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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve

2

Watershed Management Program Record of Decision; 28Aug1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watershed Management Program Watershed Management Program Record of Decision SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded watershed management projects. Various sources-including Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agencies-propose watershed management projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, the Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual watershed management programs and projects. This decision is based on consideration of

3

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing (08/11/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-169) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-169) Mickey Carter Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing Project No: 1994-017-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources, 6.10 Access Fencing Location: Lemhi County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian exclosure.

4

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/4/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-165) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-165) Mickey Carter TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence Project No: 1994-017-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 4.12 Filter Strips, 6.1 Differed Grazing, 6.10 Access Fencing Location: Custer County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the

5

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-91)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2002 , 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-91) Tom Morse, KEWL-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Hood River Fish Habitat (Evans Creek Culvert Replacement) Project No: 1998-021-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.13 Culvert removal/replacement to improve fish passage, 2.1 Maintain healthy riparian plant communities, 2.4 Provide filter strips to catch sediment and other pollutants, 2.6 Native seeds inventory, 2.7 Avoid exotic species, 7.2 Install hydraulic structures at low streamflows, 7.3 Minimize erosion

6

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-57)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 12, 2001 July 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-57) Allyn Meuleman - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Idaho Fish Screening Improvement (Champion, Iron, Fourth of July, Goat Creeks) Project No: 1994-015-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.15 Fish passage enhancement - fishways; 4.25 Consolidate/Replace irrigation diversion dams; 4.10 Water Conveyance: pipeline. Location: Stanley, Custer County, Idaho. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a project that will enhance in-stream

7

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-164: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/2/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2004 , 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-164) Mickey Carter TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - L-9 Irrigation Diversion Modification Project No: 1994-017-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways, 4.1 Irrigation Water Management, 4.2 Water Measuring Devices, 4.23 Intake and Return Diversion Screens, 4.25 Consolidation/Replace Irrigation Diversion Dams Location: Lemhi County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Lemhi Soil and Water Conservation District

8

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-166: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/6/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2004 6, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-166) Jay Marcotte Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Coleman Creek Fish Passage Restoration Project No: 2002-025-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to Improve Fish Passage, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 2.6 Native Seed Inventories, 2.7 Avoid Exotic Species, 2.9 Mechanical Vegetation Removal, 4.2 Water Measuring

9

Implementation of the Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF) Watershed Model for Nutrient Trading in the Ohio River Ba sin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Ohio River Water Quality Trading Program, the Scioto, Muskingum, and Allegheny watersheds were analyzed, using the Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF) model, to determine their capacity for nutrient trading. For consistency across the Ohio River Basin, the watershed models were implemented using the hydrological unit code (HUC) 10 delineation available from the United States Geological Survey. Data from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Pennsylvania Department ...

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-88): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (08/26/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2002 6, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-88) John Baugher, KEWL-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: John Day Watershed Restoration (2002-2003) Project No: 1998-018-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 4.2 Water Measuring Devices; 4.10 Water Conveyance Pipeline; 4.25 Consolidate / Replace Irrigation Diversion Dams; 6.5 Water Supply: Pipeline. Location: Canyon City, Grant County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon.

11

Enhancement of Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF) for Mercury Watershed Management and Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the enhancement of EPRI's Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to enable it to simulate the biogeochemical cycling and fish accumulation of mercury in the environment. This report should be of value to the power sector, industry, environmental organizations, government, and public agencies concerned about environmental mercury.

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-99): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Watershed Management Program EIS, (DOEEIS-0265SA-99) Dorothy Welch (KEWU - 4) TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, COTR Proposed Action: Longley Meadows Restoration Project...

13

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-100): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 11/25/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 25, 2002 November 25, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-100) Tracey Yerxa TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Oregon Fish Screening Project, Screen Replacements 2003 Project No: 1993-066-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bio Engineering Techniques; 1.10 Structural Bank Protection using Engineering Structures; 1.14 Reduce Scour and Deposition at Hydraulic Structures; 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement-Fishways; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements;

14

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-79) (5/20/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2002 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-79) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Eisminger/ CREP Dike Relocation Project No: 1992-026-01 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.3 Creation of Wetlands to Provide Near Channel Habitat and Store Water for Land Use, 2.7 Avoid Exotic Species, 2.4 Provide Filter Strips to Catch Sediment and Other Pollutants, 6.1 Deferred Grazing. Location: Union County, Oregon

15

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-102): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 1/17/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-102) David Byrnes, KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program - Ellensburg Water Company/ Cooke Creek Diversion Project Project No: 2002-025-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams; 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures; 1.8 Bank Protection Through Vegetation Management; 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities; 4.10 Water Conveyance - Pipeline; 4.20 Water

16

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-69) (11/15/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 15, 2001 November 15, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS, (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-69) Linda Hermeston - KEWL Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Improvement of Anadromous Fish Habitat and Passage in Omak Creek Project No: 2000-001-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures; 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures; 1.8 Bank Protection Through Vegetation Management; 1.9 Structural bank protection using bioengineering methods; 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to improve fish passage; 1.16 Spawning habitat enhancements; 1.17 Rearing habitat enhancement.

17

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-59) (8/14/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2001 14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-59) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Reestablish Safe Access into Tributaries of the Yakima Subbasin, Tucker Creek Fish Passage Project Project No: 98-034-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways/Screening, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams. Location: Tucker Creek, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Yakama Nation Fisheries

18

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-101): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management EIS 1/2/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2003 , 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-101) Mark Shaw, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Restoration of Anadromous Fish Access to Hawley Creek Project No: 2001-052-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 4.18: Purchase / Negotiate Water Right Location: Lemhi, Lemhi County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Lemhi Soil and Water Conservation District, with the cooperation of the Idaho Governor's Office of Species Conservation. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a project to enhance fish habitat on

19

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/04/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-163) John Baugher TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: John Day Watershed Restoration Program Project No: 1998-018-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 4.2 Water Measuring Devices 4.10 Water Conveyance Pipeline, 4.25 Consolidate/Replace Irrigation Diversion Dams, 6.5 Water Supply: Pipeline, 6.10 Access: Fencing; 8.13 Stand Thinning; 8.15 Manage Stands to Enhance Snowpack Location: Sites within the John Day River Watershed, in Wheeler County and Grant County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm

20

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-78) (5/9/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 9, 2002 May 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-78) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase II (modification to DOE/EIS-0265/SA-72). Project No: 1997-051-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources. Location: Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 310 acres of privately-owned

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-66) (10/4/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04, 2001 04, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-66) John Baugher - KEW-4 Tom Morse - KEW-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Managers Proposed Action: Water Right Acquisition Program Project No: 2001-023-00 (Fifteenmile Subbasin Water Right Acquisition Program) 1999-008-00 (Columbia Plateau Water Right Acquisition Program) 2001-056-00 (Trout Creek 2001 Streamflow Enhancement) 2001-069-00 (John Day Basin Stream Enhancement Project, Summer 2001) Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 4.18 Purchase / Negotiate Water Right; 4.19 File for Instream Water Right.

22

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-68)(10/12/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2001 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-68) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Mill Creek and Little Creek Crossing Improvement Project No: 1992-026-01 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to Improve Fish Passage. Location: Mill Creek and Little Creek, Union County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP), and the Union County Public Works Department (UCPWD) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA provides funds to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed

23

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-92): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/16/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2) 2) Dorothy Welch, KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Asotin Creek Six-Year Direct Seed Program Project No: 1999-060-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 3.2 Conservation Copping Sequence, 3.3 Conservation Tillage, 3.8 Delayed Seed Bed Preparation, 3.9 Grasses and Legumes in rotation, 3.26 Evaluate Field Limitations, 3.27 Equipment Calibration and Use. Location: Various locations in the Asotin Creek Watershed, WA. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a no-till/direct seed farming

24

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-63) (9/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2001 7, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-63) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Pelican Creek Crossing Improvement Project No: 1992-026-01 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to Improve Fish Passage. Location: Pelican Creek, Union County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP), and the Union County Public Works Department (UCPWD) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA provides funds to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed

25

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-83)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2002 19, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-83) John Baugher Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Bear Creek Irrigation Siphon Project Project No: 1993-066-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bio Engineering Techniques; 1.10 Structural Bank Protection using Engineering Structures; 1.14 Reduce Scour and Deposition at Hydraulic Structures; 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement-Fishways; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements; 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities; 2.4 Provide Filter Strips to

26

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-95): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/21/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21, 2002 21, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-95) Ron Morinaka (KEWU - 4) TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, COTR Proposed Action: Libby Creek Channel Stabilization Project Project No: 199500400 Watershed Management Program (See App. A : Available Management Techniques): 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures; 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bioengineering Methods; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements; 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities. Location: On Libby Creek, located about 18 miles southwest of the town of Libby, Montana

27

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-03): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/16/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3) 3) Dorothy Welch, KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Couse/Tenmile Creeks Six-Year Direct Seed Program Project No: 2002-050-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 3.2 Conservation Cropping Sequence, 3.3 Conservation Tillage, 3.8 Delayed Seed Bed Preparation, 3.9 Grasses and Legumes in Rotation, 3.26 Evaluate Field Limitations, 3.27 Equipment Calibration and Use Location: Various properties in Anatone, Asotin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a six-year direct seed program

28

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

Gilbes, Fernando

29

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-170: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS--Tapteal Bend Riparian Corridor Restoration Project (8/11/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2004 1, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-170) Jonathan McCloud Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Tapteal Bend Riparian Corridor Restoration Project Project No: 2002-018-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities Location: Benton County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Tapteal Bend Greenway Association Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the

30

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-168: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed - Jim Brown Creek Streambank Stabilization (08/10/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-168) Sabrina Keen Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed - Jim Brown Creek Streambank Stabilization Project No: 1996-077-02 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bioengineering Methods Location: Clearwater County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Nez Perce Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration, Nez Perce Tribe, and Potlatch Corporation are proposing to stabilize streambanks along Jim Brown Creek near

31

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - John Day Watershed Restoration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the John Day Watershed Restoration Program, which includes projects to improve watershed conditions, resulting in improved fish and wildlife habitat. The project was planned and coordinated by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs through the John Day Basin Office in Prairie City, Oregon. A variety of activities will be implemented, described below. The project will involve the installation of four permanent lay flat diversions (structures) to replace temporary diversions. Two structures would be constructed in Beech Creek, one in Little Beech Creek and one in the John Day River. The structures will replace temporary pushup dams, which were constructed annually of various materials. Installation of the permanent diversion structures eliminates the stream-disturbing activities associated with annual installation of temporary structures. They also will enable fish passage in all flow conditions, an improvement over the temporary structures which can obstruct fish passage under some conditions. Five scour chains will be installed in six sites within the John Day River. The chains will be 3 feet long and consist of 1/4 inch chain. They will be buried within the streambed to monitor the movement of material in the streambed. Other activities that will be implemented include: Installation of off-site water systems in areas where fencing and revegetation projects are implemented, in order to restrict livestock access to waterways; construction of facilities to return irrigation flows to the Johns Day River, including the installation of pipe to replace failing drains or return ditches; installation of pumps to replace temporary diversions; and removal of junipers from approximately 500 acres per year by hand felling.

N /A

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-162: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS -Libby Creek Lower Cleveland Stabilization Project (07/29/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2004 29, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-162) Ron Morinaka (KEWU - 4) Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - COTR Proposed Action: Libby Creek (Lower Cleveland) Stabilization Project Project No: 199500400 Watershed Management Program (See App. A : Available Management Techniques): 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures; 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bioengineering Methods; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements; 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities. Location: On Libby Creek, located about 18 miles southwest of the town of Libby, Montana

34

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-72)(12/3/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 3, 2001 December 3, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-72) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase II. Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources. Location: Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase 2 privately owned parcels

35

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) (10/4/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2001 4, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) Jay Marcotte Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin. Project No: 2001-039-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways. Location: Various Walla Walla River Basin Irrigation Diversions, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Walla Walla County Conservation District. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to provide cost share for a program that

36

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-71) (10/29/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2001 29, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-71) Alan Ruger Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Duncan Creek Channel Rehabilitation Project Project No: 2001-053-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.11 Remove Debris Functioning as Barrier to Passage, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.9 Mechanical Vegetation Control. Location: Skamania County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW)

37

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-70) (10/23/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2001 23, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-70) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase I. Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources. Location: Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase 4 privately owned parcels totaling

38

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS and the Hood River Fisheries Project Final EIS(DOE/EIS-0241) (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-62) (9/14/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2001 4, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-62) and the Hood River Fisheries Project Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0241). Thomas Morse Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Hood River Fish Habitat Project Project No: 1998-021-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.16 and 1.17 Spawning and rearing habitat enhancements; 2.1 Maintain healthy riparian plant communities; 4.9 Water conveyance: ditch and canal lining; 4.23 Intake and return diversion screens; 1.13 Culvert removal and replacement. Location: Odell, Hood River County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Confederated Tribes of the Warms

39

Searching for simplified farmers' crop choice models for integrated watershed management in Thailand: A data mining approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study used the C4.5 data mining algorithm to model farmers' crop choice in two watersheds in Thailand. Previous attempts in the Integrated Water Resource Assessment and Management Project to model farmers' crop choice produced large sets of decision ... Keywords: Data mining, Decision support system, Decision trees, Farmers' crop choice

Benchaphun Ekasingh; Kamol Ngamsomsuke

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Scenario development for water resources planning and watershed management: Methodology and semi-arid region case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilizing the scenario development framework from Mahmoud et al. (2009), a set of scenarios were developed for and applied in the Verde River Watershed in Arizona, USA. Through a scenario definition exercise, three dimensions of future change with respective ... Keywords: Scenario development, Scenario planning, Scenarios, Water resources management, Water resources planning

Mohammed I. Mahmoud; Hoshin V. Gupta; Seshadri Rajagopal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A watershed-scale design optimization model for stormwater best management practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency developed a decision-support system, System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis Integration (SUSTAIN), to evaluate alternative plans for stormwater quality management and flow abatement techniques in urban ... Keywords: BMP modeling, Best management practices (BMPs), Cost-effectiveness, Decision-support system, Design optimization model, Green infrastructure (GI), Low impact development (LID), Stormwater management

Joong Gwang Lee; Ariamalar Selvakumar; Khalid Alvi; John Riverson; Jenny X. Zhen; Leslie Shoemaker; Fu-Hsiung Lai

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Waterflood surveillance techniques; A reservoir management approach  

SciTech Connect

The reservoir management aspects of waterflooding span the time before the start of waterflood to the time when the secondary recovery either is uneconomic or is changed to an enhanced recovery. This paper reviews waterflood techniques and reports on surveillance techniques in the management of waterflooding of oil wells.

Thakur, G.C. (Chevron USA Inc. (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Application of the soil and water assessment tool in a tropical agricultural catchment of the Panama Canal watershed implications for its use in watershed management activities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Panama Canal Watershed (PCW) provides water to operate the Canal, generate hydroelectricity, and supply water provisions to the local and metropolitan populations. With a (more)

Oestreicher, Jordan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Watershed Restoration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-167: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Program EIS - Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project - Klickitat Meadows Restoration (08/09/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2004 9, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-167) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project - Klickitat Meadows Restoration Project No: 1997-056-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams, 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures, 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 7.18 Road Closures, 8.10 Stream Channel Protection

47

Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Managed pressure drilling techniques and tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economics of drilling offshore wells is important as we drill more wells in deeper water. Drilling-related problems, including stuck pipe, lost circulation, and excessive mud cost, show the need for better drilling technology. If we can solve these problems, the economics of drilling the wells will improve, thus enabling the industry to drill wells that were previously uneconomical. Managed pressure drilling (MPD) is a new technology that enables a driller to more precisely control annular pressures in the wellbore to prevent these drillingrelated problems. This paper traces the history of MPD, showing how different techniques can reduce drilling problems. MPD improves the economics of drilling wells by reducing drilling problems. Further economic studies are necessary to determine exactly how much cost savings MPD can provide in certain situation. Furter research is also necessary on the various MPD techniques to increase their effectiveness.

Martin, Matthew Daniel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Improving employment services management using IPA technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is intended to build a management mechanism that continuously improves Public Employment Services (PESs), using the Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA). First of all, experts were consulted to create indicators and questionnaires for the ... Keywords: Employment service, Importance-Performance Analysis, Management mechanism, Quality indicator

Chi-Cheng Chang

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Model Watershed Plan; Lemhi, Pahsimeroi, and East Fork of the Salmon River Management Plan, 1995 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho`s Model Watershed Project was established as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s plan for salmon recovery in the Columbia River Basin. The Council`s charge was simply stated and came without strings. The tasks were to identify actions within the watershed that are planned or needed for salmon habitat, and establish a procedure for implementing habitat-improvement measures. The Council gave the responsibility of developing this project to the Idaho Soil Conservation Commission. This Model Watershed Plan is intended to be a dynamic plan that helps address these two tasks. It is not intended to be the final say on either. It is also not meant to establish laws, policies, or regulations for the agencies, groups, or individuals who participated in the plan development.

Swift, Ralph

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-18) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/17/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: October 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-18) Charlie Craig - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Eugene Wetlands Acquisition Phase II Project No: 1992-059-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques - 1.1 Fee- Title Acquisition, 1.2 Easement Acquisition. Location: Lane County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Nature Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition and preservation of approximately 99 acres of native wet prairie and oak woodland habitat in Lane County, Oregon.

52

Aiken Standard: Japanese company learns management techniques from SRNL |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aiken Standard: Japanese company learns management techniques from Aiken Standard: Japanese company learns management techniques from SRNL Aiken Standard: Japanese company learns management techniques from SRNL January 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Savannah River National Laboratory scientist Dave Herman (right) discusses waste management equipment during a visit by Japanese scientists involved in the cleanup at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant. Savannah River National Laboratory scientist Dave Herman (right) discusses waste management equipment during a visit by Japanese scientists involved in the cleanup at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant. As representatives from Tokyo Electric Power Company visited Aiken, they discussed the efforts they are making to help remediate the damage caused by the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl explosion in April 1986.

53

Increase Productivity - Implement Energy Management Systems with Project Management Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Glass Division is the second smallest of Ford Motor Company's 20 odd major divisions. It employs four percent of Ford's people, uses but one and one-half percent of the manufacturing space yet it consumes 20 percent of the energy. As Plant Engineering Manager of this small but active division, I devote a big part of my time on justifying energy expenditures and the means to reduce these costs. Ten years ago energy costs were one tenth of today's costs and just about three percent of the division's operating costs. Now they are approaching twelve percent. We believe that energy management systems would contribute to improved productivity in the manufacturing and fabricating facilities. But instinctiveness is not enough to get the funds approved to install the system. We are planning to conduct a major undertaking to prove feasibility. It will be a methodical plan of action. We have prepared a graphic plan of action of the major work items that have to be done to prepare the feasibility report. This presentation highlights the work associated with completing the feasibility report. From this report we develop the documents required for management approval. And we feel comfortable that this approach will result in having energy management systems installed in our division plants.

Spinner, M. P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Computationally Simple Battery Management Techniques for Wireless Nodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computationally Simple Battery Management Techniques for Wireless Nodes Maria Adamou 1 and Saswati In this paper, we investigate di#11;erent battery management policies for a wireless node. The goal is to increase the lifetime of a node by exploiting its battery characteristics. We have presented a framework

Sarkar, Saswati

55

Montana Watershed Coordination Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watershed Coordination Council Watershed Coordination Council Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Watershed Coordination Council Name Montana Watershed Coordination Council Place Helena, Montana Zip 59604-6873 Website http://mtwatersheds.org/index. References MWCC Website[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Montana Watershed Coordination Council is an organization based in Helena, Montana. MWCC has been cultivating broad-based support for community driven approaches to managing complex land and water issues for over eighteen years as the statewide organization representing each of more than 60 watershed groups. The MWCC mission is to enhance, conserve, and protect natural resources and sustain the high quality of life in Montana for present and future

56

Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on annual average runoff and NPS pollution from the watershed and its five sub-basins. Results highlight the effectiveness of the L-THIA approach in assessing the long-term hydrologic impact of urban sprawl. The L-THIA/NPS GIS model is a powerful tool for identifying environmentally sensitive areas in terms of NPS pollution potential and for evaluating alternative land use scenarios to enhance NPS pollution management. Access to the model via the INTERNET enhances the usability and effectiveness of the technique significantly. Recommendations can be made to community decision makers, based on this analysis, concerning how development can be controlled within the watershed to minimize the long-term impacts of increased stormwater runoff and NPS pollution for better management of water resources.

Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Supplement Anlalysis for the Watershed Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-58) (8/7/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2001 7, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-58) Mark Shaw - KEWN-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Asotin Creek Channel, Floodplain and Riparian Restoration (2001) Project Number: 2000-067-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.3 Restoration of Channelized River and Stream Reaches, 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures, 1.7 Install Other Habitat Complexity Structures, 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 2.1

58

Hybrid Run-time Power Management Technique for Realtime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new run-time power management technique for real-time embedded systems which consist of a voltage scalable processor and power controllable peripheral devices. We have observed that there exist significant trade-offs in terms of energy consumption between the Dynamic Power Management (DPM) scheme and the Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS) scheme over a wide range of system operating conditions. The proposed technique fully exploits workload-variation slack time by partitioning the task into several timeslots and shut down the unneeded peripheral device on timeslot-by-timeslot basis.

Minyoung Kim; Embedded System With

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day Risk Management Techniques and Practice (RMTAP) workshop held September 18-19 at the Hotel Nikko in San Francisco. The purpose of the workshop, which was sponsored by the SC/Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, was to assess current and emerging techniques, practices, and lessons learned for effectively identifying, understanding, managing, and mitigating the risks associated with acquiring leading-edge computing systems at high-performance computing centers (HPCCs). Representatives from fifteen high-performance computing (HPC) organizations, four HPC vendor partners, and three government agencies attended the workshop. The overall workshop findings were: (1) Standard risk management techniques and tools are in the aggregate applicable to projects at HPCCs and are commonly employed by the HPC community; (2) HPC projects have characteristics that necessitate a tailoring of the standard risk management practices; (3) All HPCC acquisition projects can benefit by employing risk management, but the specific choice of risk management processes and tools is less important to the success of the project; (4) The special relationship between the HPCCs and HPC vendors must be reflected in the risk management strategy; (5) Best practices findings include developing a prioritized risk register with special attention to the top risks, establishing a practice of regular meetings and status updates with the platform partner, supporting regular and open reviews that engage the interests and expertise of a wide range of staff and stakeholders, and documenting and sharing the acquisition/build/deployment experience; and (6) Top risk categories include system scaling issues, request for proposal/contract and acceptance testing, and vendor technical or business problems. HPC, by its very nature, is an exercise in multi-level risk management. Every aspect of stewarding HPCCs into the petascale era, from identification of the program drivers to the details of procurement actions and simulation environment component deployments, represents unprecedented challenges and requires effective risk management. The fundamental purpose of this workshop was to go beyond risk management processes as such and learn how to weave effective risk management practices, techniques, and methods into all aspects of migrating HPCCs into the next generation of leadership computing systems. This workshop was a follow-on to the Petascale System Integration Workshop hosted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)/NERSC last year. It was intended to leverage and extend the risk management experience of the participants by looking for common best practices and unique processes that have been especially successful. This workshop assessed the effectiveness of tools and techniques that are or could be helpful in HPCC risk management, with a special emphasis on how practice meets process. As the saying goes: 'In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is'. Finally, the workshop brought together a network of experts who shared information as technology moves into the petascale era and beyond.

Quinn, T; Zosel, M

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

WATERSHED SCIENCE Watershed Science is the study of the natural processes and human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption, agriculture, energy production, transportation, and recreation. Management of fresh water.colostate.edu/career-services/ Sample Watershed Science Employers State of Colorado State of Wyoming Telesto URS US Geological Survey US

62

Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed are coordinated with the Clearwater National Forest and Potlatch Corporation. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed of the Clearwater River in 1996. Fencing to exclude cattle for stream banks, stream bank stabilization, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts are the primary focuses of this effort. The successful completion of the replacement and removal of several passage blocking culverts represent a major improvement to the watershed. These projects, coupled with other recently completed projects and those anticipated in the future, are a significant step in improving habitat conditions in Lolo Creek.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Encouraging low-impact-development stormwater-management practices / Assabet River Watershed sub-basin case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory codes and ordinances create a framework that guide stormwater management decision processes. These regulations are designed to protect the health and safety of the public and to preserve the natural integrity ...

Brown, James E. (James Edward), 1969-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed; Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed are coordinated with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. During the FY 2002, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-87): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS Cowlitz Tap-Olympia White River 7/23/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2002 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-87) Mark Shaw TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Protect and Restore the Asotin Creek Watershed - Upper Charley Subwatershed Ecosystems Restoration Projects (road obliteration) Project No: 2002-054-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 7.18 Road Closure Location: Charley Creek Subwatershed, Umatilla National Forest, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a project that will address

66

Watershed Mercury Loading Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explains and illustrates a simplified stochastic framework, the Watershed Mercury Loading Framework, for organizing and framing site-specific knowledge and information on mercury loading to waterbodies. The framework permits explicit treatment of data uncertainties. This report will be useful to EPRI members, state and federal regulatory agencies, and watershed stakeholders concerned with mercury-related human and ecological health risk.

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Management competences, not tools and techniques: A grounded examination of software project management at WM-data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional software project management theory often focuses on desk-based development of software and algorithms, much in line with the traditions of the classical project management and software engineering. This can be described as a tools and techniques ... Keywords: Competence, Software engineering, Software project management

Jeremy Rose; Keld Pedersen; Jens Henrik Hosbond; Pernille Krmmergaard

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed; Annual Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed; Annual Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and designs completed on two of the high priority culverts. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assessment of a multi-objective decision support system generated land use plan on forest fodder dependency in a Himalayan watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of integrated watershed land use plans generated through multi-objective optimization techniques in a Central Himalayan watershed on forest fodder dependency for meeting fodder requirements of livestock in the watershed. ... Keywords: Forest fodder dependency, Himalayas, Integrated watershed development, Multi-objective decision support system

A. Raizada; Pradeep Dogra; B. L. Dhyani

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Proceedings: International Workshop on Innovative DSM [Demand Side Management] Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is becoming more important in the utility environment characterized by increasing competition and major uncertainties in demand and supply. EPRI and CIGRE, a leading international organization for the electric power industry, cosponsored this workshop to discuss strategies for designing and implementing DSM programs.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Potlatch River Watershed Restoration, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project's goal is to improve instream fish habitat in the Potlatch River and the lower Clearwater River through comprehensive watershed planning, implementation of best management practices and expanded water quality and fish habitat monitoring. This proposal has two primary objectives: (1) complete the Potlatch River watershed implementation plan; and, (2) augment existing monitoring efforts in the Potlatch River to broaden the water quality and fish resource data baseline.

Stinson, Kenneth

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Information technology - Security techniques - Information security management systems - Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISO/IEC 27001:2005 covers all types of organizations (e.g. commercial enterprises, government agencies, not-for profit organizations). ISO/IEC 27001:2005 specifies the requirements for establishing, implementing, operating, monitoring, reviewing, maintaining and improving a documented Information Security Management System within the context of the organization's overall business risks. It specifies requirements for the implementation of security controls customized to the needs of individual organizations or parts thereof. ISO/IEC 27001:2005 is designed to ensure the selection of adequate and proportionate security controls that protect information assets and give confidence to interested parties. ISO/IEC 27001:2005 is intended to be suitable for several different types of use, including the following: use within organizations to formulate security requirements and objectives; use within organizations as a way to ensure that security risks are cost effectively managed; use within organizations to ensure comp...

International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Using supply chain management techniques to make wind plant and energy storage operation more profitable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our research demonstrates that supply chain management techniques can improve the incremental gross profits of wind plant and storage operations by up to five times. Using Monte-Carlo simulation we create and test scenarios ...

Saran, Prashant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Presented at the National Conference on Applied Techniques for Analysis and Management of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/ Presented at the National Conference on Applied Techniques for Analysis and Management Management (VRM) processes for their own agencies. Training Course The Federal Highway Administration contracted with Jones & Jones, a Seattle planning and design firm, to develop and conduct the training course

Standiford, Richard B.

77

GDCSim: A tool for analyzing Green Data Center design and resource management techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption in data centers can be reduced by efficient design of the data centers and efficient management of computing resources and cooling units. A major obstacle in the analysis of data centers is the lack of a holistic simulator, where the ... Keywords: BlueTool infrastructure project, GDCSim, green data center design, resource management technique, energy consumption, computing resource, green data center simulator, energy efficiency, data center geometries, workload characteristics, platform power management schemes, scheduling algorithm

Sandeep K. S. Gupta; Rose Robin Gilbert; Ayan Banerjee; Zahra Abbasi; Tridib Mukherjee; Georgios Varsamopoulos

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Substation based data interpretation techniques for improved power system management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is now considerable pressure on electric utilities to operate their systems in the most efficient manner possible and to provide increased quality of service to customers. This pressure, coupled with the decreasing availability of reserve margins dictates that there is a requirement for comprehensive system operation support through, among other things, the provision of quality information relating to the behavior of the primary and secondary systems. This paper will show how the data available within modern substation control and management systems can be exploited in a cost-effective manner, through the implementation of advanced substation functions in an open systems environment. Certain functions which are presently carried out at the control center could be distributed (or partially distributed) to the substation. These functions may provide the utility staff with quality information, which can in turn be used to satisfy the objectives of increasing quality and security of supply, in addition to optimizing the utility`s information, maintenance and asset management functions.

Booth, C.; McDonald, J.R. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Centre for Electrical Power Engineering; Laycock, W.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

ACM Computing Survey, Vol. X, No. X, Article X, Pub. date:. Recent Thermal Management Techniques for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACM Computing Survey, Vol. X, No. X, Article X, Pub. date:. Recent Thermal Management Techniques are higher- capacity alternatives to conventional air cooling techniques. Thermal reliability/security issues, performance and reliability ACM File Format: KONG, J., CHUNG, S. W., AND SKADRON, K., 2010. Recent Thermal

Skadron, Kevin

80

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Stormwater Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy and purpose of this act is to encourage planning and management of storm water runoff in each watershed consistent with sound water and land use practices.

83

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

Coty, J

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fish Passage Assessment: Big Canyon Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the fish passage assessment as outlined as part of the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project as detailed in the CY2003 Statement of Work (SOW). As part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP), this project is one of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) many efforts at off-site mitigation for damage to salmon and steelhead runs, their migration, and wildlife habitat caused by the construction and operation of federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The proposed restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed follow the watershed restoration approach mandated by the Fisheries and Watershed Program. Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program vision focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects. We strive toward maximizing historic ecosystem productive health, for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations. The Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program (NPTFWP) sponsors the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project. The NPTFWP has the authority to allocate funds under the provisions set forth in their contract with BPA. In the state of Idaho vast numbers of relatively small obstructions, such as road culverts, block thousands of miles of habitat suitable for a variety of fish species. To date, most agencies and land managers have not had sufficient, quantifiable data to adequately address these barrier sites. The ultimate objective of this comprehensive inventory and assessment was to identify all barrier crossings within the watershed. The barriers were then prioritized according to the amount of habitat blocked at each site and the fish life history stages impacted. This assessment protocol will hopefully prove useful to other agencies and become a model for use in other watersheds.

Christian, Richard

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

An Efficient Hillclimbing-based Watershed Algorithm and its Prototype Hardware Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image segmentation is the process of isolating objects in an input image, that is, partitioning the image into disjoint regions, such that each region is homogeneous with respect to some property, such as gray value or texture. Watershed-based image ... Keywords: FGPA implementation, hillclimbing technique, image segmentation, watershed transformation

C. Rambabu; I. Chakrabarti

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Restoration And Management Strategies Of Wetlands In Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changing land use in the watershed area, pollution fromland use management, has also led to problems of pollution,

Ramachandra, T. V.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where necessary, and applying fertilizers at rates that maximize agricultural production without polluting the environment. Watershed runoff and industrial and municipal effluents pollute streams and reservoirs. Point source pollution (industries and municipalities) can be monitored. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers, and climatic variables. Routing models are needed to determine the quality of water as it flows from nonpoint sources through streams and valleys to rivers and large reservoirs. Models are also needed to determine optimal strategies for planning land use, conservation practices, and fertilizer application to maximize agricultural production subject to water quality constraints. Three of the most important agricultural pollutants are suspended sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Robinson [1971] pointed out that sediment is the greatest pollutant of water in terms of volume. Sediment also transports other pollutants, like phosphorus and nitrogen. These two elements are principally involved in lake eutrophication. Frequently algae blooms develop in nutrient-laden water and cause it to have an off-taste and an unpleasant odor. The odor of decaying plants becomes offensive; fish are killed because of reduced dissolved oxygen in the water, and recreation is deterred. The objective of this research was to develop models for use in managing large agricultural watersheds to obtain maximum agricultural production and to maintain water quality standards. The models were designed to: 1. Simulate daily runoff, and sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen yields from small watersheds (areas land owners and operators) for planning land use, fertilizer application, and conservation practices on subwatersheds. 4. Determine the optimal strategy for each subwatershed to maximize agricultural production for the entire watershed subject to water quality constraints. Generally, water-quality models are developed by adding chemical modeling components to existing runoff and sediment models because runoff and sediment provide transportation for chemicals. Several conceptual models for predicting chemical yields from small watersheds have been presented [Crawford and Donigian, 1973; Donigian and Crawford, 1976; Frere, et al., 1975; Hagin and Amberger, 1974; Kling, 1974; Johnson and Straub, 1971]. However, these models are not applicable to large watersheds because they have no routing mechanism. For this reason, runoff, sediment, and nutrient models were refined and developed here for application to large watersheds. Probably, the most widely used and accepted model for predicting runoff volume is the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number system [U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 1972]. The SCS model was modified by adding a soil-moisture-index accounting procedure [Williams and Laseur, 1976]. The modified water yield model is considerably more accurate than the original SCS model. On a watershed near Riesel, Texas, the modified model explained 95% of the variation in monthly runoff as compared with 65% for the original model. The water-yield model was refined here by replacing the climatic index (lake evaporation) with daily consumptive water use for individual crops.

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Protect and Restore Red River Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Red River Watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2001. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. From completing a watershed assessment to two NEPA efforts and a final stream restoration design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Red River to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed. Another major, and extremely, important component of this project is the Red River Meadow Conservation Easement. We have begun the process of pursuing a conservation easement on approximately 270 acres of prime meadow habitat (Red River runs through this meadow and is prime spawning and rearing habitat).

Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

90

Low level waste management: a compilation of models and monitoring techniques. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In support of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Science Applications, Inc., conducted a survey of models and monitoring techniques associated with the transport of radionuclides and other chemical species from LLW burial sites. As a result of this survey, approximately 350 models were identified. For each model the purpose and a brief description are presented. To the extent possible, a point of contact and reference material are identified. The models are organized into six technical categories: atmospheric transport, dosimetry, food chain, groundwater transport, soil transport, and surface water transport. About 4% of the models identified covered other aspects of LLW management and are placed in a miscellaneous category. A preliminary assessment of all these models was performed to determine their ability to analyze the transport of other chemical species. The models that appeared to be applicable are identified. A brief survey of the state-of-the-art techniques employed to monitor LLW burial sites is also presented, along with a very brief discussion of up-to-date burial techniques.

Mosier, J.E.; Fowler, J.R.; Barton, C.J. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 The past and future implications for salmon habi

Geist, David R.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

93

Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Organizational structure : management techniques and lessons learned in aligning technical and program management resources in engineering-intensive organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The roles of systems engineering, program and project management, and engineering management are continuously blurred and challenged in complex engineering organizations. The demands made of each of these functions can ...

Siddiqui, Talha, 1969-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Flood Control and Watershed Management (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Counties and towns are required to issue permits for development within the 100-year floodplain. Development is broadly defined to include any man-made change to land, including grading, filling,...

96

Characterization of in-cylinder techniques for thermal management of diesel aftertreatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One challenge in meeting emission regulations with catalytic aftertreatment systems is maintaining the proper catalyst temperatures that enable the catalytic devices to perform the emissions reduction. In this study, in-cylinder techniques are used to actively control the temperature of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF) in order to raise the DPF temperature to induce particulate oxidation. The performance of four strategies is compared for two different starting DPF temperatures (150 C and 300 C) on a 4-cylinder, 1.7-liter diesel engine. The four strategies include: (1) addition of extra fuel injection early in the combustion cycle for all four cylinders, (2) addition of extra fuel injection late in the combustion cycle for all four cylinders, (3) operating one-cylinder with extra fuel injection early in the combustion cycle, and (4) operating one-cylinder with extra fuel injection late in the combustion cycle. In cases (3) and (4), the cylinder operating with extra fuel injection is changed frequently to avoid oil dilution complications. In addition to the in-cylinder strategies, an in-pipe fuel addition technique for thermal management was studied for comparison. Results show that at starting temperatures above 300 C, late cycle injection strategies that cause temperature rise from exotherms created by unburned fuel components result in higher temperature rise for a given fuel penalty. At the low temperature of 150 C, early injection strategies that create temperature rise from both combustion and light reductant exotherms are preferred due to the inability of the catalyst to oxidize unburned fuel from late injection strategies.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Watershed modeling using large-scale distributed computing in Condor and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models are increasingly being used to quantify the effects of best management practices (BMPs) on water quality. While these models offer the ability to study multiple BMP scenarios, and to analyze impacts of various management decisions on watershed ... Keywords: Condor, Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Program, Lincoln Lake, Soil and Water Assessment Tool Model, TeraGrid, best management practices

Margaret W Gitau; Li-Chi Chiang; Mohamed Sayeed; Indrajeet Chaubey

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Walker Branch Watershed on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watershed History Prior to World War II, the Walker Branch Watershed was a typical rural area with a mix of forest, sustenance agriculture, and open woodland grazing. After...

99

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

Browne, Dave

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Watershed Evaluation and Habitat Response to Recent Storms : Annual Report for 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large and powerful storm systems moved through the Pacific Northwest during the wet season of 1995--96, triggering flooding, mass erosion, and, alteration of salmon habitats in affected watersheds. This project study was initiated to assess whether watershed conditions are causing damage, triggered by storm events, to salmon habitat on public lands in the Snake River basin. The storms and flooding in 1995--96 provide a prime opportunity to examine whether habitat conditions are improving, because the effects of land management activities on streams and salmon habitat are often not fully expressed until triggered by storms and floods. To address these issues, they are studying the recent storm responses of watersheds and salmon habitat in systematically selected subbasins and watersheds within the Snake River system. The study watersheds include several in the Wenaha and Tucannon subbasins in Washington and Oregon, and the watersheds of Squaw Creek (roaded) and Weir Creek (unroaded) in the Lochsa River subbasin, Idaho. The study was designed to examine possible differences in the effects of the storms in broadly comparable watersheds with differing magnitudes or types of disturbance. Watershed response is examined by comparing storm response mechanisms, such as rates of mass failure, among watersheds with similar attributes, but different levels of land management. The response of salmon habitat conditions is being examined by comparing habitat conditions before and after the storms in a stream and among streams in watersheds with similar attributes but different levels of land management. If appropriate to the results, the study will identify priority measures for reducing the severity of storm responses in watersheds within the Snake River Basin with habitat for at-risk salmon. This annual report describes the attributes of the study watersheds and the criteria and methods used to select them. The report also describes the watershed and fish habitat attributes evaluated and the methods used to evaluate them. Watershed responses and attributes evaluated include mass failures, historic soil loss, the integration of roads with the drainage network, estimated flood recurrence intervals, and headwater channel morphology. Habitat attributes evaluated include large woody debris, pool frequency and depth, substrate conditions, and bank stability. Multiple analyses of habitat data in the Tucannon and Wenaha subbasins remain to be completed due to difficulties stemming from data characteristics that indicated that some of the pre-existing data may have be of questionable accuracy. Diagnostic attributes of the questionable data included a change in monitoring protocols during the pre- to post-flood analysis period, physically implausible temporal trends in some habitat attributes at some sites, and conflicting results for the same attribute at the same locations from different data sources. Since unreliable data can lead to spurious results, criteria were developed to screen the data for analysis, as described in this report. It is anticipated that while the data screening will prevent spurious results, it will also truncate some of the planned analysis in the Tucannon and Wenaha systems.

Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Huntington, Charles W.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Techniques for Battery Health Conscious Power Management via Electrochemical Modeling and Optimal Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation combines electrochemical battery models and optimal control theory to study power management in energy storage/conversion systems. This topic is motivated by the need (more)

Moura, Scott J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluating disaster management knowledge model by using a frequency-based selection technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disaster Management (DM) is a multidisciplinary endeavour and a very difficult knowledge domain to model. It is a diffused area of knowledge that is continuously evolving and informally represented. Metamodel is the output artefact of metamodelling, ... Keywords: disaster management, frequency-based selection, knowledge model, metamodel, model transformation

Siti Hajar Othman; Ghassan Beydoun

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hybrid power management in real time embedded systems: an interplay of DVFS and DPM techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy-aware scheduling of real time applications over multiprocessor systems is considered in this paper. Early research reports that while various energy-saving policies, for instance Dynamic Power Management (DPM) and Dynamic Voltage & Frequency ... Keywords: Dynamic power management, Dynamic voltage & frequency scaling, Energy, Machine learning, Multiprocessor scheduling, Power, Real time systems

Muhammad Khurram Bhatti; Ccile Belleudy; Michel Auguin

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). One suggested Best Management Practice (BMP) is the export of phosphorus (P) through turfgrass sod produced with composted dairy manure from an impaired rural watershed to an urban watershed. The manure-grown sod releases P slowly and would not require additional P fertilizer for up to 20 years in the receiving watershed. This would eliminate P application to the sod and improve the water quality of urban streams. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to model a typical suburban watershed that would receive the transplanted sod. The objective of the modeling was to determine the water quality changes due to the import of sod transplanted from turf fields and grown with composted dairy manure. The SWAT model was calibrated to simulate historical flow and sediment and nutrient loading to Mary's Creek. The total P stream loading to Mary's Creek was lower when manure-grown sod was imported instead of commercial sod grown with inorganic fertilizers. Yet, flow, sediment yield, and total N yield increased equally for both cases at the watershed outlet. The SWAT simulations indicate that a turfgrass BMP can be used effectively to import manure P into an urban watershed and reduce in-stream P levels when compared to sod grown with inorganic fertilizers.

Richards, Chad Edward

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The use of management science techniques to improve decision making in poultry processing facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of the poultry industry into a major meat producing agribusiness has caused poultry processing facilities to evolve into major complexes that rely increasingly on machinery to process mass numbers of chicken carcasses. This results in a less flexible environment in which production decisions are made. A software system has been developed to meet these challenges. Parts Pro utilizes its model builder (MB) component to gather statistical and genetic information about the poultry flock to develop a mathematical model representing the constraints of the facility, as well as the request of the decision maker. This information is delivered to the second component, the model solder (MS) which is responsible for solving the mathematical model. Three experiments were conducted to determine if PartsPro was capable of representing a poultry processing facility. In Experiment 1 , genetic information from four different strains of broilers (A,B,C,D), was used in combination with the incrementally increased profits of white and dark meat final products to determine the effects of prices and strain cross on final product. A composite-base control trial was run using a composite average of the strain cross data and base final product prices. Strain cross A combined with 20% increases in white meat final products offered the highest profit of any combinations. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine if the system was capable of accommodating user made production decisions. Final profits and final product mixes were compared to a composite-base run that was the average genetic yields of all strain crosses, and base prices of final products. The system altered cut-up means to accommodate the production of requested products. Final trial profits were less than the composite-base trial. Experiment 3 was conducted to determine the system's sensitivity to price changes of unproduced products. A nearly 60% increase in price of the unproduced product caused the system to alter final product mix. Total profit of the newly altered product mix was less than the composite-base trial. This research demonstrates that management science techniques can be applied successfully to aid decision making in a poultry processing facility.

Conrad, Kenneth Allen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patterns of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patters of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing streambanks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination includes: within department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira; McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Empirical Analysis of Semantic Techniques Applied to a Network Management Classification Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semantic technologies are increasingly being employed to integrate, relate and classify heterogeneous data from various problem domains. To date, however, little empirical analysis has been carried out to help identify the benefits and limitations of ... Keywords: OWL, SWRL, SPARQL, axioms, rules, queries, network performance management

Aidan Boran; Ivan Bedini; Christopher J. Matheus; Peter F. Patel-Schneider; Stefan Bischof

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DRDU: A data reuse analysis technique for efficient scratch-pad memory management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In multimedia and other streaming applications, a significant portion of energy is spent on data transfers. Exploiting data reuse opportunities in the application, we can reduce this energy by making copies of frequently used data in a small local memory ... Keywords: Scratch-pad memory management, compiler analysis, data reuse analysis, memory hierarchy

Ilya Issenin; Erik Brockmeyer; Miguel Miranda; Nikil Dutt

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Radio access network power management considering radio over fiber technique for 4G mobile system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radio over fiber technique was suggested as excelent candidates for 4G radio access network considering large number mobile users. With higher number of base stations, a microwave link presents more disadvantages across base stations in relation to power ... Keywords: 4G mobile system, fiber dispersion, power manaegment, radio access network, radio over fiber

Jalal J. Hamad Ameen; Widad Ismail; Sevia M. Idrus

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Identification of sediment sources in forested watersheds with surface coal mining disturbance using carbon and nitrogen isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Sediments and soils were analyzed using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry and carbon and nitrogen elemental analyses to evaluate the their ability to indicate land-use and land management disturbance and pinpoint loading from sediment transport sources in forested watersheds disturbed by surface coal mining. Samples of transported sediment particulate organic matter were collected from four watersheds in the Southern Appalachian forest in Kentucky. The four watersheds had different surface coal mining history that were classified as undisturbed, active mining, and reclaimed conditions. Soil samples were analyzed including reclaimed grassland soils, undisturbed forest soils, geogenic organic matter associated with coal fragments in mining spoil, and soil organic matter from un-mined grassland soils. Statistically significant differences were found for all biogeochemical signatures when comparing transported sediments from undisturbed watersheds and surface coal mining disturbed watersheds and the results were attributed to differences in erosion sources and the presence of geogenic organic matter. Sediment transport sources in the surface coal mining watersheds analyzed using Monte Carlo mass balance un-mixing found that: {delta}{sup 15}N showed the ability to differentiate streambank erosion and surface soil erosion; and {delta} {sup 13}C showed the ability to differentiate soil organic matter and geogenic organic matter. This suggests that streambank erosion downstream of surface coal mining sites is a significant source of sediment in coal mining disturbed watersheds. The results suggest that the sediment transport processes governing streambank erosion loads are taking longer to reach geomorphologic equilibrium in the watershed as compared with the surface erosion processes.

Fox, J.F. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relating to hydroelectricity generation, irrigation water,resources to generate hydroelectricity Managing watershedsFor example, micro-hydroelectricity generation may be an

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Descriptions and Expectations of Recommended BMPs for Improving the Bosque River Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bosque River and its watershed face complex water quality problems that are not easy to solve. Attempts have been made to improve the quality of the water moving through this watershed, but have had little success due to the broad scope of work that is needed to positively impact water quality in the Bosque River. This document is part of a multi-faceted project that aims to improve the environmental infrastructure in the watershed in a manner that focuses on existing pollution issues. The projects first phase, which included the development of an environmental infrastructure improvement plan, has been completed. This plan outlined a methodology for determining likely areas that would contribute the most significant source of pollution to the watershed and developed a tool for determining the priority in which all sub-watersheds in the basins should be evaluated for needed pollution abatement measures. The Phase I report also established a list of feasible best management practices (BMPs) and ranked them based on the recommendations of a scientific advisory committee. Six steps were identified as an effective process to choose the proper BMPs for each sub-watershed in the basin. If these steps are followed, the best BMPs for each location should be effectively identified. This document expands on the Phase I report by providing an in-depth physical description of each BMP along with an overview of potential costs and applicable areas, situations, and locations where these practices should be implemented. The BMPs are organized into five groups based on applicable location(s): on-farm BMPs, between field and creek BMPs, in-stream or gully BMPs, universal BMPs, and city BMPs. The majority of these BMPs target the excessive amount of nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), entering surface water supplies. Several BMPs also focus on sediment control, as some of the soils in the watershed are highly erosive and pose the threat of transporting nutrients with them when they erode. Some BMPs also address ecosystem health and habitat issues in the watershed. Collectively, the recommended BMPs aim to improve the overall quality and productivity of the entire watershed. Many of these BMPs involve simple, inexpensive adjustments of current practices while others require more significant changes that may require technical and financial assistance. The last section of this document highlights potential sources of technical information and methods for disseminating educational materials to landowners and other interested parties. Potential federal and state sources of funding are also listed in this section for the use of parties considering the installation of multiple or more expensive BMPs on their land. This document serves as a source of general information about BMPs that would benefit landowners and agency personnel assisting landowners in the Bosque River watershed. This information can help guide interested parties to BMPs that are most feasible for their needs as well as provide a general overview of how to implement the selected practice(s) to yield the best results for their location. Successful BMP implementation will reduce the impact of human activities and lead to environmental improvement in the Bosque watershed.

Meier, Megan; Gregory, Lucas

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

The AmeriFlux Data Activity and Data System: An Evolving Collection of Data Management Techniques, Tools, Products and Services  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the U.S. Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Over this period, climate change science has expanded from research focusing on basic understanding of geochemical cycles, particularly the carbon cycle, to integrated research addressing climate change impacts, vulnerability, adaptation, and mitigation. Interests in climate change data and information worldwide have grown remarkably and, as a result, so have demands and expectations for CDIAC s data systems. To meet the growing demands, CDIAC s strategy has been to design flexible data systems using proven technologies blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. CDIAC development teams are multidisciplinary and include computer science and information technology expertise, but also scientific expertise necessary to address data quality and documentation issues and to identify data products and system capabilities needed by climate change scientists. CDIAC has learned there is rarely a single commercial tool or product readily available to satisfy long-term scientific data system requirements (i.e., one size does not fit all and the breadth and diversity of environmental data are often too complex for easy use with commercial products) and typically deploys a variety of tools and data products in an effort to provide credible data freely to users worldwide. Like many scientific data management applications, CDIAC s data systems are highly customized to satisfy specific scientific usage requirements (e.g., developing data products specific for model use) but are also designed to be flexible and interoperable to take advantage of new software engineering techniques, standards (e.g., metadata standards) and tools and to support future Earth system data efforts (e.g., ocean acidification). CDIAC has provided data management support for numerous long-term measurement projects crucial to climate change science. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We share our approaches in satisfying the challenges of delivering AmeriFlux data worldwide to benefit others with similar challenges handling climate change data, further heighten awareness and use of an outstanding ecological data resource, and highlight expanded software engineering applications being used for climate change measurement data.

Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Krassovski, Misha B [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Texas connects watershed protection and erosion through compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS CONNECTS WATERSHED PROTECTION AND EROSION THROUGHLandscape Architect, Texas Department of Transportation, 125E. 11 th Street Austin, Texas 78701, Fax: 512-416-3098 Scott

Cogburn, Barrie; McCoy, Scott

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and State of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Department Title of Proposed Project: South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program State Involved: Montana Abstract: In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead drainage. The South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program constitutes a

124

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sedimentation in Lavon Reservoir Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Law 92-500 - the 1972 Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments - mandates the analysis of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution controls. This report presents the results of a study of the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in the watershed above Lavon Reservoir. The study focuses on: (a) effects of erosion controls on farm income, (b) off-side sediment damages in the watersheds; (c) costs of administering and enforcing alternative erosion-sedimentation controls, and (d) effects of adopting cotton pest management methods. Erosion controls considered include possible regulatory programs as well as voluntary programs combined with economic incentives. While the stimulus for this study was concern over pollution (an off-site problem) it can not, because of long-run farm income consequences, be separated from conservation problems (an on-farm problem). Thus, the study is as much an analysis of conservation economics as it is an analysis of environmental economics. Accordingly, the report contains substantial information on the short and long-run on-farm benefits and costs of various soil conservation practices for all soil mapping units in Lavon watershed The results are applicable to much of the Blackland Prairies Land Resource area.

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A climate-hydrology scenario library approach to watershed management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 and an azole-type corrosion inhibitor is used to protect the copper-based admiralty brass metallurgy of the main condenser. 6 Calcium sulfate is the limiting scale-forming salt...

127

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Analysis Using Aerial Photography and Ground Survey Data " (Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As you are aware, the Watershed Analysis study which we are conducting will require additional time for completion. We are submitting this interim report on the project for your review and comment. The report is intended to: i. 2. Describe the status of the project and projected timeline for completion; Present our conceptual approach to watershed analysis in the context of cumulative effects; 3. Describe the past use of remote sensing for stream, riparian, and watershed studies and some critical issues which must be addressed in any watershed or stream analysis system; 4. Describe our study methods; 5. Present a preliminary analysis of changes in stream habitat in Taneum creek as determined from physical stream surveys conducted for this project and historical stream survey data. Since the aerial photograph analysis is not completed, we do not believe that a

Dave Somers; Jeanette Smith; Robert Wissmar; Nancy Sturnham Dnr; Tim Beechie; Dave Somers; Jeanette Smith; Robert Wissmar

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Development and application of the spatially explicit load enrichment calculation tool (select) to determine potential E. coli loads in watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the USEPA National Section 303(d) List Fact Sheet, bacterial pathogens are the leading cause of water quality impairments in Texas. The automated Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) uses spatially variable factors such as land use, soil condition, and distance to streams to characterize pathogen sources across a watershed. The results support development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) where bacterial contamination is of concern. SELECT calculates potential E. coli loads by distributing the contributing source populations across suitable habitats, applying a fecal production rate, and then aggregating the potential load to the subwatersheds. SELECT provides a Graphical User Interface (GUI), developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) within ArcGIS 9.X, where project parameters can be adjusted for various pollutant loading scenarios. A new approach for characterizing E. coli loads resulting from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) was incorporated into the SELECT methodology. The pollutant connectivity factor (PCF) module was created to identify areas potentially contributing E. coli loads to waterbodies during runoff events by weighting the influence of potential loading, runoff potential, and travel distance. Simulation results indicate livestock and wildlife are potentially contributing large amounts of E. coli in the Lake Granbury Watershed in areas where these contributing sources are not currently monitored for E. coli. The bacterial water quality violations near Lake Granbury are most likely the result of malfunctioning OWTSs and pet waste in the runoff. The automated SELECT was verified by characterizing the potential E. coli loading in the Plum Creek Watershed and comparing to results from a prior study (Teague, 2007). The E. coli potential load for the watershed was lower than the previous study due to major differences in assumptions. Comparing the average ranked PCF estimated by physical properties of the watershed with the statistical clustering of watershed characteristics provided similar groupings. SELECT supports the need to evaluate each contributing source separately to effectively allocate site specific best management practices (BMPs). This approach can be used as a screening step for determining areas where detailed investigation is merited. SELECT in conjunction with PCF and clustering analysis can assist decision makers develop Watershed Protection Plans (WPPs) and determine TMDLs.

Riebschleager, Kendra Jean

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1999 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a summary of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until last year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. However, the watershed stream evaluation team used in the watershed analysis determined that there were problems along the Pataha Creek that needed to be addressed that would add further protection to the banks and therefore a further reduction of sedimentation into the stream. 1999 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. In stream work was not addressed this year because of the costs associated with these projects and the low impact of the sediment issue concerning Pataha Creeks impact on Chinook Salmon in the Tucannon River.

Bartels, Duane G.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Seeing the System through the End Users' Eyes: Shadow Expert Technique for Evaluating the Consistency of a Learning Management System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interface consistency is an important basic concept in web design and has an effect on performance and satisfaction of end users. Consistency also has significant effects on the learning performance of both expert and novice end users. Consequently, ... Keywords: Consistency, Measurement, Methods, Performance, Shadow Expert Technique, Usability Test

Andreas Holzinger; Christian Stickel; Markus Fassold; Martin Ebner

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Low-Intrusion Techniques and Sensitive Information Management for Warhead Counting and Verification: FY2012 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the second year of this project is described by the series of technical reports and manuscripts that make up the content of this report. These documents summarize successes in our goals to develop our robust image-hash templating and material-discrimination techniques and apply them to test image data.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; Gilbert, Andrew J.; White, Timothy A.; Pitts, W. Karl; Misner, Alex C.; Seifert, Allen

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Grays River Watershed Restoration Status Report 2007, May 1, 2007 - October 30, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-013-00, 'Grays River Watershed Restoration', began in FY04 and continues into FY09. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during the period 1 May 2007 through 30 October 2008. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with the Columbia River Estuary Task Force (CREST) on implementation of the Grays River Restoration Project. The Grays River is vitally important to the recovery of Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon because it currently has the most viable population remaining in the LCR region. The Grays River watershed is also important to the recovery of salmon and steelhead in the LCR ecosystem. Today, numbers of naturally spawning salmon and steelhead have declined to levels far below historical numbers because of habitat limiting factors that include but are not limited to the lack of habitat connectivity, diversity, channel stability, riparian function and altered stream flow conditions. The objective of this project is to restore habitat-forming processes to enhance salmon and steelhead populations in the Grays River, following recommendations developed during the FY04-06 BPA-sponsored Grays River Watershed Assessment (BPA Project No. 2003-013-00). Specifically, this project will be the first step in restoring channel structure and function that will increase instream habitat diversity, channel stability, and riparian integrity in the critical response reach upstream and adjacent to critical salmon spawning areas of the Grays River. The major component of this strategy is the planning, design, installation, and monitoring of engineered logjams (ELJ) that will rejuvenate historic channel and floodplain processes. Additional restoration measures include reforesting the riparian corridor to enhance future large woody debris recruitment and investigation of conservation activities within ecologically critical areas. These activities include land acquisition and levee removal to protect critical areas and reconnect floodplain areas. Finally, monitoring integrated with restoration activities is proposed to evaluate restoration effectiveness and allow for adaptive management of future restoration treatments in the project area as well as other degraded watersheds in the Lower Columbia River.

Hanrahan, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research has indicated that, depending upon driver and passenger characteristics, passengers can have either a positive or negative influence upon driver behaviour. In conclusion to a recent study investigating the roles that passengers can play to influence, positively and negatively, driver behaviour, Regan and Mitsopoulos (2001) recommended, among other things, that the principles of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training may increase passengers ability to positively influence driver behaviour and also drivers ability to accept constructive feedback. The present study investigated the potential application of CRM training within young driver training in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). This involved a literature review, an analysis of the differences between the driving and aviation domains, an analysis of the team-based activities and the knowledge, skills and attitudes required during driving to perform those activities, consultation with CRM experts from the aviation and medicine domains and the conduct of six focus groups involving young learner drivers, provisional licence drivers and course teachers. The findings indicate that CRM training as part of young driver training in the ACT is a viable concept to pursue. The application of CRM training within young driver training has potential to significantly enhance the positive and reduce the negative effects of passengers on young driver behaviour, and thus the safety of young drivers and passengers alike. The outcomes of this study formed the basis for a set of recommendations for the development of a young driver CRM training program in the ACT.

Young Drivers; Eve Mitsopoulos; Michael Regan; Janet Anderson; Paul Salmon; Jessica Edquist; Ii Report Documentation Page

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Two-Tier Statistical Forecast Method for Agricultural and Resource Management Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple phase schemes to predict seasonal climate based on leading ENSO indicators can be used to estimate the value of forecast information in agriculture and watershed management, but may be limited in predictive skill. Here, a simple two-tier ...

Steven A. Mauget; Jonghan Ko

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Supplement Analysis for the Watrshed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-75) (2/20/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2002 20, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-75) Peter Lofy - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Gourlay Creek Fish Ladder Project Project No: 2001-038-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways. Location: Columbia County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the City of Scappoose Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the construction of a fish passage facility at the Gourlay Creek Dam/water reservoir in Columbia County, Oregon. The City of

137

Short communication: Estimation of stream channel geometry in Idaho using GIS-derived watershed characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes estimation of stream channel geometry with multiple regression analysis of GIS-derived watershed characteristics including drainage area, catchment-averaged precipitation, mean watershed slope, elevation, forest cover, percent area ... Keywords: Cross-sections, GIS, Modeling, Stream channels, Streamstats, Watersheds

Daniel P. Ames; Eric B. Rafn; Robert Van Kirk; Benjamin Crosby

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual report, August 1, 1990-July 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The research work, during the period of the report, can be divided into three main categories, the first category being the NE Hitchcock reservoir characterization review task. NE Hitchcock field production and log data were acquired. Well by well review of production was performed and cross-correlated with geologic interpretations. The second category is the reservoir selection task. In the process of selecting two water-drive gas reservoir candidates, over 150 fields located in the Rockies, New Mexico, West Texas, Mid Continent, Michigan and offshore Louisiana were searched. The reservoir selection criteria is: water-drive gas reservoir, location near a geologic outcrop (if possible), field size of 5-40 wells, and availability of core and modern well logs. Accordingly, the Vermejo/Moore-Hooper Fusselman and the Grand Isle PD sand fields were selected to be studied. The third category is the laboratory investigations. The task includes rock mechanical properties, phase behavior and sand control portions. In the rock mechanical properties segment, laboratory measurements were made on several Berea Core plugs. The equation of state and an empirical approach are being used to predict initial reservoir gas composition from current production data for the phase behavior part. The sand control part was completed with conclusions regarding the ability to predict the existence of plastic failure region of an unconsolidated sand near a wellbore. The project is continuing to accomplish its goals to evaluate different production management strategies on the two chosen water-drive gas reservoirs through reservoir engineering, geologic interpretation, experimental work and reservoir simulation studies.

Crafton, J.W.; Davis, D.; Graves, R.; Poettmann, F.; Thompson, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Pesticide Education in the Coastal Zone of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arroyo Colorado is an ancient channel of the Rio Grande River that extends eastward for about 90 miles from near the city of Mission, Texas through southern Hidalgo County to the city of Harlingen in Cameron County, eventually discharging into the Laguna Madre near the Cameron-Willacy County line. The tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado, as classified by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), is between the confluence with Laguna Madre in Cameron/Willacy County to a point 100 meters (110 yards) downstream of Cemetery Road, south of Port Harlingen in Cameron County. This part of the river is also defined as a coastal natural resource area (CNRA) and a coastal wetland in the Coastal Coordination Act. Water quality monitoring over the past decade has confirmed low oxygen levels and escalated ammonia and nitrate concentrations that have contributed to multiple fish kills in the tidal segment. These sub-optimal aquatic conditions resulted in this portion of the Arroyo Colorado being placed on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for high aquatic life use impairment in 2002. Numerous urban sources, such as point source wastewater discharges, have contributed to this impairment; however, according to the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan (ACWPP), nonpoint source agricultural runoff accounts for much of the water quality issues in the tidal segment. These coastal issues and other water quality issues in the watershed have been addressed by the more than 715-member Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership in the ACWPP. The plan identifies needs specific to water quality protection and improvement for the agricultural community as well as addressing nonpoint source pollution from the urban environment such as landscapes. In response to the ACWPP, Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) proposed to work with the Texas AgriLife Extension Service to implement an educational program aimed at agricultural producers, which included turfgrass producers and local independent school districts that manage athletic fields. The agricultural effort was an integrated farm management program focused on pesticide education and proper nutrient management for Cameron and Willacy counties to address water quality issues related to agricultural production in the tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado. While the turfgrass and athletic field managers were invited to the educational programs provided through the agricultural effort, a separate educational workshop was held for turf producers and managers to increase awareness of how nutrient, pesticide and irrigation management can reduce the amount of nonpoint source pollution. This education plan helps fulfill two goals of the Texas Coastal Management Program. First, agricultural and turfgrass producers and managers in Cameron and Willacy county were educated on water quality issues and how the proper application of pesticides meets current laws and regulations, and can improve the water quality and fish community in the Arroyo Coastal Natural Resources Area (CNRA). Second, the producers and managers were taught that implementing proper pesticide application practices will reduce the potential for nonpoint source pollution, which will improve the water quality in the Arroyo CNRA. This project also enhances the area's ability to continue to support valuable aquatic life and meet water quality goals outlined in the ACWPP. An additional environmental success for this area, given the over-allocation and availability of clean surface waters, will be the added water savings attributed to the irrigation management educational program provided through this effort.

Berthold, Allen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Unpaving the Way to Creek Restoration in Lower Sausal Creek Watershed: Applying the EU Water Framework Directive to a US Urban Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River. UCthe EU Water Framework Directive to a US Urban Watershed byUnion Water Framework Directive (WFD) provides a strategy

Li, Hong; Wardani, Jane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1998 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a few of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. 1998 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek.

Bartels, Duane G.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Blackland Research Extension Center Temple, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Blackland Research Extension Center Temple, Texas January 25, 2011 Robert Adams Alan Plummer Associates, Inc. radams@apaienv.com Ashley Alexander Texas State Soil Station, Texas Tech University tom.arsuffi@ttu.edu Jenna Barrett Brazos River Authority jbarrett

144

Wind River Watershed Restoration 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2004, researchers from U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. Juvenile salmonid population surveys were conducted within select study areas throughout the subbasin. We expanded our survey coverage of the mainstem Wind River to a reach in the vicinity of Carson National Fish Hatchery to assess effects of non-indigenous Chinook on native steelhead. These efforts add to a database of habitat and fish data collected in the Wind River since 1996. This research contributes to the Wind River Restoration Project, which includes active stream habitat restoration and monitoring of adult and juvenile steelhead populations. We maintained a network of 32 thermographs in the Wind River subbasin during 2004. Additionally, Underwood Conservation District provided us with data from seven thermographs that they maintained during 2004. Thermograph data are identifying areas with chronic high water temperatures and stream sections where high rates of warming are occurring. During 2004, water temperatures at 26 thermograph sites exceeded the 16 C limit for surface waters set by the Washington Department of Ecology. Water temperatures exceeded 20 C at five sites in the Trout Creek watershed. Our thermograph dataset includes information from as early as 1996 at some sites and has become a valuable long-term dataset, which will be crucial in determining bioenergetic relationships with habitat and life-histories. We have monitored salmonid populations throughout the Wind River subbasin by electrofishing and snorkeling. We electrofished four stream sections for population estimates during 2004. In these sections, and others where we simply collected fish without a population estimate, we tagged juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to track growth and movement of individuals. We snorkeled nine stream sections during 2004. Juvenile steelhead populations have varied greatly between streams and between years. Numbers of age-0 steelhead have increased substantially since 2000 within the MINE reach (rkm 35.0-40.0) section of the upper Wind River. Because of potential negative interactions with steelhead, naturally spawned populations of introduced juvenile Chinook salmon are of concern in the mainstem of the Wind River. During 2004, we deployed over 3,000 PIT tags in the Wind River subbasin, primarily in juvenile steelhead, but also in juvenile Chinook. We are compiling a dataset of recapture information on these tagged fish as well as interrogation information from Bonneville Dam and other sites. The habitat and fish data collected have been used in Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment modeling efforts, the Wind River Subbasin Plan, and the Total Maximum Daily Load report from Washington Department of Ecology. Continued monitoring of changes in habitat, combined with data on fish populations, will help guide planning efforts of land and fish managers. As long-term active and passive restoration actions are implemented in the Wind River and its tributaries, these data will provide the ability to measure change. Because the Wind River subbasin has no steelhead hatchery or supplementation, these data will be useful to compare population trends in subbasins with hatchery or supplementation management.

Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The proposed fence will meet or exceed BPA's minimum requirement of a 35-foot setback from the stream. Fence posts will be driven into the ground with a post ponder. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing.

N /A

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development and implementation of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution control plans was mandated by the 1972 Federal Pollution Control Act Amendments, Public Law 92-500. The purpose of this particular report is to present the results of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages in the watershed; (c) the costs of administering and enforcing alternative erosion controls, and (d) on-farm economics of soil conservation practices. Erosion controls considered include the traditional voluntary programs combined with economic incentives as well as possible regulatory programs. The focus of the study is on erosion and sedimentation because sediment is a potential transporter of pollutants. Practices to control agricultural non-point source pollution would probably be aimed at reducing soil loss. Conservation and conservation related practices are, at present, considered the best technical practices to abate agricultural non-point source pollution. This is a study of both conservation and environmental economics, two areas that tend to be closely related. For this project, the concern was over potential pollution (an off-site problem), but because of long-run farm income consequences, this concern cannot be separated from conservation problems (an on-farm problem). Accordingly, the report contains substantial information on the short and long-run on-farm benefits and costs of various soil conservation practices for the specific soil mapping units in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The results of this study are applicable to the majority of the soils in the High Plains Land Resource Area. Only sheet and rill erosion are considered in the study. The first section of the report describes the selected "Best Management Practices" and examines the on-farm economics of soil conservation. The second section postulates various sediment damage control options and models the economic consequences of implementation, both to agricultural producers as a group, and to society.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, Annual Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to enhance and restore the ecological integrity and ecosystem function of the Grays River watershed. The recommended restoration and enhancement efforts developed in this project should incorporate local community stakeholder interests and needs. The objectives of this project are (1) to perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessment; (2) to develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) to gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River sub-basin.

McGrath, Kathleen E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

NETL: IEP - Water-Energy Interface: In-House Watershed Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-House Watershed Science & Technology R&D In-House Watershed Science & Technology R&D The Geosciences Division of the NETL Office of Science and Technology conducts ongoing in-house research and development pertaining to water issues related to energy production. The division provides skill, expertise, and technical support for NETL programs in areas of environmental and energy technologies that are consistent with the mission of the NETL. Geophysical Investigations NETL is continuously developing new geophysical technologies that address environmental issues associated with the extraction and utilization of fossil fuels. Specifically, NETL has used helicopter electromagnetic and night-time thermal infrared surveys to detect and map contaminated groundwater at abandoned coal mines in north-central Pennsylvania and at an abandoned mercury mine in California. Also, NETL has used helicopter electromagnetic surveys to identify potentially hazardous conditions (unconsolidated slurry pockets, high phreatic zones, and shallow underground mines) at 14 coal waste impoundments in southern West Virginia with a moderate to high hazard potential. In the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, helicopter electromagnetic surveys were flown to determine the best management strategy for water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. Hazards posed by abandoned wells has prompted NETL to develop airborne and ground-based well finding strategies for surveying both large, open areas and small, highly developed areas. The intent of this research is to develop cost-effective airborne geophysical technologies that rapidly gather needed information from large areas, especially areas that might otherwise be inaccessible. Ground surveys from mobile platforms have been developed for use where airborne surveys are not possible or practical.

150

Essays on the Effectiveness of Environmental Conservation and Water Management Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An awareness of the effect of agricultural production on the environment has led to the development of policies to mitigate its adverse effects. This dissertation provides analyses of agri-environmental policies designed to protect environmental assets, as well as analytical decision-making tools useful for conducting policy evaluations. The first essay employs propensity score matching techniques to estimate the additionality of federal agricultural conservation programs for six conservation practices for farmers in Ohio. Additionality is an important measure of the effectiveness of conservation programs in inducing an increase in the conservation effort of farmers. Results suggest that additionality is positive and statistically significant for all six conservation practices. However, while programs achieve positive additionality for all practice types, a comparison between conservation practices reveals that certain practice types achieve higher percent additionality than others. Such results, coupled with information on the environmental benefits obtained per practice, could prove useful to program managers for improving the effectiveness of conservation programs. The second essay develops a new methodology to decompose the additionality measure into the two effects induced by conservation programs: expansion versus the new adoption of conservation practices. To do so, the relative contributions of two types of farmers, prior-adopters and new-adopters, are estimated. Results of the decomposition reveal that the additionality for prior-adopters is not significant for all practice types. Instead, additional conservation effort comes from new-adopters adopting new practices. Second, decomposition estimates suggest that practice types with a greater fraction of enrolled farmers that are new-adopters achieve greater percent additionality than those with greater proportions of prior-adopters. This suggests that a farmers? history in conservation adoption has a significant influence on additionality levels. The final essay analyzes the effect of recent instream flow diversion-guidelines on agricultural water security and streamflows within a decentralized water management regime. Spatially-explicit economic and hydrologic models are integrated to evaluate the tradeoffs between salmon bypass-flows and agricultural water security for three different diversion-guidelines within a northern-California watershed. Results indicate that the most restrictive diversion-guideline provides the greatest protection of bypass-flow days within smaller watersheds; however, within larger watersheds protection is not as significant. Water security, however, decreases sharply under the strict and moderate diversion-guidelines, especially during dry years. Overall, results indicate that greater focus should be given to protecting streamflows in the smallest watersheds, and meeting human water needs during dry years, when agricultural water security is impacted the most.

Mezzatesta, Mariano

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

McKenzie River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations, supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. A primary goal of the Council's program is to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. The MWC will always have a baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. This watershed program is strengthened by the completion of the BPA funded Sub-basin Assessment, Conservation Strategy and the establishment of a Benchmarks system, thus, providing the MWC a prioritized framework for restoration efforts. Objectives for FY03 included: (1) Continued coordination of McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups that restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though a strategic and comprehensive outreach and education program, utilizing Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and council operations.

Thrailkil, Jim

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

DOE/EIS-0353; South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration July 2005 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and State of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Department Title of Proposed Project: South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program State Involved: Montana Abstract: In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic

153

Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds  

SciTech Connect

On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

None available

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

SWAT-Based Streamflow Estimation and Its Responses to Climate Change in the Kadongjia River Watershed, Southern Tibet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Runoff estimation and its response to climate change in ungauged or poorly gauged basins based on hydrological models are frontier research issues of the hydrological cycle. For the Kadongjia River watershed (KRW), a poorly gauged watershed ...

Rui Sun; Xueqin Zhang; Yang Sun; Du Zheng; Klaus Fraedrich

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Assessing the Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Mountain Snowpack in the St. Mary River Watershed, Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The St. Mary River watershed is an important international watershed that supplies irrigation water to large portions of southern Alberta, Canada, and northern Montana. The St. Mary River is fully allocated and users on both sides of the border ...

Ryan J. MacDonald; James M. Byrne; Stefan W. Kienzle; Robert P. Larson

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

SWAT-based streamflow estimation and its responses to climate change in Kadongjia River Watershed, South Tibet, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Runoff estimation and its response to climate change in ungauged or poorly gauged basins based on hydrological models are frontier research issues of the hydrological cycle. For Kadongjia River Watershed (KRW), a poorly gauged watershed located in ...

Rui Sun; Xueqin Zhang; Yang Sun; Du Zheng; Klaus Fraedrich

157

McKenzie River Watershed Coordination, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations and grant funds supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's (MWC) efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. Primary goals of the MWC are to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. Underpinning the goals is the MWC's baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. Objectives for FY02 included: (1) Continue to coordinate McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups to restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the middle to lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though an outreach and education program, utilizing (BPA funded) Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and Council operations.

Thrailkil, Jim

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

159

An integrated media, integrated processes watershed model Gour-Tsyh Yeh a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated media, integrated processes watershed model Gour-Tsyh Yeh a, , Don-Sin Shih b , Jing modelling Groundwater and surface water coupling High performance parallel computing River hydraulics of a numerical model simulating fluid flow in WAterSHed Systems of 1D Stream-River Networks, 2D Overland Regime

Central Florida, University of

160

Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Multimetric spatial optimization of switchgrass plantings across a watershed  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for bioenergy crops presents our society with the opportunity to design more sustainable landscapes. We have created a Biomass Location for Optimal Sustainability Model (BLOSM) to test the hypothesis that landscape design of cellulosic bioenergy crop plantings may simultaneously improve water quality (i.e., decrease concentrations of sediment, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen) and increase profits for farmer-producers while achieving a feedstock-production goal. BLOSM was run using six scenarios to identify switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) planting locations that might supply a commercial-scale biorefinery planned for the Lower Little Tennessee (LLT) watershed. Each scenario sought to achieve different sustainability goals: improving water quality through reduced nitrogen, phosphorus, or sediment concentrations; maximizing profit; a balance of these conditions; or a balance of these conditions with the additional constraint of converting no more than 25% of agricultural land. Scenario results were compared to a baseline case of no land-use conversion. BLOSM results indicate that a combined economic and environmental optimization approach can achieve multiple objectives simultaneously when a small proportion (1.3%) of the LLT watershed is planted with perennial switchgrass. The multimetric optimization approach described here can be used as a research tool to consider bioenergy plantings for other feedstocks, sustainability criteria, and regions.

Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Griffiths, Natalie A [ORNL; Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Middleton, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Thomas, Neil [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Sources and Fates of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Rural and Urban Watersheds in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bryan/College Station (B/CS) region has been reported to have elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface water. Increased DOC concentrations are worrisome as DOC has been shown to be an energy source for the recovery and regrowth of E. coli and many watersheds are impaired by high bacteria levels. To examine the sources and fates of DOC in rural and urban regions to better understand DOC movement though the environment, seven watersheds were studied. To investigate source, streams were analyzed using diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy (DR-NIR) and carbon isotopes. Fate of DOC was determined through monthly streams samples, gathered between March 2011 and February 2012, which were incubated for biodegradable DOC (BDOC). Soil in the region was sampled based on land use categories. Soil was analyzed for DOC and BDOC as well as DOC adsorption, the other major fate of DOC. Above ground vegetation was sampled in conjunction with soil and analyzed for BDOC. Data indicated that fecal matter from cliff swallows provided considerable organic material to streams in the B/CS region as shown through DR-NIR. Carbon isotope values in streams ranged from -23.5 +/- 0.7% to -26.8 +/- 0.5%. Stream spectra may be able to predict carbon isotope values in streams (Adj. R2 = 0.88). Mean annual stream DOC concentrations ranged from 11 +/- 3 mg/L to 31 +/- 12 mg/L, which represents a significant decrease in DOC between 2007 and 2011. Concurrent increases in pH and conductivity were also recorded. The decrease in DOC and the increases in pH and conductivity may be due to impacts of high sodium irrigation tap water. Biodegradable DOC was low in streams, which is likely due to DOC being present in streams in refractory forms that are resistant to microbial breakdown. Soil chemistry, including soil adsorption, was greatly influenced by sodium. The elevated adsorption coefficients and release values seen in highly developed and urban open areas can be attributed to frequent exposure to high sodium irrigation water. The results indicate that sodium is a major driver of DOC in the system. Sound management decisions concerning irrigation water chemistry and urban development might eventually emerge to protect water quality as a result of this research.

Cioce, Danielle

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-181- Noxon-Hot Springs/Taft-Hot Springs 39/2 to 44/1)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2003 2, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-34) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Asotin Creek Watershed, Washington-Schlee Acquisition Project No: 1996-094-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Asotin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 8,500 acres consisting of shrub-steppe rangeland, 1,480 acres of Conservation Reserve Program

165

BPA Riparian Fencing and Alternative Water Development Projects Completed within Asotin Creek Watershed, 2000 and 2001 Asotin Creek Fencing Final Report of Accomplishments.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35. According to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Priority WRIA's by ''At-Risk Stock Significance Map'', it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern Washington. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve; no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe, Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps members from the Nez Perce Tribe have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred and seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, the ACCD has been securing and administering funding for endangered salmonids since 1994. The ''Asotin Creek Riparian Planting 2000-053-00 and Asotin Creek Riparian Fencing 2000-054-00'' teamed BPA and the Governor's Salmon Recovery Funding to plant approximately 84,191 trees and shrubs in the Asotin Creek Watershed. In addition BPA and private cost-share dollars were utilized to drill 3 wells, provide 15 off-site alternative water developments (troughs), 5 spring developments, and 9,100 feet of riparian fencing. The trees will provide shade and long-term LWD recruitment to the stream. The wells, alternative water developments, springs and fencing will reduce direct animal impacts on the stream. In one area alone, a well, 3,000 ft of riparian fence with 5 alternative water developments will exclude 300 head of cattle from using the stream as a source of drinking water during the winter months.

Johnson, B.J. (Bradley J.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Simulating Typhoon Floods with Gauge Data and Mesoscale-Modeled Rainfall in a Mountainous Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based distributed hydrological model was applied to simulate typhoon floods over a mountainous watershed in Taiwan. The meteorological forcings include the observed gauge rainfall data and the predicted rainfall data from a mesoscale ...

Ming-Hsu Li; Ming-Jen Yang; Ruitang Soong; Hsiao-Ling Huang

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Discharge Characteristics and Changes over the Ob River Watershed in Siberia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes long-term (193690) monthly streamflow records for the major subbasins within the Ob River watershed in order to examine discharge changes induced by human activities (particularly reservoirs and agricultural activities) and ...

Daqing Yang; Baisheng Ye; Alexander Shiklomanov

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Topographic and Atmospheric Influences on Precipitation Variability over a Mountainous Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using rotated principal component analysis (PCA), unique, orthogonal spatial patterns of daily and monthlyprecipitation on a well-instrumented, mountainous watershed in Idaho are examined for their relationship totopography, geographic location, ...

Gregory L. Johnson; Clayton L. Hanson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume I of III Reports A thru E, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the ongoing efforts to document life history strategies of steelhead in the Wind River watershed and to formulate criteria for ranking restoration needs and proposed projects.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Rainfall Amount, Intensity, Duration, and Frequency Relationships in the Mae Chaem Watershed in Southeast Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dense tipping-bucket rain gauge network was established in the Mae Chaem watershed in the mountains of northwestern Thailand as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment-Tropics (GAME-T). ...

Koji Dairaku; Seita Emori; Taikan Oki

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modeling the potential role of a forest ecosystem in phytostabilization and phytoextraction of 90Sr at a contaminated watershed  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of {sup 90}Sr at forest sites in the White Oak Creek watershed, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was simulated with a simple, site-specific, multicompartment model that linked biomass and element cycling dynamics. The model was used to predict the role of forest cover in mitigating hydrologic losses of {sup 90}Sr from contaminated soils (i.e. phytostabilization) under conditions where contaminant transport is governed mainly by shallow subsurface flow. The model was also used to predict the removal of {sup 90}Sr from soil (i.e. phytoextraction) through the growth and harvest of short rotation woody crops over a period of 30 years. Simulations with the model indicated that (1) forest preservation on the watershed is a form of phytostabilization because forest cover helps to minimize hydrologic losses of {sup 90}Sr and (2) an attempt to significantly reduce amounts of {sup 90}Sr in soil through phytoextraction would be unsuccessful. Over a period of 30 years, and under various management strategies, the model predicted that <15% of the {sup 90}Sr initially present in soil at a contaminated site was lost through hydrologic transport and <53% was lost by radioactive decay. Phytostabilization may be important in the management of radioactive land when issues like waste minimization and pollution prevention affect the selection of technologies to be used in environmental restoration.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Grande Ronde Model Watershed Project; Dark Canyon Riparian Exclosure, Completion Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baker Field Office, Vale District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) submitted a project proposal for funding in 2002 through the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP). The project consisted of constructing two riparian exclosures to prevent livestock grazing in the riparian areas of Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek. The BLM completed the NEPA documentation and supplied the fencing materials. Funding from BPA through the GRMWP was used to complete the construction of the two exclosures. This project was completed in the fall of 2002. The project area is located in Union County, Oregon on BLM managed land adjacent to Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek, T. 3. S., R. 35 E., Section 24 and 25. Section 24 is along Dark Canyon Creek and section 25 is along Meadow Creek. Approximately 0.4 miles of stream would be protected from grazing with the construction of the two exclosures. A two person crew was hired to construct a four-strand barbed wire fence. The fence enclosed the riparian area on both sides of each creek so that no grazing would occur within the riparian area on BLM managed land. Total fence length is approximately 1.25 miles. Materials consisted of metal fence posts, barbed wire, rockjacks, fence stays, and 2 x 4's. The fence was constructed in the fall of 2002. The riparian area is effectively excluded from livestock grazing at this time. The construction of the exclosures should enhance riparian vegetation, increase bank stability, and improve riparian and in-stream habitat by exclusion of livestock in the riparian areas. Monitoring will ensure that the exclosures continues to be effective. Annual monitoring will include photo-points and compliance checks during the grazing season by BLM personnel. The BLM will submit a monitoring report, which includes the results of the annual monitoring, to the GRMWP in years 2005 and 2007. The exclosures do cross the creeks so maintenance may be needed on occasion, especially after high flow events in the creeks. Material such as logs which are mobilized during high stream flows may damage the exclosures requiring maintenance to keep cattle from grazing in the riparian areas. The BLM spent approximately $4,000 on fencing materials and $1,375 on NEPA compliance. In addition, the estimated cost of the monitoring over five years is expected to be approximately $1,600. The $5,050 that the BLM received from the BPA for the project was used to hire two temporary employees to construct the exclosures.

Kuck, Todd

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

Conley, Will

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Spatially Distributed Sensible Heat Flux over a Semiarid Watershed. Part II: Use of a Variable Resistance Approach with Radiometric Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiometric surface temperature images from aircraft observations over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, a semiarid rangeland watershed, were used with ground-based meteorological data at a reference site for extrapolating estimates of ...

William P. Kustas; Karen S. Humes

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Vegetation Control in the Long-Term Self-Stabilization of the Liangzhou Oasis of the Upper Shiyang River Watershed of West-Central Gansu, Northwest China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the relationship between vegetation in the Liangzhou Oasis in the Upper Shiyang River watershed (USRW) of west-central Gansu, China, and within-watershed precipitation, soil water storage, and oasis self-support. Oases along ...

Charles P-A. Bourque; Quazi K. Hassan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of Microscopic Disease in Oral Tongue Cancer Using Whole-Mount Histopathologic Techniques: Implications for the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To map the distribution of microscopic disease (MD) in head-and-neck cancer by analyzing digital images of whole-mounted serial sections of tongue cancer specimens. Methods and Materials: Ten T1-3 oral tongue cancer specimens were evaluated. The specimens were sliced into 3-mm blocks from which one or more 4-{mu}m slides were taken and digitized to create whole-mounted serial sections. Gross tumor and microscopic disease were digitally contoured on each slide. Lines perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) edge were created at 0.05-mm intervals and the distance between GTV and MD measured. Results: Of 88 slides assessed, 44 (50%) had evidence of MD. Of the 63,809 perpendicular lines drawn along the GTV edges, 2320 (3.6%) encountered microscopic disease along their path. The majority of MD abutted the GTV, and only 26.7% was noncontiguous with the GTV edge. The maximum distance from the border was 7.8 mm. Ninety-nine percent of all MD was within 4.75 mm and 95% was within 3.95 mm of the GTV. Conclusion: In this study we were able to assess the distribution of MD more accurately than has been possible with routine pathologic techniques. The results indicate that when the GTV is correctly identified, there is very little MD to be found outside this volume. This has implications for the volume of tissue resected at surgery and the volume included in the clinical target volume in conformal radiotherapy planning.

Campbell, Sorcha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Poon, Ian, E-mail: Ian.Poon@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Markel, Dan; Vena, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Higgins, Kevin; Enepekides, Dan [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rapheal, Simon; Wong, John; Allo, Ghassan; Morgen, Eric [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Khaoum, Nader; Smith, Ben; Balogh, Judith; MacKenzie, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Davidson, Jean [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wang, Dan; Yaffe, Martin [Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Wind River Watershed Restoration Project; Underwood Conservation District, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Wind River project is to preserve, protect and restore Wind River steelhead. In March, 1998, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed the steelhead of the lower Columbia as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act. In 1997, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife rated the status of the Wind River summer run steelhead as critical. Due to the status of this stock, the Wind River summer steelhead have the highest priority for recovery and restoration in the state of Washington's Lower Columbia Steelhead Conservation Initiative. The Wind River Project includes four cooperating agencies. Those are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), United States Geological Service (USGS), US Forest Service (USFS), and Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Tasks include monitoring steelhead populations (USGS and WDFW), Coordinating a Watershed Committee and Technical Advisory Group (UCD), evaluating physical habitat conditions (USFS and UCD), assessing watershed health (all), reducing road sediments sources (USFS), rehabilitating riparian corridors, floodplains, and channel geometry (UCD, USFS), evaluate removal of Hemlock Dam (USFS), and promote local watershed stewardship (UCD, USFS). UCD's major efforts have included coordination of the Wind River Watershed Committee and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), water temperature and water chemistry monitoring, riparian habitat improvement projects, and educational activities. Our coordination work enables the local Watershed Committee and TAC to function and provide essential input to Agencies, and our habitat improvement work focuses on riparian revegetation. Water chemistry and temperature data collection provide information for monitoring watershed conditions and fish habitat, and are comparable with data gathered in previous years. Water chemistry information collected on Trout Creek should, with 2 years data, determine whether pH levels make conditions favorable for a fish parasite, Heteropolaria lwoffi. Educational activities further the likelihood that future generations will continue to understand and enjoy the presence of native fish stocks in the Wind River basin.

White, Jim

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Wind River Watershed Restoration Project, Segment II, 2000-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its second year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey - Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW).

Bair, Brian; Olegario, Anthony; Powers, Paul

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Microfluidic Analysis for Carbon Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on applying microfluidic techniques to analyze two carbon management methods; underground carbon sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. The small scale nature of (more)

Sell, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A Watershed Perspective on Bioenergy Sustainability: A Workshop to be held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Watershed Perspective on Bioenergy Sustainability: A Workshop to be held at Oak Ridge National-scale perspective of cellulosic bioenergy feedstock sustainability will be held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory bioenergy feedstock production (particularly hydrology and water quality). Overall goals for the workshop

186

An Analysis of Microbial Pollution in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This assessment of fecal coliform sources and pathways in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets is part of the Project ENVironmental InVESTment (ENVVEST) being conducted by the Navy's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, the Suquamish Tribe, Kitsap County, the City of Bremerton, the City of Port Orchard, and other local stakeholders. The goal of this study was to identify microbial pollution problems within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and to provide a comprehensive assessment of fecal coliform (FC) contamination from all identifiable sources in the watershed. This study quantifies levels of contamination and estimated loadings from known sources within the watersheds and describes pollutant transport mechanisms found in the study area. In addition, the effectiveness of pollution prevention and mitigation measures currently in place within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed are discussed. This comprehensive study relies on historical data collected by several cooperating agencies, in addition to data collected during the study period from spring 2001 through summer 2005. This report is intended to provide the technical information needed to continue current water quality cleanup efforts and to help implement future efforts.

May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email Texas Water Resources Institute glbryant@ag.tamu.edu Ruben Camacho EPA SRF Camacho.Ruben@epamail.epa.gov Jody Carton Trinity Basin Conservation Foundation jcarton@trinitybasin.org Pamela Casebolt Texas State

188

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Participants July 27, 2011 First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Participants July 27, 2011 Austin First Last Organization Email Robert Adams Alan Plummer Associates, Inc. radams@apaienv.com Jacqueline Aitkenhead-Peterson Texas@tsswcb.state.tx.us Blake Alldredge Texas AgriLife Extension balldredge@tamu.edu Beth Almaraz Nueces River Authority

189

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable January 25, 2012 # First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable January 25, 2012 # First Last Organization Email 1 Robert Adams Alan Plummer Assoc., Inc. radams@apaienv.com 2 Ashley Alexander Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board aalexander@tsswcb.texas.gov 3 Blake Alldredge Texas AgriLife Extension Service balldredge

190

Re: BPA FY 07-09 Project Proposal #200711200 Teanaway Watershed Protection and Restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re: BPA FY 07-09 Project Proposal #200711200 Teanaway Watershed Protection and Restoration Kittitas draft province recommendations). The conservation easements acquisition costs qualify for funding by BPA as a Capital investment, as indicated in the Project Narrative on page 8. Proposed Project Funding Allocation

191

Extraordinary Flood Response of a Small Urban Watershed to Short-Duration Convective Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 9.1 km2 Moores Run watershed in Baltimore, Maryland, experiences floods with unit discharge peaks exceeding 1 m3 s?1 km?2 12 times yr?1, on average. Few, if any, drainage basins in the continental United States have a higher frequency. A ...

James A. Smith; Andrew J. Miller; Mary Lynn Baeck; Peter A. Nelson; Gary T. Fisher; Katherine L. Meierdiercks

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Watershed Transformation Based Identification of the Combustion Region in an Oxy-coal Flame Image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the increasingly stringent standards on pollutant emissions, oxy-coal combustion technologies are being proposed for both existing and new coal-fired power plants. However, there is lack of research to characterize this new type of combustion ... Keywords: edge detection, image enhancement, wavelet transformation, oxy-coal flame, watershed transformation, image segmentation

Tian Qiu; Yong Yan; Gang Lu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Mercury contamination in fish-eating birds from a polluted watershed  

SciTech Connect

The mercury contents of selected fish-eating birds in the watershed affected by the Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota are reported. The mine had used the mercury amalgamation process to recover gold, and had discharged 12 to 40 pounds of mercury per day. Elevated mercury levels were found in the birds.

Hesse, L.W.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Implementing cutting plane management and selection techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closely related to cut generation is the problem of reducing the number of ... They concentrate on generating cuts which ...... Programming, pages 124, 2012. 5.

195

Implementing cutting plane management and selection techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 21, 2012 ... Citation: Technical Report, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, 33098 Paderborn, Germany, 12/2012. Download: [PDF].

196

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a coevolving naturalcultural system. Suitable ecosystem attributes can be achieved by managing human maintenance that protects the riparian corridor. · Manage recreational use to protect riparian values Creek and the Warm Springs River during runoff periods. · Road systems and upland management practices

198

Managing UX teams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This SIG will serve two purposes: as a forum to share the results from the two-day CHI workshop, and also as a forum for the management community to discuss topics of interest. Keywords: design, management, method, organizations, practice, research, technique, user experience

Janice Rohn; Dennis Wixon; Jim Nieters; Carola Thompson

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Lawn Water Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties, management practices and watering techniques.

McAfee, James

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

Statistical Comparisons of Watershed-Scale Response to Climate Change in Selected Basins across the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an earlier global climate-change study, air temperature and precipitation data for the entire twenty-first century simulated from five general circulation models were used as input to precalibrated watershed models for 14 selected basins across ...

John Risley; Hamid Moradkhani; Lauren Hay; Steve Markstrom

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hydroclimatic Response of Watersheds to Urban Intensity: An Observational and Modeling-Based Analysis for the White River Basin, Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impervious surface area (ISA) has different surface characteristics from the natural land cover and has great influence on watershed hydrology. To assess the urbanization effects on streamflow regimes, the authors analyzed the U.S. Geological ...

Guoxiang Yang; Laura C. Bowling; Keith A. Cherkauer; Bryan C. Pijanowski; Dev Niyogi

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Numerical Prediction of Precipitation and River Flow over the Russian River Watershed during the January 1995 California Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation and river flow during a January 1995 flood event over the Russian River watershed in the northern Coastal Range of California were simulated using the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Coupled ...

Norman L. Miller; Jinwon Kim

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program (DOE/EIS-0353) (05/01/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program RECORD OF DECISION Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department's (MFWP) South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program. This program is the Proposed Action in the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program EIS (DOE/EIS- 0353, July 2005). BPA will fund the program pursuant to its authority under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in the Columbia River Basin. The project constitutes a portion of the Hungry

204

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3MS Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-934 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M...

205

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-9213 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

206

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs ANL-949 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

207

Underground Distribution Cable Fleet Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes industry research and data collection related to distribution cable system management. Focus areas include international practices for cable system management, international research activities, and application of diagnostic testing techniques. This report is a follow-up to the 2010 effort to catalog leading practices for distribution cable fleet management.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Variation in foliar 15N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance ({sup o}{sup 15}N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N{sub 2}-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O{sub i}-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar {sup 15}N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Scenario Modelling: A Holistic Environmental and Energy Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Scenario Modelling: A Holistic Environmental and Energy Management Technique for Building Managers Speaker(s): James...

210

Remediation of the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Lab: An Accelerated Closure Success Story  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melton Valley (MV) Watershed at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) encompasses approximately 430 hectares (1062 acres). Historic operations at ORNL produced a diverse legacy of contaminated facilities and waste disposal areas in the valley. In addition, from 1955 to 1963, ORNL served as a major disposal site for wastes from over 50 off-site government-sponsored installations, research institutions, and other isotope users. Contaminated areas in the watershed included burial grounds, landfills, underground tanks, surface impoundments, liquid disposal pits/trenches, hydro-fracture wells, leak and spill sites, inactive surface structures, and contaminated soil and sediment. Remediation of the watershed in accordance with the requirements specified in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Actions in Melton Valley, which estimated that remedial actions specified in the ROD would occur over a period of 14 years, with completion by FY 2014. Under the terms of the Accelerated Closure Contract between DOE and its contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, the work was subdivided into 14 separate sub-projects which were completed between August 2001 and September 2006, 8 years ahead of the original schedule. (authors)

Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, R. [U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adams, V. [U.S. DOE, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Five Essays on Modern Asset Management Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a basic orientation and education about state-of-the-art asset management techniques in American industry and examples of how they can be used for managing electricity generation assets. The report describes EPRI R&D activities in support of generation asset management and discusses how current and planned research leverages these state-of-the-art techniques.

1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Achieving autonomous power management using reinforcement learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System level power management must consider the uncertainty and variability that come from the environment, the application and the hardware. A robust power management technique must be able to learn the optimal decision from past events and improve ... Keywords: Power management, computer, machine learning, thermal management

Hao Shen; Ying Tan; Jun Lu; Qing Wu; Qinru Qiu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 3: Case Studies on New Water Paradigm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies and evaluates the foundation and requirements for a sustainable water infrastructure at the community and watershed scales. The report will be of value not only to the public water supply, stormwater management, and wastewater treatment sectors, but also the electric power sector, given the strong interdependencies among the four sectors. In addition, the report will of value to government agencies involved in water regulations and policy.

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

Topographic variation of soil nitrogen dynamics at Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of soil nitrogen (N) transformations is central to quantifying the N dynamics and productivity of ecosystems. The objectives of this work were to examine spatial and temporal variation of soil N dynamics and to identify factors correlated with topographic variation in soil N dynamics in a forest watershed. Net N mineralization and net nitrification potential were measured by aerobic laboratory incubations of surface (0-7 cm) mineral soils. Principal components analysis was used to describe sampling sites across the watershed based on 13 site characterization variables. A topographic index used in hydrologic modeling, In ({alpha}/tan {beta}), was calculated for each site as the natural logarithm of the ratio of the upslope drainage area per unit contour length ({alpha}) to the local slope angle (tan {beta}). Soils from valley floors had greater total N concentrations, lower carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios, greater potential net nitrification, and greater microbial activity (as indicated by short-term urease assays) than soils from ridges. Mean net nitrification potential was 0.59 {micro}g N g{sup -1} d{sup -1} in surface soils from valley floors and was < 0.01 on ridges and slopes. The first principal component was related to the N and C properties of soils, leaf litter, and leaf fall at a site. The second principal component was related to forest stand composition. The topographic index was significantly correlated with important variables related to soil N dynamics. Once calibration data are derived, this index may be useful as a first approximation to total soil N concentrations and soil C:N ratios in forest watersheds because In ({alpha}/tan {beta}) can be calculated from geographic information systems that contain topographic data.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Huston, Michael A [ORNL; Thoms, C. A. [University of Wisconsin

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Performance Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Performance Management. ... If you are unable to access these PDF files, please contact the Office of Workforce Management.

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

218

Risk assessment technique for evaluating research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to evaluate research laboratories according to risk, where risk is defined as the product of frequency and consequence. This technique was used to evaluate several laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the direction of the Department of Energy, Idaho Field Office to assist in the risk management of the Science and Technology Department laboratories. With this technique, laboratories can be compared according to risk, and management can use the results to make cost effective decisions associated with the operation of the facility.

Bolander, T.W.; Meale, B.M.; Eide, S.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Risk assessment technique for evaluating research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to evaluate research laboratories according to risk, where risk is defined as the product of frequency and consequence. This technique was used to evaluate several laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the direction of the Department of Energy, Idaho Field Office to assist in the risk management of the Science and Technology Department laboratories. With this technique, laboratories can be compared according to risk, and management can use the results to make cost effective decisions associated with the operation of the facility.

Bolander, T.W.; Meale, B.M.; Eide, S.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

15.761 Operations Management, Summer 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course will introduce concepts and techniques for design, planning and control of manufacturing and service operations.The course provides basic definitions of operations management terms, tools and techniques ...

Rosenfield, Donald

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stream restoration case studies in North Carolina utilizing natural channel design techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Watershed land uses are inventoried to determine pollutionwatershed land uses to determine sources of pollution and

Harman, William A.; Jennings, Gregory D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

iManage: policy-driven self-management for enterprise-scale systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is obvious that big, complex enterprise systems are hard to manage. What is not obvious is how to make them more manageable. Although there is a growing body of research into system self-management, many techniques are either too narrow, focusing ... Keywords: Bayesian networks, enterprise-systems, policies, self-management

Vibhore Kumar; Brian F. Cooper; Greg Eisenhauer; Karsten Schwan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Managing time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Professionals overwhelmed with information glut can find hope from new insights about time management.

Peter J. Denning

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Oklahoma, industry consumes about 35% of the total energy consumed. While it is true that much work has been done in the larger companies, most small to medium sized companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. Often they simply do not understand the savings possible or the techniques available. Recognizing this, a program was developed to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings allowable through energy management techniques. The program is entitled 'Oklahoma Industrial Energy; Management Program' and is located at Oklahoma State University. This paper describes past, on-going, and proposed activities of this Program and assesses their impact. Included are industrial energy management conferences, closed circuit television short courses on selected energy management topics, energy auditing, industrial energy audits (through the Oklahoma Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center) , energy and water management research, and two courses currently being offered.

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2003-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Lapwai Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District). Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period December 1, 2003 through February 28, 2004 include; seven grade stabilization structures, 0.67 acres of wetland plantings, ten acres tree planting, 500 linear feet streambank erosion control, two acres grass seeding, and 120 acres weed control.

Rasmussen, Lynn

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

PETSc: Docs: Code Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code Management Code Management Home Download Features Documentation Manual pages and Users Manual Citing PETSc Tutorials Installation SAWs Changes Bug Reporting Code Management FAQ License Linear Solver Table Applications/Publications Miscellaneous External Software Developers Site In this file we list some of the techniques that may be used to increase one's efficiency when developing PETSc application codes. We have learned to use these techniques ourselves, and they have improved our efficiency tremendously. Editing and Compiling The biggest time sink in code development is generally the cycle of EDIT-COMPILE-LINK-RUN. We often see users working in a single window with a cycle such as: Edit a file with emacs. Exit emacs. Run make and see some error messages. Start emacs and try to fix the errors; often starting emacs hides

228

Management Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

229

On reducing energy management delays in disks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise computing systems consume a large amount of energy, the cost of which contributes significantly to the operating budget. Consequently, dynamic energy management techniques are prevalent. Unfortunately, dynamic energy management for disks impose ... Keywords: Disk energy management, Peer memory sharing, Spin-up delay reduction

Krish K.R., Guanying Wang, Puranjoy Bhattacharjee, Ali R. Butt, Chris Gniady

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

M-FISH Karyotyping - A New Approach Based on Watershed Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Karyotyping is a process in which chromosomes in a dividing cell are properly stained, identified and displayed in a standard format, which helps geneticist to study and diagnose genetic factors behind various genetic diseases and for studying cancer. M-FISH (Multiplex Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization) provides color karyotyping. In this paper, an automated method for M-FISH chromosome segmentation based on watershed transform followed by naive Bayes classification of each region using the features, mean and standard deviation, is presented. Also, a post processing step is added to re-classify the small chromosome segments to the neighboring larger segment for reducing the chances of misclassification. The approach provided improved accuracy when compared to the pixel-by-pixel approach. The approach was tested on 40 images from the dataset and achieved an accuracy of 84.21 %.

Sreejini, K S; Govindan, V K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Energy Management Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation Notices & Rules Guidance Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting Energy Management Guidance The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance on Federal

232

Linking farmer, forest and watershed: Understanding forestry and soil resource management along the upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenya is generally considered to be poor, and that in the UCRN, because of the cold and overcast weather,

Krupnik, Timothy J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Linking Farmer, Forest and Watershed: Agricultural Systems and Natural Resources Management Along the Upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crop Maize, UCRN Maize, Kenya Drybeans, UCRN Drybeans, SubSaharan Africa Pyrethrum, UCRN Pyrethrum, Kenya Potato,UCRN Potato, Kenya 9 M ' #H H # H H 6:? B # H H # H H

Krupnik, Timothy J.; Jenkins, Marion W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Linking farmer, forest and watershed: Understanding forestry and soil resource management along the upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Soil Analysis. Nairobi, Kenya. , Ministry of Agriculture,P. 702. Ogot, B. A. 1978. Kenya Before 1990. Nairobi: EastLake NakuruNational Park, Kenya. The Professional Geographer

Krupnik, Timothy J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Linking Farmer, Forest and Watershed: Agricultural Systems and Natural Resources Management Along the Upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Number Texture density pH (PPM) (meg/100g) (%) Sandy SiltLoam Sandy SiltLoam Sandy Silt Loam Sandy Silt Loam Sandy Silt Loam Clay

Krupnik, Timothy J.; Jenkins, Marion W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques, Energy Conversion and Management, 39 (11),Applications, Energy Conversion and Management, 45 , pp.2011, Low-grade Heat Conversion into Power Using Organic

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessing Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimates in Semiarid Watersheds Using the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Gauge Network and TRMM PR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rain gauge network associated with the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona provides a unique opportunity for direct comparisons of in situ measurements and satellite-based instantaneous rain rate estimates like ...

Eyal Amitai; Carl L. Unkrich; David C. Goodrich; Emad Habib; Bryson Thill

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spatially Distributed Sensible Heat Flux over a Semiarid Watershed. Part I: Use of Radiometric Surface Temperatures and a Spatially Uniform Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially distributed radiometric surface temperatures over a semiarid watershed were computed using remotely sensed data acquired with an aircraft-based multispectral scanner during the Monsoon 90 Large Scale Field Experiment. The multispectral ...

K. S. Humes; W. P. Kustas; D. C. Goodrich

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computerized Computerized Maintenance Management Systems to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

240

Erosion and Sediment Damages and Economic Impacts of Potential 208 Controls: A Summary of Five Watershed Studies in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of economic analyses of erosion and sedimentation in five agricultural watersheds in Texas (see fig. 1). Economic analyses of the study areas considered both the on-farm economics of soil conservation and the economic consequences of various sedimentation control options. These topics were joined in the studies because they deal with different facets of the same problem. Unlike some potential pollutants, soil particles transported from a farmer's field that may become a problem downstream are a valuable resource, not a waste product. Because soil is valuable in itself, some level of soil conservation is going to be economically desirable even if downstream damages are not present or are not considered by the farmer. Results of the studies show that soil conservation does indeed pay in many situations and that its value is greater the longer the planning horizon of a farmer. This suggests that an educational program in this regard may reduce sediment damage while increasing farm income at the same time . Sediment can cause environmental damage (off-site costs) both directly and indirectly. Directly, the soil particles can cause environmental damage by filling up reservoirs and flood control structures and by deposition in other places. Indirectly, sediment can cause environmental costs by carrying plant nutrients that are potential pollutants. For the study watersheds, no evidence was found that the concentration of plant nutrients in the water posed health hazards to livestock or humans, nor caused undue eutrophication in the watersheds. Consequently, the study focused on off-site sediment damages resulting from shortened economic lives of reservoir and flood control structures and from sediment deposition in the watershed. Annualized off-site sediment damages ranged from a high of 26 cents per ton of gross erosion in Lake Lavon watershed to 14 cents per ton of gross erosion in Duck Creek, to 13.5 cents per ton of gross erosion in Lower Running Water Draw, to a negligible amount in Turkey Creek and Cameron County. These estimates are considerably lower than off-site sediment damages in corn belt watersheds (Lee & Guntermann). Policy Options for Controlling Sediment Public policies that can be implemented to abate off-site sediment damages include direct regulation, provision of economic incentives, education, and public investment. For point sources of pollutants, regulations are typically directed toward the pollutant at or near the point of emission into waterways. However, this is infeasible with non-point sources such as sediment because they enter waterways at an infinite number of points. Hence, regulations must be directed toward the practices that cause erosion and thus sedimentation. The economic incentive option includes alternatives such as Federal or State cost-sharing for adoption of conservation practices, and disincentives such as taxes or penalties on erosion. Education is a viable policy option in situations where producers are not adopting soil conservation practices that would be profitable. In these situations a successful education program would increase producer's income as well as reducing off-site sediment damages. Public investment could be used to pay for dredging sediment from reservoirs and flood control structures to prevent loss of flood control, water supply and recreational benefits. Social benefits and costs of various policy options based on direct regulation, taxation, and provision of economic incentives were estimated for three watersheds: Lake Lavon, Duck Creek, and Lower Running Water Draw. Items considered in the benefit-cost analysis were: (a) farm income consequences; (b) off-site sediment damages abated; (c) governmental cost or revenue; and (d) administration and enforcement costs associated with each policy. The major conclusion of this social benefit and cost analysis is that off-site damages are not large enough to warrant controls on agricultural activities in any of the watersheds; that i

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) in Rabbit Creek-Cat Creek Watershed, Summer 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is a method for evaluating the health of water bodies and watersheds by analyzing sample catches of fishes. Sites are scored on a numerical scale of 12--60 and on that basis assigned to a ``bioclass`` ranging from ``very poor`` to ``excellent.`` Overall, the major causes of depressed IBI scores in the Rabbit Creek watershed would appear to be: Organic pollution, mostly from livestock, but also from agricultural runoff and possible septic tank failures; sedimentation, principally from stream bank damage by cattle, also possibly from agriculture and construction; toxic pollution from agrochemicals applied to Holly Springs Golf course and agricultural fields` and Warming of water and evaporation loss due to elimination of shade on stream banks and construction of ponds.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Data Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation and Quality Assurance for Data Sharing and Archival Now that you have planned your project and data management, collected data, integrated imagery, or generated model...

243

SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-1 -1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish, document, and maintain adequate purchasing systems. 2. To ensure contractors flow down contract requirements to subcontractors. WHY IS SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT IMPORTANT? In many Department prime contracts a significant portion of the obligated dollars is spent on subcontract work. Due to the absence of a direct contractual relationship with the subcontractor, the Department must rely on the prime contractor to manage subcontract work. Subcontractors perform significant work efforts at sites and are an integral part of the site's success. Prime

244

Reservation Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservation Management The ORR is home to three major facility complexes: the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Y-12...

245

Management Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to global waste vitrification and related programs Serve as a technical platform for DOE reviews Environmental Management Leadership Team Responsible for identifying or...

246

Management Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Plan (SSMP) to be submitted to Congress after the April 2010 release of the Nuclear Posture Review Report. It is aligned with the President's National Security Strategy...

247

Variation in foliar [sup 15]N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

SciTech Connect

Spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance ([sigma][sup 15]N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N[sub 2]-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O[sub 1]-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar [sup 15]N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil. 34 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

Garten, C.T. Jr. (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hybrid Dynamic Energy and Thermal Management in Heterogeneous Embedded Multiprocessor SoCs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid Dynamic Energy and Thermal Management in Heterogeneous Embedded Multiprocessor SoCs Shervin propose a joint thermal and energy management technique specifically designed for heterogeneous MPSo technique simultaneously reduces the thermal hot spots, temperature gradients, and energy consumption

Simunic, Tajana

249

DEACTIVATION MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT The purpose here is to provide information for specific aspects of project management that apply to deactivation. Overall management of deactivation projects should use a traditional project management approach, and as such is not addressed. The following specific topics are based on lessons learned during deactivation of DOE facilities.  The Deactivation Mission  The Stabilization/Deactivation "Customer"  Project Approach for a Complex Facility  Establishing the Overall End-State  Viewing Deactivation in Two Phases  Early Decisions  Early Deactivation Tasks  Facility-Specific Commitments  Hazard Reduction  Detailed End-Points  Set Up Method and Criteria  Post-Deactivation S&M Plan

250

Safety & Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination Management andor Coordination of APS Site WorkServices Safety & Emergency Management Database Maintenance Personnel Safety & Emergency Management Area...

251

Electron Based Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Characterization of Materials through High Resolution Coherent Imaging: Electron Based Techniques Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials...

252

Milling Techniques - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

February 4-8 1996 TMS ANNUAL MEETING Anaheim, California. SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING OF NANOCRYSTALLINE POWDER III: Milling Techniques...

253

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume II of III Reports F and G, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report here their on-ground restoration actions. Part 1 describes work conducted by the Underwood Conservation District (UCD) on private lands. This work involves the Stabler Cut-Bank project. Part 2 describes work conducted by the U.S. Forest Service. The Stabler Cut-Bank Project is a cooperative stream restoration effort between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the UCD, private landowners, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The Stabler site was identified by UCD during stream surveys conducted in 1996 as part of a USFWS funded project aimed at initiating water quality and habitat restoration efforts on private lands in the basin. In 1997 the Wind River Watershed Council selected the project as a top priority demonstration project. The landowners were approached by the UCD and a partnership developed. Due to their expertise in channel rehabilitation, the Forest Service was consulted for the design and assisted with the implementation of the project. A portion of the initial phase of the project was funded by USFWS. However, the majority of funding (approximately 80%) has been provided by BPA and it is anticipated that additional work that is planned for the site will be conducted with BPA funds.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Skip to main content Energy.gov Office of Environmental Management Search form Search Office of Environmental Management Services Waste Management Site & Facility Restoration...

255

Organization Update Assistant Manager for Environmental Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EM-90 Office of the Manager Mark Whitney, Manager Sue Cange, Deputy Manager Brenda Hawks, Senior Technical Advisor Karen Ott, Chief of Staff Karen Forester, Administrative...

256

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Energy Management Program Contacts to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Management Program Contacts on Facebook Tweet about Federal...

257

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Requirements by Subject to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Subject on Facebook Tweet about Federal...

258

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water-Efficient Irrigation on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best...

259

Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) are a type of management software that perform functions in support of operations and...

260

Personal Property Management Certification Brochure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PPM TRAINING PPM TRAINING Training is available through DOE and ACMP- authorized providers. Subject to demand and funding availability, the ACMP sponsors acquisition training at various DOE locations. Schedules are published quarterly. Check with your Site Acquisition Career Manager (SACM) for training information. CONTINUOUS LEARNING To remain current in financial assistance /contracting knowledge, skills, techniques, and abilities, all those PPM certified must obtain 80 hours of CL/CE every two years. Failure to do so has serious consequences as stated in Chapter 3 of the ACMP Handbook. ACQUISITION CAREER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MA-611, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIVISION OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT E-MAIL: ACMP@HQ.DOE.GOV PERSONAL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Commitment to project management excellence  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the commitment of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to excellence in developing and implementing new project management and project control guidelines and in developing a training course. For the new Project Control Systems (PCS) Guidelines, DOE has consistently applied the precepts of Total Quality Management in the way problems were identified and resolved, in the use of techniques to develop the new guidance, and in the use of methods to create the new manager training. With the guidelines, DOE has responded to administration policy in developing a cost-effective, streamlined, and quantitative performance measurement. 3 refs.

Bates, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Management Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immobilization Research Immobilization Research Kurt Gerdes U.S. DOE, Office of Engineering and Technology John Vienna Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management May 19, 2009 2009 Hanford - Idaho - Savannah River Technical Exchange 2 Objectives Perform research and development to advance the waste stabilization technology options by through closely- coupled theory, experimentation, and modeling Develop solutions for Hanford, Idaho, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge wastes challenges (along with facilitating management of future wastes) Environmental Management General Approach Balance between near-term incremental technology improvements and long-term transformational solutions Address the requirements for high risk waste streams - high-level tank waste (RPP, SRS)

263

Changes in Flood Management along the Pajaro River: A Transition to Watershed Management Approaches and Lessons from the Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000). WaterFrameworkDirective. E. Parliment,Official2007). FloodRiskDirective. E. Parliment,Officialthe Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive Stacie

Jagger, Stacie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Work Manager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-time control system has been developed and deployed nationally to support BTs work management programme. This paper traces the history, system architecture, development, deployment and service aspects of this very large programme. Many ...

G. J. Garwood

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Management Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEMO: Request for proposal for Computer-Aided Facilities and Maintenance Management application software; professional services; development services for interfaces to Financial Management and Human Resources systems; configuration, test, train, maintenance and support services to implement and maintain a CAFM Solution for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, the Trial Courts, the Appellate Courts and the Judicial Council, known as The AOC Group. You are invited to review and respond to the attached Request for Proposal (RFP):

Rfp Number Isdcafm

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Airflow Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides an overview of airflow management, with an emphasis on how reduced airflow can improve energy efficiency in data centers. Airflow management within a data center can have a dramatic impact on energy efficiency. Typically, much more cold air circulates within conventional data centers than is actually needed to cool equipment related to information and communication technology (ICT). It is not uncommon for facilities to supply more than two to three times the minimum require...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

Proceedings: Demand-Side Management Incentive Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings provide background information on proposed regulatory incentive mechanisms to encourage utilities to develop demand-side management programs. Attendees discussed and analyzed various proposals and techniques and developed lists of key attributes that incentive mechanisms should have.

None

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

269

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Assessment of Printed Circuit Board Diagnostic Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project evaluated the techniques, theoretical methods, and recommendations made in previous EPRI reports on printed circuit boards (PCBs). The goal was to find techniques to help manage PCB life.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Environmental Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Community, Environment Environmental Stewardship Environmental Protection Environmental Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental...

271

Quality System Documentation Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quality System Documentation Management. ... Minutes, summaries, or notes from Management Meetings of significance are archived here. ...

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

NIST Performance Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Performance Management Program. Performance ... appraisal. APMS and FWS Performance Management Programs: ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

Presidential Management Fellows Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presidential Management Fellows Program. Summary: About the Program: The Presidential Management Fellows (PMF ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Crypto Key Management Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A Framework for Designing Cryptographic Key Management Systems ... A Framework for Designing Cryptographic Key Management Systems ...

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

275

Multicolor Underwater Imaging Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studies were conducted on multispectral polarimetric subtraction imaging techniques for underwater imaging that use a broadband light source. The main objective of this study was (more)

Waggoner, Douglas Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Techniques for Drivers Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Management Strategies Driver Techniques Fleet Rightsizing

277

A Characterization of Distribution Techniques for Dynamic Adaptive Grid Hierarchies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Characterization of Distribution Techniques for Dynamic Adaptive Grid Hierarchies Samip Bhavsar for distributed adaptive grid hierarchies that underlie parallel adaptive mesh-refinement (AMR) techniques is the development of a policy driven tool for automated configuration and run-time management of distributed

Parashar, Manish

278

Dynamic spectrum management using GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of equipments of the wireless network and the mobile devices are widely used and the demand of dynamic spectrum resources is significantly growing. How to maximize the social utility in modern technique becomes an important issue. In this paper, ... Keywords: Shannon utility, background interference, crosstalk, dynamic spectrum management, genetic algorithm

Ping-Liang Chen; Chia-Liang Peng; Shin-Jia Chen; Yu-Cheng Lin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

need to effectively manage business performance. This has never been more true than in todays complex, highly regulated and confusing business environment which requires better decisions and improved execution now! In spite of the billions of dollars invested in infor-mation technology to address these challenges, managers and executives in many organizations still make key decisions underpinned by their own personal versions of documents and spread-sheets. Their organization struggles to provide a seamless flow of trusted information between customers, suppliers and their employees. The result is that most organizations cannot provide their people with the right information at the right time, and in attempting to do so are committing significant resources to compiling and auditing numbers instead of using them to inform the business. Consequently, they are far more reac-tive than proactive and ultimately they are not efficiently and effectively managing their current and future performance. Leading organizations are investing in managing information and developing predictive insights to drive sustainable business results. These com-panies have become masters in Performance Management- going beyond mere users of business intelligence to become the Intelligent Enterprises. ...a new breed of company is upping the stakes....have dominated their fields by deploy-ing industrial-strength analytics across a wide variety of activities. In essence, they are trans-forming their organiza-tions into armies of killer apps and crunching their way to victory.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Color Management for Color Facsimile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a color management system for the color facsimile. It consists of protocols for the colorimetric calibration of the scanner and the printer by establishing the relationships between the device-dependent color coordinates and the device-independent CIELAB color space. The scanner calibration is based on 3rd order polynomial regression techniques. The printer calibration uses 3D triangulation techniques, which gives us high flexibility and which allows us to apply different color gamut mapping techniques in an efficient way. The online color transformations are calculated by a tetrahedral interpolator using 3D look-up tables provided by the calibration algorithms.

Jon Yngve Hardeberg; Francis Schmitt; Ingeborg Tastl; Hans Brettel; Jean-pierre Crettez

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Evaluating the SWAT Model for Hydrological Modeling in the Xixian Watershed and A Comparison with the XAJ Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Already declining water availability in Huaihe River, the 6th largest river in China, is further stressed by climate change and intense human activities. There is a pressing need for a watershed model to better understand the interaction between land use activities and hydrologic processes and to support sustainable water use planning. In this study, we evaluated the performance of SWAT for hydrologic modeling in the Xixian River Basin, located at the headwaters of the Huaihe River, and compared its performance with the Xinanjiang (XAJ) model that has been widely used in China

Shi, Peng; Chen, Chao; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Zhang, Xuesong; Cai, Tao; Fang, Xiuqin; Qu, Simin; Chen, Xi; Li, Qiongfang

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

Occurrence, Prevalence, and Disinfection Potential of Tetracycline Resistance Genes and Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in a Subtropical Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Antibiotics are an important method for protecting human health. Unfortunately, the development of antibiotic resistance has decreased the effectiveness of antibiotics in treating disease and preventing deaths associated with bacterial infection. The objective of this dissertation research was to gain a better understanding of anthropogenic influences on occurrence of tetracycline resistance and use of traditional disinfection methods for the reduction of tetracycline resistant bacteria and genes. Culture based and molecular methods were used to evaluate the occurrence of tetracycline resistance in a rapidly urbanizing watershed, identify the dominant resistant organisms and resistance genes in the watershed, and evaluate the use of UV and chlorine to reduce the concentration of resistant bacteria and resistance genes. Results from this research showed that tetracycline resistance was prevalent and is maintained in this study area. Several bacterial species (Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, Chryseobacterium, E. coli, Pseudomonas, and Serratia) made up the resistant population. The results also indicated that tet(W) was the major resistance gene in this watershed and that a majority of the resistant bacteria were capable of transferring their resistance. Landuse did not cause a difference in occurrence of resistant bacteria or resistance genes which suggests that a rapidly urbanizing watershed could experience resistance. It was also identified that environmental media (sediment and water) influence the occurrence and prevalence of resistant bacteria and resistance genes. The results indicate that streambed sediment may act as a reservoir for resistance and resistance might be transported in the water. Finally, the results showed that neither UV nor chlorine disinfection were effective in reducing tet(W) concentrations though the results varied greatly among species. Results from this research indicate that preventing the occurrence and distribution of resistance gene in the environment is difficult, and resistance will most likely be maintained. Therefore, in order to prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance, it will be important to prevent antibiotic resistance from becoming established in the environment. This can be done by educating the public about the importance of misusing and mismanaging antibiotics. Additionally, classifying antibiotics for either human or veterinary use may help slow the development of resistance. This should prevent clinically important antibiotics from being used in sub-therapeutic doses, which could decrease the selective pressure in the environment. Also clinically relevant bacteria can be prevented from interacting with resistant bacteria in the environment by disinfecting human waste.

Sullivan, Bailey Ann

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each and every citizen has been affected by the energy crisis by now. Business and industry have especially been hurt as the rising cost of energy and its dwindling supplies are the twin jaws of a vise rapidly closing in on profits. Much work is being done in large companies; but most small to medium companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. The reasons are many but often they simply I do not understand the savings possible or the techniques available. Recognizing this, the Oklahoma Department of Energy designed a program to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings available through energy management and some basic techniques. The program is, entitled "Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program" and is housed at Oklahoma State University. The program is funded by the U. S. Department of Energy through the State Energy Conservation Plan. This paper describes the program offerings, impact to date and plans for the future.

Estes, C. B.; Turner, W. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Data Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Data Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Data Techniques: The collection, processing, and interpretation of data from various methods so accurate interpretations can be made about the subject matter. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Data techniques are any technique where data is collected and organized in a manner so that the information is useful for geothermal purposes. The

286

Contamination Control Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

EBY, J.L.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

287

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Print Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

288

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

289

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

290

Management of supply chain: an alternative modelling technique for forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasting is a necessity almost in any operation. However, the tools of forecasting are still primitive in view

Datta, Shoumen

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

291

Alliance revenue management in practice : techniques and simulation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary motivations for the formation of airline alliances have been to increase revenues and decrease costs for alliance partners. A major advantage comes through increase in the number of destinations served by an ...

Jain, Himanshu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Operational Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Operational Management Aviation Management Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Facilities and Infrastructure Federal Advisory Committee Management Freedom of...

293

Aviation Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aviation Management Aviation Management Aviation Management Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Facilities and Infrastructure Federal Advisory Committee Management Freedom...

294

Using Structured Interviewing Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GAO assists congressional decisionmakers in their deliberative process by furnishing analytical information on issues and options under consideration. Many diverse methodologies are needed to develop sound and timely answers to the questions that are posed by the Congress. To provide GAO evaluators with basic information about the more commonly used methodologies, GAOs policy guidance includes documents such as methodology transfer papers and technical guidelines, This methodology transfer paper on using structured interviewing techniques discusses how GAO evaluators should incorporate structured interview techniques when appropriate to performing our work. It explains when these techniques should be

Gao/pemd-. Preface; Werner Grosshans

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions  

SciTech Connect

Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Surface mining and reclamation effects on flood response of watersheds in the central Appalachian Plateau region - article no. W04407  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km{sup 2} watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

Ferrari, J.R.; Lookingbill, T.R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P.A.; Eshleman, K.N. [University of Maryland, Frostburg, MD (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Performance-aware thermal management via task scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High on-chip temperature impairs the processor's reliability and reduces its lifetime. Hardware-level dynamic thermal management (DTM) techniques can effectively constrain the chip temperature, but degrades the performance. We propose an OS-level technique ... Keywords: Thermal management, task scheduling

Xiuyi Zhou; Jun Yang; Marek Chrobak; Youtao Zhang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Environmental Management. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE...

299

Toward Understanding the Value of Climate Information for Multiobjective Reservoir Management under Present and Future Climate and Demand Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation techniques and idealized reservoir management models are used to assess the utility of climate information for the effective management of a single multiobjective reservoir. Reservoir management considers meeting release and ...

Nicholas E. Graham; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ORISE: Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Emergency Management Effective emergency management relies on thorough integration of preparedness plans at all levels of government. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Techniques Magnetotelluric Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Techniques:

302

Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Determination of lithology, grain size Stratigraphic/Structural: Thickness and geometry of rock strata, fracture identification Hydrological: Porosity, permeability, water saturation Thermal: Formation temperature with depth Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques: Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids

303

Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Techniques Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: may be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: may be inferred Hydrological: may be inferred Thermal: may be inferred Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques: Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Geophysical techniques measure physical phenomena of the earth such as gravity, magnetism, elastic waves, electrical and electromagnetic waves.

304

A framework for warranty management in industrial assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to suggest a management framework for a better organization of warranty assistance, using engineering techniques already developed for similar processes and according to a process-based quality management system. Therefore, ... Keywords: After sales, Industrial assets, Reference framework, Warranty management

V. GonzLez-Prida; A. Crespo MRquez

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Knowledge Management, Business Intelligence, and Content Management: The IT Practitioner's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within an IT framework, this book discusses creation, protection, development, sharing, and management of information and intellectual assets through the use of business intelligence and other knowledge sharing and analytical techniques.

Jessica Keyes

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Tower Management to someone by E-mail Cooling Tower Management to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

307

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Management Planning to someone by E-mail Water Management Planning to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

308

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

309

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ensemble Evaluation of Hydrologically Enhanced Noah-LSM: Partitioning of the Water Balance in High-Resolution Simulations over the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of two versions of the Noah land surface model (LSM) to simulate the water cycle of the Little Washita River experimental watershed is evaluated. One version that uses the standard hydrological parameterizations of Noah 2.7 (STD) is ...

Enrique Rosero; Lindsey E. Gulden; Zong-Liang Yang; Luis G. De Goncalves; Guo-Yue Niu; Yasir H. Kaheil

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C  

SciTech Connect

This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessment of erosion hotspots in a watershed: Integrating the WEPP model and GIS in a case study in the Peruvian Andes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study in assessment of erosion hotspots in an Andean watershed. To do this, we made use of an interface called Geospatial Modelling of Soil Erosion (GEMSE): a tool that integrates Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with ... Keywords: Andes, GIS, Geospatial modeling, Runoff, Soil loss, WEPP

Guillermo A. Baigorria; Consuelo C. Romero

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Summary - Environmental Management Waste Management Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-11 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Environmental Management...

316

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Faucets and Showerheads to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Faucets and Showerheads on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

317

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Water Intensive Processes to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Other Water Intensive Processes on Facebook Tweet about...

318

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Efficient Landscaping to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water-Efficient Landscaping on Facebook Tweet about Federal...

319

Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Techniques Modeling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Modeling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Modeling Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock types, rock chemistry, stratigraphic layer organization Stratigraphic/Structural: Stress fields and magnitudes, location and shape of permeable and non-permeable structures, faults, fracture patterns Hydrological: Visualization and prediction of the flow patterns and characteristics of geothermal fluids, hydrothermal fluid flow characteristics, up-flow patterns

320

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DUF6 Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Depleted UF6 Management An introduction to DOE's Depleted UF6 Management Program. The mission of the DOE's Depleted UF6 Management Program is to safely and efficiently...

322

Your Records Management Responsibilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Records Management Your Records Management Responsibilities Table of Contents INTRODUCTION RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IMPORTANCE OF RECORDS MANAGEMENT YOUR RECORDS MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES RECORDS MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE ELECTRONIC RECORDS & RECORDKEEPING LAW, REGULATION, AND POLICY ASSISTANCE RECORDS MANAGEMENT TERMS 2 INTRODUCTION If you are a government employee or contractor working for a federal agency, records management is part of your job. This pamphlet explains your responsibilities for federal records and provides the context for understanding records management in the federal government and in the Department of Energy. TOP RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

323

Integrated Safety Management Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTEGRATED SAFETY INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DESCRIPTION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Environmental Management Headquarters May 2008 Preparation: Braj K. sin& Occupational Safety and Health Manager Office of Safety Management Concurrence: Chuan-Fu wu Director, Offlce of Safety Management Deputy Assistant Secretary for safe& Management andoperations Operations Officer for 1 Environmental Management Approval: Date p/-g Date Environmental Management TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS................................................................................................................................................................v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .........................................................................................................................................1

324

Managing time, part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Masterful time management means not just tracking of messages in your personal environment, but managing your coordination network with others.

Peter J. Denning; Ritu Raj

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Environmental Management Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Systems Technical Assistance Tools Technical Assistance Tool: Integrating Sustainable Practices into Environmental Management Systems , November 2009...

326

Managing PCBs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compliance with Environmental Protection Agency regulations for managing the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that were widely distributed in electrical equipment will be costly to the utility industry, estimated at over $5 billion over a ten-year period by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Most of the budget could be needed to identify and reclaim 2.5 million contaminated transformers. Three divisions are coordinating EPRI research efforts with those of other companies and utilities in the areas of detection, destruction, spill cleanup, disposal, and health effects. (DCK)

Lihach, N.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Quantitative Precipitation Forecast Techniques for Use in Hydrologic Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative hydrologic forecasting usually requires knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. First, it is important to accurately measure the precipitation falling over a particular watershed of interest. Second, ...

Konstantine P. Georgakakos; Michael D. Hudlow

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

M E Environmental Management Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

safety  performance  cleanup  closure safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration, EM-10 Office of D&D and Facility Engineering, EM-13 Facility Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) D&D Program Map Addendum: Impact of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on EM's D&D Program 2013 Edition U.S. Department Of Energy safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 3/13/2013 The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

329

Resin infiltration transfer technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Technique Subgroupings Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and NSLS-II beamlines according to DOE Technique Scheme and NSLS-II beamlines according to DOE Technique Scheme Technique Subgroupings Spectroscopy 01 - Low Energy Spectroscopy Infrared Photoemission U12IR, U4IR / MET* U5UA, U13 / ESM 02 - Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Tender XAS U4B, U7A, X24A / SST, SSS* X15B, X19A / TES* 03 - Hard X-ray Spectroscopy EXAFS X3A, X3B, X11A, X11B, X18A, X18B, X23A2 / ISS, BMM, QAS*, XAS* 04 - Optics/Calibration/Metrology U3C,X8A/ OFT,MID Scattering 05 X-ray Diffraction X-Ray Powder Diffraction Extreme Conditions Energy Dispersive Micro-Beam Diffraction X7B,X10B,X14A,X16C,X17A / XPD,IXD* X17B2,X17B3,X17C / XPD, TEC*, 4DE* X17B1, X17B2 / NA X13B / MXD* 06 MX, footprinting Protein Crystallography X-ray footprinting X4A, X4C, X6A, X12B, X12C, X25, X29 / FMX, AMX, NYX;

331

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

332

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress-relaxation techniques using electric

333

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress relaxation techniques using electric

334

Category:Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques page? For detailed information on Gravity Techniques, click here. Category:Gravity Techniques Add.png Add a new Gravity Techniques Technique Pages in category "Gravity...

335

Importance-driven compositing window management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present importance-driven compositing window management, which considers windows not only as basic rectangular shapes but also integrates the importance of the windows content using a bottom-up visual attention model. Based on this information, importance-driven compositing optimizes the spatial window layout for maximum visibility and interactivity of occluded content in combination with see-through windows. We employ this technique for emerging window manager functions to minimize information overlap caused by popping up windows or floating toolbars and to improve the access to occluded window content. An initial user study indicates that our technique provides a more effective and satisfactory access to occluded information than the well-adopted Alt+Tab window switching technique and see-through windows without optimized spatial layout. Author Keywords compositing window management, visual saliency, space

Manuela Waldner; Markus Steinberger; Raphael Grasset; Dieter Schmalstieg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Overview - Data Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help > Data Management Help > Data Management Data Management for Data Providers Click an arrow to follow the data management path of a data set from planning to curation. plan Overview plan Plan manage Manage archive Archive curation DAAC Curation Data Management Overview Plan Manage Archive DAAC Curation Related Links DAAC Help Best Practices PDF Workshops DataONE ESIP Data Management Overview Welcome to the data management pages for data providers to the ORNL Distributed Active Archive (DAAC). These pages provide an overview of data management planning and preparation and offer practical methods to successfully share and archive your data. Plan - write a short data management plan while preparing your research proposal, Manage - assign logical, descriptive file names, define the contents of your data files, and use consistent data values when preparing

337

Bayesian Belief Network (BBN)-based advisory system development for steam generator replacement project management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growing need for improved project management technique points to the usefulness of a knowledge-base advisory system to help project managers understand current and future project status and optimize decisions based ...

Kim, Dohyoung, 1970-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Office of Legacy Management FY 2009 Energy Management Data Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Office of Legacy Management FY 2009 Energy Management Data Report Office of Legacy Management FY 2009 Energy Management Data...

339

ICT Supply Chain Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management Manager's Forum ... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management National Institute of Standards and Technology Page 6. ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

340

Surface mine pollution abatement and land use impact investigation. Volume III. Considerations of post mining land use, mine inventory and abatement plan for the quicksand watershed. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five volume series primarily presents three general topics. The first of these is a discussion of considerations relating to post-mining land use. Following this discussion, an evaluation of factors relating to more important environmental and land use impacts of the surface mining industry in Eastern Kentucky is presented. The last topic presents a mine inventory of the 33 surface mines located in the Quicksand Watershed in Breathitt County, Kentucky. Surface mines have several environmental and land use impacts. Those considered in the discussion which are of special importance to Eastern Kentucky are hydrologic influence, sedimentation, spoil bank stability, the impact on the public road system and mine access roads, and haul road abandonment. A number of major conclusions of general applicability are given along with some conclusions specifically related to the Quicksand Watershed.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Magnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetic Techniques Magnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Magnetic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Presence of magnetic minerals such as magnetite. Stratigraphic/Structural: Mapping of basement structures, horst blocks, fault systems, fracture zones, dykes and intrusions. Hydrological: The circulation of hydrothermal fluid may impact the magnetic susceptibility of rocks. Thermal: Rocks lose their magnetic properties at the Curie temperature (580° C for magnetite) [1] and, upon cooling, remagnetize in the present magnetic field orientation. The Curie point depth in the subsurface may be determined in a magnetic survey to provide information about hydrothermal activity in a region.

342

Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Techniques Gravity Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gravity Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Gravity Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Distribution of density in the subsurface enables inference of rock type. Stratigraphic/Structural: Delineation of steeply dipping formations, geological discontinuities and faults, intrusions and the deposition of silicates due to hydrothermal activity. Hydrological: Density of sedimentary rocks are strongly influenced by fluid contained within pore space. Dry bulk density refers to the rock with no moisture, while the wet bulk density accounts for water saturation; fluid content may alter density by up to 30%.(Sharma, 1997)

343

Run manager module for CORAL laboratory management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new module, the Run Manager (RM), for Stanford Nanofabrication Facility's Common Object Representation for Advanced Laboratories (CORAL). CORAL is the lab manager with which MIT's Microsystems ...

Klann, Jeffrey G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single-Pass Cooling Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Single-Pass Cooling Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Federal...

345

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3) environmental management programs, (4) training, (5)Management Programs3-5 Structure and Responsibility.3-6 Training,Management System Plan Program Elements Additional information regarding EMS training

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Railway Revenue Management: Overview and Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The railway industry offers similar revenue management opportunities to those found in the airline industry. The railway industry caters for the delivery and management of cargo as well as the transport of passengers. Unlike the airline industry, the railway industry has seen relatively little attention to revenue management problems. We provide an overview of the published literature for both passenger and freight rail revenue management. We include a summary of the some the available models and include some possible extensions. From the existing literature and talks with industry, it is clear that that there is room to exploit revenue management techniques in the railway industry, an industry that has revenues of $60 billion in the US and promises huge growth in Europe in the forthcoming years.

Er Armstrong; Joern Meissner

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data in the Paso del Norte region for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations and flood control. Tasks accomplished in Phase II include the complete migration of the Project Website and related databases to the ArcIMS software, which provides a better spatial query capacity. The database was enhanced by incorporating more gauge stations, limited groundwater data (well information, water levels, water quality, and pumpage) and other new data, and strengthened data sharing by implementing FGDC classic metadata. Protocols were explored for data sharing and spatial queries and opportunities for more active participation of volunteer regional data providers in the Project. The linkage of the PdNWC database with future groundwater and surface water model development was also assessed. Based on the experiences gained in the Project, the following recommendations for future Project work include: * Continued compilation of new data sources not yet included in the Project to enhance data sharing, * Installation of additional new monitoring stations and equipment and inclusion of these monitoring sites in future ArcIMS map products to fill data gaps and provide additional real-time data, * Strengthening the links with the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) being advanced by the USACE. Special focus will be given to serving DEM and orthophoto data recently transferred from the USACE to NMWRRI and enhancing direct Web linkages with USACE and URGWOM project activities to improve model development capacity and enhance sharing of modeling results, * Development and implementation of a user needs survey focusing on new data sets of interest, enhanced access mechanisms, and other suggestions to improve the Project Website, * Development and making available online for download a Microsoft Access database of Project water resource data to provide search and query functions, * Development of an online help tutorial that would support online searches of the database, making the site easier for end users to navigate and utilize, and * Continuity in the exploration of future funding opportunities for Project activities, especially through linkages with other regional data compilation and modeling projects. Part I of this report presents major historical and technical components of the Phase II development of the Database and GIS prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon. Groundwater elements of interest, relevant to the development of the coordinated database and to the integral comprehension of the watersheds mission and planning are also included as Part II of this report. This part, prepared by Z. Sheng and others, presents the sources of regional groundwater resources data compiled by different federal and state entities and outlines suggestions for regional groundwater data to be implemented with an ArcIMS interface so that this data can be shared and accessed by all Paso del Norte Watershed Council stakeholders. Part III, prepared by R. Srinivasan, presents the technical challenges posed to data sharing by multiple data collectors and sources and summarizes the different protocols available for an effective transfer and sharing of data through a GIS ArcIMS interface. Part IV, prepared by Z. Sheng and D. Zhang, explores the possibility to link the Database Project to a comprehensive development of regional hydrological models within the Rio Grande reach between Elephant Butte Dam, in New Mexico, and Fort Quitman, Texas. Finally, Part V, prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon, presents closing comments as well as a summary of the recommendations made throughout the document. Dr. Hanks provided assistance in summarizing preliminary user survey results

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Support to someone by E-mail Management Support to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

349

Energy Star Portfolio Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 2013 What's New in Portfolio Manager ? EPA's ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool helps you measure and track energy use, water use, and greenhouse gas emissions of your...

350

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

FILE MANAGEMENT MANUAL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.5.2 (ZAP BAD POINTERS) : Appendices :1 Glossary of Important File-Management Terms :29 SPIRES Documentation * SPIRES File Management ***...

352

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011...

353

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 nd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

354

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY...

355

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY...

356

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 4 th Quarter Metrics Final Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2008 Target FY 2008 Actual...

357

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Final FY...

358

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

359

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

360

Waterway Management Districts (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Waterway management districts are established to manage and supervise the use and development of waterways in municipalities with populations between 29,600 and 29,900.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

K&N Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... K&N Management (PDF version of this profile). (Photo courtesy of K&N Management). Download high-res version of this photo. ...

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Data Management Policy The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Policy The guidelines below describe Data Management procedures, processes and resources that need to be understood by both user projects and in-house research. 1....

363

Data Management Webinar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Data Management Best Practices Webinar Environmental Data Management Best Practices Webinar NASA EarthData Webinar Series September 10, 11, and 12, 2013 Abstract The...

364

Stormwater Management Program (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stormwater Management program of the Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Conservation and Restoration administers the rules and regulations for stormwater management for Pennsylvania...

365

ALS Project Management Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management practices across all ALS projects. It describesthat the primary weakness in ALS project management effortsrich projects common at the ALS. It is sometimes difficult

Krupnick, Jim; Harkins, Joe

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Corrective Action Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) Home CAMP Background DOE Directives Corrective Action Management Team Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) CAMP Quarterly Reports...

367

Emergency Management Evaluations - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Management Evaluations Reports 2010 Independent Oversight Review of Emergency Management at the Pantex Site Office and Pantex Plant, November 2010 Independent Oversight...

368

Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

369

Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Identify and document surface geology and mineralogy. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Locates active faults in the area of interest. Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

370

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Duck Creek Watershed, Dickens County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, Public Law 92-500, established a national goal of eliminating the discharge of pollutants into the nation's waterways by 1985. As a step toward that goal an interim water quality standard of "fishable, swimmable waters nationwide" by July 1, 1983 was determined. Under section 208 of this law, each state was required to establish a "continuing planning process" to define controls for agricultural non-point sources of water pollution. Section 208 calls for the development of state and area-wide water quality management plans The plans are to include "a process to (i) identify if appropriate? agriculturally and silviculturally related non-point sources of pollution, including runoff from manure disposal areas, and from land used for livestock and crop production, and (ii) set forth procedures and methods (including land use requirements) to control to the extent feasible such sources." The water quality issue of concern in this study is fertilizer and pesticide residuals carried into waterways by sediment. Since sediment is a potential transporter of pollutants, practices to control agricultural non-point source pollution would probably be aimed at reducing soil loss. Conservation and conservation related practices are, at present, considered the best technical practices to abate agricultural non-point source pollution. This study examines the economic impact of various policies that could be used to reduce soil loss. Both regulatory and voluntary policies are considered. Economic impacts examined include: (a) impacts of the policies on farm income; (b) government costs associated with the policies, including administration costs; (c) off-site sediment damages that would be abated; and (d) social desirability of the policies. The first section of the report describes the selected "Best Management Practices" and examines the on-farm economics of soil conservation. Then, the second section postulates various sediment damage control options and models the economic consequences, both to agricultural producers as a group? and to society of implementing them.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R.D.; Mueller, P. E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT PLANS MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans  Overview  Project Management Plan Suggested Outline Subjects  Crosswalk between the Suggested PMP Outline Subjects and a Listing of Project Planning Elements  Elements of Deactivation Project Planning  Examples From Project Management Plans Overview The purpose here is to assist project managers and project planners in creating a project plan by providing examples and pointing to information that have been successfully used by others in the past. Section 4.2 of DOE Guide 430.1-3, DEACTIVATION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE discusses the content and purpose of deactivation project management plans. It is presented as a suggested outline followed by other potential subjects. For the convenience of readers, that information is repeated below.

372

EIS-0265: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

watershed management projects. Watershed Management Program Record of Decision, DOEEIS-0265 (August 1997) More Documents & Publications EIS-0246: Record of Decision...

373

NETL Recognized for Management Excellence | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recognized for Management Excellence Recognized for Management Excellence NETL Recognized for Management Excellence March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Management practices at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been recognized by one of the world's leading professional organizations for chemical engineers. The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) has announced it will recognize NETL Director Anthony V. Cugini with its 2011 Management Division Award at its 2011 Spring Meeting. The award recognizes NETL management for "its substantial contribution to the management of engineers involved in the chemical process industries, and to management techniques and procedures utilized in those industries."The award is sponsored by Dow

374

NETL Recognized for Management Excellence | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recognized for Management Excellence Recognized for Management Excellence NETL Recognized for Management Excellence March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Management practices at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been recognized by one of the world's leading professional organizations for chemical engineers. The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) has announced it will recognize NETL Director Anthony V. Cugini with its 2011 Management Division Award at its 2011 Spring Meeting. The award recognizes NETL management for "its substantial contribution to the management of engineers involved in the chemical process industries, and to management techniques and procedures utilized in those industries."The award is sponsored by Dow

375

Peace Corps Assignment 114 Farm Management/Agribusiness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Train agribusinesses in market analysis, production techniques, economic forecasting, financing options at agricultural training institutions. Technical Assistance and Training for Small Farmers Design and implementPeace Corps Assignment 114 Farm Management/Agribusiness Creating Sustainable Solutions As a Peace

Maxwell, Bruce D.

376

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation

377

A Survey of Energy Saving Techniques for Mobile Computers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portable products such as pagers, cordless and digital cellular telephones, personal audio equipment, and laptop computers are increasingly being used. Because these applications are battery powered, reducing power consumption is vital. In this report we first give a survey of techniques for accomplishing energy reduction on the hardware level such as: low voltage components, use of sleep or idle modes, dynamic control of the processor clock frequency, clocking regions, and disabling unused peripherals. Systemdesign techniques include minimizing external accesses, minimizing logic state transitions, and system partitioning using application-specific coprocessors. Then we review energy reduction techniques in the design of operating systems, including communication protocols, caching, scheduling and QoS management. Finally, we give an overview of policies to optimize the code of the application for energy consumption and make it aware of power management functions. Applications play a c...

Gerard J. M. Smit; Paul J.M. Havinga

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reservoir management using streamline simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geostatistical techniques can generate fine-scale description of reservoir properties that honor a variety of available data. The differences among multiple geostatistical realizations indicate the presence of uncertainty due to the lack of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions. However, this approach is not feasible in practice because of the computational costs associated with multiple detailed flow simulations. Other major reservoir management challenges include the determination of the swept and unswept areas at a particular time of interest in the life of a reservoir. Until now, sweep efficiency correlations have generally been limited to homogeneous 2-D cases. Calculating volumetric sweep efficiency in a 3-D heterogeneous reservoir is difficult due to the inherent complexity of multiple layers and arbitrary well configurations. Identifying the swept and unswept areas is primarily important for making a decision on the infill locations. Most of the mature reservoirs all over the world are under waterflood. Managing a waterflood requires an understanding of how injection wells displace oil to producing wells. By quantifying the fluid movements, the displacement process can be actively managed. Areas that are not being swept can be developed, and inefficiencies, such as water cycling, can be removed. Conventional simulation provides general answers to almost all of these problems, however time constraint prohibits using a detailed model to capture complexities for each well. Three dimensional streamline simulation can meet most of these reservoir management challenges. Moreover use of fast streamline-based simulation technique offers significant potential in terms of computational efficiency. Its high performance simulation speed makes it well suited for describing flow characteristics for high resolution reservoir models and can be used on a routine basis to make effective and efficient reservoir management decisions. In this research, we extend the capability of streamline simulation as an efficient tool for reservoir management purposes. We show its application in terms of swept volume calculations, ranking of stochastic reservoir models, pattern rate allocation and reservoir performance forecasting under uncertainty.

Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic ...

Burner A. W.; Liu Tianshu

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems. NISTIR 7028 Type Evaluation Quality Manual Template. This NISTIR has been ...

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development of risk management- relatedITservicesthatbenefittheentireUCsystem. The systems developed at UC and maintenance have diminished so dramatically. #12;7 ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AnnuAl RepoRt 2010, are collaborating to implement a new asset management, work management, and integrated planning system

Hammock, Bruce D.

382

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offices, the EMS Program Program Elements Environmental ManagementOffice of Institutional Assurance as stated in the OQMP. 3-7 Environmental ManagementEnvironmental Management System Fiscal Year Improve (EMP classification) Integrated Safety Management System International Organization for Standardization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Office

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluating runoff simulations from the Community Land Model 4.0 using observations from flux towers and a mountainous watershed  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies using the Community Land Model (CLM) focused on simulating landatmosphere interactions and water balance at continental to global scales, with limited attention paid to its capability for hydrologic simulations at watershed or regional scales. This study evaluates the performance of CLM 4.0 (CLM4) for hydrologic simulations, and explores possible directions of improvement. Specifically, it is found that CLM4 tends to produce unrealistically large temporal variation of runoff for applications at a mountainous catchment in the Northwest United States where subsurface runoff is dominant, as well as at a few flux tower sites. We show that runoff simulations from CLM4 can be improved by: (1) increasing spatial resolution of the land surface representations; (2) calibrating parameter values; (3) replacing the subsurface formulation with a more general nonlinear function; (4) implementing the runoff generation schemes from the Variability Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. This study also highlights the importance of evaluating both the energy and water fluxes application of land surface models across multiple scales.

Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Aihui; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Scenario Modelling: A Holistic Environmental and Energy Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Modelling: A Holistic Environmental and Energy Management Scenario Modelling: A Holistic Environmental and Energy Management Technique for Building Managers Speaker(s): James O'Donnell Date: September 30, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Vladimir Bazjanac At the operational level of organisations, building managers most commonly evaluate environmental and energy performance. They originate from a variety of technical and non-technical backgrounds with corresponding experiences, knowledge and skill sets. The profile of building managers as established in this work accounts for this diverse variation. Building performance data and information that is typically available for the established profile of building managers is insufficient for optimum operation. This presentaion presents the scenario modelling technique

385

Optimization and reinforcement learning techniques in multi-agent graphical games and economic dispatch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work discusses optimization and reinforcement learning techniques in power system Economic Dispatch and Multi-Agent graphical games. Power System Economic Dispatch (ED) is one of the power system energy management tools that is used to allocate ...

Mohammed Abouheaf / Frank L. Lewis, Wei-Jen Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Cryptographic Key Management Workshop 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryptographic Key Management Workshop 2010. Purpose: ... Related Project(s): Cryptographic Key Management Project. Details: ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmental Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management System Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System is a systematic method for assessing mission activities, determining the environmental impacts of those activities, prioritizing improvements, and measuring results. May 30, 2012 The continuous improvement cycle Our Environmental Management System encourages continuous improvement of our environmental performance. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Managing our effects on the environment We are committed to protecting the environment while conducting our national security and energy-related missions. Laboratory Environmental Governing Policy What is the Environmental Management System? It covers every program in the Laboratory

389

LPP Risk Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

History and Process History and Process Slide 2 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management History ◦ Current Baseline Process Overview ◦ Identification ◦ Simulation ◦ Management Successes & Challenges Slide 3 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks ◦ 1 Week Risk Summit held week of August 4 th , 2008 Broad representation from all levels of Isotek, DOE, PTC, and outside consultants Focused on risk and opportunity identification Included risk description, assumptions, and triggers No quantification or analysis No restrictions, constraints, or filtering HQ provided facilitator Prescribed format and capture methodology Slide 4 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks ◦ Risk Summit Results

390

Diagnostics Techniques of Power Transformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides the information on the diagnostics techniques for condition monitoring of power transformer (PT). This paper deals with the practical importance of the transformer diagnostic in the Electrical Engineering field. A review has been ... Keywords: temperature, condition monitoring, diagnostics methods, paper analysis techniques, oil analysis techniques

Piush Verma; Y. R. Sood; Jashandeep Singh

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Office of Resource Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Management Resource Management Home Sub Offices › Business Operations › Information Management › Human Resources and Administration Mission and Functions HSS Standard Operating Practices (For Internal Users Only) HSS Subject Matter Experts and Functional Points of Contacts Contact Us HSS Logo Office of Resource Management Direct Report to the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer Mission and Functions Mission The Office of Resource Management supports the infrastructure of the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) by providing balanced, unbiased, technically competent, and customer focused services in the areas of: (1) Financial Management, including budget formulation and execution; (2) Procurement Management, including contract and credit card programs; (3) Information Management, including technology-based solutions and programs; (4) Quality Assurance; (5) Human Resources, including recruitment and retention programs; (6) Administrative Services, including property management, travel, and work space management; and; (7) Strategic and Program Planning including performance and efficiency measures.

392

Dynamic power management with hybrid power sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DPM (Dynamic Power Management) is an effective technique for reducing the energy consumption of embedded systems that is based on migrating to a low power state when possible. While conventional DPM minimizes the energy consumption of the embedded system, ... Keywords: DPM, embedded system, fuel cell, hybrid power

Jianli Zhuo; Chaitali Chakrabarti; Kyungsoo Lee; Naehyuck Chang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Adaptive display power management for mobile games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we show how tone mapping techniques can be used to dynamically increase the image brightness, thus allowing the LCD backlight levels to be reduced. This saves significant power as the majority of the LCD's display power is consumed by ... Keywords: backlight scaling, mobile games, power management, tone mapping

Bhojan Anand; Karthik Thirugnanam; Jeena Sebastian; Pravein G. Kannan; Akhihebbal L. Ananda; Mun Choon Chan; Rajesh Krishna Balan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Energy Efficient Battery Management Carla F. Chiasserini Ramesh R. Rao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficient Battery Management Carla F. Chiasserini Ramesh R. Rao Dipartimento di Elettronica be maximized. In this paper we investigate battery management techniques that can dramatically improve, is implemented to achieve a further improvement in the battery performances. In this case, the discharge demand

395

Dose Reduction Techniques  

SciTech Connect

As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

WAGGONER, L.O.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

Techniques in Broadband Interferometry  

SciTech Connect

This is a compilation of my patents issued from 1997 to 2002, generally describing interferometer techniques that modify the coherence properties of broad-bandwidth light and other waves, with applications to Doppler velocimetry, range finding, imaging and spectroscopy. Patents are tedious to read in their original form. In an effort to improve their readability I have embedded the Figures throughout the manuscript, put the Figure captions underneath the Figures, and added section headings. Otherwise I have resisted the temptation to modify the words, though I found many places which could use healthy editing. There may be minor differences with the official versions issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office, particularly in the claims sections. In my shock physics work I measured the velocities of targets impacted by flyer plates by illuminating them with laser light and analyzing the reflected light with an interferometer. Small wavelength changes caused by the target motion (Doppler effect) were converted into fringe shifts by the interferometer. Lasers having long coherence lengths were required for the illumination. While lasers are certainly bright sources, and their collimated beams are convenient to work with, they are expensive. Particularly if one needs to illuminate a wide surface area, then large amounts of power are needed. Orders of magnitude more power per dollar can be obtained from a simple flashlamp, or for that matter, a 50 cent light bulb. Yet these inexpensive sources cannot practically be used for Doppler velocimetry because their coherence length is extremely short, i.e. their bandwidth is much too wide. Hence the motivation for patents 1 & 2 is a method (White Light Velocimetry) for allowing use of these powerful but incoherent lamps for interferometry. The coherence of the illumination is modified by passing it through a preparatory interferometer.

Erskine, D J

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

A flexible location management scheme for mobile computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Location management for mobile users is an important issue in distributed, mobile computing environments. In this thesis, I propose a flexible location management scheme on the Internet to support mobile users. The proposed scheme supports location search and update operations based on a data replication technique. I implemented the proposed scheme as an experimental prototype using ORACLE Distributed Database Management System (DDBMS), where two clients access independent database objects on one server to simulate the behavior of a distributed system.

Zhang, Ying

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

In: Management of Wet-Weather Flow in the Watershed (Edited by Dan Sullivan and Richard Field). CRC Press, Boca Raton. Publication in 2002.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source areas (especially vehicle service areas) and critical land uses (especially manufacturing if present in the stormwater (likely for some industrial and commercial facilities and vehicle service. #12;5-18 4. Runoff from manufacturing industrial areas should also be diverted from infiltration

Pitt, Robert E.

399

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for sound energy management is no longer worthy of debate. Action is necessary and much is being done by U.S. industry. Unfortunately, however, the majority of the work is being done by the few large energy intensive industries throughout the country. The average small to medium sized company has yet to undertake a dedicated program. The reasons are numerous, but often it is simply because of a lack of knowledge of techniques or the amount of savings possible. Recognizing this, the Oklahoma Department of Energy designed a program to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings available through energy management and some basic techniques. The program is entitled "Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program" and is housed at Oklahoma State University. The program is funded by the U. S. Department of Energy through the State Energy Conservation Plan. This paper describes the program offerings, impact to date and plans for the future. The program offerings basically include: 1. A series of tuition free Industrial Energy Management Conferences (over 20 given to date involving many Oklahoma industries). 2. A free energy newsletter entitled "Energy Channel" mailed to all participating Oklahoma industries. 3. A series of Energy Audit booklets including instructions and forms. 4. Technical aid on a limited basis. 5. A series of laboratory type experiments involving power factor, solar energy, boiler combustion improvement and other energy related projects. 6. Fact sheet publication as the need develops. Plans for the future include expansion of the program to small businesses in general through the Energy Extension Service and more technical aid to participating industries, The basic plan involving the services above shall remain intact. The program has been very successful to date. The results are directly transferable to other states and the program directors are willing to share information.

Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Using Data Mining Techniques to Address Critical Information Exchange Needs in Disaster Affected  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disaster information in the context of disaster management phases: Preparation, Response, RecoveryUsing Data Mining Techniques to Address Critical Information Exchange Needs in Disaster Affected Management and Disaster Recovery have gained immense importance in the wake of recent man and nature

Chen, Shu-Ching

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

TECHNIQUES FOR EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE OF PRE-TIMED RAMP METERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 TECHNIQUES FOR EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE OF PRE-TIMED RAMP METERS USING ARCHIVED ITS DATA Robert: 503-725-8480 Email: elgeneid@pdx.edu ABSTRACT Pre-Timed Ramp Metering (PRM) is a traffic management efficient, effective, equitable and sustainable. Pre-Timed Ramp Metering (PRM) is a traffic management

Bertini, Robert L.

402

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Law and Regulation Federal agencies must meet energy management requirements outlined by Federal various statutory laws and regulations. They include: National Energy Conservation...

403

Energy Conservation Management Can Pay For Itself  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With proper management of energy conservation programs, any structure can be energy efficient. And this energy efficiency need not require great expenditures. A 'systems approach' to energy management identifies a series of activities which results in a cost effective, overall reduction in energy consumption. An energy management program should begin with inexpensive changes in administrative policies. There's a right way and a wrong way to use a building; how it's used can materially affect energy consumption. A statement of goals, clear definition of accountability, and a meaningful method of evaluating progress can produce remarkable energy savings with payback times measured in months. The accumulated savings from changes in administrative policies then pay for progressively more expensive improvements in operations and maintenance. Ultimately, the savings generated by many no- or low-cost actions begin to pay for capital improvements. The remainder of this paper will illustrate how energy conservation management techniques have been economically applied to a variety of buildings.

McCall, R.; Bickle, L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique. The new JILA "frequency comb spectroscopy" technique ...

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

An economic analysis of a large scale ashe juniper clearing project in the Leon River watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ashe Juniper (Juniperus ashei) is native to the Edwards Plateau in central Texas. In the past 150 years, however, this species has rapidly increased in abundance within its range. Reduced fire frequency and increased livestock grazing, are two factors attributed to the rapid rate of juniper encroachment. While the losses associated with brush encroachment are recognized, many ranchers lack the funds necessary to implement management practices to reduce juniper densities on their property. The high cost associated with clearing brush has led to the creation of cost-share programs, which help offset the expenses incurred by participating landowners. The Leon River Restoration Project (LRRP), implemented on private lands within Coryell and Hamilton Counties, Texas, is one such cost-share program. Funding for the LRRP is received through non-programmatic sources, in the form of grants, from various state and federal organizations and agencies. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides a second source of funding through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). Participants contracted through LRRP funds receive 85% cost-share benefits, up to a maximum of $15,000. Landowners participating in the LRRP under EQIP funds receive 50% cost-share incentives, up to a maximum of $250,000. The purpose of this study was to record changes that occurred on land enrolled in the LRRP, following juniper removal, and the economic benefits recognized by this work. Thirty landowners scheduled to participate in the LRRP were interviewed in 2003, prior to juniper control work. In 2006, 23 of the original 30 landowners participated in a second interview, following their completion of brush removal work. Changes attributed to juniper removal were recorded during these post-clearing interviews. Stocking rate changes were used as the basis for measuring economic benefits recognized by the clearing efforts. Changes in hunting or grazing lease rates resulting from juniper clearing were also used to monitor economic benefits of the brushwork. A second component of the study tested for differences in landowner satisfaction between LRRP participants enrolled under LRRP funds, and those contracted under EQIP funds. Importanceperformance matrixes were created to display satisfaction differences.

Flack, Rebecca Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Office of Environmental Management | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Environmental Management Search form Search Office of Environmental Management Services Waste Management Site & Facility Restoration Program Management Communication & Engagement...

408

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information and Education Programs to someone by E-mail Information and Education Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Information and Education Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Information and Education Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Information and Education Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Information and Education Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Information and Education Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Information and Education Programs on AddThis.com...

409

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Kitchen Equipment to someone by E-mail Commercial Kitchen Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses

410

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Alternate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternate Water Sources to someone by E-mail Alternate Water Sources to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases

411

Federal Energy Management Program: Bureau of Land Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bureau of Land Management - Campground, Utah to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Bureau of Land Management - Campground, Utah on Facebook Tweet about...

412

Federal Energy Management Program: DOE Enhances Management of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: DOE Enhances Management of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management...

413

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

414

NETL: News Release - NETL Recognized for Management Excellence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2011 4, 2011 NETL Recognized for Management Excellence Washington, DC - Management practices at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been recognized by one of the world's leading professional organizations for chemical engineers. The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) has announced it will recognize NETL Director Anthony V. Cugini with its 2011 Management Division Award at its 2011 Spring Meeting. The award recognizes NETL management for "its substantial contribution to the management of engineers involved in the chemical process industries, and to management techniques and procedures utilized in those industries."The award is sponsored by Dow Chemical. In particular, NETL management was cited for greatly expanding "the scope and extent of worldwide collaboration between NETL, industry and universities" and for championing the advancement of computational modeling in chemical engineering applications.

415

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Guidance The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance on Federal laws and regulations related to energy management. General Guidance for Facilities Overview of Federal Energy Management Policy and Mandates: Guidance document outlining Federal energy management goals and requirements for Federal energy managers. Sustainability Requirement Crosswalk: Crosswalk of sustainability and energy goals and targets within executive orders and other statutes. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005): Guidelines that established criteria for exclusions from the energy performance requirement for a fiscal year or any Federal building or collection of Federal buildings within the statutory framework provided by the law.

416

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part III GIS Coverage for the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, Mxico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report fulfills the deliverables required by the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES/03-PL- 02: Modification No. 3) on behalf of the Paso del Norte Watershed Council. Tasks accomplished in this phase include (a) assessment of data availability for expansion of the URGWOM model, identification of data gaps, generation of data needed from historic data using empirical methods, compilation and verification of the water quality data for reaches between the Elephant Butte Reservoir, New Mexico and Fort Quitman, Texas; (b) development of the RiverWare physical model for the Rio Grande flow for the selected reaches between Elephant Butte Reservoir and El Paso, beginning with a conceptual model for interaction of surface water and groundwater in the Rincon and Mesilla valleys, and within the limits of available data; and (c) implementation of data transfer interface between the coordinated database and hydrologic models. This Project was conducted by researchers at Texas A&M University (TAMU) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) under the direction of Zhuping Sheng of TAMU and J. Phillip King of New Mexico State University. It was developed to enhance the coordinated database, which was originally developed by the Paso del Norte Watershed Council with support of El Paso Water Utilities to fulfill needs for better management of regional water resources and to expand the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) to cover the river reaches between Elephant Butte Dam, New Mexico and Fort Quitman, Texas. In Phases I and II of this Project (TAES/03-PL-02), hydrological data needed for flow model development were compiled and data gaps were identified and a conceptual model developed. The objectives of this phase were to develop a physical model of the Rio Grande flow between Elephant Butte Dam and American Dam by using data collected in the first development phase of the PdNWC/Corps Coordinated Water Resources Database and to enhance the data portal capabilities of the PdNWC Coordinated Database Project. This report is Part III of a three part completion report for Phase III and provides information on water sources, uses, and GIS of the canals and ditches of the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District 009 (ID 009) in the Jurez Lower Valley, Chihuahua, Mxico. The author explains that the water needs of this region have changed in recent years from being primarily for agricultural purposes to domestic and industrial uses currently. Also, the United States wanted to assess and identify new data sources on a GIS format for the Mexican side. Therefore, this project produced several maps with the location of channels and ditches along the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District. This information also will support water planning of the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District 009. The maps were produced from existing digital data regarding water resources and by adding thematic layers such as soil salinity and soil texture from analog maps. ASTER satellite imagery and official panchromatic aerial photography were used to produce the maps.

Granados, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Plan - Data Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Plan Data Management for Data Providers Click an arrow to follow the data management path of a data set from planning to curation. plan Overview plan Plan manage Manage archive Archive curation DAAC Curation Data Management Overview Plan Manage Archive DAAC Curation Related Links DAAC Help Best Practices PDF Workshops DataONE ESIP Data Management Plans NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program now requires that each proposal include a Data Management Plan (DMP) of up to two pages. A DMP for a proposal is a brief document that outlines what you will do with your data during and after your research, to ensure your data will be safe, documented, and accessible now and in the future. A DMP - developed early and used throughout the research project - will increase research efficiency by making the data understandable and usable in the future and

418

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for DUF 6 Conversion Project Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Meetings November/December 2001 Overview Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 2 DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart EM-10 Policy EM-40 Project Completion EM-20 Integration EM-50 Science and Technology EM-31 Ohio DUF6 Management Program EM-32 Oak Ridge EM-33 Rocky Flats EM-34 Small Sites EM-30 Office of Site Closure Office of Environmental Management EM-1 DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 3 DUF 6 Management Program DUF 6 Management Program * Mission: Safely and efficiently manage the DOE inventory of DUF 6 in a way that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, and protects the environment DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 4 DUF 6 Inventory Distribution

419

LFRG Program Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the EM Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Program Management Plan (LFRG PMP) is to establish the LFRG roles and responsibilities, the LFRG management processes,...

420

Power Management Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

additional savings of 1.3 billion are lost because power management is present, but disabled. In some cases, power management is not compatible with the application or doesn't...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Coastal Management Act (Georgia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not establish new regulations or laws; it is designed to...

422

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

423

US CMS Program Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USCMS US CMS Home US CMS @ Work US CMS Research Program Management Joel Butler, US CMS Research Program Manager E-mail: butler@fnal.gov Phone: (630) 840-3148, Fax: (630) 840-2194...

424

Personalized diabetes management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we present a system to make personalized lifestyle and health decisions for diabetes management, as well as for general health and diet management. In particular, we address the following components of the ...

O'Hair, Allison Kelly

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Optimizing IT process management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the author discusses some key concepts in IT process management. The paper also includes the recommendations in these following aspects: team organization, physical environment, project selection, politics, organizational communication, ... Keywords: IT process management

Tony Tony Lee

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Emergency Management Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EM Forum The Oak Ridge Emergency Management Forum is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) and Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA). Each...

427

Energy manager design for microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Manager Design for Microgrids Hillier, F. , and G.Energy Manager Design for Microgrids Appendix A: Smart*DER:Manager Design for Microgrids Prepared for the California

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Use Portfolio Manager | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use Portfolio Manager Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial...

429

Energy manager design for microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a building energy management system already in place to2003. Microgrid Energy Management System Oak Ridge, TN:better. The term energy management systems (EMS) is widely

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Meter Data Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The traditional role of Meter Data Management (MDM) systems has been to acquire and prepare meter data for billing purposes, but these systems have much wider operational value for utilities. Advanced MDM systems could reshape electric power delivery, management, and economics if their cost and complexity could be managed. This White Paper lays out the potential advantages of improved Meter Data Management Systems (MDMS), discusses possible deployment strategies for such systems, and provides a descripti...

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Asset Management Best Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has conducted a series of surveys on the status of the implementation of power delivery asset management and the maintenance of key substation components. The results will assist utilities in determining how to best adapt or adopt the principles of asset management in their organizations. This technical update presents the results of surveys covering organizational and technical aspects of asset management, including detailed questions on the management of pow...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

432

System and Network Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document covers Systems and Network Management Requirements and is the first deliverable in a joint EPRI and Utility User Project to develop Network Management capability for Electric Utility Automation Systems (UAS) using international communication standards such as IEC 61850. The management of substation automation systems is critical since tools are now based, for the most part, on proprietary hardware and software. In modern state-of-the art substations, traditional network management has ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

433

Maintenance and Veg Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Reauthorization of Transmission Line Permits, Maintenance and Vegetation Management on Forest Service Lands...

434

Management Transition Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Records and Information Records and Information Management Transition Guidance November 2013 Records and Information Management Transition Guidance i Records and Information Management Transition Guidance Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 1 1.0 Introduction and Purpose ..................................................................................................... 1 LM Records Functions ................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 The Records Life Cycle ....................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Organizational Responsibilities ........................................................................................... 2

435

Towards inclusive identity management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article argues for a shift of perspective in identity management (IDM) research and development. Accessibility and usability issues affect identity management to such an extent that they demand a reframing and reformulation of basic designs and requirements ... Keywords: Authentication, Disabilities, E-Inclusion, Exclusion, Identity management, Information security, Privacy, Universal design, Usability

Lothar Fritsch; Kristin Skeide Fuglerud; Ivar Solheim

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Statistical techniques for the characterization of partially observed epidemics.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques appear promising to construct and integrate automated detect-and-characterize technique for epidemics - Working off biosurveillance data, and provides information on the particular/ongoing outbreak. Potential use - in crisis management and planning, resource allocation - Parameter estimation capability ideal for providing the input parameters into an agent-based model, Index Cases, Time of Infection, infection rate. Non-communicable diseases are easier than communicable ones - Small anthrax can be characterized well with 7-10 days of data, post-detection; plague takes longer, Large attacks are very easy.

Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Crary, David (Applied Research Associates, Inc, Arlington, VA); Cheng, Karen (Applied Research Associates, Inc, Arlington, VA)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

438

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV March 10, 2011 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past $4 Billion U.S. Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS * More than $4 BILLION in Recovery Act payments are accelerating environmental cleanup * 67% of EM Recovery Act funds have been paid Financial data are based on reporting as of March 9, 2011, and are subject to change. EM has made more than $4 billion in Recovery Act payments, or 32 percent of the DOE's $12.4 billion in Recovery Act payments. DOE received $35.2 billion

439

SHSD Manager Safety Engineering Group Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety, Excavation Safety, Scaffold Safety D. Cubillo: Division Database Programmer J. Durnan: Design. Horn (0.5) ORPS Categorizer S. Moss (Emeritus) S. Kane, Group Manager 9/7/10 Environment, Safety

440

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Program Contacts Contact Us By phone: 202-586-5772 By mail: U.S. Department of Energy EE-2L 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 Contact...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "watershed management techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Integrated Safety Management (ISM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Safety Management Integrated Safety Management Home ISM Policy ISM Champions ISM Workshops Resources Archives Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Integrated Safety Management (ISM) ism logo Welcome to the Department of Energy's Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Web Site. The Department and its contractors remain firmly committed to ISM as first defined in 1996. The objective of ISM is to perform work in a safe and environmentally sound manner. More specifically, as described in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy: "The Department and Contractors must systematically integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels so that missions are accomplished while protecting the public, the worker, and the environment. This is to be accomplished through effective integration of safety management into all facets of work planning and execution." "

442

Category:Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 subcategories, out of 2 total. A Active Seismic Techniques 2 pages P Passive Seismic Techniques 2 pages Pages in category "Seismic Techniques" The following 2...

443

Definition: Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the subsurface through the measurement...

444

Category:Data Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Data Techniques page? For detailed information on Data Techniques...

445

Identity Management Systems Program Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identity Management Systems Program. ... Identity management systems are responsible for the creation, use, and termination of electronic identities. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Managed Programs, Environmental Protection Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

training and supporting subject matter expertise. Environmental Information Management System: storing, managing, verifying, protecting, retrieving and archiving BNL's...

447

Environ Monit Assess DOI 10.1007/s10661-013-3256-6 Evaluation of stream chemistry trends in US Geological Survey reference watersheds, 19702010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a long-term monitoring program established by the US Geological Survey in the 1960s to track changes in the streamflow and stream chemistry in undeveloped watersheds across the USA. Trends in stream chemistry were tested at 15 HBN stations over two periods (1970 2010 and 19902010) using the parametric Load Estimator (LOADEST) model and the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test. Trends in annual streamflow and precipitation chemistry also were tested to help identify likely drivers of changes in stream chemistry. At stations in the northeastern USA, there were significant declines in stream sulfate, which were consistent with declines in sulfate deposition resulting from the reductions in SO2 emissions mandated under the Clean Air Act Amendments. Sulfate declines in stream water were smaller than declines in deposition suggesting sulfate may be accumulating in watershed soils and thereby delaying the stream response to improvements in deposition. Trends in stream chemistry at stations in other part of the country generally were attributed to climate variability or land disturbance. Despite declines in sulfate deposition, increasing stream sulfate was observed at several stations and appeared to be linked to periods of drought or declining streamflow. Falling water tables might have

M. Alisa Mast; M. A. Mast

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Twistor inspired techniques in QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I present a short review of the new twistor inspired techniques