays did not consistently indicate chemical contamination in any system. Chemical analyses did not indicate elevated levels of contaminants in the water column. Sediment bioassays demonstrated greater responses than water-column assays. Sediment in the upstream reaches of the South River demonstrated significant toxicity. Toxicity was also observed at the uppermost Severn River station and the middle Patuxent River station. Chemical analyses of composite sediment samples indicated elevated metals levels in the South River. Some metals were above threshold values in the Patuxent and Wicomico rivers. Organic analyses demonstrated low level polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbon contamination in all four systems. The toxicological risk ranking model ranked the South River as the most contaminated-impacted site. The ranking model identified specific locations in the Severn and Patuxent rivers that indicate sediment contamination. The Wicomico River had the lowest overall risk score. The toxicological risk ranking results for sediment were significantly correlated with species diversity for fish communities sampled by bottom trawl. Results were consistent with data from previous years. Regression analysis of 2 years of data indicate that fish community impairment can be predicted with ambient toxicity results.

  4. In Situ Stabilization of Inactive Low Level Waste Pipelines in the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cange, J.; Cox, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coye, St. [Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Skinner, R. [US DOE Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shaw, K. [Restoration Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McGinley, S. [Pro2Serve, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contained an inactive waste pipeline system consisting of approximately 12 kilometers of buried waste pipelines and over 142 m{sup 3} in surface/subsurface appurtenances (e.g., vents, valve pits, pump vaults, etc.). Historically, the system was used to transport liquid low level and process waste between generator facilities in Melton Valley, storage and disposal sites in Melton Valley, and storage/treatment facilities in Bethel Valley. The selected remedy in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for inactive pipelines was isolation, removal, or stabilization. Pipeline remediation activities began in the summer of 2005 and were completed in the spring of 2006. The task entailed an iterative process of selecting pipeline access points, excavating and exposing pipelines, performing tapping, draining and cutting activities, either installing fittings for grouting or plugging and capping the lines. Grouting was accomplished using paired access points, with one location serving as the grout injection point and the other as vent/drain and grout confirmation point. Grouting was conducted by pumping a cement-bentonite grout into the specially installed fittings and typically proceeded from a low point to a high point to ensure complete filling of the pipeline (i.e., no void space). The project successfully grouted a total of 8,454 meters (linear distance) of pipeline; another 3,573 meters of pipeline was stabilized through isolation. (authors)

  5. A watershed-based method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Liem T., E-mail: ltran1@utk.edu [Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); O& #x27; Neill, Robert V. [OTIE and Associates, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Elizabeth R. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents a method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region. The method is based on the concept of 'self-/peer-appraisal' of a watershed in term of vulnerability. The self-/peer-appraisal process is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. The analysis provided insights on the environmental conditions, in general, and the relative vulnerability pattern, in particular, of the Mid-Atlantic region. The suggested method offers a simple but effective and objective way to perform a regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Consequently the method can be used in various steps in environmental assessment and planning. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is based on the self-/peer-appraisal concept in term of vulnerability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analysis is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method provides insights on the regional relative vulnerability pattern.

  6. Benefits and costs of load management: a technical assistance and resource material handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Ronald; Ackerman, Gary; Lau, Ronald; Patmore, James; Ma, Fred; Sechan, Neil; Schoor, Alan; Simon, Lois; Bleiweis, Bruce; Lloyd, Kevin

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook will assist state regulatory authorities and electric utilities in complying with the Load Management Standard of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. The handbook has two major sections. The first discusses load-management techniques in terms of equipment, customer applications, combinations of techniques, etc. Key steps for evaluating the costs and benefits of load management options also are presented. These steps are intended to sequentially eliminate ineffective load-management options as the cost-benefit calculation becomes more detailed. The second section includes up-to-date information on available load-management technologies, models for utility costing, load-management data transfer, prescreening of load-management options, and the load-management literature.

  7. The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert editor, R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIVISION Waste Management Quality Assurance ImplementingI I IMPLEMENTING MANAGEMENT QUALITY PLAN ASSURANCE I lilillI WM-QAIMP Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing

  8. Conservation - The Keystone of Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, R. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THESE TECHNIQUES. INTRODUCTION THANK YOU FOR AFFORDING ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO PRESENT THE IH ENERGY MANAGEMENT PRO GRA~,.:. I BELIEVE IT IS THROUGH THIS TYPE OF FREE AND OPEN EXCHANGE THAT THE CAUSE OF ENERG Y MANAGEMENT IS MOST EFFICIENTLY ADVANCED... IN OURS. THE IH PROGRAt-.l INCLUDES: - SUPPORT OF TOP l\\llANAGEMENT DEFI1'iITE GOAL - PLANT SPECIFIC PLAN - PLANT ENERG Y COORDINATOR - $16 MILLION BUDGET NO PROGRAM CAN BE SUCCESSFUL IF NOT SUP PORTED BY THE BOSS. A PROGRAM WITHOUT A GOAL...

  9. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

  10. Fusing Integration Test Management with Change Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    - 1 - Infuse: Fusing Integration Test Management with Change Management Gail E. Kaiser* Dewayne E, NJ 07974 Murray Hill, NJ 07974 Infuse is an experimental software development environment focusing the change set into the baseline. We have previously described how Infuse enforces static consistency at each

  11. Review of uranium bioassay techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

  12. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 6 Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan Waste6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan LBNL/4 Management Quality Assurance

  13. Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

  14. Bacterial Source Tracking in Impaired Watersheds: Evaluation of Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods for Increased Source Specificity and Improved Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Emily C

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    % of the isolates unidentified (Hauck, 2006). Trinity River An urban BST project was sponsored by TCEQ in the Trinity River Basin in Dallas in 2005. The TMDL project is currently close to the implementation plan phase, but BST was conducted in the early..., and dogs in pets (Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research, 2006). Assessment of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco and Belton Lake The Lake Waco and Belton Lake study was a significant collaboration of the Texas Farm Bureau, TSSWCB...

  15. StochasticStochasticStochasticStochasticStochasticStochasticStochasticStochastic Modeling of a PowerModeling of a PowerModeling of a PowerModeling of a PowerModeling of a PowerModeling of a PowerModeling of a PowerModeling of a Power--------Managed System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Modeling of a PowerModeling of a Power-------- Managed System: Construction andManaged System: Construction andManaged managementDynamic power management !! Simple systemsSimple systems "" Continuous Time Markov Decision Process designaware compiler and architecture design !! Power control and management techniquesPower control

  16. Business, management and finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Business, management and finance Essentials Taught degrees Masters in Business Administration (MBA) MSc in Banking and Finance MSc in Corporate and Financial Risk Management MSc in Financial Mathematics MSc in International Accounting and Corporate Governance MSc in International Finance MSc

  17. Information Technology Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Cancels DOE G 200.1-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 1-16-2013, cancels DOE O 415.1.

  18. Portfolio Manager Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portfolio Manager 3 | TAP Webcast eere.energy.gov What is Portfolio Manager? Free, web-based tool for benchmarking existing buildings Measure and track the energy use of...

  19. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-7.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Policy February 2013 The University of Leeds is responsible to reflect best environmental practice, implement an environmental management system to pursue sustainability and continuous improvement and seek innovative ways of meeting environmental objectives. These include: To meet

  1. Information Technology Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Cancels DOE G 200.1-1. Admin Chg 1 approved 1-16-2013.

  2. Computerized Maintenance Management Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) are a type of management software that perform functions in support of operations and maintenance (O&M) programs. The software automates most of the logistical functions performed by O&M staff.

  3. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 410.2. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, cancels DOE O 410.2.

  4. Personalized diabetes management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hair, Allison Kelly

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we present a system to make personalized lifestyle and health decisions for diabetes management, as well as for general health and diet management. In particular, we address the following components of the ...

  5. Coastal Management Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not establish new regulations or laws; it is designed to...

  6. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  7. Benchmarking Corporate Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norland, D. L.

    BENCHMARKING CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT Dr. Douglas L. Norland Director of Research and Industrial Programs Alliance to Save Energy Washington, DC ABSTRACT There is growing interest among energy managers in finding out how their company...'s energy management procedures and perfonnance compare to that of other companies. Energy management involves everything from setting goals and targets to implementing best maintenance practices. This paper, however, discusses benchmarking energy...

  8. Erasure Techniques in MRD codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache; R. Sujatha; R. S. Raja Durai

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is organized into six chapters. The first chapter introduces the basic algebraic structures essential to make this book a self contained one. Algebraic linear codes and their basic properties are discussed in chapter two. In chapter three the authors study the basic properties of erasure decoding in maximum rank distance codes. Some decoding techniques about MRD codes are described and discussed in chapter four of this book. Rank distance codes with complementary duals and MRD codes with complementary duals are introduced and their applications are discussed. Chapter five introduces the notion of integer rank distance codes. The final chapter introduces some concatenation techniques.

  9. Workforce Management Office (WFMO) Functional Statements WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and destruction. BMD oversees WFMO's personal property management, Freedom of Information Act responses, Entry, organizing, and administering comprehensive human resources management programs in collaboration wMay 2014 Workforce Management Office (WFMO) ­ Functional Statements WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE

  10. Business, management and finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Business, management and finance Essentials Taught degrees Masters in Business Administration (MBA) MSc in Banking and Finance MSc in Corporate and Financial Risk Management MSc in Financial Mathematics in International Accounting and Corporate Governance MSc in International Finance MSc in International Management

  11. Risk Management Strategy Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Risk Management Strategy Introduction 1. The risk of adverse consequences is inherent in all activity. Dynamic enterprise will inevitably create new risks. Risk management is about ensuring that all significant relevant risks are understood and prioritised as part of normal management

  12. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources and Management Centre for The Centre for Forest Resources and Management aims the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration-energy development, forest resource forecasting, genetic improvement, woodland regeneration and creation, management

  13. Environmental Management at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : ANUgreen for the HotRot Organic Recycling Project Sustainable Transport Category Winner: LEAD Development Themes: 1. Community Engagement 2. Energy and Greenhouse Management 3. Water Management 4. Recycling and Waste Management 5. Transport 6. Pollution Prevention and Environmental Risk 7. Biodiversity The Future

  14. Medical Management Treatment Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Guide for Researchers and Clinicians) This manual is an adaptation of: Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Research Guide for Medically, Maryland #12;Message to the Users of this Medical Management (MM) Manual from the Editors Background

  15. FRESH THINKING FOR MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    FOR TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT Technology Acceptance in Organizations: What Can We Do to Improve it? by Patricia in organizations is thus an important topic in both management research and management practice. Technology choice of a mobile phone. In organizations, there are two steps in technology adoption. First

  16. Records Management Administration & Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    SUBJECT: Records Management Administration & Finance Number: 4010 Effective Date: 02 applies to the retention and disposal of public records. The university records management liaison officer for Administration and Finance,will provide liaison and assistance in allphases of the records management process

  17. Database Management Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Database Management Certificate Program DATABASE TECHNOLOGIES 13 Today, organizations in every to obtain general data analysis and management skills or apply both Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server database capabilities of relational databases in conjunction with the new "Big Data" management frameworks for data

  18. Financial Management Oversight

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for effective financial management and adherence to DOE and applicable external financial management requirements and sets forth standards for ensuring the integrity and responsiveness of financial management and the accuracy and reliability of DOEs financial statements. Cancels DOE O 2200.13.

  19. Risk & QualityRisk & Quality ManagementManagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    liability."" [Balsaono RR, Brown[Balsaono RR, Brown MK, Risk ManagementMK, Risk Management inin Legal

  20. Electronic waste management approaches: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiddee, Peeranart [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@crccare.com [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Wong, Ming H. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (China)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Human toxicity of hazardous substances in e-waste. ? Environmental impacts of e-waste from disposal processes. ? Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material Flow Analysis (MFA), Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) to and solve e-waste problems. ? Key issues relating to tools managing e-waste for sustainable e-waste management. - Abstract: Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. This paper presents an overview of toxic substances present in e-waste, their potential environmental and human health impacts together with management strategies currently being used in certain countries. Several tools including Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material Flow Analysis (MFA), Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) have been developed to manage e-wastes especially in developed countries. The key to success in terms of e-waste management is to develop eco-design devices, properly collect e-waste, recover and recycle material by safe methods, dispose of e-waste by suitable techniques, forbid the transfer of used electronic devices to developing countries, and raise awareness of the impact of e-waste. No single tool is adequate but together they can complement each other to solve this issue. A national scheme such as EPR is a good policy in solving the growing e-waste problems.

  1. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cells by cooling and concentration techniques," inheat. Different techniques of cooling solar cells have been

  2. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    1 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.) -- Chapter 3 -- Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber. All rights reserved. #12;2013/08/12 2 #12;33 Chapter 3: Data Preprocessing n Data Preprocessing: An Overview n Data Quality n Major Tasks in Data Preprocessing n Data Cleaning n Data Integration n Data

  3. Dissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    Telluride Photovoltaics The goal of increasing the efficiency of solar cell devices is a universal oneDissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques for Thin-Film Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics. Increased photovoltaic (PV) performance means an increase in competition with other energy tech- nologies

  4. CAMPUS BLUEPRINT ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT COUNCIL'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    CAMPUS BLUEPRINT ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT COUNCIL'S STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN 2012'S ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT COUNCIL'S STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN 2012-2017 Report Outline Building a Big: Student Recruitment Initiatives Sharing Our Story of Quality Improving the Academic Profile and Student

  5. CSREES Nutrient Management Working Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    planning process ­ Nutrient management training ­ P-Indexes and tools developed ­ Educational materials #12Welcome CSREES Nutrient Management Working Meeting May 4 and 5, 2004 Atlanta, GA #12;University Objectives · Information Sharing Among States ­ Nutrient management regulations ­ Nutrient management

  6. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  7. Army Regulation 2550 Information Management: Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 25­50 Information Management: Records Management Preparing and Managing Information Management: Records Management Preparing and Managing Correspondence *Army Regulation 25. This regulation on the prepa- ration and management of Army corre- spondence has been revised. This revision

  8. A quality management approach to civil engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baber, Thomas James

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    engineering 4. Hydrologic modeling Qttality Mttnttgement Between the 1920s and 1960s several men emerged as the leaders of the quality management movement: W. Fdwards Deming, Joseph M. Juran, Armand V. Feigenbaum, and Kaoru Ishikawa. This list..." for quality improvement and his use of statistical techniques for process control (Demi ng, 1986). Joseph M. Juran is well known for his Quality Trilogy: Quality Planning, Quality Control, and Quality Improvement (, luran, 1986). Juran saw quality as two...

  9. Strategies for Successful Energy Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on energy management for the portfolio manager initiative

  10. Investigation of techniques for improvement of seasonal streamflow forecasts in the Upper Rio Grande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Song-Weon

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.2.1. Rio Grande Watershed.????????????.. 47 3.2.2. Rio Ojo Watershed.?????????????? 48 3.3. Method and Data.??????????????????... 49 3.3.1. Snowmelt Runoff Model (SRM)..????????.. 49 3.3.2. Determination of SCA...-5. Polar plot (bin size: 30 o ) showing the dependence of SCA as a function of aspect for (A) the Rio Grande and (B) the Rio Ojo watersheds for MODIS (solid line) and NOHRSC (dotted line). Selected days are the same as those of Figure 3-4??????? 66...

  11. A Manager's Approach to Energy Cost Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, R. J.

    A major responsibility of management is the control and containment of operating costs. Energy costs are a major portion of the industrial budget. GM has developed a 3 phase approach to energy conservation. Phase I -Administrative Controls...

  12. Energy Management Working Group: Accelerating Energy Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheihing, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Countries participating in the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) Energy Management Working Group (EMWG) are leveraging their resources and taking collective action to strengthen national and international efforts to facilitate the adoption...

  13. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Livestock Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Bruce B.; Hart, Charles R.

    2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Livestock producers need to create flexible plans for dealing with drought. This publication explains the steps that should be included in such a plan, including taking a forage inventory, using stocker animals, establishing a livestock management...

  14. Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Innovative Exploration...

  15. Nutrient Management TrainingNutrient Management Training for Technical Service Providersfor Technical Service Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient ManagementNutrient Management ­­ Record KeepingRecord Keeping ­­ Feed ManagementFeed ManagementNutrient Management TrainingNutrient Management Training for Technical Service Providersfor Management Planning Technical Guidance.Management Planning Technical Guidance. Manure and Wastewater Handling

  16. EIS-0265-SA-57: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Watershed Management Program - Idaho Fish Screening Improvement (Champion, Iron, Fourth of July, Goat Creeks)

  17. A New Technique to Backup and Restore DBMS using XML and .NET Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadry, Seifedine; Kassem, Hussam; Hayek, Hassan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we proposed a new technique for backing up and restoring different Database Management Systems (DBMS). The technique is enabling to backup and restore a part of or the whole database using a unified interface using ASP.NET and XML technologies. It presents a Web Solution allowing the administrators to do their jobs from everywhere, locally or remotely. To show the importance of our solution, we have taken two case studies, oracle 11g and SQL Server 2008.

  18. Graph partitioning advance clustering technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhulatha, T Soni

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clustering is a common technique for statistical data analysis, Clustering is the process of grouping the data into classes or clusters so that objects within a cluster have high similarity in comparison to one another, but are very dissimilar to objects in other clusters. Dissimilarities are assessed based on the attribute values describing the objects. Often, distance measures are used. Clustering is an unsupervised learning technique, where interesting patterns and structures can be found directly from very large data sets with little or none of the background knowledge. This paper also considers the partitioning of m-dimensional lattice graphs using Fiedler's approach, which requires the determination of the eigenvector belonging to the second smallest Eigenvalue of the Laplacian with K-means partitioning algorithm.

  19. Liquid measurement - Techniques and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, B.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a few liquid measurement techniques and their associated problems. In measuring liquid petroleum gas, the first obstacle to overcome is accomodating some form of volumetric measurement. This is usually accomplished by orifice, positive displacement, or turbine meters. Each of the three established methods is covered extensively by industry standards in the API Manual of Petroleum Standards. If the operator follows these standards, very accurate results can be achieved.

  20. Data mining and visualization techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Chung (Richland, WA); Whitney, Paul (Richland, WA); Thomas, Jim (Richland, WA)

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are association rule identification and visualization methods, systems, and apparatus. An association rule in data mining is an implication of the form X.fwdarw.Y where X is a set of antecedent items and Y is the consequent item. A unique visualization technique that provides multiple antecedent, consequent, confidence, and support information is disclosed to facilitate better presentation of large quantities of complex association rules.