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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.  

SciTech Connect

Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

ARM Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Water Vapor IOP The SGP CART site will host the third ARM water vapor IOP on September 18-October 8, 2000. The CART site is home to a powerful array of instruments capable of...

3

ARM - Water Vapor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vapor Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global...

4

Hydrogen Cars and Water Vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This cycle is currently under way with hydrogen fuel cells. As fuel cell cars are suggested as a solutionHydrogen Cars and Water Vapor D.W.KEITHANDA.E.FARRELL'S POLICY FORUM "Rethinking hydrogen cars" (18 misidentified as "zero-emissions vehicles." Fuel cell vehicles emit water vapor. A global fleet could have

Colorado at Boulder, University of

5

The Dust Settles on Water Vapor Feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...To understand water vapor feedback...shifts in the atmospheric circulation...caused a positive water vapor feedback...temperature. Condensation, evaporation...shifts in the atmospheric circulation...caused a positive water vapor feedback...temperature. Condensation, evaporation...

Anthony D. Del Genio

2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Vapor IOP 2000.09.18 - 2000.10.08 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb Data Availability Yes For data sets, see below. Description Scientific hypothesis: 1. Microwave radiometer (MWR) observations of the 22 GHz water vapor line can accurately constrain the total column amount of water vapor (assuming a calibration accuracy of 0.5 degC or better, which translates into 0.35 mm PWV). 2. Continuous profiling by Raman lidar provides a stable reference for handling sampling problems and observes a fixed column directly above the site only requiring a single height- independent calibration factor. 3. Agreement between the salt-bath calibrated in-situ probes, chilled

7

Chem. Mater. 1995, 7, 2269-2272 2269 Water Vapor Adsorption on Chemically Treated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chem. Mater. 1995, 7, 2269-2272 2269 Water Vapor Adsorption on Chemically Treated Activated Carbon August 25, 1995@ Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon cloth (ACCBO)which has been oxidized% Cl), and ACCBO (4% N), exhibits sigmoidal isotherms with hysteresis loops of varying magnitudes

Cal, Mark P.

8

Optical monitor for water vapor concentration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma. 5 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Optical monitor for water vapor concentration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Vapor IOP 1996.09.10 - 1996.09.30 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb For data sets, see below. Summary SCHEDULE This IOP will be conducted from September 10 - 30, 1996 (coincident with the Fall ARM-UAV IOP). Instruments that do not require supervision will be operated continuously during this period. Instruments that do require supervision are presently planned to be operated for 8-hour periods each day. Because it is necessary to cover as broad a range of environmental conditions as possible, the daily 8-hour period will be shifted across the diurnal cycle as deemed appropriate during the IOP (but will be maintained as a contiguous 8-hour block).

11

atmospheric water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric water vapor atmospheric water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 247.8 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

12

atmoshperic water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmoshperic water vapor atmoshperic water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude for China. Source NREL Date Released April 12th, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmoshperic water vapor China GEF GIS NREL solar SWERA TILT UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 625.6 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 704.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 01/01/1985 - 12/31/1991 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access

13

Environmental Chemistry at Vapor/Water Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Chemistry at Vapor/Water Interfaces: Insights from Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Aaron M. Jubb, Wei Hua, and Heather C. Allen Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State/0505-0107$20.00 Keywords salts, lipids, atmospheric chemistry, ion binding, oxidation Abstract The chemistry that occurs

14

Cobalt Ultrathin Film Catalyzed Ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cobalt Ultrathin Film Catalyzed Ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) using a cobalt ultrathin film (1 nm) as the catalyst and ethanol as carbon feedstock flow during the growth. The trace amount of self-contained water (0.2-5 wt %) in ethanol may act

Hone, James

15

Estimating the Atmospheric Water Vapor Content from Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differential absorption technique for estimating columnar water vapor values from the analysis of sunphotometric measurements with wide- and narrowband interferential filters centered near 0.94 ?m is discussed and adapted. Water vapor line ...

Artemio Plana-Fattori; Michel Legrand; Didier Tanré; Claude Devaux; Anne Vermeulen; Philippe Dubuisson

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Towards improved spinnability of chemical vapor deposition generated multi-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. J. F. 1999 Carbon nanotubes and related structures: newof vapor grown carbon nanotubes and single wall nanotubes, Eto Carbon Materials in Carbon Nanotubes: Preparation and

McKee, Gregg Sturdivant Burke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Apparent Temperature Dependence on Localized Atmospheric Water Vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apparent Temperature Dependence on Localized Atmospheric Water Vapor Matthew Montanaroa, Carl), hence water vapor is the primary constituent of concern. The tower generates a localized water vapor, Office B108, Aiken, SC, USA ABSTRACT The atmosphere is a critical factor in remote sensing. Radiance from

Salvaggio, Carl

19

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vapor IOP Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Water Vapor IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb For data sets, see below. Summary The Water Vapor IOP was conducted as a follow-up to a predecessor IOP on water vapor held in September 1996. This IOP relied heavily on both ground-based guest and CART instrumentation and in-situ aircraft and tethered sonde/kite measurements. Primary operational hours were from 6 p.m. Central until at least midnight, with aircraft support normally from about 9 p.m. until midnight when available. However, many daytime measurements were made to support this IOP. The first Water Vapor IOP primarily concentrated on the atmosphere's lowest

20

Phase effects for electrons in liquid water and water vapor  

SciTech Connect

The objective of these studies is to compare transport, energy loss, and other phenomena for electrons in water in the liquid and vapor phases. Understanding the differences and similarities is an interesting physics problem in its own right. It is also important for applying the relatively large body of experimental data available for the vapor to the liquid, which is of greater relevance in radiobiology. This paper presents a summary of results from a series of collaborative studies carried out by the authors at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung (GSF). 14 figs.

Turner, J.E.; Paretzke, H.G.; Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Ritchie, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

modifications reduced but could not eliminate these adverse effects. The Raman lidar water vapor (aerosol extinction) measurements produced by these modified algorithms were,...

22

Growth of manganese filled carbon nanofibers in the vapor phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the vapor phase growth of partially filled graphitic fibers, 20-30 nm in diameter and up to a micron in length, during a manganese catalyzed carbon electric arc discharge. The fiber morphology resembles that of catalytic chemical vapor deposited carbon filaments but the inside hollow contains intermittent precipitates and continuous filling of Mn that at times occupy >50% of fiber lengths. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss line spectra show that the fillings form as solid cores and may correspond to pure metal.

P. M. Ajayan; C. Colliex; J. M. Lambert; P. Bernier; L. Barbedette; M. Tence; O. Stephan

1994-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates V. Mattioli and P. Basili Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction In recent years the Global Positioning System (GPS) has proved to be a reliable instrument for measuring precipitable water vapor (PWV) (Bevis et al. 1992), offering an independent source of information on water vapor when compared with microwave radiometers (MWRs), and/or radiosonde

24

Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of carbon-free ZnO using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of carbon-free ZnO using the bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)zinc precursor. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of carbon-free...

25

CVD CNT CNT (Vapor-grown carbon fiber, VGCF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CNT CNT CVD CNT CNT (Vapor-grown carbon fiber, VGCF) 10001300 CNT CVD Smalley CO 24 CCVD 1 #12; 27 mm 3% 200 sccm 800 10 10 Torr 300 sccm Ethanol tank Hot bath boat Ar/H2 Ar or Ethanol tank Hot bath Ethanol tank Hot bath Pressure gauge Maindraintube Subdraintube

Maruyama, Shigeo

26

Detonation wave driven by condensation of supersaturated carbon vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental observation of a detonation wave driven by the energy of condensation of supersaturated carbon vapor is reported. The carbon vapor was formed by the thermal decay of unstable carbon suboxide C3O2 behind shock waves in mixtures containing 10–30% C3O2 in Ar. In the mixture 10% C3O2+Ar the insufficient heat release resulted in a regime of overdriven detonation. In the mixture 20% C3O2+Ar measured values of the pressure and wave velocity coincident with calculated Chapman-Jouguet parameters were attained. In the richest mixture 30% C3O2+Ar an excess heat release caused the slowing down of the condensation rate and the regime of underdriven detonation was observed.

A. Emelianov; A. Eremin; V. Fortov; H. Jander; A. Makeich; H. Gg. Wagner

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

27

ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave Radiometer and Microwave Profiler, yielded excellent data over a range of conditions. In all, angular-scanned and calibrated radiometric data from 22.345 to 380 GHz were taken. The Precipitable Water Vapor varied about an order of magnitude from 1 to 10 mm, and surface temperatures varied from about -10 to -40 deg. Celcius. Vaisala RS90

28

Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, and D. D. Turner University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction An overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) is given. This field experiment was conducted during November-December 2000 near the central ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in north central Oklahoma, and was sponsored jointly by the ARM, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE), and the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) programs. Its primary goal was to collect accurate measurements of upper-level (~8 to 12 km) water vapor near the ground-based ARM site. These data are being used to determine the accuracy of measurements that are

29

Photocoupling of Methane in Water Vapor to Saturated Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane can be converted into alkanes (from C2 to C6) continuously by ultraviolet (185 nm) irradiation in the presence of water vapor. The products from this reaction are alkanes, which is different from the comp...

JunePyo Oh; Taketoshi Matsumoto; Junji Nakamura

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

investigating the source, transport, and isotope fractionation of water vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigating the source, transport, and isotope fractionation of water vapor in the atmospheric cospectral similarity for temperature and water vapor isotope fluxes. mixing ratio generator Routine field use in water vapor isotope research. The unit generates a stable water vapor mixing ratio by measuring

Minnesota, University of

31

Calculating the vapor pressure of water from the second law of thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculating the vapor pressure of water from the second law of thermodynamics ... Thermodynamics ...

M. H. Everdell

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Water-vapor effect on the electrical conductivity of a single-walled carbon nanotube mat A. Zahab,* L. Spina, and P. Poncharal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of physico-chemical adsorption of gases in nanotubes have been reported.11­14 One of the most excit- ing was then carefully out- gassed by heating the sample up to 220 °C at a constant rate of about 3 °C/mn. The sample lower than 0.1 °C during water injection and pumping cycle was negli- gible when compared

Demouchy, Sylvie

33

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

Sheridan, Jennifer

34

Transport and sorption of volatile organic compounds and water vapor in porous media  

SciTech Connect

To gain insight on the controlling mechanisms for VOC transport in porous media, the relations among sorbent properties, sorption equilibrium and intraparticle diffusion processes were studied at the level of individual sorbent particles and laboratory columns for soil and activated carbon systems. Transport and sorption of VOCs and water vapor were first elucidated within individual dry soil mineral grains. Soil properties, sorption capacity, and sorption rates were measured for 3 test soils; results suggest that the soil grains are porous, while the sorption isotherms are nonlinear and adsorption-desorption rates are slow and asymmetric. An intragranular pore diffusion model coupled with the nonlinear Freundlich isotherm was developed to describe the sorption kinetic curves. Transport of benzene and water vapor within peat was studied; partitioning and sorption kinetics were determined with an electrobalance. A dual diffusion model was developed. Transport of benzene in dry and moist soil columns was studied, followed by gaseous transport and sorption in activated carbon. The pore diffusion model provides good fits to sorption kinetics for VOCs to soil and VOC to granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers. Results of this research indicate that: Intraparticle diffusion along with a nonlinea sorption isotherm are responsible for the slow, asymmetric sorption-desorption. Diffusion models are able to describe results for soil and activated carbon systems; when combined with mass transfer equations, they predict column breakthrough curves for several systems. Although the conditions are simplified, the mechanisms should provide insight on complex systems involving transport and sorption of vapors in porous media.

Lin, Tsair-Fuh

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM Observations Cady-Pereira, Karen Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Shephard, Mark Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Mlawer, Eli Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Atmospheric State and Surface The primary objective of the TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) instrument on the Aura spacecraft is the retrieval of trace gases, especially water vapor and ozone. The TES retrievals extremely useful for global monitoring of the atmospheric state, but they must be validated. The ARM sites are well instrumented and provide continuous measurements, which

36

A thermoacoustic oscillator powered by vaporized water and ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We measure the temperature difference required to drive a thermoacoustic oscillator containing air water vapor and liquid water as the working fluids. The oscillator is composed of a large tube containing an array of narrow tubes connected at one end to a tank of liquid water. When the water is heated the temperature difference across the tube array increases until thermoacoustic oscillations occur. The temperature difference at the onset of oscillation is measured to be 56 ? ° C significantly smaller (by ? 200 ? ° C ) than the temperature measured when the tank is filled with dry air instead of water. The temperature difference can be further reduced to 47 ? ° C by using ethanol instead of water.

Daisuke Noda; Yuki Ueda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fatigue Resistance of Asphalt Mixtures Affected by Water Vapor Movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation has two key objectives: the first objective is to develop a method of predicting and quantifying the amount of water that can enter into a pavement system by vapor transport; the second objective is to identify to which extent...

Tong, Yunwei

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

38

Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG07-90IDI2934,and by the Department of PetroleumSGP-TR-148 Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal Reservoir Rocks Shubo Shang Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering

Stanford University

39

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements David M. Slocum,* Thomas M such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

40

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurements of atmospheric water vapor above Mauna Kea using an infrared radiometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of atmospheric water vapor above Mauna Kea using an infrared radiometer David A in atmospheric water vapor that distort the phase coherence of incoming celestial signals. The signal received water vapor, this paper presents results obtained with a second generation IRMA operating at the James

Naylor, David A.

42

Sulfur Impregnation on Activated Carbon Fibers through H2S Oxidation for Vapor Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sulfur Impregnation on Activated Carbon Fibers through H2S Oxidation for Vapor Phase Mercury: Sulfur was impregnated onto activated carbon fibers ACFs through H2S oxidation catalyzed by the sorbent CE Database subject headings: Activated carbon; Sulfur; Mercury; Hydrogen sulfides; Oxidation

Borguet, Eric

43

Nickel catalyst faceting in plasma-enhanced direct current chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanofibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Nickel catalyst faceting in plasma-enhanced direct current chemical vapor deposition of carbon vapor deposition with Ni catalysts on the top of nanofibers. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology and crystallography of Ni catalysts, which are essential for the nucleation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

Optimization of the chemical vapor deposition process for carbon nanotubes fabrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of the chemical vapor deposition process for carbon nanotubes fabrication M. Grujicica-phase chemistry and surface chemistry model is developed to analyze, at the reactor length scale, chemical vapor (carrier gas) in the presence of cobalt catalytic particles in a cylindrical reactor. The model allows

Grujicic, Mica

45

CO-CATALYTIC ABSORPTION LAYERS FOR CONTROLLED LASER-INDUCED CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF CARBON NANOTUBES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of co-catalytic layer structures for controlled laser-induced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes is established, in which a thin Ta support layer chemically aids the initial Fe catalyst reduction. This enables a significant...

Michaelis, F.B.; Weatherup, R.S.; Bayer, B.C.; Bock, M.C.D; Sugime, H.; Caneva, S.; Robertson, J.; Baumberg, J.J.; Hofmann, S.

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

WATER VAPOR IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK OF DG Tau  

SciTech Connect

Water is key in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of comets and icy/water planets. While high-excitation water lines originating in the hot inner disk have been detected in several T Tauri stars (TTSs), water vapor from the outer disk, where most water ice reservoirs are stored, was only reported in the nearby TTS TW Hya. We present spectrally resolved Herschel/HIFI observations of the young TTS DG Tau in the ortho- and para-water ground-state transitions at 557 and 1113 GHz. The lines show a narrow double-peaked profile, consistent with an origin in the outer disk, and are {approx}19-26 times brighter than in TW Hya. In contrast, CO and [C II] lines are dominated by emission from the envelope/outflow, which makes H{sub 2}O lines a unique tracer of the disk of DG Tau. Disk modeling with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo indicates that the strong UV field, due to the young age and strong accretion of DG Tau, irradiates a disk upper layer at 10-90 AU from the star, heating it up to temperatures of 600 K and producing the observed bright water lines. The models suggest a disk mass of 0.015-0.1 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the estimated minimum mass of the solar nebula before planet formation, and a water reservoir of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} Earth oceans in vapor and {approx}100 times larger in the form of ice. Hence, this detection supports the scenario of ocean delivery on terrestrial planets by the impact of icy bodies forming in the outer disk.

Podio, L.; Dougados, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Aresu, G. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Codella, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Florence (Italy); Cabrit, S. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Nisini, B. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Sandell, G. [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Building N232, Rm. 146, P.O. Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Williams, J. P. [Institute for Astronomy (IfA), University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Testi, L. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Woitke, P. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Role of oxygen vacancies in water vapor chemisorption and CO oxidation on titania  

SciTech Connect

Titanium dioxide is widely used as support for various important catalysts. Although nonstoichiometric titania behaves as an n-type semiconductor, the nature of the defect sites is not yet fully understood. In the present investigation the water vapor adsorption and carbon monoxide oxidation on TiO[sub 2] is explained considering oxygen vacancies as the major defect. It is also shown that incorporation of an Al[sup 3+] ion in TiO[sub 2] reduces the concentration of oxygen ion vacancies and inhibits the transformation of anatase to rutile.

Sengupta, G.; Chatterjee, R.N.; Maity, G.C. (Project and Development India Ltd. Sindri, Dhanbad, Bihar (India)); Satyanarayna, C.V.V. (RSIC, Bombay (India). Indian Inst. of Tech. Powai)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Determination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

route from the cathode catalyst layer to the cathode flow channels. Water can be removed from the cellDetermination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers Jacob M: Water vapor diffusion PEMFC Water management GDL Diffusivity MPL a b s t r a c t The primary removal

Kandlikar, Satish

49

Final Report for ARM Project Measuring 4-D Water Vapor Fields with GPS  

SciTech Connect

Water vapor is a primary element in the Earth’s climate system. Atmospheric water vapor is central to cloud processes, radiation transfer, and the hydrological cycle. Using funding from Department of Energy (DOE) grant DE-FG03-02ER63327, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) developed new observational techniques to measure atmospheric water vapor and applied these techniques to measure four dimensional water vapor fields throughout the United States Southern Great Plains region. This report summarizes the development of a new observation from ground based Global Positioning System (GPS) stations called Slant Water Vapor (SW) and it’s utilization in retrieving four dimensional water vapor fields. The SW observation represents the integrated amount of water vapor between a GPS station and a transmitting satellite. SW observations provide improved temporal and spatial sampling of the atmosphere when compared to column-integrated quantities such as preciptitable water vapor (PW). Under funding from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, GPS networks in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region were deployed to retrieve SW to improve the characterization of water vapor throughout the region. These observations were used to estimate four dimensional water vapor fields using tomographic approaches and through assimilation into the MM5 numerical weather model.

Braun, John

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

50

MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN THE ARCTIC Cadeddu, Maria Argonne National Laboratory Category: Instruments A new G-band (183 GHz) vapor radiometer (GVR), developed and built by Prosensing Inc. (http://www.prosensing.com), was deployed in Barrow, Alaska, in April 2005. The radiometer was deployed as part of the ongoing Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's effort to improve water vapor retrievals in the cold, dry Arctic environment. The instrument measures brightness temperatures from four double sideband channels centered at 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz from the 183.31-GHz water vapor line. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. The GVR will remain in Barrow

51

An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes M Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition of various nanotube surface and edge reactions (e.g. adsorption of hydrocarbons and hydrogen onto the surface

Grujicic, Mica

52

Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements in supersaturated water vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rate of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapors of water was studied experimentally using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a carrier gas. Our study covers a range of nucleation rates from 3 × 10 ? 1 to 3 × 10 2 cm ? 3 s ? 1 at four isotherms: 290 300 310 and 320 K . The molecular content of critical clusters was estimated from the slopes of experimental data. The measured isothermal dependencies of nucleation rate of water on saturation ratio were compared with the prediction of the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation the empirical prediction of Wölk et al. [J. Chem. Phys.117 10 (2002)] the scaled model of Hale [Phys. Rev. A33 4156 (1986)] and the former nucleation onset data.

David Brus; Vladimír Ždímal; Ji?í Smolík

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Retrieval of water vapor profiles over ocean using SSM/I and SSM/T-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of water vapor profiles, while the SSM/I can be used to retrieve, among other things, the total integrated water vapor (TIWV) in a column of air. It is theoretically possible to use SSM/I data to supplement the SSM/T-2 data, producing more accurate water...

Blankenship, Clay Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration Robert B. Jackson,1 * Esteban G. Farley,1 David C. le Maitre,5 Bruce A. McCarl,6 Brian C. Murray7 Carbon sequestration strategies plantations feature prominently among tools for carbon sequestration (1­8). Plantations typi- cally combine

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

55

ARM - PI Product - MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govDataPI Data ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water govDataPI Data ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor 2005.02.01 - 2011.04.25 Site(s) FKB GRW HFE NIM PYE SBS General Description A new algorithm is being developed for the ARM Program to derive liquid water path (LWP) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the 2-channel (23.8 and 31.4 GHz) microwave radiometers (MWRs) deployed at ARM climate research facilities. This algorithm utilizes the "monoRTM" radiative transfer model (http://rtweb.aer.com), a combination of both an advanced statistical and physical-iterative retrieval, and brightness temperature offsets applied before the retrieval is performed. This allows perhaps the

56

Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

Grigorian, Leonid (Raymond, OH); Hornyak, Louis (Evergreen, CO); Dillon, Anne C (Boulder, CO); Heben, Michael J (Denver, CO)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

Water, Vapor, and Salt Dynamics in a Hot Repository  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a new model study examining the high temperature nuclear waste disposal concept at Yucca Mountain using MULTIFLUX, an integrated in-drift- and mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic model. The results show that a large amount of vapor flow into the drift is expected during the period of above-boiling temperatures. This phenomenon makes the emplacement drift a water/moisture attractor during the above-boiling temperature operation. The evaporation of the percolation water into the drift gives rise to salt accumulation in the rock wall, especially in the crown of the drift for about 1500 years in the example. The deposited salts over the drift footprint, almost entirely present in the fractures, may enter the drift either by rock fall or by water drippage. During the high temperature operation mode, the barometric pressure variation creates fluctuating relative humidity in the emplacement drift with a time period of approximately 10 days. Potentially wet and dry conditions and condensation on salt-laden drift wall sections may adversely affect the storage environment. Salt accumulations during the above-boiling temperature operation must be sufficiently addressed to fully understand the waste package environment during the thermal period. Until the questions are resolved, a below-boiling repository design is favored where the Alloy-22 will be less susceptible to localized corrosion. (authors)

Bahrami, Davood; Danko, George [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV, 89557 (United States); Walton, John [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University, El Paso, TX, 79968 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Desalination-of water by vapor-phase transport through hydrophobic nanopores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new approach to desalination of water whereby a pressure difference across a vapor-trapping nanopore induces selective transport of water by isothermal evaporation and condensation across the pore. Transport ...

Lee, Jongho

60

Inexpensive Near-IR Sun Photometer for Measuring Total Column Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An inexpensive two-channel near-IR sun photometer for measuring total atmospheric column water vapor (precipitable water) has been developed for use by the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) environmental science ...

David R. Brooks; Forrest M. Mims III; Richard Roettger

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling the Exchanges of Energy, Water, and Carbon Between Continents and the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Exchanges of Energy, Water, and Carbon Between Continents and the Atmosphere P. J, water vapor, and momentum across the land-atmosphere interface to be specified. These fluxes and the climate system to global change, for example, in- creasing atmospheric CO2 (1�3). Three generations

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

62

Synthesis of carbon nanotubes on diamond-like carbon by the hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by laser ablation of carbon rods, direct current arc-discharge between electrodes, or by chemical vapor emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high resolution transmission scanning electron micro- scopy natural oxide. The synthesis of the DLC films was carried out using 13.56 MHz RF-PECVD. Prior to the DLC

Hong, Byungyou

63

Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks  

SciTech Connect

The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 °C and at 200 °C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ? p/p0 ? 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130°C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ? 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated processes were not present, and no increase in water adsorption with temperature was observed

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

64

Patterned growth of single-walled carbon nanotube arrays from a vapor-deposited Fe catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patterned growth of single-walled carbon nanotube arrays from a vapor-deposited Fe catalyst H. B deposition using low-coverage vacuum-deposited iron as a catalyst. Ordered arrays of suspended nanotubes constructed directly on contacting metal electrodes of Pt/Cr patterned with catalysts. Patterning with solid

Golovchenko, Jene A.

65

Sulfurization of a carbon surface for vapor phase mercury removal II: Sulfur forms and mercury uptake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

promote the formation of organic sulfur and the presence of H2S during the cooling process increased in the presence of H2S was very effective towards Hg uptake in nitrogen. Corre- lation of mercury uptake capacitySulfurization of a carbon surface for vapor phase mercury removal ­ II: Sulfur forms and mercury

Borguet, Eric

66

Noncatalytic synthesis of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

A new method is proposed to obtain uniform arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes without catalysts. Nanotubes have been formed by carbon condensation from a hydrogen-methane gas mixture activated by a dc discharge. Structural and morphological investigations of the obtained material were performed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. It is shown that the obtained nanotubes contain no impurities that could act as catalysts. Based on these experimental data, it is concluded that the nanotube synthesis under study is noncatalytic. Possible mechanisms of this synthesis are considered.

Ismagilov, R. R., E-mail: ismagil@polly.phys.msu.ru; Shvets, P. V.; Kharin, A. Yu.; Obraztsov, A. N. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface  

SciTech Connect

Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

69

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Photoluminescence microscopy of carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition: Influence of external dielectric screening on optical transition energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photoluminescence (PL) laser microscopy was applied to determine optical transition energies E11 and E22 of individual semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) suspended on top of carbon nanotube “forests,” grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on silicon substrates. A uniform increase of E11 and E22 energies by 40–55 and 24–48meV, respectively, was found for 19 different (n,m) nanotube species suspended in air or a vacuum—relative to SWNTs in a reference water-surfactant dispersion. CVD-grown SWNTs embedded in paraffin oil and 1-methylnaphthalene show nearly the same PL peak positions as SWNTs in aqueous dispersion, indicating similar dielectric screening of excitons in SWNTs in these media.

Oliver Kiowski; Sergei Lebedkin; Frank Hennrich; Sharali Malik; Harald Rösner; Katharina Arnold; Christoph Sürgers; Manfred M. Kappes

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

Application of two-photon laser-induced fluorescence for visualization of water vapor in combustion environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations concerning the potential for the visualization of water vapor in combustion processes have been made. The water molecules were excited through a two-photon excitation...

Neij, Hans; Aldén, Marcus

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region J. Braun, T. Van Hove, S. Y. Ha, and C. Rocken GPS Science and Technology Program University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has a need for an improved capability to measure and characterize the four-dimensional distribution of water vapor within the atmosphere. Applications for this type of data include their use in radiation transfer studies, cloud-resolving and single-column models, and for the establishment of an extended time series of water vapor observations. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research's (UCAR) GPS Science and Technology (GST) Program is working with ARM to leverage the substantial investment in

73

Tropospheric Water Vapor Profiles Retrieved from Pressure-Broadened Emission Spectra at 22 GHz  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors present the analysis and the evaluation of the retrieval of tropospheric water vapor profiles from pressure-broadened emission spectra at 22 GHz measured with a ground-based microwave spectroradiometer. The spectra have a bandwidth of ...

Alexander Haefele; Niklaus Kämpfer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China); Institute of Powder Metallurgy and Advanced Ceramics, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111, 1st Section, Northern 2nd Ring Road, Chengdu (China); Yan, Qingzhi, E-mail: qzyan@ustb.edu.cn; Lang, Shaoting [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effect of Water Vapor on the Oxidation Mechanisms of a Commercial Stainless Steel for Interconnect Application in High Temperature Water Vapor Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High temperature water vapor electrolysis is one of the most promising methods...2–5 %H2O) and cathode atmospheres (10 %H2–90 %H2O). In cathode atmosphere, ageing tests performed up to 1,000 h revealed the format...

Maria Rosa Ardigo; Ioana Popa; Sébastien Chevalier; Sylvain Weber…

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A simple test method for measuring water vapor resistance of porous polymeric materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A simple test method is proposed for measuring water vapor resistance of fabrics. A piece of cotton fabric connected to a container filled with distilled water through a plastic tube was used on a hot plate to generate a saturated water vapor condition on one side of the sample. The temperature of the cotton fabric (approximation of human skin covered with sweat) was measured by a thermocouple. The water vapor resistance of the sample was determined based on the water vapor pressure gradient across the sample and the heat flux. Five types of textile fabric laminated to PU/TPU membranes, plus one type of conventional fabric, were tested by using this simple apparatus as well as the sweating guarded hot plate instrument. The results showed that good agreement was observed between these two test methods. In addition, the surface temperature of the cotton ‘skin’ varied with different fabrics. This is in accordance with the actual intended situation, i.e., the skin temperature of the body is related to the ability of clothing materials to transfer water vapor. Therefore, this simple test apparatus better simulates real-life conditions than the sweating guarded hot plate instrument.

Jianhua Huang; Chang Zhang; Xiaoming Qian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

79

Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction enhanced by desiccation and water Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

80

Structure control of carbon nanotubes using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon nanotube structures such as tube diameter, growth site, and formation density are controlled using radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) method. We have produced uniformly well-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown over the large scale area and linearly arrayed \\{MWNTs\\} grown in a selected area without any highly-sophisticated patterning process. In our RF-PECVD experiment, furthermore, individually grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) or their thin bundles are synthesized for the first time within the scope of the PECVD methods. These results indicate that PECVD method provides the high potential for the further development of nano-technology.

T. Kato; G.-H. Jeong; T. Hirata; R. Hatakeyama

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site  

SciTech Connect

The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

Ferrare, R.A.

2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

82

RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE.  

SciTech Connect

We have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. This Raman lidar system is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols (Goldsmith et al., 1998). These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. We have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (Feltz et al., 1998; Turner et al., 1999). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

FERRARE,R.A.

2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Impact of Thermal Conductivity and Diffusion Rates on Water Vapor Transport through Gas Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water management in a hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is critical for performance. The impact of thermal conductivity and water vapor diffusion coefficients in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) has been studied by a mathematical model. The fraction of product water that is removed in the vapour phase through the GDL as a function of GDL properties and operating conditions has been calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the current model enables identification of conditions when condensation occurs in each GDL component and calculation of temperature gradient across the interface between different layers, providing insight into the overall mechanism of water transport in a given cell design. Water transport mode and condensation conditions in the GDL components depend on the combination of water vapor diffusion coefficients and thermal conductivities of the GDL components. Different types of GDL and water removal scenarios have been identified and related to experimentally-determined GDL proper...

Burlatsky, S F; Gummallaa, M; Condita, D; Liua, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures P. Varanasi and Q. Zou Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York Introduction Water vapor is undoubtedly the most dominant greenhouse gas in the terrestrial atmosphere. In the two facets of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research, atmospheric remote sensing (air-borne as well as Cloud and Radiation Testbed [CART] site-based) and modeling of atmospheric radiation, the spectrum of water vapor, ranging from the microwave to the visible wavelengths, plays a significant role. Its spectrum has been the subject of many studies throughout the last century. Therefore, it is natural to presume it should be fairly well established by now. However, the need for a

85

Posters Toward an Operational Water Vapor Remote Sensing System Using the Global Positioning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Posters Toward an Operational Water Vapor Remote Sensing System Using the Global Positioning System S. I. Gutman, (a) R. B. Chadwick, (b) and D. W. Wolf (c) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado A. Simon Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science Boulder, Colorado T. Van Hove and C. Rocken University Navstar Consortium Boulder, Colorado Background Water vapor is one of the most important constituents of the free atmosphere since it is the principal mechanism by which moisture and latent heat are transported and cause "weather." The measurement of atmospheric water vapor is essential for weather and climate research as well as for operational weather forecasting. An important goal in modern weather prediction is to improve the accuracy of short-term

86

Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Over the Southern Great Plains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Over the Southern Great Plains R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. Clayton and V. Brackett Science Applications International Corporation National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. P. Tooman and J. E. M. Goldsmith Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California J. A. Ogren National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory Boulder, Colorado E. Andrews Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado

87

The exchange rate for tritiated water vapor adsorbed on silica gel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EXCHANGE RATE FOR TRITIATED WATER VAPOR ADSORBED ON SILICA GEL A Thesis by PENNY ALANE SHAMBLIN Submitted to the Cnaduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfihmnt of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1987 Major Subject: Health Physics THE EXCHANGE RATE FOR ~TED WATER VAPOR ADSORBED ON SILICA GEL A Thesis by PENNY ALANE SHAMBUN Approved as to style and content by: Milton E. McLain (Chair of Committee) Gerald A. Schla (Member) Ric ard...

Shamblin, Penny Alane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Materials, methods and devices to detect and quantify water vapor concentrations in an atmosphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

We have demonstrated that a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor coated with a nanoporous framework material (NFM) film can perform ultrasensitive water vapor detection at concentrations in air from 0.05 to 12,000 ppmv at 1 atmosphere pressure. The method is extendable to other MEMS-based sensors, such as microcantilevers, or to quartz crystal microbalance sensors. We identify a specific NFM that provides high sensitivity and selectivity to water vapor. However, our approach is generalizable to detection of other species using NFM to provide sensitivity and selectivity.

Allendorf, Mark D; Robinson, Alex L

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

Characterization and tribological application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were successfully prepared on glass substrates and surfaces of selenium drums via radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. The...

Ning Cao; Zhen-yi Fei; Yong-xin Qi; Wen-wen Chen…

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A NORMETEX MODEL 15 M3/HR WATER VAPOR PUMPING TEST  

SciTech Connect

Tests were performed using a Model 15 m{sup 3}/hr Normetex vacuum pump to determine if pump performance degraded after pumping a humid gas stream. An air feed stream containing 30% water vapor was introduced into the pump for 365 hours with the outlet pressure of the pump near the condensation conditions of the water. Performance of the pump was tested before and after the water vapor pumping test and indicated no loss in performance of the pump. The pump also appeared to tolerate small amounts of condensed water of short duration without increased noise, vibration, or other adverse indications. The Normetex pump was backed by a dual-head diaphragm pump which was affected by the condensation of water and produced some drift in operating conditions during the test.

Klein, J.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sorption-caused attenuation and delay of water-vapor signals in eddy-covariance sampling tubes and filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption and desorption (together sorption) processes in sampling tubes and filters of eddy-covariance stations cause attenuation and delay of water-vapor signals, leading to underestimation of water-vapor fluxes by tens of per cent. The aim of ...

Annika Nordbo; Pekka Kekäläinen; Erkki Siivola; Ivan Mammarella; Jussi Timonen; Timo Vesala

92

Water Vapor Transport and Moisture Budget over Eastern China: Remote Forcing from the Two Types of El Niño  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The water vapor transport and moisture budget over eastern China remotely forced by the cold-tongue (CT) and warm-pool (WP) El Niño show striking differences throughout their lifetime. The water vapor transport response is weak in the developing ...

Xiuzhen Li; Wen Zhou; Deliang Chen; Chongyin Li; Jie Song

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Measurement of Water Vapor Concentration using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunable diode laser spectroscopy and the Beer-Lambert relation has been used to measure the absorption of water vapor both in an absorption cell and in a shock tube. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a laser diagnostic capable of determining...

Barrett, Alexander B.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Summary Weusedthreemethodstomeasureboundarylayer conductance to heat transfer (gbH) and water vapor transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary Weusedthreemethodstomeasureboundarylayer conductance to heat transfer (gbH) and water vapor of transpiration). The boundary layer conductance to heat transfer is small enough that leaf temperature can become diffusion, the boundary layer around a leaf also provides resistance to the transfer of heat between a leaf

Martin, Timothy

95

2.1 RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors with the use of narrowband (~0.4 nm bandpass) filters, reduces the background skylight and, therefore

96

Water Vapor and Mechanical Work: A Comparison of Carnot and Steam Cycles OLIVIER PAULUIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the corresponding Carnot cycle. The Carnot and steam cycles can be combined into a mixed cycle that is forcedWater Vapor and Mechanical Work: A Comparison of Carnot and Steam Cycles OLIVIER PAULUIS Center in the atmosphere is discussed here by comparing two idealized heat engines: the Carnot cycle and the steam cycle

Pauluis, Olivier M.

97

Water Vapor Radiometry : Outline of Goals and Tasks for the Spring Semester 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that can accu­ rately measure the spectrum of the water vapor emis­ sion. The current receivers follow, as in a conventional re­ ceiver, the correlation receiver splits the rf signal into two with a splitter that follows the feed horn. Both branches are mixed with a carefully controlled ther­ mal load. A 180 ffi phase shift

Backer, Don

98

Interannual Variations of Stratospheric Water Vapor in MLS Observations and Climate Model Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By analyzing the almost-decade-long record of water vapor measurements from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on the NASA Aura satellite and by detailed diagnostic analysis of the results from state-of-the art climate model simulations, ...

Yoshio Kawatani; Jae N. Lee; Kevin Hamilton

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Time-to-Detect Trends in Precipitable Water Vapor with Varying Measurement Error  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study determined the theoretical time-to-detect (TTD) global climate model (GCM) precipitable water vapor (PWV) 100-yr trends when realistic measurement errors are considered. Global trends ranged from 0.055 to 0.072 mm yr?1 and varied ...

Jacola Roman; Robert Knuteson; Steve Ackerman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Water Vapor Budget in a Developing Tropical Cyclone and Its Implication for Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evolution of the water vapor budget from the tropical wave stage to the tropical cyclone stage is examined using a high-resolution numerical model simulation. The focus is on a time window from 27 h prior to genesis to 9 h after genesis, and the ...

Cody Fritz; Zhuo Wang

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Models of the atmospheric water vapor budget for the Texas HIPLEX area: by Steven Francis Williams.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CELLS Im ALL CASES zi III 500 LI IL' IL II) LI IZ 550 650 700 750 GOC r 0 r r I V 650 los 106 LOSS (gs ) 106 I09 GAIN Eiq ?13 Local ate-of ? ch, . iioe in the total IIaSS Of Water Vapor in 50-mb layers (q 6 l) over the Texas HTPLL... and vertical tzanspo" 2. of water vapor through boundaries of 50-mb layers in (g s r) over the Texas HIPLEX area averaged ior types of convective activity local r-te-of-change in. the total in-ss of water , ? 1 vaoor in 50-mb 1 yers (g s ) over the Texas...

Williams, Steven Francis

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sensitive and selective detection of hydrocarbon/water vapor mixtures with a nanoporous silicon microcantilever  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We have developed a sensitive and selective sensor for hydrocarbon/water vapor mixtures using nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy with a porous silicon (P-Si) microcantilever. Facile and direct anodization process is utilized to fabricate vertically aligned nanopores of 20–50 nm diameters on a plain silicon microcantilever. The effective Young's modulus and surface area of a P-Si microcantilever can be easily controlled by the thickness of the anodized P-Si layer. Here we demonstrate the detection of 1 wt% naphtha/water vapor mixtures using nanoporous cantilever IR spectroscopy. Nanoporous nature of the cantilever surface enhances its thermomechanical sensitivity. In addition, trapping the volatile hydrocarbon molecules in the nanowells increases the analyte concentration on the surface. Nanomechanical IR spectra of adsorbed vapors were obtained by plotting the deflection amplitudes of the microcantilever as a function of the illuminating IR wavenumber. The mass of the adsorbed vapors was determined from variations in the resonance frequency of the cantilever.

Dongkyu Lee; Omid Zandieh; Seonghwan Kim; Sangmin Jeon; Thomas Thundat

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Electromagnetic Assisted Carbonated Water Flooding in Heavy Oil Recovery:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbonated water flooding (CWF) is an enhanced oil recovery method where an oil reservoir is flooded with water containing dissolved CO2. The CO2 is then… (more)

Son Tran, T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference...

Manning, Norman Willis William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Water Vapor Adsorption Effect on Silica Surface Electrostatic Patterning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Even after a few centuries of research by distinguished authors, electrostatic charging of insulators is still poorly known, and it often goes out of control because the identity of charge carriers is not known, in nearly every case in the laboratory or in a practical situation. ... (16-22) Three different mechanisms for contact electrification were recently emphasized by McCarty and Whitesides: electron transfer for contact between metals or semiconductors, ion transfer for contact involving materials that contain mobile ions, and asymmetric partitioning of hydroxide ions between adsorbed layers of water for contact involving nonionic and insulating materials. ... (15, 48, 49) The apparatus was built using two aluminum concentric cylinders (electrically insulated from each other by using polyethylene foam) connected by a coaxial cable to a Keithley instrument model 610C electrometer that was used in the charge measurement mode. ...

Rubia F. Gouveia; Carlos A. R. Costa; Fernando Galembeck

2008-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effect of water vapor/hydrogen environments on niobium, B-66 niobium alloy, tantalum, and Ta-10W alloy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the results of an experimental investigation of the effect of water vapor/hydrogen environments on the mechanical properties of niobium, B-66 niobium alloy, tantalum, and Ta-10W alloy are presented. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens of these materials in water vapor/hydrogen mixture ratios of 1 and 3. The water vapor/hydrogen environment caused strength reductions on tantalum and Ta-10W and ductility reductions on all four materials. The degree and causes of embrittlement were a complex function of temperature.

Walter, R.J.; Bentle, G.G.; Chandler, W.T. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols R. A. Ferrare and K. D. Evans (a) Hughes STX Corporation Lanham, Maryland S. H. Melfi and D. N. Whiteman NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland The principal objective of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is to develop a better understanding of the atmospheric radiative balance in order to improve the parameterization of radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs) which are used to study climate change. Meeting this objective requires detailed measurements of both water vapor and aerosols since these atmospheric constituents affect the radiation balance directly, through scattering and absorption of solar and

108

Outdoor field evaluation of passive tritiated water vapor samplers at Canadian power reactor sites  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is one of several radioactive nuclides routinely monitored in and around CANDU{reg_sign} (CANada Deuterium Uranium) power reactor facilities. Over the last ten years, passive samplers have replaced active sampling devices for sampling tritiated water vapor in the workplace at many CANDU stations. The potential of passive samplers for outdoor monitoring has also been realized. This paper presents the result of a 1-y field trial carried out at all five Canadian CANDU reactor sites. The results indicate that passive samplers can be used at most sampling locations to measure tritiated water vapor in air concentrations as low as 1 Bq m{sup -3} over a 30-d sampling period. Only in one of the five sampling locations was poor agreement observed between active and passive monitoring data. This location, however, was very windy and it is suspected that the gusty winds were the source of the discrepancies observed. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Wood, M.J. [Chalk River Lab., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ice-water and liquid-vapor phase transitions by a Ginzburg–Landau model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model for the first order phase transitions as ice-water and liquid-vapor is proposed using the Ginzburg–Landau equation for the order parameter ? . In this model the density ? is composed of two quantities ? 0 and ? 1 such that 1 / ? = 1 / ? 0 + 1 / ? 1 where ? 1 is strictly connected to the order parameter ? . By means of this decomposition we are able to represent the Andrew diagram without the use of the heuristic van der Waals equation.

Mauro Fabrizio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Enriched stable carbon isotopes in the pore waters of carbonate sediments dominated by seagrasses: Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enriched stable carbon isotopes in the pore waters of carbonate sediments dominated by seagrasses inorganic carbon (d13 C-DIC) were carried out in shallow water carbonate sediments of the Great Bahamas Bank (GBB) to further examine sediment­seagrass relationships and to more quantitatively describe the cou

Burdige, David

111

Tensile, water vapor barrier and antimicrobial properties of PLA/nanoclay composite films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

PLA-based composite films with different types of nanoclays, such as Cloisite Na+, Cloisite 30B and Cloisite 20A, were prepared using a solvent casting method and their tensile, water vapor barrier and antimicrobial properties were tested. Tensile strength (TS), elongation at break (E), and water vapor permeability (WVP) of control PLA film were 50.45 ± 0.75 MPa, 3.0 ± 0.1%, and 1.8 × 10?11 g m/m2 s Pa, respectively. TS and E of nanocomposite films prepared with 5 g of clay/100 g of PLA decreased 10–20% and 11–17%, respectively, depending on the clays used. On the contrary, WVP of the nanocomposite films decreased 6–33% through nanoclay compounding. Among the clay types used, Cloisite 20A was the most effective in improving the water vapor barrier property while sacrificing tensile properties the least. The effect of clay concentration tested using Cloisite 20A showed a significant decrease in TS and WVP, with increases in clay content. Among the PLA/clay composite films tested, only PLA/Cloisite 30B composite film showed a bacteriostatic function against Listeria monocytogenes.

Jong-Whan Rhim; Seok-In Hong; Chang-Sik Ha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts  

SciTech Connect

These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation.

Wu, X.; Diak, G.R.; Hayden, C.M.; Young, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Multi-reanalysis comparison of variability in column water vapor and its analysis increment associated with Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study conducts a multi-reanalysis comparison of variability in column water vapor (CWV) represented in three reanalysis products (JRA-55, JRA-25, and ERA-Interim) associated with Madden–Julian Oscillation (MJO) in boreal winter, with emphasis ...

Satoru Yokoi

114

Tunable structures and properties of electrospun regenerated silk fibroin mats annealed in water vapor at different times and temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regenerated silk fibroin (SF) mats were fabricated using electrospinning technique, followed by mild water vapor annealing to effectively tune the structures and improve the mechanical properties of the mats at different annealing times and temperatures. ...

Xiangyu Huang, Suna Fan, Alhadi Ibrahim Mohammed Altayp, Yaopeng Zhang, Huili Shao, Xuechao Hu, Minkai Xie, Yuemin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Glacial Cooling in the Tropics: Exploring the Roles of Tropospheric Water Vapor, Surface Wind Speed, and Boundary Layer Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is a modeling study of possible roles for tropospheric water vapor, surface wind speed, and boundary layer processes in glacial cooling in the Tropics. The authors divide the Tropics into a region of persistent deep convection and a ...

Richard Seager; Amy C. Clement; Mark A. Cane

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Representation of Water Vapor and Its Dependence on Vertical Resolution in the Hadley Centre Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulations of the Hadley Centre Atmospheric Climate Model version 3, HadAM3, are used to investigate the impact of increasing vertical resolution on simulated climates. In particular, improvements in the representation of water vapor and ...

V. D. Pope; J. A. Pamment; D. R. Jackson; A. Slingo

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work performed on this project from October 2004 through March 2005. In previous work, a surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) was shown to be an effective system for removing BTEX contaminants from produced water. Additional work on this project demonstrated that a compost-based biofilter could biodegrade the BTEX contaminants found in the SMZ regeneration waste gas stream. However, it was also determined that the BTEX concentrations in the waste gas stream varied significantly during the regeneration period and the initial BTEX concentrations were too high for the biofilter to handle effectively. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of using a passive adsorption column placed upstream of the biofilter to attenuate the peak gas-phase VOC concentrations delivered to the biofilter during the SMZ regeneration process. In preparation for the field test of the SMZ/VPB treatment system in New Mexico, a pilot-scale SMZ system was also designed and constructed during this reporting period. Finally, a cost and feasibility analysis was also completed. To investigate the merits of the passive buffering system during SMZ regeneration, two adsorbents, SMZ and granular activated carbon (GAC) were investigated in flow-through laboratory-scale columns to determine their capacity to handle steady and unsteady VOC feed conditions. When subjected to a toluene-contaminated air stream, the column containing SMZ reduced the peak inlet 1000 ppmv toluene concentration to 630 ppmv at a 10 second contact time. This level of buffering was insufficient to ensure complete removal in the downstream biofilter and the contact time was longer than desired. For this reason, using SMZ as a passive buffering system for the gas phase contaminants was not pursued further. In contrast to the SMZ results, GAC was found to be an effective adsorbent to handle the peak contaminant concentrations that occur early during the SMZ regeneration process. At a one second residence time, the GAC bed reduced peak contaminant concentrations by 97%. After the initial peak, the inlet VOC concentration in the SMZ regeneration gas stream drops exponentially with time. During this period, the contaminants on the GAC subsequently desorbed at a nearly steady rate over the next 45 hours resulting in a relatively steady effluent concentration of approximately 25 ppm{sub v}. This lower concentration is readily degradable by a downstream vapor phase biofilter (VPB) and the steady nature of the feed stream will prevent the biomass in the VPB from enduring starvation conditions between SMZ regeneration cycles. Repetitive sorption and desorption cycles that would be expected in the field were also investigated. It was determined that although the GAC initially lost some VOC sorption capacity, the adsorption and desorption profiles stabilized after approximately 6 cycles indicating that a GAC bed should be suitable for continuous operation. In preparation for the pilot field testing of the SMZ/VPB system, design, ''in-house'' construction and testing of the field system were completed during this project period. The design of the SMZ system for the pilot test was based on previous investigations by the PI's in Wyoming, 2002 and on analyses of the produced water at the field site in New Mexico. The field tests are scheduled for summer, 2005. A cost survey, feasibility of application and cost analyses were completed to investigate the long term effectiveness of the SMZ/VPB system as a method of treating produced water for re-use. Several factors were investigated, including: current costs to treat and dispose of produced water, end-use water quality requirements, and state and federal permitting requirements.

Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

2005-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Coupled Carbon/Water Fluxes in Complex Terrain, Water-Limited Forests Investigators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupled Carbon/Water Fluxes in Complex Terrain, Water-Limited Forests Investigators: Karen Humes of quantifying the magnitude, timing, distribution and coupling of carbon and water fluxes in mountainous forestlands. This includes one segment of the continuum of carbon and water flow from the "forest to the sea

Walden, Von P.

119

Breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 SCIENCE Breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapour, inert gases. On the basis of proton affinity, the major constituents of air and breath (nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide

120

Contribution of water vapor pressure to pressurization of plutonium dioxide storage containers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pressurization of long-term storage containers filled with materials meeting the US DOE storage standard is of concern.1 2 For example temperatures within storage containers packaged according to the standard and contained in 9975 shipping packages that are stored in full view of the sun can reach internal temperatures of 250?°C.3 Twenty five grams of water (0.5 wt.%) at 250?°C in the storage container with no other material present would result in a pressure of 412 psia which is limited by the amount of water. The pressure due to the water can be substantially reduced due to interactions with the stored material. Studies of the adsorption of water by PuO 2 and surface interactions of water with PuO 2 show that adsorption of 0.5 wt.% of water is feasible under many conditions and probable under high humidity conditions.4 5 6 However no data are available on the vapor pressure of water over plutonium dioxide containing materials that have been exposed to water.

D. Kirk Veirs; John S. Morris; Dane R. Spearing

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Oxidation of zirconium alloys in 2.5 kPa water vapor for tritium readiness.  

SciTech Connect

A more reactive liner material is needed for use as liner and cruciform material in tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBAR) in commercial light water nuclear reactors (CLWR). The function of these components is to convert any water that is released from the Li-6 enriched lithium aluminate breeder material to oxide and hydrogen that can be gettered, thus minimizing the permeation of tritium into the reactor coolant. Fourteen zirconium alloys were exposed to 2.5 kPa water vapor in a helium stream at 300 C over a period of up to 35 days. Experimental alloys with aluminum, yttrium, vanadium, titanium, and scandium, some of which also included ternaries with nickel, were included along with a high nitrogen impurity alloy and the commercial alloy Zircaloy-2. They displayed a reactivity range of almost 500, with Zircaloy-2 being the least reactive.

Mills, Bernice E.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures  

SciTech Connect

Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 C). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

Walter G. Luscher; David J. Senor; Keven K. Clayton; Glen R. Longhurst

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Method of condensing vaporized water in situ to treat tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a first portion of the formation. Conditions may be controlled in the formation so that water vaporized by the heaters in the first portion is selectively condensed in a second portion of the formation. At least some of the fluids may be produced from the formation.

Hsu, Chia-Fu (Rijswijk, NL)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the projections, reducing the carbon intensity of theprojections use renewable energy as a means of reducing the carbon intensity

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into carbon dioxide (CO2) heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to adapt water heating technology to meet U.S. market requirements, including specifications, cost, and performance targets. Carbon dioxide is a refrigerant with a global warming potential (GWP) of 1. The CO2 heat pump water heater research seeks to develop an improved life cycle climate performance compared to conventional refrigerants. For example, R134a, another type of refrigerant, has a GWP of 1,300. Project Description This project seeks to develop a CO2-based heat pump water heater (HPWH)

126

Carbon promoted water electrolysis to produce hydrogen at room temperature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the work was to conduct water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production. The electrochemical gasification of carbons… (more)

Ranganathan, Sukanya.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Climatological aspects of the balance of water-vapor in the atmosphere overlying the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Water-Vapor in the Atmosphere Overlying the Gulf of Mexico (August 1968) Allen Dean Cummings, B, S. , Baylor EEniversity Directed by: Dr, Guy A, Franceschini Aerological data from ten observing stations around the perimeter of the Gulf of Mexico... for the period, . Tune 1962 through May 1966 were used to study the water balance of the atmosphere ove. - the Gulf. For each of forty-ci ht months, average vector. components of water-vapor transfer at sixteen levels in the atmosphere were computed...

Cummings, Allen Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride to examine the effects of carbon tetrachloride concentration and temperature on the morphology of carbon with increasing carbon tetrachloride concentration. Step bunching and pinning was observed at a IV/III ratio

Li, Lian

129

Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development of the cycle and have gained an in-depth understanding of the governing fundamental knowledge, based on the laws of physics and thermodynamics and verified with our testing results. Through this research, we are identifying optimal working fluid and operating conditions to eventually demonstrate the core technology for space cooling or other applications.

Hosni, Mohammad H.

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Comparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor in Observational and Model Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

The global water vapor distribution for five observational based data sets and three GCM integrations are compared. The variables considered are the mean and standard deviation values of the precipitable water for the entire atmospheric column and the 500 to 300 hPa layer for January and July. The observationally based sets are the radiosonde data of Ross and Elliott, the ERA and NCEP reanalyses, and the NVAP blend of sonde and satellite data. The three GCM simulations all use the NCAR CCM3 as the atmospheric model. They include: a AMIP type simulation using observed SSTs for the period 1979 to 1993, the NCAR CSM 300 year coupled ocean--atmosphere integration, and a CSM integration with a 1% CO2 increase per year. The observational data exhibit some serious inconsistencies. There are geographical patterns of differences related to interannual variations and national instrument biases. It is clear that the proper characterization of water vapor is somewhat uncertain. Some conclusions about these data appear to be robust even given the discrepancies. The ERA data are too dry especially in the upper levels. The observational data evince much better agreement in the data rich Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern. Distinct biases are quite pronounced over the Southern Ocean. The mean values and particularly the standard deviations of the three reanalyses are very dependent upon the GCM used as the assimilation vehicle for the analyses. This is made clear by the much enhanced tropical variability in the NCEP/DOE/ AMIP reanalyses compared the initial NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis. The NCAR CCM3 shows consistent evidence of a dry bias. The 1% CO2 experiment shows a very similar pattern of disagreement with the sonde data as the other integrations, once account is taken of the warming trend. No new modes of difference are evident in the 1% CO2 experiment. All the CCM3 runs indicated too much Tropical variability especially in the western Tropical Pacific and Southeast Asia. A EOF analysis of the interannual variations of the zonally averaged precipitable water and the 500 to 300 hPa layer reveals fundamental differences in the structure of the variations. The impact of ENSO and variations of the ITCZ have only a low level of correspondence between the observed data, much less the simulations. It is apparent that an adequate characterization of the climatology of the global water vapor distribution is not yet at hand.

Boyle, J.S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A QSPR Study of the Solubility of Gases and Vapors in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

QSPR correlation equations were developed for the prediction of the solubilities of organic gases and vapors in water. ... The Ostwald solubility coefficient (L) is defined as the ratio of the equilibrium concentrations of a gaseous compound in the liquid and in the gas phase (eq 1), where a superscript w (Lw) usually denotes water as a solvent. ... Table 2) are as follows:? the energy gap between HOMO and LUMO (EHOMO ? ELUMO), the numbers of nitrogen atoms and of oxygen atoms in the molecule, and the most negative partial charge weighted topological electronic index43a (PCWTE) defined by eq 7, where qi and qj are the Zefirov partial charges43b of the bonded atoms, rij is the respective bond lengths, and Qmin is the most negative partial charge. ...

Alan R. Katritzky; Lan Mu; Mati Karelson

1996-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Isotope 18O/16O ratio measurements of water vapor by use of the 950-nm wavelength region with cavity ring-down and photoacoustic spectroscopic techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two optical methods, cavity ring-down spectroscopy and photoacoustic spectroscopy, are applied to the measurement of the isotope ratio 18O/16O in water-vapor...

Samura, Ken; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Hayashida, Akira; Kagi, Eriko; Ishiwata, Takashi; Matsumi, Yutaka

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Low-level wind maxima over the western Gulf of Mexico and their role in water vapor advection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure gradient favorable for the maintenance of a LLJ over the western Gulf. The LLT along the South Texas coast contributed to large northward fluxes of water vapor. The western coast of the Gulf of Mexico accounted for 12% more water vapor... stations 33 8 As in Figure 7 except the NGM and radiosonde observation from along the eastern Gulf coast are being compared 34 9 As in Figure 7 except the NGM and radiosonde observations from along the western Gulf coast are being compared 36 10...

Engel, Gregory Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Thermodynamics of Water Entry in Hydrophobic Channels of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments and computer simulations demonstrate that water spontaneously fills the hydrophobic cavity of a carbon nanotube. To gain a quantitative thermody- namic understanding of this phenomenon, we use the recently developed Two Phase Thermodynamics (2PT) method to compute translational and rotational entropies of confined water molecules inside single-walled carbon nanotubes and show that the increase in energy of a water molecule inside the nanotube is compensated by the gain in its rotational entropy. The confined water is in equilibrium with the bulk wa- ter and the Helmholtz free energy per water molecule of confined water is the same as that in the bulk within the accuracy of the simulation results. A comparison of translational and rotational spectra of water molecules confined in carbon nanotubes with that of bulk water shows significant shifts in the positions of the spectral peaks that are directly related to the tube radius.

Hemant Kumar; Biswaroop Mukherjee; Shiang-Tai Lin Chandan Dasgupta; A. K. Sood; Prabal K. Maiti

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results H. E. Revercomb, R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, F. A. Best, and R. G. Dedecker University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin H. B. Howell National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Systems Design and Applications Branch Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Accurate and spectrally detailed observations of the thermal emission from radiatively important atmospheric gases, aerosols, and clouds are now being provided to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data base by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) prototype at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. Spectra over the range from 520 to 3000 cm -1 (3 to 19 microns) with a resolution of 0.5 cm

136

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-128 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added Product April 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

137

Assimilable Organic Carbon (AOC) in Drinking Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments in water treatment The removal in water treatment of microorganisms causing the so-called “water-borne” diseases and the prevention of contamination of drinking water with these orga...

D. van der Kooij

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). 1. Introduction Water vapor is the key atmosphericTen Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to Deep Convection ZHENGZHAO LUO, DIETER KLEY,* AND RICHARD H. JOHNSON

Lombardi, John R.

139

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the embodied energy in drinking water supply systems: a caselosses to 5% of total drinking water supply for threeResearch Council. Drinking Water Distribution Systems:

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Portable Eddy Covariance System for the Measurement of Ecosystem–Atmosphere Exchange of CO2, Water Vapor, and Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To facilitate the study of flux heterogeneity within a region, the authors have designed and field-tested a portable eddy covariance system to measure exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. The ...

D. P. Billesbach; M. L. Fischer; M. S. Torn; J. A. Berry

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A three-beam water vapor sensor system for combustion diagnostics using a 1390 nm tunable diode laser  

SciTech Connect

H{sub 2}O(v) is an important species in combustion and hypersonic flow measurements because it is a primary combustion product. Measurements of water vapor can be used to determine performance parameters, such as extent and efficiency of combustion in propulsion and aerodynamics facilities. Water vapor concentration measurement in these high-temperature hypervelocity combustion conditions requires very high sensitivity and fast time response. A three-beam diode laser H{sub 2}O(v) measurement system for nonintrusive combustion diagnostics has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center and successfully tested and installed at GASL NASA HYPULSE facility for routine operation. The system was built using both direct laser absorption spectroscopy and frequency modulation laser spectroscopy. The output beam from a distributed feedback (DFB) InGaAsP diode laser (emitting around 1.39 {micro}m) is split into three equal-powered equal-distanced parallel beams with separation of 9 mm. With three beams, the authors are able to obtain water vapor number densities at three locations. Frequency modulation spectroscopy technique is used to achieve high detection sensitivity. The diode laser is modulated at radio frequency (RF), while the wavelength of the diode laser is tuned to scan over a strong water vapor absorption line. The detected RF signal is then demodulated at the fundamental frequency of the modulation (one-F demodulation). A working model and a computer software code have been developed for data process and data analysis. Water vapor number density measurements are achieved with consideration of temperature dependence. Experimental results and data analysis will be presented.

Wang, L.G. [Coll. of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Vay, S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Vapor Corrosion Response of Low Carbon Steel Exposed to Simulated High Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

A program to resolve the issues associated with potential vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion in the Type III high level waste tanks is in place. The objective of the program is to develop understanding of vapor space (VSC) and liquid/air interface (LAIC) corrosion to ensure a defensible technical basis to provide accurate corrosion evaluations with regard to vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. The results of the FY05 experiments are presented here. The experiments are an extension of the previous research on the corrosion of tank steel exposed to simple solutions to corrosion of the steel when exposed to complex high level waste simulants. The testing suggested that decanting and the consequent residual species on the tank wall is the predominant source of surface chemistry on the tank wall. The laboratory testing has shown that at the boundary conditions of the chemistry control program for solutions greater than 1M NaNO{sub 3}{sup -}. Minor and isolated pitting is possible within crevices in the vapor space of the tanks that contain stagnant dilute solution for an extended period of time, specifically when residues are left on the tank wall during decanting. Liquid/air interfacial corrosion is possible in dilute stagnant solutions, particularly with high concentrations of chloride. The experimental results indicate that Tank 50 would be most susceptible to the potential for liquid/air interfacial corrosion or vapor space corrosion, with Tank 49 and 41 following, since these tanks are nearest to the chemistry control boundary conditions. The testing continues to show that the combination of well-inhibited solutions and mill-scale sufficiently protect against pitting in the Type III tanks.

Wiersma, B

2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Charge transfer effects of ions at the liquid water/vapor interface  

SciTech Connect

Charge transfer (CT), the movement of small amounts of electron density between non-bonded pairs, has been suggested as a driving force for a variety of physical processes. Herein, we examine the effect of CT on ion adsorption to the water liquid-vapor interface. Using a CT force field for molecular dynamics, we construct a potential of mean force (PMF) for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cl{sup ?}, and I{sup ?}. The PMFs were produced with respect to an average interface and an instantaneous interface. An analysis of the PMF relative to the instantaneous surface reveals that the area in which the anions experience a free energy minimum is quite narrow, and the cations feel a steeply repulsive free energy near the interface. CT is seen to have only minor effects on the overall free energy profiles. However, the long-ranged effects of ions are highlighted by the CT model. Due to CT, the water molecules at the surface become charged, even when the ion is over 15 Å away from the surface.

Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W., E-mail: srick@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

A study of oil displacement by carbonated water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A STUDY OF OIL DISPLACEMENT BY CARBONATED WATER A Thesis by Roohollah Partovi-N. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1988... Major Subject: Petroleum Fn ineerin A STUDY OF OIL DISPLACEMENT BY CARBONATED WATER A Thesis by Roohollah Partovi-N. Approved as to style and content by: ( irman of mmittee) M mber) (Head of partment) (Member) January 1968 CP9292...

Partovi-Najafabadi, Roohollah

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Drinking Water Problems: Benzene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their water. Activated charcoal or granular activated carbon Cellulose fibers Unfiltered water inlet Filtered water outlet Carbon granules Cellulose fibers Cellulose fibers Figure 2: Granular activated carbon (GAC) filter (adapted from Parrott et al...). filters used to improve the taste or remove odor of the water also can remove some contaminants in water supplies. These filters are effective in removing vola- tile organic compounds which easily vaporize into the atmosphere under normal conditions...

Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Mass Spectroscopy and Reaction Studies of Laser-Vaporized Clusters from Metal-Doped Carbon Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C50 + LaC60 + (40) 30 40 50 60 70 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) (a) Positive La Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) C43 ­ C44 ­ Mass (amu) LaC32 ­ (a) (b) Fig. 2 Even distribution. 440 460 480 500 36 38 40 42 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b

Maruyama, Shigeo

147

Tropical Anvil Characteristics and Water Vapor of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL): Impact of Homogeneous Freezing Parameterizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Freezing Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Freezing Parameterizations on Tropical Anvil Characteristics and Water Vapor Content of the TTL Jiwen Fan Climate Physics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contributed by: Jennifer Comstock, Mikhail Ovtchinnikov, Sally McFarlane, and Greg McFarquhar OBJECTIVES Look into the effects of the commonly used heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing parameterizations on anvil properties and water vapor content in the TTL for the deep convective clouds developed in the contrasting environments. Examine the impact of the immersion-freezing on homogeneous freezing process. Homogeneous freezing parameterizations (HFPs) 1) Koop et al. (2000): J r depends on the water activity of the solution and is independent of the nature of solute.

148

Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies  

SciTech Connect

A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C. [East China University of Chemical Technology, Shanghai (China)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Effect of low steam/carbon ratio on water gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by reverse co-precipitation and an industrial catalyst were used for the low-temperature water gas shift reaction. The catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis (atomic absorption spectroscopy), BET surface area, nitrous oxide chemisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and catalytic activity in the target reaction. The catalyst prepared by reverse co-precipitation showed higher BET and copper surface areas, as well as higher catalytic activity. XRD patterns showed that the aurichalcite and hydrozincite precursors were converted into crystalline CuO and ZnO oxides when calcined in air at 623 K. TPR profiles revealed that Cu(I) oxide forms prior to Cu. Binding energies corresponding to several copper states on fresh catalysts were observed by XPS, but copper was in the metallic state during the reaction conditions (reduced catalyst). By varying the catalytic reaction conditions, such as vapor/carbon ratio and the time of contact, it is possible to obtain different conversion rates of carbon monoxide and thus operate under conditions of lower vapor consumption.

Renan Tavares Figueiredo; André Luis Dantas Ramos; Heloysa Martins Carvalho de Andrade; J.L.G. Fierro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Corrosion of aluminum-uranium alloys in water vapor at 200 C  

SciTech Connect

Specimens of aluminum-uranium alloys at 10 and 18 wt.% uranium were exposed to a saturated water vapor condition at 200 C up to about 12 weeks and compared to previous results for aluminum 1100. The aluminum-uranium materials exhibited a range of initial corrosion rates and approached similar rates with the formation of a passive film of boehmite (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot}H{sub 2}O). The initial corrosion rates of the aluminum-uranium materials were one to four times higher than that for aluminum 1100. It is postulated that a micro-galvanic coupling between the large UAl{sub 4} particles and the aluminum matrix has caused this difference. Sectioning the exposed specimens shows different characteristics of the oxide layers. In the oxide on the aluminum-10% uranium alloy (Al-10%U), small uranium aluminide particles can be seen in a boehmite matrix and do not seem to be corroded. The oxide film on the aluminum-18% uranium alloy (Al-18%U) appears to have two distinct oxide layers. The outer layer has mass aggregates in a boehmite matrix, while the inner layer contains UAl{sub 4} particles as in the case of Al-10%U.

Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.; Barrett, K.Y.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Corrosion of Aluminum-Uranium Alloys in Water Vapor at 200\\260C  

SciTech Connect

Coupons of aluminum-uranium alloys at 10 and 18 weight percent were exposed to a saturated water vapor condition at 200 degrees C up to about 1500 hours and compared to previous results for aluminum 1100. The aluminum-uranium materials exhibited a range of initial corrosion rates and approached similar rates with the formation of a passive film of boehmite (Al2O3oH2O). The cast and extruded 10 percent uranium, having a primary aluminum-eutectic microstructure, was more corrosion resistant than the 18% cast and extruded. The initial corrosion rates of the aluminum-uranium materials were one to four times higher than that for aluminum 1100. It is postulated that a micro-galvanic coupling between the large UAl4 particles and the aluminum matrix has caused the variation. Sectioning the exposed specimens shows different characteristics of the oxide layers. In the case of the cast and extruded Al-10 percent U alloy, small uranium aluminide particles can be seen in the boehmite matrix and do not seem to be corroded. The oxide film of the Al-18 percent U alloy appears to have two distinct oxide layers. The outer layer has mass aggregates formed in the aluminum oxide matrix, while the inner layer contains UAl4 particles as in the case of Al-10 percent U

Lam, P.S.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Optimization of the Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes on FeCo(Ni)/SiO2 Aerogel Catalysts by Statistical Design of Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on optimizing the catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) from ethene over supported transition metal SiO2 nanocomposite aerogels using the statistical design of experiments (DOE) approach. ... The NIST/SEMATECH e-Handbook of Statistical Methods, http://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook/ is acknowledged for DoE-related information. ...

László Vanyorek; Danilo Loche; Hajnalka Katona; Maria Francesca Casula; Anna Corrias; Zoltán Kónya; Ákos Kukovecz; Imre Kiricsi

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Responsibility of electric resistance of polyethyleneimine-grafted carbon black against alcohol vapor and humidity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystalline polyethyleneimine (PEI(C)) was successfully grafted onto carbon black surface by direct condensation of imino groups of PEI with carboxyl groups on the surface using N,N?-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as a...

Norio Tsubokawa; Sachio Yoshikawa; Kiyotaka Maruyama; Tomoaki Ogasawara…

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

3708 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 47, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 Retrieval of Atmospheric Water Vapor Density With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3708 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 47, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 Retrieval, remote sensing, water vapor. Manuscript received November 1, 2008; revised May 2, 2009 and August 8, 2009 the latent heat of vaporization is a principal mechanism for the transport of energy from the equatorial

Reising, Steven C.

155

Method and apparatus for simulating atomospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO.sub.2  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth's surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO.sub.2 and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO.sub.2 and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO.sub.2 and moisture.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

Sopori, B.L.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Glass softening, crystallization, and vaporization of nano-aggregates of Amorphous Solid Water: Fast Scanning Calorimetry studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast scanning calorimetry (FSC) was employed to investigate glass softening dynamics in amorphous solid water (ASW) nano-aggregates with thicknesses ranging from 2 to 20 nm. ASW nano-aggregates were prepared by vapor-deposition on the surface of a tungsten filament near 141 K and then heated at a rate of 100 kK/s. The resulting thermogram complex endo- and exothermal features were analyzed using a simple model. The results of the analysis show that glass softening of ASW nano-aggregates takes place at 160 K and vaporization of ASW nano-aggregates can take place at temperatures as low as 185 K. The results of these studies are discussed in conjunction with results of past studies of glass softening dynamics in water in various confining geometries.

Deepanjan Bhattacharya; Liam OReilly; Vlad Sadtchenko

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Investigation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in flemish drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the study was to investigate the drinking water supplied to majority of residents of Flanders in Belgium. Over 500 water samples were collected from different locations, after particular and complete treatment procedure to evaluate the efficiency of each treatment step in production of biologically stable drinking water. In this study assimilable organic carbon (AOC) was of our interest and was assumed as a parameter responsible for water biostability. The influence of seasons and temperature changes on AOC content was also taken into account. The AOC in most of the non-chlorinated product water of the studied treatment plants could not meet the biostability criteria of 10 ?g/l, resulting in the mean AOC concentration of 50 ?g/l. However, majority of the examined chlorinated water samples were consistent with proposed criteria of 50–100 ?g/l for systems maintaining disinfectant residual. Here, mean AOC concentration of 72 ?g/l was obtained. Granular activated carbon filtration was helpful in diminishing AOC content of drinking water; however, the nutrient removal was enhanced by biological process incorporated into water treatment (biological activated carbon filtration). Disinfection by means of chlorination and ozonation increased the water AOC concentration while the ultraviolet irradiation showed no impact on the AOC content. Examination of seasonal AOC variations showed similar fluctuations in six units with the highest values in summer and lowest in winter.

Monika Polanska; Koen Huysman; Chris van Keer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Petroleum contaminated ground-water: Remediation using activated carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground-water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products during extraction and processing operations is a serious and a growing environmental problem in Nigeria. Consequently, a study of the use of activated carbon (AC) in the clean up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination to a more acceptable level. In the experiments described, crude-oil contamination of ground water was simulated under laboratory conditions using ground-water samples collected from existing hand-dug wells at Eagle Island, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Different masses of the absorbent (i.e., activated carbon) were then added to the samples of ground water. The so treated water samples were left to equilibrate for 7 days, after which the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contents of the samples were measured. Adsorption isotherms were derived for the two forms of activated carbon used, namely granular activated-carbon (GAC) and powdered activated-carbon (PAC). Results of the TPH analyses showed that activated carbon is an excellent means for the stripping-off of the contaminant: there were decreases in contaminant concentration from an initial concentration of 9304.70 mg/l to average final concentrations of 361.00 and 12.37 mg/l, that is, 96% and 99.9% resulting from the same amounts of GAC and PAC applications respectively. The results of this study revealed that the powdered form of AC would be very effective in the remediation of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated ground water and its use is therefore recommended.

M.J. Ayotamuno; R.B. Kogbara; S.O.T. Ogaji; S.D. Probert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Mesoporous Carbon for Capacitive Deionization of Saline Water  

SciTech Connect

Self-assembled mesoporous carbon (MC) materials have been synthesized and tested for application in capacitive deionization (CDI) of saline water. MC was prepared by self-assembly of a triblock copolymer with hydrogen-bonded chains via a phenolic resin, such as resorcinol or phloroglucinol in acidic conditions, followed by carbonization and, in some cases, activation by KOH. Carbon synthesized in this way was ground into powder, from which activated MC sheets were produced. In a variation of this process, after the reaction of triblock copolymer with resorcinol or phloroglucinol, the gel that was formed was used to coat a graphite plate and then carbonized. The coated graphite plate in this case was not activated and was tested to serve as current collector during the CDI process. The performance of these MC materials was compared to that of carbon aerogel for salt concentrations ranging between 1000 ppm and 35,000 ppm. Resorcinol-based MC removed up to 15.2 mg salt per gram of carbon, while carbon aerogel removed 5.8 mg salt per gram of carbon. Phloroglucinol-based MC-coated graphite exhibited the highest ion removal capacity at 21 mg of salt per gram of carbon for 35,000 ppm salt concentration.

Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Sharma, Ms. Ketki [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

\\{NOx\\} emission characteristics of fluidized bed combustion in atmospheres rich in oxygen and water vapor for high-nitrogen fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study examines the influence of water vapor in combustion atmosphere on \\{NOx\\} emission from oxygen-enriched combustion of air-dried distilled spirit lees and its char in a laboratory fluidized bed of 760 mm high and 68 mm in inner diameter. Steam was added into the fluidizing gas to vary the vapor content in the combustion atmosphere. At a combustion temperature of 950 °C and a steam-to-fuel mass ratio (S/F) of 0.5, the presence of water vapor reduced the \\{NOx\\} concentration in the flue gas for low O2 contents (?30 vol.%) in the combustion agent but increased the \\{NOx\\} emission for high O2 contents (?40 vol.%). The possible causes were clarified for this shift from suppression to promotion of fuel-N conversion into \\{NOx\\} with raising O2 concentration in the combustion agent. Varying temperature from 850 °C to 1150 °C resulted in a peak conversion of fuel-N to \\{NOx\\} in the temperature range of 950–1050 °C for all the tested O2 concentrations. Increasing the O2 concentration tended to lower the critical temperature corresponding to such a peak fuel-N conversion. Testing results also suggested that the presence of excessive water vapor in the combustion atmosphere would inhibit the release of fuel-N in the devolatilization stage and promote the formation of some reducing gases. In addition to the anticipated diluting effect, the steam addition also shortened the reaction time for homogeneous and heterogeneous \\{NOx\\} reduction by the reducing gases and char. It is postulated that the formation of OH radicals at high O2 content and high temperature could cause the observed increase in the \\{NOx\\} emission.

Chuanqiang Zhu; Shuyuan Liu; Huan Liu; Juan Yang; Xiaoxing Liu; Guangwen Xu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluating Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with RRTMG/McICA using Modeled and Observed AIRS Spectral Radiances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with RRTMG/McICA using Modeled and Observed AIRS Spectral Radiances Michael J. Iacono, Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 USA 1. Overview Objectives: * Evaluate water vapor and temperature simulation in two versions of CAM3 by comparing modeled and observed cloud-cleared AIRS spectral radiances. * Use spectral differences to verify comparisons between modeled water vapor and temperature and observed fields retrieved from AIRS radiances. Models: OSS: Optimal Spectral Sampling model developed at AER was used to simulate clear sky AIRS radiance spectra in CAM3. RRTMG/McICA: ARM-supported LW and SW radiative transfer model developed at AER for application to GCMs. RRTMG has been fully

163

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment V. Mattioli Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado V. Morris Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are widely used to measure atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid path (CLP). Comparisons of PWV derived from MWRs with water vapor retrievals from instruments like radiosondes, Global Positioning System (GPS) and Raman

164

On the challenges of tomography retrievals of a 2D water vapor field using ground-based microwave radiometers: An observation system simulation experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-dimensional water vapor fields were retrieved by simulated measurements from multiple ground-based microwave radiometers using a tomographic approach. The goal of this paper was to investigate how the various aspects of the instrument set-up (...

Véronique Meunier; David D. Turner; Pavlos Kollias

165

Atmospheric Water Vapor Pressure over Land Surfaces: A Generic Algorithm with Data Input Limited to Air Temperature, Precipitation and Geographic Location  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lack of information for surface water vapor pressure (WVP) represents a major impediment to model-assisted ecosystem analysis for understanding plant-environment interactions or for projecting biospheric re...

X. Yin

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Growing carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

observed from multiwalled carbon nanotubes produced by arc discharge.6 Recent experimental studies have of nanocarbon on large scales ever since it was first observed at the cathode in an electric arc evaporation experi- ment where the anode had been consumed.1 In addition to the refinement of the arc discharge

Qin, Lu-Chang

167

LNG fire and vapor control system technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Displacement of oil from porous material with carbonated water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISPLACEMENT OF OIL FROM POROUS MATERIAL WITH CARBONATED WATER A Thesis By JAGJIT S. YADAV Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1967 Ma/or Sub)act; Petroleum Engineering DISPLACEMENT OF OIL FROM POROUS MATERIAL WITH CARBONATED WATER A Thesis By JAGJIT ST YADAV Approved as to style and content by: ( ai an of Committee) cZ&-& 3~ ~" (Head of Department) (Member) (Member...

Yadav, Jagjit Singh

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A logical extension of the ASTM Standard E96 to determine the dependence of water vapor transmission on relative humidity  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that the water vapor transmission properties of hygroscopic building materials depend on the local relative humidities(rh). Traditionally, the ASTM Standard E96 specifies only two conditions of rh. The dry cup method in the standard corresponds to a mean rh of 25% and the wet cup to 75%. This information is not enough to describe the behavior of the material through the entire range of rh. European Standards have already proposed an extension of the existing standard to address this issue. ASTM standard should follow this change. A logical extension of the E96 standard to include the effect of rh on water vapor transmission properties has been proposed and is being discussed by one of the C16 Committee Task Groups. This paper presents the application of the proposed extension to several common building materials. The details include the operating principles of a constant temperature-rh chamber and the effects on the test results, of the vapor resistance offered by still air inside the cup, the surface resistances and buoyancy. The experimental data were used to critically assess the above effects. The data as well as the analyses of the data are expected to provide guidance to refine the existing ASTM Standard.

Lackey, J.C.; Marchand, R.G.; Kumaran, M.K. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Research in Construction

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Numerical Simulation of Hydrodynamics of a Heavy Liquid Drop Covered by Vapor Film in a Water Pool  

SciTech Connect

A numerical study on the hydrodynamics of a droplet covered by vapor film in water pool is carried out. Two level set functions are used as to implicitly capture the interfaces among three immiscible fluids (melt-drop, vapor and coolant). This approach leaves only one set of conservation equations for the three phases. A high-order Navier-Stokes solver, called Cubic-Interpolated Pseudo-Particle (CIP) algorithm, is employed in combination with level set approach, which allows large density ratios (up to 1000), surface tension and jump in viscosity. By this calculation, the hydrodynamic behavior of a melt droplet falling into a volatile coolant is simulated, which is of great significance to reveal the mechanism of steam explosion during a hypothetical severe reactor accident. (authors)

Ma, W.M.; Yang, Z.L.; Giri, A.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas vaeg 33 A, 100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Thermodynamic Models for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria of Nitrogen+Oxygen+Carbon Dioxide at Low Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the design and optimization of CO2 recovery from alcoholic fermentation processes by distillation, models for vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) are needed. Two such thermodynamic models, the Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS) and a model based on Henry's law constants, are proposed for the ternary mixture N2+O2+CO2. Pure substance parameters of the Peng-Robinson EOS are taken from the literature, whereas the binary parameters of the Van der Waals one-fluid mixing rule are adjusted to experimental binary VLE data. The Peng-Robinson EOS describes both binary and ternary experimental data well, except at high pressures approaching the critical region. A molecular model is validated by simulation using binary and ternary experimental VLE data. On the basis of this model, the Henry's law constants of N2 and O2 in CO2 are predicted by molecular simulation. An easy-to-use thermodynamic model, based on those Henry's law constants, is developed to reliably describe the VLE in the CO2-rich region.

Vrabec, J; Buchhauser, U; Meyer-Pittroff, R; Hasse, H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Vapor spill monitoring method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA); McRae, Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Recovery Act: Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Water Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) distributed a portion of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to advance technologies for chemical conversion of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) captured from industrial sources. The focus of the research projects is permanent sequestration of CO 2 through mineralization or development

174

Experimental investigation of factors controlling the calcium carbonate ion activity product of shallow water carbonate-rich sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS CONTROLLING THE CALCIUM CARBONATE ION ACTIVITY PRODUCT OF SHALLOW WATER CARBONATE-RICH SEDIMENTS A Thesis by LAWRENCE DOUGLAS BERNSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Oceanography EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS CONTROLLING THE CALCIUM CARBONATE ION ACTIVITY PRODUCT OF SHALLOW WATER CARBONATE...

Bernstein, Lawrence Douglas

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Diameter and wall number control of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the relationship between the average wall number (N) and the diameter (d) for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by chemical vapour deposition. It is found that N depends linearly on d for diameters in the range of 2.5–10?nm, while single wall nanotubes predominate for diameters under about 2.1?nm. The linear relationship is found to depend somewhat on the growth conditions. It is also verified that the mean diameter depends on the diameter of the originating catalyst nanoparticle, and thus on the initial catalyst thickness where a thin film catalyst is used. This simplifies the characterisation of CNTs by electron microscopy. We also find a linear relationship between nanotube diameter and initial catalyst film thickness.

Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang, E-mail: gz222@cam.ac.uk; Zhang, Can; Chen, Bingan; Santiago Esconjauregui, C.; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Collaborative Research: The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to an accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR climate model. To better understand and eventually better represent these processes, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, intra-seasonal oscillations and the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. The effect of the MIT and AER physics also has been tested in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 (hereinafter STD) and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics (hereinafter MOD) are still unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of the intra-seasonal oscillations (ISOs). The new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor relative to satellite measurements.

Dr. Kerry Emanuel; Michael J. Iacono

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation traditional deep water formation via entrainment of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-active species collected for oxygen, total carbon, alkalinity, nutrients, and CFCs. The alkalinity and total carbon data

Talley, Lynne D.

178

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

179

Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Based Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

180

The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to the accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). To better understand and eventually better represent these processes in this major national climate model, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global climate models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, on intra-seasonal oscillations and on the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. In addition, the MIT and AER physics packages have been incorporated and tested in combination within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model for the purpose of evaluating and improving convective and radiative processes on time scales appropriate to weather simulations. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics are unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of dynamical intra-seasonal oscillations such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In addition, it has been shown that the new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor in CAM as established through the comparison of modeled and observed satellite radiances. This suggests that continuing regional discrepancies in water vapor amounts in the climate model may not be solely related to convective or radiative processes. The major results of this project have been described in more detail in a journal article titled â??The Impacts of AER Radiation and MIT Convection on the Water Cycle Simulated by CAM3.5â? that will be submitted for publication during Fall 2010.

Emanuel, Kerry; Iacono, Michael J.

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C). Surprisingly, the ability of activated carbon to remove organics from the water is better at a high temperature than at room temperature. These initial results are opposite to those expected from chromatographic theory, since the solubility of the organics is about 100,000-fold higher in the hot water than in ambient water. At present, the physicochemical mechanism accounting for these results is unknown; however, it is possible that the lower surface tension and lower viscosity of subcritical water (compared to water at ambient conditions) greatly increases the available area of the carbon by several orders of magnitude. Regardless of the mechanism involved, the optimal use of activated carbon to clean the wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation will depend on obtaining a better understanding of the controlling parameters. While these investigations focused on the cleanup of wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation, the results also apply to cleanup of any wastewater contaminated with nonpolar and moderately polar organics such as wastewaters from coal and petroleum processing.

Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Analysis and removal of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) from treated drinking water using a biological activated carbon filter system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study is focused on reducing the concentration of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in treated drinking water. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of AOC removal by biological activated carbon filters (BACF) in a pilot-scale system. The results show that BACF reduces the total concentration of AOC. The concentration of AOC primarily indicates microorganism growth in a water supply network, and the amount of AOC in water is significantly reduced after BACF treatment. The predicted and measured values of AOC in output water treated by the BACF system show linear relationships, and their correlation coefficients are high. An AOC empirical equation was established by determining the relationship between water quality parameters such as total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, UV254, ammonia nitrogen, and total phosphorous. These findings may be relevant to conventional water treatment plants or to water distribution systems to provide treated drinking water with a high level of biological stability.

Jie-Chung Lou; Chih-Yuan Yang; Che-Jung Chang; Wei-Hsiang Chen; Wei-Bin Tseng; Jia-Yun Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Oxidation of Slurry Aluminide Coatings on Cast Stainless Steel Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC in Water Vapor  

SciTech Connect

A new, cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, has been developed for a wide range of high temperature applications, including diesel exhaust components, turbine casings and turbocharger housings. CF8C-Plus offers significant improvements in creep rupture life and creep rupture strength over standard CF8C steel. However, at higher temperatures and in more aggressive environments, such as those containing significant water vapor, an oxidation-resistant protective coating will be necessary. The oxidation behavior of alloys CF8C and CF8C-Plus with various aluminide coatings were compared at 800oC in air plus 10 vol% water vapor. Due to their affordability, slurry aluminides were the primary coating system of interest, although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation coatings were also compared. Additionally, a preliminary study of the low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminized CF8C-Plus was conducted at 800oC. Each type of coating provided substantial improvements in oxidation behavior, with simple slurry aluminides showing very good oxidation resistance after 4,000 h testing in water vapor. Preliminary low cycle fatigue results indicated that thicker aluminide coatings degraded high temperature fatigue properties of CF8C-Plus, whereas thinner coatings did not. Results suggest that appropriately designed slurry aluminide coatings are a viable option for economical, long-term oxidation protection of austenitic stainless steels in water vapor.

Haynes, James A [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Kumar, Deepak [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Using radiative transfer models to study the atmospheric water vapor content and to eliminate telluric lines from high-resolution optical spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) and the retrieval algorithm, incorporated in the SCIATRAN 2.2 software package developed at the Institute of Remote Sensing/Institute of Enviromental Physics of Bremen University (Germany), allows to simulate, among other things, radiance/irradiance spectra in the 2400-24 000 {\\AA} range. In this work we present applications of RTM to two case studies. In the first case the RTM was used to simulate direct solar irradiance spectra, with different water vapor amounts, for the study of the water vapor content in the atmosphere above Sierra Nevada Observatory. Simulated spectra were compared with those measured with a spectrometer operating in the 8000-10 000 {\\AA} range. In the second case the RTM was used to generate telluric model spectra to subtract the atmospheric contribution and correct high-resolution stellar spectra from atmospheric water vapor and oxygen lines. The results of both studies are discussed.

Gardini, A; Pérez, E; Quesada, J A; Funke, B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Wick for metal vapor laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Water-in-carbon dioxide emulsions: Formation and stability  

SciTech Connect

Stable water-in-carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsions, for either liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2} containing up to 70 vol % water, are formed with various molecular weight perfluoropolyether ammonium caroxylate surfactants. Water droplet sizes ranging from 3 to 10 {micro}m were determined by optical microscopy. From conductivity measurements, an inversion to C/W emulsions results from a decrease in CO{sub 2} density or salinity at constant pressure, a decrease in surfactant molecular weight, or an increase in temperature. Emulsions become more stable with a change in any of these formulation variables away from the balanced state, which increases interfacial tensions and interfacial tension gradient enhancing Marangoni-Gibbs stabilization. This type of stability is enhanced with an increase in the molecular weight of the surfactant tails, which increases the thickness of the stabilizing films between droplets. W/C emulsions formed with the 7,500 molecular weight surfactant were stable for several days.

Lee, C.T. Jr.; Psathas, P.A.; Johnston, K.P.; Grazia, J. de; Randolph, T.W.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and HB 90:Carbon capture and sequestration, http://legisweb.6th annual conference on carbon capture and sequestration,7th annual conference on carbon capture & seques- tration,

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evidence of Water Adsorption in Hydrophobic Nanospaces of Highly Pure Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Highly pure double-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method have a quasi one-dimensional nanopore system. We determined these nanotubes’ nanopore structures by means of molecular probe adsorption using N2 at 77 K,...

Yousheng Tao; Hiroyuki Muramatsu; Morinobu Endo; Katsumi Kaneko

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Assessment of precipitable water vapor derived from ground-based BeiDou observations with Precise Point Positioning approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimation from Global Positioning System (GPS) has been extensively studied and used for meteorological applications. However PWV estimation using the emerging BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is very limited. In this paper the PWV estimation strategy and the evaluation of the results inferred from ground-based BDS observations using Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method are presented. BDS and GPS data from 10 stations distributed in the Asia–Pacific and West Indian Ocean regions during the year 2013 are processed using the PANDA (Position and Navigation Data Analyst) software package. The BDS-PWV and GPS-PWV are derived from the BDS-only and GPS-only observations, respectively. The PPP positioning differences between BDS-only and GPS-only show a standard deviation (STD) Indian Ocean regions and that BDS alone can be used for PWV estimation with an accuracy comparable to GPS.

Min Li; Wenwen Li; Chuang Shi; Qile Zhao; Xing Su; Lizhong Qu; Zhizhao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analysis and forecast improvements from simulated satellite water vapor profiles and rainfall using a global data assimilation system  

SciTech Connect

The potential improvements of analyses and forecasts from the use of satellite-observed rainfall and water vapor measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Sensor Microwave (SSM) T-1 and T-2 instruments are investigated in a series of observing system simulation experiments using the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (formerly Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) data assimilation system. Simulated SSM radiances are used directly in a radiance retrieval step following the conventional optimum interpolation analysis. Simulated rainfall rates in the tropics are used in a moist initialization procedure to improve the initial specification of divergence, moisture, and temperature. Results show improved analyses and forecasts of relative humidity and winds compared to the control experiment in the tropics and the Southern Hemisphere. Forecast improvements are generally restricted to the first 1-3 days of the forecast. 27 refs., 11 figs.

Nehrkorn, T.; Hoffman, R.N.; Louis, J.F.; Isaacs, R.G.; Moncet, J.L. (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Foliar Carbon Isotope Composition (? 13C) and Water Use Efficiency of Different Populus deltoids Clones Under Water Stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Foliar carbon isotope composition (? 13C), total dry biomass, and long-term water use efficiency (WUEL) of 12 Populus deltoids clones were studied under water stress in a greenhouse. Total dry bio...

Fengjun Zhao; Rongfu Gao; Yingbai Shen; Xiaohua Su…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide ... In this study, we used high-pressure infrared spectroscopy to examine the carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) in situ over a 24 h reaction period with scCO2 containing water concentrations between 0% and 100% saturation, at temperatures of 35, 50, and 70 °C, and at a pressure of 100 bar. ... Little or no detectable carbonation was observed when brucite was reacted with neat scCO2. ...

John S. Loring; Christopher J. Thompson; Changyong Zhang; Zheming Wang; Herbert T. Schaef; Kevin M. Rosso

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

Deposition of carbon films by electrolysis of a water-ethylene glycol solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An attempt was made to deposit carbon films by electrolysis of a water-ethylene glycol solution. Carbon plate and an...n...-type silicon substrate were dipped in the solution and a high d.c. potential was negativ...

T. Suzuki; Y. Manita; T. Yamazaki; S. Wada; T. Noma

1995-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 102, NO. D24, PAGES 29,737-29,745, DECEMBER 26, 1997 Atmospheric aerosol and water vapor characteristics over north  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosol and water vapor characteristics over north central Canada during BOREAS B. L. Markham, J typically0.09 and 0.34 cm, respectively.Size distributionsderivedfrom solar almucantarmeasurementsshowtheHughesSTXCorporation,Greenbelt,Maryland. 2Formerlyat HSTX/GSFC-NASA,Greenbelt,Maryland. Copyright1997by the American

196

Ocean Water Vapor and Cloud Burden Trends Derived from the Topex Microwave Radiometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. TMR OBSERVATIONS The TMR flew in a 10-day non-sun-synchronous exact repeat orbit with an inclination algorithm is a log-linear regression algorithm with coefficients that are stratified by wind speed and water

Ruf, Christopher

197

Oxygen isotope anomaly observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada and the implication for the stratosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stratospheric input of anomalous water, injections of stratospheric tritium (mainly produced by atmospheric detonations of thermonuclear devices during 1954?1963) to various sites in Greenland and Antarctica were recorded in snow pits (e.g., ref...

Ying Lin; Robert N. Clayton; Lin Huang; Noboru Nakamura; James R. Lyons

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Water transport inside a single-walled carbon nanotube driven by temperature gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water transport inside a single-walled carbon nanotube driven by temperature gradient J. Shiomi mass transport of a water cluster inside a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) with the diameter of about 1.4 nm. The influence of the non-equilibrium thermal environment on the confined water cluster has

Maruyama, Shigeo

199

Oil Recovery Enhancement from Fractured, Low Permeability Reservoirs. [Carbonated Water  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The results of the investigative efforts for this jointly funded DOE-State of Texas research project achieved during the 1990-1991 year may be summarized as follows: Geological Characterization - Detailed maps of the development and hierarchical nature the fracture system exhibited by Austin Chalk outcrops were prepared. The results of these efforts were directly applied to the development of production decline type curves applicable to a dual-fracture-matrix flow system. Analysis of production records obtained from Austin Chalk operators illustrated the utility of these type curves to determine relative fracture/matrix contributions and extent. Well-log response in Austin Chalk wells has been shown to be a reliable indicator of organic maturity. Shear-wave splitting concepts were used to estimate fracture orientations from Vertical Seismic Profile, VSP data. Several programs were written to facilitate analysis of the data. The results of these efforts indicated fractures could be detected with VSP seismic methods. Development of the EOR Imbibition Process - Laboratory displacement as well as Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI and Computed Tomography, CT imaging studies have shown the carbonated water-imbibition displacement process significantly accelerates and increases recovery from oil saturated, low permeability rocks. Field Tests - Two operators amenable to conducting a carbonated water flood test on an Austin Chalk well have been identified. Feasibility studies are presently underway.

Poston, S. W.

1991-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

200

Intraparticle heat and mass transfer characteristics of silica-gel/water vapor adsorption  

SciTech Connect

Recently, highly efficient energy utilization systems which extensively employ adsorption phenomena such as pressure swing adsorption, heat storage, adsorption heat pump, etc. are being regarded as one of the countermeasures for environmental issues such as green house effect and ozone layer destruction. An Adsorption Heat Pump (AHP) has been investigated as one of the important techniques via which cold heat energy is obtained from waste thermal energy below 373K without using electricity and CFCs. An AHP normally consists of an adsorber and an evaporator/condenser and cold heat energy is generated by latent heat of evaporation during adsorption process. For realizing the AHP technology, it has been pointed out that the development of an adsorber with optimum heat and mass transfer characteristics is essentially important. In this study, experimental studies were carried out which was based on the data of temperature inside the adsorbent particle and adsorptivity profiles at the adsorption/desorption process by volumetric method. To clarify adsorption mechanism relatively large silica-gel particle (7 mm f) was used. Temperature distribution in the particle is determined at the center, at one half radius in the radial direction and at the surface by using very thin (30 mm f) thermocouples. The temperatures at these points simultaneously increase/decrease as soon as the adsorption/desorption started, reached their respective maximum/minimum values and then return to initial temperature. The temperature profiles for the adsorption process show that the temperature at the surface is initially slightly higher than the other two points. All three points reached their respective maximum temperature at the same time with the temperature at the center point the highest and at the surface the lowest. The temperature profiles during the desorptive process are almost exactly the opposite to that of the adsorption process. This shows that the adsorption phenomena can take place not only at the surface but inside the adsorbent particle, implying that intraparticle vapor diffusion has a great influence on adsorptivity.

Yamamoto, Eri; Watanabe, Fujio; Hasatani, Masanobu

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hydrogen Ingress in Steels During High-Temperature Oxidation in Water Vapor  

SciTech Connect

It is well established that hydrogen derived from water vapour can penetrate oxidizing alloys with detrimental effect. However, the complexities of tracking hydrogen in these materials have prevented the direct profiling of hydrogen ingress needed to understand these phenomena. Here we report hydrogen profiles in industrially-relevant alumina- and chromia- forming steels correlated with the local oxide-metal nano/microstructure by use of SIMS D2O tracer studies and experimental protocols to optimize D retention. The D profiles unexpectedly varied markedly among the alloys examined, which indicates mechanistic complexity but also the potential to mitigate detrimental water vapour effects by manipulation of alloy chemistry.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hydrogen production via carbon-assisted water electrolysis at room temperature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the work was to conduct carbon-assisted water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production and to improve upon… (more)

Bollineni, Shilpa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

204

Field Testing of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Analyzers Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prevalent methods for making high-accuracy tower-based measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio, notably nondispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR), require frequent system calibration and sample drying. Wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down ...

Scott J. Richardson; Natasha L. Miles; Kenneth J. Davis; Eric R. Crosson; Chris W. Rella; Arlyn E. Andrews

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Wavelength-modulation laser hygrometer for ultrasensitive detection of water vapor in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- bines wavelength-modulation absorption spectros- copy WMS 12­16 that uses near-infrared InGaAsP diode is measured by use of a near-infrared diode laser and wavelength-modulation absorption spectroscopy. Humidity in the spectral regions of strongest water absorption. Sensitive single-mode cavity ring-down techniques based

206

Assessment of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from Scottish transitional waters Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(6), 959970 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from Scottish transitional waters This paper addresses the assessment of terrestrially derived organic carbon in sediments from two Scottish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

207

Development and Application of a Bioluminescence-Based Test for Assimilable Organic Carbon in Reclaimed Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Jersey 08043 Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is an important parameter governing the...protection) can have dramatic impacts on AOC levels in drinking water, few water utilities routinely measure AOC levels because of the difficulty of the...

Lauren A. Weinrich; Eugenio Giraldo; Mark W. LeChevallier

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

208

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water† ... A packed bed of carbon within the reactor catalyzed the gasification of these organic vapors in the water; consequently, the water effluent of the reactor was clean. ... A method for removing plugs from the reactor was developed and employed during an 8-h gasification run involving potato wastes. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Stephen Glen Allen; Deborah Schulman; Xiaodong Xu; Robert J. Divilio

2000-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

* Corresponding author -kfingerman@berkeley.edu 1 Integrating Water Sustainability into the Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it to Average Fuel Carbon Intensity (AFCI) (c) Charge a tax on water use for biofuel production (d) Establish Carbon Fuel Standard Kevin Fingerman1* , Daniel Kammen1,2 , and Michael O'Hare2 1 Energy & Resources (Chapagain and Hoekstra, 2004). As the State of California implements the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS

Kammen, Daniel M.

210

Hydroelectric Voltage Generation Based on Water-Filled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydroelectric Voltage Generation Based on Water-Filled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes ... The hydroelectric voltage generator can be expressed by the model illustrated in Figure 6a and b. ... Individual water-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes as hydroelectric power converters ...

Quanzi Yuan; Ya-Pu Zhao

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

212

Vapor deposition of hardened niobium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

Blocher, Jr., John M. (Columbus, OH); Veigel, Neil D. (Columbus, OH); Landrigan, Richard B. (Columbus, OH)

1983-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

Designing Turbine Endwalls for Deposition Resistance with 1,400 °C Combustor Exit Temperatures and Syngas Water Vapor Levels„The Ohio State University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing Turbine Endwalls for Designing Turbine Endwalls for Deposition Resistance with 1,400 °C Combustor Exit Temperatures and Syngas Water Vapor Levels-The Ohio State University Background This University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) project will explore a critical need for innovative turbine endwall designs that could increase turbine durability and mitigate the adverse effects of residue deposition from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). The Ohio State University (OSU), in cooperation with Brigham Young University (BYU),

214

The rate of carbonic acid decomposition in sea water and its oceanographic significance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Air Purging . . . . . . . . , . . 58 15 L6 Carbon-14 Uptake by ~la ~nas sp. in a Closed System, under 4f Carbon Dioxide Gas Purging and under N Gas Purging using Low pH Sea Water . C b -V, Uptk by~Mt ~~lt ik Cl System and under N2 Gas... and under Nitrogen Gas Purging and 4$ Carbon Dioxide Purging, using low pH Sea Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 63 12 Carbon-14 Uptake by Nitzuhia closterium in a Closed System and under Nitrogen Gas Purging . 1v PREFATORY' NOTE The author...

Park, Kilho

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electrolyte vapor condenser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

1983-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electrolyte vapor condenser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well.

Sederquist, Richard A. (Newington, CT); Szydlowski, Donald F. (East Hartford, CT); Sawyer, Richard D. (Canton, CT)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solubilization and Purification of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Water by in Situ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solubilization and Purification of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Water by in Situ Radical into bundles that aggregate into tangled networks. Dissolution of SWNT in water, which is important because contained 68 mg of SWNT-PSS in 100 mL of water. A detailed procedure is in the Supporting Information

Resasco, Daniel

218

Water Vapor Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen plays an important role in the so-called hydrogen economy (technology). The term expresses an energy concept in which hydrogen serves as energy storage and fuel for combustion in engines or fuel cells. H...

Ulrich Guth

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Water Vapor Experiment Concludes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Holger Voemel, NOAA and University of Colorado). November 2003 2 first North American launch of the new Vaisala RS92 radiosonde on November 5, 2003. NASA also deployed a...

220

Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water and 1,2-Dichloroethane-Water Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and bonding at the carbon tetrachloride-water (CCl4-H2O) and the 1,2-dichloroethane-water (DCE-H2O) liquidVibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water and 1,2-Dichloroethane-Water Interfaces Dave S. Walker, Fred G. Moore, and Geraldine L

Richmond, Geraldine L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermal decomposition of ethanol and growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal decomposition of ethanol and growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this study, we have investigated the thermal decomposition of ethanol at various temperatures, as well National Meeting, San Francisco, CA, September 10-14, 2006 1/1 PRES 29 - Thermal decomposition of ethanol

Maruyama, Shigeo

222

Quantum Chemical Simulations Reveal Acetylene-Based Growth Mechanisms in the Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

Nonequilibrium quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulation of early stages in the nucleation process of carbon nanotubes from acetylene feedstock on an Fe38 cluster was performed based on the density-functional tight-binding (DFTB) potential. Representative chemical reactions were studied by complimentary static DFTB and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oligomerization and cross-linking reactions between carbon chains were found as the main reaction pathways similar to that suggested in previous experimental work. The calculations highlight the inhibiting effect of hydrogen for the condensation of carbon ring networks, and a propensity for hydrogen disproportionation, thus enriching the hydrogen content in already hydrogen-rich species and abstracting hydrogen content in already hydrogen-deficient clusters. The ethynyl radical C2H was found as a reactive, yet continually regenerated species, facilitating hydrogen transfer reactions across the hydrocarbon clusters. The nonequilibrium QM/MD simulations show the prevalence of a pentagon-first nucleation mechanism where hydrogen may take the role of one arm of an sp2 carbon Y-junction. The results challenge the importance of the metal carbide formation for SWCNT cap nucleation in the VLS model and suggest possible alternative routes following hydrogen-abstraction acetylene addition (HACA)-like mechanisms commonly discussed in combustion synthesis.

Eres, Gyula [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Ying [Nagoya University, Japan] [Nagoya University, Japan; Gao, Xingfa [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; Qian, Hu-Jun [Jilin University, Changchun] [Jilin University, Changchun; Ohta, Yasuhito [Fukui Institute of Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8103, Japan] [Fukui Institute of Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8103, Japan; Wu, Xiaona [Nagoya University, Japan] [Nagoya University, Japan; Morokuma, Keiji [Fukui Institute of Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8103, Japan] [Fukui Institute of Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8103, Japan; Irle, Stephan [WPI-Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules and Department of Chemistry, Nagoya University, Japan] [WPI-Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules and Department of Chemistry, Nagoya University, Japan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The mechanism of the adsorption of water molecules on carbon adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of studies on the mechanism of the adsorption of water molecules by nonporous and microporous carbon adsorbents carried out using various physicochemical methods are surveyed. The influence of the chemical state of the surface and the porous structure of adsorbents on the heat of adsorption and the mechanism of filling of the carbon surface and micro- and mesopores of carbon adsorbents are analysed. The nature of primary adsorption sites and the influence of the adsorption of water molecules on the X-ray diffraction parameters (microcrystalline structure) of carbon adsorbents are studied. The methods of investigation of the porous structure and chemical state of the surface of carbon adsorbents based on the analysis of water vapour adsorption isotherms are considered. The bibliography includes 80 references.

R Sh Vartapetyan; A M Voloshchuk

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Water Use at Pulverized Coal Power Plants with Postcombustion Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Use at Pulverized Coal Power Plants with Postcombustion Carbon Capture and Storage ... (24) When CO2 is captured, the heat rejected around the primary condenser does not include the steam extracted for CO2 regeneration. ...

Haibo Zhai; Edward S. Rubin; Peter L. Versteeg

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Improvement of the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) analytical method for reclaimed water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microbial growth is an issue of concern that may cause hygienic and aesthetic problems during the transportation and usage of reclaimed water. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is an important parameter which dete...

Xin Zhao; Hongying Hu; Shuming Liu…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evaluation and simplification of the assimilable organic carbon nutrient bioassay for bacterial growth in drinking water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A modified assimilable organic carbon (AOC) bioassay is proposed. We evaluated all aspects of the AOC bioassay technique, including inoculum...raw waters need to be filtered prior to an AOC analysis. Glass fiber filters used with either...

L A Kaplan; T L Bott; D J Reasoner

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Driving force of water entry into hydrophobic channels of carbon nanotubes: entropy or energy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spontaneous entry of water molecules inside single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been confirmed by both simulations and experiments. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the thermodynamics of filling of a (6,6) carbon nanotube in a temperature range from 273 to 353 K and with different strengths of the nanotube-water interaction. From explicit energy and entropy calculations using the two-phase thermodynamics method, we have presented a thermodynamic understanding of the filling behaviour of a nanotube. We show that both the energy and the entropy of transfer decrease with increasing temperature. On the other hand, scaling down the attractive part of the carbon-oxygen interaction results in increased energy of transfer while the entropy of transfer increases slowly with decreasing the interaction strength. Our results indicate that both energy and entropy favour water entry into (6,6) SWCNTs. Our results are compared with those of several recent studies of water entry into carbon nanotub...

Kumar, Hemant; Maiti, Prabal K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Enhanced carbon monoxide utilization in methanation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide - containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is subsequently reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Surprisingly, hydrogen and water vapor present in the feed gas do not adversely affect CO utilization significantly, and such hydrogen actually results in a significant increase in CO utilization.

Elek, Louis F. (Peekskill, NY); Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Angular and energy dependence of cross sections for ejection of electrons from water vapor. III. 20–150-keV neutral-hydrogen impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absolute values of cross sections for electron production in collisions of neutral hydrogen atoms of 20–150 keV energy with water vapor molecules have been measured as a function of the ejection energy and angle. The range of angles was 10° to 160° and the electron energy range was 1–300 eV. The doubly differential cross sections were integrated over angle and/or energy to obtain singly differential cross sections, total electron production cross sections, and average energies of ejection. The angular distribution of the electron loss peak was found to have some features in common with the cross section for elastic scattering of electrons.

M. A. Bolorizadeh and M. E. Rudd

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide Water vapor #12;Atmospheric composition (parts per million by volume) · Nitrogen (N2) 780Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere Bill Satzer 3M Company #12;Outline,840 · Oxygen (O2) 209,460 · Argon (Ar) 9340 · Carbon dioxide (CO2) 394 · Methane (CH4) 1.79 · Ozone (O3) 0

Olver, Peter

231

Layered Organic Structure at the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water Interface Dennis K. Hore, Dave S. Walker, and Geraldine L. Richmond*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Layered Organic Structure at the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water Interface Dennis K. Hore, Dave S remediation. The carbon tetrachloride-water interface in particular has been the subject of numerous the density profile across the interface. No detailed studies of the carbon tetrachloride structure

Richmond, Geraldine L.

232

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

subcritical and supercritical con?gurations, respectively Environmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 Fig. 5 Water

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 ‘‘capture penalty’’ of increased waterEnvironmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 DOI 10.1007/s00267-010-9434-1 FORUM WaterEnvironmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 Fig. 5 Water

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the land propagates through models and the processes and feedbacks they simulate. One of our jobs as environmental partitioning of energy, the evapotranspiration of water and if the land-surface is a sink or a source of CO2

235

Ecological Modelling xxx (2005) xxxxxx Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on simulated NEE. Finally 17 parameters, linked to photosynthesis, vegetative respiration and soil water are used to create a set of 17,000 simulations, where the values of the 17 key parameters are randomlyEcological Modelling xxx (2005) xxx­xxx Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest Part I

Boyer, Edmond

236

Development of a Rapid Assimilable Organic Carbon Method for Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measurement of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is proposed. The time needed to perform...There was no significant difference between AOC values determined with strain P17 for the...bacterial levels in some samples. Comparison of AOC values obtained by the Belleville laboratory...

Mark W. LeChevallier; Nancy E. Shaw; Louis A. Kaplan; Thomas L. Bott

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Exchanges of Energy, Water and Carbon Dioxide Xuhui Lee (Yale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

esFmates of vegetaFon-air exchange and that the degree of bias is different for acFve (heat and water) and passive (CO 2 ) scalars. Horizontally Homogeneous Mesoscale Horizontal...

238

Ordovician carbonate formation waters in the Illinois Basin: Chemical and isotopic evolution beneath a regional aquitard  

SciTech Connect

Formation waters from carbonate reservoirs in the upper Ordovician Galena Group of the Illinois Basin have been analyzed geochemically to study origin of salinity, chemical and isotopic evolution, and relation to paleohydrologic flow systems. These carbonate reservoirs underlie the Maquoketa Shale Group of Cincinnatian age, which forms a regional aquitard. Cl-Br relations and Na/Br-Cl/Br systematics indicate that initial brine salinity resulted from subaerial evaporation of seawater to a point not significantly beyond halite saturation. Subsequent dilution in the subsurface by meteoric waters is supported by delta D-delta O-18 covariance. Systematic relations between Sr-87/Sr-86 and 1/Sr suggest two distinct mixing events: introduction of a Sr-87 enriched fluid from a siliciclastic source, and a later event which only affected reservoir waters from the western shelf of the basin. The second mixing event is supported by covariance between Sr-87/Sr-86 and concentrations of cations and anions; covariance between Sr and O-D isotopes suggests that the event is related to meteoric water influx. Systematic geochemical relations in ordovician Galena Group formation waters have been preserved by the overlying Maquoketa shale aquitard. Comparison with results from previous studies indicates that waters from Silurian-Devonian carbonate strata evolved in a manner similar to yet distinct from that of the Ordovician carbonate waters, whereas waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian strata that overlie the New Albany Shale Group regional aquitard are marked by fundamentally different Cl-Br-Na and Sr isotope systematics. Evolution of these geochemical formation-water regimes apparently has been influenced significantly by paleohydrologic flow systems.

Stueber, A.M. (Illinois Univ., Edwardsville, IL (United States)); Walter, L.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparing removal of trace organic compounds and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) at advanced and traditional water treatment plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stability of drinking water can be indicated by the assimilable organic carbon (AOC). This AOC value represents the regrowth capacity of microorganisms...254, and AOC) from water, experimental results indicate th...

Jie-Chung Lou; Chung-Yi Lin; Jia-Yun Han…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

14 - Estimating Water, Energy, and Carbon Footprints of Residential Swimming Pools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter demonstrates the development and application of a model as a tool to assess and compare the environmental impacts of residential swimming pools. To demonstrate the applicability and dependability of this model as an assessment, planning, and management tool, realistic scenarios were employed to estimate and compare water, energy, and carbon footprints of residential swimming pools located in Maricopa County (Phoenix metropolitan area, Arizona) and colder climates. The estimated water footprints of the modeled residential swimming pools range from 45 m3/year to 185 m3/year/pool, while the estimated energy footprints range between 2400 and 2800 kWh/year/pool. The carbon footprint of the modeled pools was estimated to be 1400 ± 50 kg CO2e/year/pool. In the absence of direct measurements, development and utilization of simple models to assess and predict water consumption proves to be an invaluable instrument that should be part of a versatile water management toolkit.

Tyler Gallion; Tyler Harrison; Robert Hulverson; Kiril Hristovski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

Viscosity of carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids: Influence of1 concentration and temperature2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Viscosity of carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids: Influence of1 concentration and temperature 0019 Fax: +33 (0) 2 23 23 40 5120 21 Abstract:22 23 Experimental results on the steady state viscosity, the nanofluids are quite Newtonian. It is also observed that the relative viscosity of30 nanofluids at high shear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

243

Efficiency of carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids as coolants Salma Halelfadl a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

previously determined. This may be helpful for using these nanofluids in real cooling systems. Keywords: Heat heating or cooling systems is used. Thus, there is a need to achieve compact systems, energy saving1 Efficiency of carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids as coolants Salma Halelfadl a , Thierry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow processes of storm and wave reworking influence the seabed through submarine erosion and sediment

Purkis, Sam

245

Water Use Efficiency in Plant Growth and Ambient Carbon Dioxide Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and carbon dioxide balance of plant leaves was made in the form of a computer program based upon known physiological facts. It predicts significant increases in water use efficiency by plants as CO is enriched, the size of the increase depending upon...

van Bavel, C. H. M.

246

Thermodynamics of Piperazine/Methyldiethanolamine/Water/Carbon Sanjay Bishnoi and Gary T. Rochelle*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamics of Piperazine/Methyldiethanolamine/Water/Carbon Dioxide Sanjay Bishnoi and Gary T though MDEA is present at much higher concentrations. Introduction Thermodynamics of aqueous amine are usually rate-controlling. Fur- thermore, a consistent thermodynamic model can quan- tify the energy

Rochelle, Gary T.

247

Comparison of assimilable organic carbon and UV-oxidizable carbon for evaluation of ultrapure-water systems.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by modified assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and UV-oxidizable carbon tests. An...greater than or equal to 0.05) alter AOC values. UV radiation decreased UV-oxidizable carbon and increased AOC. Comparison of assimilable organic carbon...

R A Governal; M T Yahya; C P Gerba; F Shadman

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Carbon gas fluxes from a brown-water and a clear-water lake in the ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

48.7 mg m-2) and water color (100 vs. 20 mg Pt L-1) throughout an open-water period when summer precipitation doubled, using both floating chambers and ...

249

A Facile High-speed Vibration Milling Method to Water-disperse Single- walled Carbon Nanohorns  

SciTech Connect

A high-speed vibration milling (HSVM) method was applied to synthesize water dispersible single- walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs). Highly reactive free radicals (HOOCCH2CH2 ) produced from an acyl peroxide under HSVM conditions react with hydrophobic SWNHs to produce a highly water dispersible derivative (f-SWNHs), which has been characterized in detail by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques together with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scatter- ing (DLS). The carboxylic acid functionalized, water-dispersible SWNHs material are versatile precursors that have potential applications in the biomedical area.

Shu, Chunying [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Zhang, Jianfei [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Sim, Jae Hyun [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Burke, Brian [University of Virginia, Charlottesville; Williams, Keith A [University of Virginia, Charlottesville; Rylander, Nichole M [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Campbell, Tom [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Esker, Alan R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Gibson, Harry W [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dorn, Harry C [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Self-Assembled Micro-Honeycomb Network of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Self-Assembled Micro-Honeycomb Network of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Solar Cells Kehang nanotubes (SWNTs) into a self-assembled micro-honeycomb network (-HN) for the application to SWNT- Si solar-assembled, micro- honeycomb network, water vapor treatment #12;3 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) feature

Maruyama, Shigeo

251

Tracing coalbed natural gas-coproduced water using stable isotopes of carbon  

SciTech Connect

Recovery of hydrocarbons commonly is associated with coproduction of water. This water may be put to beneficial use or may be reinjected into subsurface aquifers. In either case, it would be helpful to establish a fingerprint for that coproduced water so that it may be tracked following discharge on the surface or reintroduction to geologic reservoirs. This study explores the potential of using {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) - coproduced water as a fingerprint of its origin and to trace its fate once it is disposed on the surface. Our initial results for water samples coproduced with CBNG from the Powder River Basin show that this water has strongly positive {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) (12 parts per thousand to 22 parts per thousand) that is readily distinguished from the negative {delta}{sup 13}C of most surface and ground water (-8 parts per thousand to -11 parts per thousand). Furthermore, the DIC concentrations in coproduced water samples are also high (more than 100 mg C/L) compared to the 20 to 50 mg C/L in ambient surface and ground water of the region. The distinctively high {delta}{sup 13}C and DIC concentrations allow us to identify surface and ground water that have incorporated CBNG-coproduced water. Accordingly, we suggest that the {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) and DIC concentrations of water can be used for long-term monitoring of infiltration of CBNG-coproduced water into ground water and streams. Our results also show that the {delta} {sup 13}C (DIC) of CBNG-coproduced water from two different coal zones are distinct leading to the possibility of using {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) to distinguish water produced from different coal zones.

Sharma, S.; Frost, C.D. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Title Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Margaret S. Torn, David P. Billesbach, Geoffrey Doyle, Brian Northup, and Sebastien C. Biraud Journal Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Volume 166-167 Pagination 169-174 Keywords Carbon exchange, eddy covariance, Fire, Grassland, Prairie, Water stress Abstract Drought and fire are common disturbances to grassland ecosystems. We report two years of eddy covariance ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes and biometric variables measured in nearby burned and unburned pastures in the US Southern Great Plains. Over the course of the experiment, annual precipitation (∼600 mm yr-1) was lower than the long term mean (∼860 mm yr-1). Soil moisture decreased from productive conditions in March 2005 dry, unproductive conditions during the growing season starting in March 2006. Just prior to the burn in early March 2005, burned and unburned pastures contained 520 ± 60 and 360 ± 40 g C m-2 of total above ground biomass (AGB) and litter, respectively. The fire removed approximately 200 g C m-2 of litter and biomass. In the 2005 growing season following the burn, maximum green AGB was 450 ± 60 and 270 ± 40 g C m-2, with corresponding cumulative annual net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) of -330 and -150 g C m-2 for the burned and unburned pastures, respectively. In contrast to NEE, cumulative mean sensible heat and water fluxes were approximately equal in both pastures during the growing season, suggesting either an increase in water use efficiency or a decrease in evaporation in the burned relative to the unburned pasture. In the 2006 growing season, dry conditions decreased carbon uptake and latent heat, and increased sensible heat fluxes. Peak AGB was reduced to 210 ± 30 g C m-2 and 140 ± 30 g C m-2 in the burned and unburned pastures, respectively, while NEE was near zero. These results suggest that the lack of precipitation was responsible for most of the interannual variation in carbon exchange for these un-irrigated prairie pastures.

253

Effects of large-scale Amazon forest degradation on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and isoprene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and...The climate and air quality in Amazonia depend...on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Water-in-carbon dioxide microemulsions: An environment for hydrophiles including proteins  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide in the liquid and supercritical fluid states is useful as a replacement for toxic organic solvents. However, nonvolatile hydrophilic substances such as proteins, ions, and most catalysts are insoluble. This limitation was overcome by the formation of aqueous microemulsion droplets in a carbon dioxide-continuous phase with a nontoxic ammonium carboxylate perfluoropolyether surfactant. Several spectroscopic techniques consistently indicated that the properties of the droplets approach those of bulk water. The protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) with a molecular weight of 67,000 is soluble in this microemulsion and experiences an environment similar to that of native BSA in buffer. 23 refs., 4 figs.

Johnston, K.P.; Harrison, K.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Clarke, M.J. [Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom)] [and others

1996-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

255

Methodology for Predicting Water Content in Supercritical Gas Vapor and Gas Solubility in Aqueous Phase for Natural Gas Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The streams in the natural gas process contain light hydrocarbons, mainly methane and ethane, associated with non-hydrocarbon supercritical gases (nitrogen, hydrogen, argon, etc.). ... For system that contains supercritical gases, the gas solubility in water can be related to the Henry's law constant. ...

Chorng H. Twu; Suphat Watanasiri; Vince Tassone

2007-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

Investigation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and bacterial regrowth in drinking water distribution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigated the variation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentrations in water from several typical water treatment plants and distribution systems in a northern city of China. It is concluded from this study that: (1) The AOC in most of the product water of the studied water treatment plants and the water from the associated distribution systems could not meet the biostability criteria of 50–100 ?g/L. (2) Only 4% of the measured AOC concentrations were less than 100 ?g/L. However, about half of the measured AOC values were less than 200 ?g/L. (3) Better source water quality resulted in lower AOC concentrations. (4) The variation of AOC concentrations in distribution systems was affected by chlorine oxidation and bacterial activity: the former resulted in an increase of AOC value while the latter led to a reduction in AOC. (5) The variation of AOC concentration followed different patterns in different distribution systems or different seasons due to their respective operational characteristics. (6) Less than 30% of AOC could be removed by a conventional treatment process, whereas 30–60% with a maximum of 50–60% could be removed by granular activated carbon (GAC). (7) The observation via scanning electron microscope (SEM) on distribution pipe tubercle samples demonstrated that the pipe inner wall was not smooth and bacteria multiplied in the crevice as well as in the interior wall of distribution pipes.

W Liu; H Wu; Z Wang; S.L Ong; J.Y Hu; W.J Ng

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Flue gas carbon dioxide sequestration during water softening with ion-exchange fibers  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the use of ion-exchange fibers (IX fibers) to permanently sequester carbon dioxide present in flue gas into an aqueous phase as calcium or magnesium alkalinity while concurrently softening hard water. The only process inputs besides carbon dioxide (or flue gas) are snowmelt (or rainwater); no other chemicals are required for the regeneration of the IX fibers. Importantly, the process is not energy intensive and carbon dioxide does not need to be compressed to excessive pressures (>150 psi) for efficient use. Sources of carbon dioxide do not require concentration and, therefore, the use of raw flue gas (similar to 17% CO{sub 2}) is feasible with the rate of sequestration governed only by the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. While valid for flue gas obtained from any combustion process (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, etc.), emissions from oil or gas combustion may be more appropriate for use in the described process due to the absence of mercury and particulates. It should also be noted that the presence of sulfur dioxide in flue gas would not adversely affect the process and may even enhance regeneration efficiency. The only product of the proposed process is an environmentally benign regenerant stream containing calcium and/or magnesium alkalinity. The unique property of IX fibers that makes the proposed process both environmentally sustainable and economically feasible is amenability to efficient regeneration with carbon dioxide and harvested snowmelt. Low intraparticle diffusional resistance is the underlying reason why IX fibers are amenable to efficient regeneration using snowmelt sparged with carbon dioxide; 95% calcium recovery was attained at a CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 6.8 atm. The energy balance for a typical electric utility shows that up to 1% of carbon dioxide emitted during combustion would be sequestered in the softening process.

Greenleaf, J.E.; SenGupta, A.K. [Lafayette College, Easton, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Responsiveness of electric resistance of polymer-grafted carbon black/alumina gel composite against solvent vapor and solute in solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbon black/alumina gel composites were prepared by sol-gel reaction of aluminum isopropoxide in the presence of polymer-grafted carbon black. The electric resistance of the alumina gel composite from polyme...

Norio Tsubokawa; Junya Inaba; Katsunori Arai; Kazuhiro Fujiki

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels Pt cluster size and its valence state etc) and the different coating parameters (PTFE to Pt-CA ratio and Pt loading on Dixon ring) on volume transfer rate (Ky.a) for H/D reaction. Ky.a values of ?0.8 m3 (STP).s?1. m?3 were obtained for Pt loading of 7% and Pt cluster size of 3 nm at atmospheric pressure.

P. K. Gupta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thermodesorption studies of catalytic systems. 16. The carbon monoxide-water vapor conversion on copper-containing catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Thermodesorption studies have shown the presence of several types of centers: centers for the firm irreversible adsorption of CO, centers for the adsorption of H/sub 2/O, centers for the competitive adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/O, and centers for the CO-H/sub 2/O conversion, on the surface of the skeletal copper catalyst. It is suggested that CO adsorbs in bridged form on the competitive adsorption centers, and in linear form on the reaction centers. The conversion reaction involves CO and H/sub 2/O molecules adsorbed on a small fraction (approx. 1%) of centers, the H/sub 2/O molecules in question being in the associative adsorbed form.

Gel'man, V.N.; Varlamova, A.M.; Sobolevskii, V.S.; Golosman, E.Z.; Yakerson, V.I.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Ni-Fe Layered Double Hydroxide-Carbon Nanotube Complex for Water Oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly active, durable and cost-effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation to evolve oxygen gas hold a key to a range of renewable energy solutions including water splitting and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of ultrathin nickel iron layered double hydroxide nanoplates on mildly oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Incorporation of Fe into the nickel hydroxide induced the formation of NiFe-layered double hydroxide. The nanoplates were covalently attached to a network of nanotubes, affording excellent electrical wiring to the nanoplates. The ultra-thin Ni-Fe layered double hydroxide nanoplates/carbon nanotube complex was found to exhibit unusually high electro-catalytic activity and stability for oxygen evolution and outperformed commercial precious metal Ir catalysts.

Gong, Ming; Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Wu, Justin Zachary; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from 15 channels between 170 and 183.310 GHz. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. Channels between 170.0 and 176.0 GHz are particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from the GVRP instrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm). In addition to integrated water vapor and liquid water, the GVRP can provide low-resolution vertical profiles of water vapor in very dry conditions.

Caddeau, MP

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/MBR system to remove carboxylates and BTEX from produced water in a field trial. Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide a better understanding of each component of the SMZ/VPB and SMZ/MBR process. Laboratory VPB studies were designed to address the issue of influent variability and periodic operation (see DE-FC26-02NT15461). These experiments examined multiple influent loading cycles and variable concentration loadings that simulate air sparging as the regeneration option for the SMZ system. Two pilot studies were conducted at a produced water processing facility near Farmington, New Mexico. The first field test evaluated SMZ adsorption, SMZ regeneration, VPB buffering, and VPB performance, and the second test focused on MBR and SMZ/MBR operation. The design of the field studies were based on the results from the previous field tests and laboratory studies. Both of the biological treatment systems were capable of removing the BTEX constituents in the laboratory and in the field over a range of operating conditions. For the VPB, separation of the BTEX constituents from the saline aqueous phase yielded high removal efficiencies. However, carboxylates remained in the aqueous phase and were not removed in the combined VPB/SMZ system. In contrast, the MBR was capable of directly treating the saline produced water and simultaneously removing the BTEX and carboxylate constituents. The major limitation of the MBR system is the potential for membrane fouling, particularly when the system is treating produced water under field conditions. The combined process was able to effectively pretreat water for reverse osmosis treatment and subsequent downstream reuse options including utilization in power generation facilities. The specific conclusions that can be drawn from this study are summarized.

Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Activated carbon from grass – A green alternative catalyst support for water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Grass blades (turf grass) have been selected as a cheap biomass source of producing activated carbon for supporting Pt particles for utilizing as electrocatalyst for H2 generation through electrolysis of water. Activation is done using ZnCl2 followed by thermal processing at 250 °C. 1% Pt was supported over the grass derived activated biomass carbon (G-ABC) powder to result in Pt@G-ABC. After physical characterization, Pt@G-ABC sample has been tested for its catalytic activity in 1 M sulfuric acid solution for H2 gas generation through Linear Sweep & Cyclic Voltammetry. Cost factor involved in the production of G-ABC has also been compared with the traditional commercially available carbon support. The studies suggest that grass may be considered not only as a potential alternative source for producing carbon supported catalyst for H2 generation but also highlight the production of low-cost carbon for further applications like electrode materials, adsorbent for color, odor and hazardous pollutants.

Palanichamy Kalyani; Ariharaputhiran Anitha; Andre Darchen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Self-Assembled Micro-Honeycomb Network of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Heterojunction Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-Assembled Micro-Honeycomb Network of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Heterojunction Solar@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Keywords: Self-assembly, micro-honeycomb network, single-walled carbon nanotubes, heterojunction solar cell-assembled micro-honeycomb network (-HN) of SWNTs obtained by water or ethanol vapor treatment of as

Maruyama, Shigeo

266

Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin film conductive carbon coatings on LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} cathode active material powders for lithium-ion batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon were produced from a solid organic precursor, anthracene, by a one-step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. The structure and morphology of the carbon coatings were examined using SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half coin cells. The composite cathodes made of the carbon-coated LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder showed superior electrochemical performance and increased capacity compared to standard composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes.

Doeff, M.M.; Kostecki, R.; Marcinek, M.; Wilcoc, J.D.

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Vapor spill pipe monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

Comparison of Short-Term Oxidation Behavior of Model and Commercial Chromia-Forming Ferritic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor  

SciTech Connect

A high-purity Fe-20Cr and commercial type 430 ferritic stainless steel were exposed at 700 and 800 C in dry air and air with 10% water vapor (wet air) and characterized by SEM, XRD, STEM, SIMS, and EPMA. The Fe-20Cr alloy formed a fast growing Fe-rich oxide scale at 700 C in wet air after 24 h exposure, but formed a thin chromia scale at 700 C in dry air and at 800 C in both dry air and wet air. In contrast, thin spinel + chromia base scales with a discontinuous silica subscale were formed on 430 stainless steel under all conditions studied. Extensive void formation was observed at the alloy-oxide interface for the Fe-20Cr in both dry and wet conditions, but not for the 430 stainless steel. The Fe-20Cr alloy was found to exhibit a greater relative extent of subsurface Cr depletion than the 430 stainless steel, despite the former's higher Cr content. Depletion of Cr in the Fe-20Cr after 24 h exposure was also greater at 700 C than 800 C. The relative differences in oxidation behavior are discussed in terms of the coarse alloy grain size of the high-purity Fe-20Cr material, and the effects of Mn, Si, and C on the oxide scale formed on the 430 stainless steel.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [University of Manitoba, Canada; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Controlling factors on the development and evolution of carbonate platforms: isostatic basement response to water-sediment loading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to accurately use sensitivity analysis on input parameters so a set of numerical simulations will geologically show the relative effects of isostatically compensated water-sediment loads on evolving carbonate platforms...

Mastrolorenzo, Maurizio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

High performance and antifouling vertically aligned carbon nanotube membrane for water purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA CNT) membrane created from the successful fusion of nanotechnology and membrane technology has been stated to be a next generation membrane due to its fast water transport and antimicrobial properties. Although previous studies of the VA CNT membrane reported the potential for fast water transport or desalination by molecular dynamics simulation, this study is the first to report on the feasibility of using the VA CNT membrane for water purification. The VA CNT membrane (4.8 nm of pore diameter and 6.8×1010 #/cm2 of pore density) was fabricated and its flux, rejection performance, and membrane biofouling tendency were evaluated in comparison to the commercial ultrafiltration (UF) membrane. The VA CNT membrane appeared to have a water flux approximately three times higher than the UF membrane and water transport approximately 70,000 times faster than conventional no-slip flow. This higher flux was peculiarly observed in water, the most hydrophilic solvent, while other solvents showed that permeate flux decreased with higher viscosity. The rejection property of the VA CNT membrane as examined by the MWCO measurement was similar to the commercial UF membrane. Additionally, the VA CNT membrane showed better biofouling resistance with approximately 15% less permeate flux reduction and 2 log less bacterial attachment than the UF membrane. This study reports the high potential of the VA CNT membrane with antifouling property in the water purification process.

Youngbin Baek; Cholin Kim; Dong Kyun Seo; Taewoo Kim; Jeong Seok Lee; Yong Hyup Kim; Kyung Hyun Ahn; Sang Seek Bae; Sang Cheol Lee; Jaelim Lim; Kyunghyuk Lee; Jeyong Yoon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Evaporative Evolution of Carbonate-Rich Brines from Synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff Pore Water, Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

The evaporation of a range of synthetic pore water solutions representative of the potential high-level-nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV is being investigated. The motivation of this work is to understand and predict the range of brine compositions that may contact the waste containers from evaporation of pore waters, because these brines could form corrosive thin films on the containers and impact their long-term integrity. A relatively complex synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff pore water was progressively concentrated by evaporation in a closed vessel, heated to 95 C in a series of sequential experiments. Periodic samples of the evaporating solution were taken to determine the evolving water chemistry. According to chemical divide theory at 25 C and 95 C our starting solution should evolve towards a high pH carbonate brine. Results at 95 C show that this solution evolves towards a complex brine that contains about 99 mol% Na{sup +} for the cations, and 71 mol% Cl{sup -}, 18 mol% {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), 9 mol%SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for the anions. Initial modeling of the evaporating solution indicates precipitation of aragonite, halite, silica, sulfate and fluoride phases. The experiments have been used to benchmark the use of the EQ3/6 geochemical code in predicting the evolution of carbonate-rich brines during evaporation.

Sutton, M; Alai, M; Carroll, S A

2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

New High Performance Water Vapor Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Balance of Plant Efficiency and Lower Costs (SBIR Phase I) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Earl H. Wagener (Primary Contact), Brad P. Morgan, Jeffrey R. DiMaio Tetramer Technologies L.L.C. 657 S. Mechanic St. Pendleton, SC 29670 Phone: (864) 646-6282 Email: earl.wagener@tetramertechnologies.com DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0006172 Project Start Date: June 17, 2011 Project End Date: March 16, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate water vapor transport membrane with * >18,000 gas permeation units (GPU) Water vapor membrane with less than 20% loss in * performance after stress tests Crossover leak rate: <150 GPU * Temperature Durability of 90°C with excursions to * 100°C Cost of <$10/m

273

The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors: A preliminary assessment of experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6 and KORA  

SciTech Connect

The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors has been measured in different laboratories under both irradiation and post irradiation conditions. The data from experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6, and in the KORA facility are compared to assess their consistency and complimentarily. The experiments are consistent under comparable experimental conditions and reveal two general mechanisms involving exposed fuel kernels embedded in carbonaceous materials. One is manifest as a strong dependence of fission gas release on the partial pressure of water vapor below 1 kPa and the other, as a weak dependence above 1 kPa.

Myers, B.F.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Carbon capture by sorption-enhanced water-gas shift reaction process using hydrotalcite-based material  

SciTech Connect

A novel route for precombustion decarbonization is the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process. In this process carbon dioxide is removed from a synthesis gas at elevated temperature by adsorption. Simultaneously, carbon monoxide is converted to carbon dioxide by the water-gas shift reaction. The periodic adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide is induced by a pressure swing cycle, and the cyclic capacity can be amplified by purging with steam. From previous studies is it known that for SEWGS applications, hydrotalcite-based materials are particularly attractive as sorbent, and commercial high-temperature shift catalysts can be used for the conversion of carbon monoxide. Tablets of a potassium promoted hydrotalcite-based material are characterized in both breakthrough and cyclic experiments in a 2 m tall fixed-bed reactor. When exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, steam, and nitrogen at 400{sup o}C, the material shows a breakthrough capacity of 1.4 mmol/g. In subsequent experiments the material was mixed with tablets of promoted iron-chromium shift catalyst and exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, steam, hydrogen, and nitrogen. It is demonstrated that carbon monoxide conversion can be enhanced to 100% in the presence of a carbon dioxide sorbent. At breakthrough, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide simultaneously appear at the end of the bed. During more than 300 cycles of adsorption/reaction and desorption, the capture rate, and carbon monoxide conversion are confirmed to be stable. Two different cycle types are investigated: one cycle with a CO{sub 2} rinse step and one cycle with a steam rinse step. The performance of both SEWGS cycles are discussed.

van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Hufton, J.R.; van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Chemical vapor detection using nanomechanical platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For high sensitive and multiplexed chemical analysis, an opto-mechanical detection platform has been built. To check the performance of the platform, we performed water vapor response measurements for ... sensors...

S. H. Lim

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration, MayEleventh Annual Carbon Capture, Utilization & Sequestrationplants with and without carbon capture. Presentation at 2009

Sathre, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

On the Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection, High-Level Cloud, and Upper Troposphere Water Vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework  

SciTech Connect

The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF), also called ‘‘superparameterization’’, embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM) at each grid column of a general circulation model to replace traditional parameterizations of moist convection and large-scale condensation. This study evaluates the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere water vapor by applying an infrared (IR) brightness temperature (Tb) and a precipitation radar (PR) simulator to the CRM column data. Simulator results are then compared with IR radiances from geostationary satellites and PR reflectivities from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). While the actual surface precipitation rate in the MMF has a reasonable diurnal phase and amplitude when compared with TRMM observations, the IR simulator results indicate an inconsistency in the diurnal anomalies of high-level clouds between the model and the geostationary satellite data. Primarily because of its excessive high-level clouds, the MMF overestimates the simulated precipitation index (PI) and fails to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle phase relationships among PI, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere relative humidity. The PR simulator results show that over the tropical oceans, the occurrence fraction of reflectivity in excess of 20 dBZ is almost 1 order of magnitude larger than the TRMM data especially at altitudes above 6 km. Both results suggest that the MMF oceanic convection is overactive and possible reasons for this bias are discussed. However, the joint distribution of simulated IR Tb and PR reflectivity indicates that the most intense deep convection is found more often over tropical land than ocean, in agreement with previous observational studies.

Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Chuntao; Tian, Baijun; Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yuying; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Pressure Broadening of H2O Absorption Lines in the 1.3 ?m Region Measured by Continuous Wave-Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy: Application in the Trace Detection of Water Vapor in N2, SiH4, CF4, and PH3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A continuous wave cavity ring-down (cw-CRD) spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of trace levels of water vapor by absorption spectroscopy at wavelengths in the...

Fiadzomor, Phyllis A Y; Baker, Derek M; Keen, Anthony M; Grant, Robert B; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (the CAMERE process)  

SciTech Connect

The CAMERE process (carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction) was developed and evaluated. The reverse-water-gas-shift reactor and the methanol synthesis reactor were serially aligned to form methanol from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. Carbon dioxide was converted to CO and water by the reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (RWReaction) to remove water before methanol was synthesized. With the elimination of water by RWReaction, the purge gas volume was minimized as the recycle gas volume decreased. Because of the minimum purge gas loss by the pretreatment of RWReactor, the overall methanol yield increased up to 89% from 69%. An active and stable catalyst with the composition of Cu/ZnO/ZrO{sub 2}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5:3:1:1) was developed. The system was optimized and compared with the commercial methanol synthesis processes from natural gas and coal.

Joo, O.S.; Jung, K.D.; Han, S.H.; Uhm, S.J. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.] [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.; Moon, I. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rozovskii, A.Y.; Lin, G.I. [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n+1).gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n.gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Goldberg, Robert I. (Selden, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

284

Optimization of water use and cost of electricity for an MEA carbon capture process, January 26, 2012  

SciTech Connect

DOE goals are: 90% CO{sub 2} capture, Less than 30% increase in COE, and to reduce water use by 70% at 50% cost of dry cooling. Objectives are: (1) Develop detailed models of supercritical power plant, MEA carbon capture process, CO{sub 2} compression; and (2) Optimize process for conflicting goals of minimizing water use and COE CO{sub 2} capture greatly increases COE and water use, power gen. 1/3 of fresh water use, and water scarcity is increasing.

Eslick, J.; Miller, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Effect of surfactants on the interfacial tension and emulsion formation between water and carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The lowering of the interfacial tension ({gamma}) between water and carbon dioxide by various classes of surfactants is reported and used to interpret complementary measurements of the capacity, stability, and average drop size of water-in-CO{sub 2} emulsions. {gamma} is lowered from {approximately}20 to {approximately}2 mN/m for the best poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide) (PPO-b-PEO-b-PPO) and PeO-b-PPO-b-PEO Pluronic triblock copolymers, 1.4 mN/m for a poly(butylene oxide)-b-PEO copolymer, 0.8 mN/m for a perfluoropolyether (PEPE) ammonium carboxylate and 0.2 mN/m for PDMS{sub 24}-g-EO{sub 22}. The hydrophilic-CO{sub 2}-philic balance (HCB) of the triblock Pluronic and PDMS-g-PEO-PPO surfactants is characterized by the CO{sub 2}-to-water distribution coefficient and V-shaped plots of log {gamma} vs wt % EO. A minimum in {gamma} is observed for the optimum HCB. As the CO{sub 2}-philicity of the surfactant tail is increased, the molecular weight of the hydrophilic segment increases for an optimum HCB. The stronger interactions on both sides of the interface lead to a lower {gamma}. Consequently, more water was emulsified for the PDMS-based copolymers than either the PPO- or PBO-based copolymers.

Rocha, S.R.P. da; Harrison, K.L.; Johnston, K.P. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Diffusive Dynamics of Water inside Hydrophobic Carbon Micropores Studied by Neutron Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When water molecules are confined to nanoscale spacings, such as in the nanometer size pores of activated carbon fiber (ACF), their freezing point gets suppressed down to very low temperatures ($\\sim$ 150 K), leading to a metastable liquid state with remarkable physical properties. We have investigated the ambient pressure diffusive dynamics of water in microporous Kynol\\texttrademark ACF-10 (average pore size $\\sim$11.6 {\\AA}, with primarily slit-like pores) from temperature $T=$ 280 K in its stable liquid state down to $T=$ 230 K into the metastable supercooled phase. The observed characteristic relaxation times and diffusion coefficients are found to be respectively higher and lower than those in bulk water, indicating a slowing down of the water mobility with decreasing temperature. The observed temperature-dependent average relaxation time $$ when compared to previous findings indicate that it is the size of the confining pores - not their shape - that primarily affects the dynamics of water for pore sizes larger than 10 {\\AA}. The experimental observations are compared to complementary molecular dynamics simulations of a model system, in which we studied the diffusion of water within the 11.6 {\\AA} gap of two parallel graphene sheets. We find generally a reasonable agreement between the observed and calculated relaxation times at the low momentum transfer $Q$ ($Q\\le 0.9$ \\AA${^{-1}}$). At high $Q$ however, where localized dynamics becomes relevant, this ideal system does not satisfactorily reproduce the measurements. The best agreement is obtained for the diffusion parameter $D$ associated with the hydrogen-site when a representative stretched exponential function, rather than the standard bi-modal exponential model, is used to parameterize the self-correlation function $I(Q,t)$.

S. O. Diallo; L. Vlcek; E. Mamontov; J. K. Keum; Jihua Chen; J. S. Hayes Jr.; A. A. Chialvo

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Sample Vapor Introduction Techniques for Use with Cryofocusing GC Inlet Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the vapor generator was operated at atmospheric pressure for...condensed water. Other studies...Because the water vapor was...tail of the water peak. Thus...obtained from an atmospheric pressure source...the vapor generator over a 1......

Christine L. Rankin; Richard D. Sacks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Carbon-nanotube-based membranes for water desalination by membrane distillation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work investigates ways to fabricate composite macro-structures made of carbon nanotubes in combination with polymers and metals to enhance membrane lifespan and performance. Carbon… (more)

Dumee, Ludovic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Capillary filling with giant liquid/solid slip: dynamics of water uptake by carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article discusses the way the standard description of capillary filling dynamics has to be modified to account for liquid/solid slip in nanometric pores. It focuses in particular on the case of a large slip length compared to the pore size. It is shown that the liquid viscosity does not play a role, and that the flow is only controlled by the friction coefficient of the liquid at the wall. Moreover in the Washburn regime, the filling velocity does not depend on the tube radius. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that this standard description fails to describe the early stage of capillary filling of carbon nanotubes by water, since viscous dissipation at the tube entrance must be taken into account.

Laurent Joly

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

Preparation of water soluble carbon nanotubes and assessment of their biological activity in embryonic zebrafish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are currently one of the most important classes of nanomaterials with unique properties sparking off numerous applications in many fields, including electronics, material science and medicine. However, applications of CNTs in medicine and other biological fields are hampered by their insolubility in aqueous media and concerns regarding toxicity. In this study, seven types of CNTs, including two single-walled, one double-walled, and four multi-walled, were evaluated for possible toxicological effects. Soluble CNTs were prepared by treatment with a mixture of acids (D2SO4 and DNO3), washed with Milli-Q water and oven dried. Transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and other techniques were used to characterise the prepared CNTs. CNT toxicity was assessed using the embryonic zebrafish. Results showed that none of the CNTs studied caused significant adverse developmental effects. These results support the potential safe use of CNTs as components of indwelling medical devices and drug delivery tools.

Adeniyi A. Adenuga; Lisa Truong; Robert L. Tanguay; Vincent T. Remcho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Vapor Power Systems MAE 4263 Final Exam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor Power Systems MAE 4263 Final Exam Wednesday, May 5, 2004 Prof. P.M. Moretti Key Instructions, then think, then write! 1. What is the dewpoint of the exhaust of your car, if the gasoline consists2 so that the mole fraction of water vapor is yH2 O = 9 9 + 8 + 47 = 0:14063 pH2 O = 0:14063 14

292

CNT-SI HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELLS WITH STRUCTURE-CONTROLLED SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBE FILMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CNT-SI HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELLS WITH STRUCTURE- CONTROLLED SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBE FILMS. The heterojunction solar cell was fabricated by dry depositing the SWNT film to the 3 mm by 3 mm n-type silicon solar cells. We proposed a water-vapor treatment to build up SWNTs to a self-assembled micro- honeycomb

Maruyama, Shigeo

293

Self-Assembled, Nanostructured Carbon for Energy Storage and Water Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact Sheet About the Development of Carbon Nanomaterials for Ultracapacitors and Capacitive Deionization

294

Multiscale Interactions between Water and Carbon Fluxes and Environmental Variables in A Central U.S. Grassland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field in the central U.S. Time-series of the entropy of water and carbon fluxes exhibit pronounced annual cycles, primarily explained by the modulation of the diurnal flux amplitude by other variables, such as the net radiation. Entropies of soil...

Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Wilson, Cassandra J.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Characterization and biodegradation of water-soluble biomarkers and organic carbon extracted from low temperature chars  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates that wildfires/biomass combustion may be an important source of labile pyrogenic water-soluble organic matter (Py-WSOM) to aquatic systems. Spectroscopic analysis (of the solid char and Py-WSOM) with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that the Py-WSOM extracted from two low temperature chars (one wood, one grass) was dominated by polar moieties (-OH and C-O) derived from depolymerization and fragmentation of lignocellulose. Incubation experiments under aerobic conditions with unsterilized river water suggested that Py-WSOM and associated biomarkers may have turnover rates on the order of weeks to months, consistent with mixing and transport conditions of riverine systems. For example, pyrogenic dissolved organic carbon (Py-DOC) had a half-life of 30-40 days. Turnover rate for the combustion biomarkers was shorter, with levoglucosan and free lignin phenols having a half-life around 3-4 days and polymeric lignin components 13-14 days. The latter observations contradict earlier studies on the biodegradation of dissolved lignin and point to the need for re-assessment of lignin degradation kinetics in well-mixed riverine systems, particularly when such lignin components are derived from thermally altered plant material that may exist in a form more labile than that in highly processed riverine DOM.

Norwood, Matt J.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Harvey, Omar

2013-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

296

Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

297

Carbon nanotubes: From macromolecules to nanotechnology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...few years later (5, 6) (Fig. 1). Several methods exist today to synthesize these structures, including electric arc-discharge (4, 7), laser ablation (8), and catalytic chemical vapor deposition (9). In all of these, carbon vapor...

P. M. Ajayan; J.-C. Charlier; A. G. Rinzler

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Photochemical generation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reduction of carbon dioxide and water under visible light irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO2...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO2...energy by producing fuels (hydrogen, carbon...M) in the reaction vessel; the gas contained...

Jean-Marie Lehn; Raymond Ziessel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Potential Effects of Organic Carbon Production on Ecosystems and Drinking Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, disinfectantsand implications for drinking water quality and the Deltaand control in drinking water. American Chemical Society,

Brown, Larry R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The influence of tree species mixture on ecosystem-level carbon accumulation and water use in a mixed boreal plantation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Throughout the world, huge areas have been occupied by monospecific tree plantations in order to fulfil the increasing demand for industrial wood products. The use of mixed-species plantations has recently been advocated as a potential compromise between maintaining high-volume wood production and conserving other ecosystem services. Yet little is known about the impact of tree species mixture on species- and ecosystem-level carbon accumulation and water use in mixed plantations. We combined data on above-ground biomass, xylem sap flux density, and the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of leaves and needles in a boreal plantation to test whether different levels of species mixture would impact tree- and plot-level biomass production, transpiration and water use efficiency. Data were recorded in 22 20-x-20-m plots (7 for transpiration) randomly allocated to either monocultures or to two-, three-, and five-species mixtures of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), Norway spruce (Picea abies), Silver birch (Betula pendula), Common alder (Alnus glutinosa) and Siberian larch (Larix sibirica). At tree level, for a given species, we found significant differences among mixtures in transpiration and water use efficiency, though species mixture had no impact on above-ground biomass. At plot level, a large variability in functioning among mixtures was observed, but increasing the number of species in the mixture did not enhance productivity, transpiration or water use efficiency. The presence in mixtures of a high performing species like birch brought about changes in the canopy structure which in turn may have led to changes in micro-environmental conditions. Such changes could have contributed to explain differences in transpiration and water use efficiency among mixtures. We concluded that mixing locally-adapted species under non-limiting soil water conditions did not provide any benefit for ecosystem-level carbon accumulation and water use at this young ontogenic stage, but our study does not preclude that some benefits might arise at older stages.

Charlotte Grossiord; André Granier; Arthur Gessler; Martina Pollastrini; Damien Bonal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid vapor pressures Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 22 3b. Thermodynamics of moist air Water phase, water latent heat of vaporization Lv Summary: 3b. Thermodynamics of moist air Water phase, water latent...

302

The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch [Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Institute of Water Chemistry

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Microwave-induced synthesis of ?-cyclodextrin/N-doped carbon nanotube polyurethane nanocomposites for water purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fabrication of polymer nanocomposites for the removal of organic species in aqueous media is achieved using conventional methods. However, these methods are expensive and deteriorating to the environment due to high energy demands and high organic solvent volume requirements. This work discusses the synthesis of nanocomposite polymers of ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) under microwave irradiation for the first time. This novel method is efficient, greener and time saving. Typically, the reaction to prepare ?-CD polymers takes about 24 h. Here we report a novel method to synthesize the polymers in 10 min. N-CNTs were synthesized via chemical vapour deposition method (CVD) using a 10 wt% Fe–Co/CaCO3 catalyst. The N-CNTs were found to contain ?2 at% nitrogen by CN analysis. The N-CNTs were of high purity and were oxidized with acid functional groups (–COOH, –CO, –OH) using nitric acid under reflux. Zeta potential studies indicated that the quantity of acid functional groups increases with increase in acid treatment times. The functionalised N-CNTs (fN-CNTs) were then polymerized with ?-CD using hexamethylene diisocyanate as the functional cross-linker in a microwave under an inert gas atmosphere. The polymers showed an efficient removal of p-nitrophenol from spiked water samples as confirmed by UV–Vis spectroscopy.

Sello P. Masinga; Edward N. Nxumalo; Bhekie B. Mamba; Sabelo D. Mhlanga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Water extraction kinetics of metals, arsenic and dissolved organic carbon from industrial contaminated poplar leaves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In industrial areas, tree leaves contaminated by metals and metalloids could constitute a secondary source of pollutants. In the present study, water extraction kinetics of inorganic elements (IE: Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Fe and Mn), dissolved organic carbon, pH and biological activity were studied for industrial contaminated poplar leaves. Moreover, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the associated top soil was measured. High quantities of Mn, Zn and As and polysaccharides were released in the solution from the strongly contaminated leaves. The kinetic of release varied with time and metal type. The solution pH decreased while dissolved organic contents increased with time after 30 days. Therefore, these contaminated leaves could constitute a source of more available organic metals and metalloids than the initial inorganic process particles. However, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the top soil suggested that a great part of the released IE was adsorbed, reducing in consequence their transfers and bioavailability. It's concluded that mobility/bioavailability and speciation of metals and metalloids released from the decomposition of polluted tree leaves depends on soil characteristics, pollutant type and litter composition, with consequences for environmental risk assessment.

Muhammad Shahid; Tiantian Xiong; Maryse Castrec-Rouelle; Tibo Leveque; Camille Dumat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thermal Stability and Substitutional Carbon Incorporation far above Solid-Solubility in Si1-xCx and Si1-x-yGexCy Layers Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cx and Si1-x-yGexCy Layers Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition using Disilane M. S. Carroll*, J. C. Sturm on (100) silicon substrates by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) with disilane source gas and disilane is known to produce higher silicon epitaxial growth rates for similar partial

306

HRX-SAFT Equation of State for Fluid Mixtures:? Application to Binary Mixtures of Carbon Dioxide, Water, and Methanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HRX-SAFT Equation of State for Fluid Mixtures:? Application to Binary Mixtures of Carbon Dioxide, Water, and Methanol ... In this work, we extend the pure fluid crossover statistical associating fluid theory (HRX-SAFT) equation of state (EOS) (Kiselev et al., Fluid Phase Equilib. ... HRX-SAFT incorporates non-analytic scaling laws in the critical region and is transformed into the analytical, classical HR-SAFT EOS far away from the critical point. ...

S. B. Kiselev; J. F. Ely; S. P. Tan; H. Adidharma; M. Radosz

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Particles of spilled oil-absorbing carbon in contact with water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen generator coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. Carbon particles with surface filaments having a hydrophobic property of oil film absorption, compositions of matter containing those particles, and a system for using the carbon particles for cleaning oil spills.

Muradov, Nazim (Melbourne, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Interaction of Ozone and Water Vapor with Spark Discharge Soot Aerosol Particles Coated with Benzo[a]pyrene:? O3 and H2O Adsorption, Benzo[a]pyrene Degradation, and Atmospheric Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Besides their relevance as toxic air pollutants, polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC = PAH + derivatives) at the surface of combustion aerosol particles can influence these particles' interaction with reactive trace gases and water vapor, their activity as condensation nuclei, their atmospheric residence times, and consequently their direct and indirect climatic effects. ... Assuming equal relative losses of triphenylene and BaP during the clean up process, the triphenylene recovery, which was generally on the order of 70%, was used to correct the BaP peak area to 100% recovery. ... Thus, the potential influence of liquid organic or aqueous layers on atmospheric particles has to be kept in mind when using the kinetic parameters presented in this work for extrapolations to the atmosphere. ...

Ulrich Pöschl; Thomas Letzel; Christian Schauer; Reinhard Niessner

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Disinfection of drinking water by using a novel electrochemical reactor employing carbon-cloth electrodes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactor for clean and efficient water purification. Disinfection of drinking...reactor for clean and efficient water purification. | Department of Biotechnology...reactor for clean and efficient water purification. Disinfection of drinking...

T Matsunaga; S Nakasono; T Takamuku; J G Burgess; N Nakamura; K Sode

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Understanding Brown Coal-Water Interactions to Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Victorian brown coal has a strong affinity for water. It exhibits high monolayer water capacities (MWC) and non-freezing water contents (NFW). In electricity generation, a large amount of brown coal is burnt (...

Leigh M. Clemow; W. Roy Jackson…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON FROM NORTH DAKOTA LIGNITE: AN OPTION FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL IN WATER TREATMENT PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will further affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. This project, a cooperative effort between the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Grand Forks Water Treatment Plant, and the University of North Dakota Department of Civil Engineering, consists of several interrelated tasks. The objective of the research was to evaluate a cost-effective PAC produced from North Dakota lignite for removing NOM from water and reducing trihalomethane formation potential. The research approach was to develop a statistically valid testing protocol that can be used to compare dose-response relationships between North Dakota lignite-derived PAC and commercially available PAC products. A statistical analysis was performed to determine whether significant correlations exist between operating conditions, water properties, PAC properties, and dose-response behavior. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were also measured for each of the waters and each of the PACs.

Daniel J. Stepan; Thomas A. Moe; Melanie D. Hetland; Margaret L. Laumb

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

Davis, Amber Marie

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Activated carbon from grass -a green alternative catalyst support for water electrolysis Kalyani Palanichamy1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cleanly producing water as the only product. Invariably it is stored in nature as water and hydrocarbons methods including water electrolysis, steam reformation of natural gas, and coal gasification are the foci of widespread production research; but water electrolysis is one of the renowned technologies which provide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Castro Valley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Properties of carbon overcoats and perfluoro-polyether lubricants in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition, high surface energy materials rearrange ora high energy laser pulse vaporizes the carbon material and

Brunner, Ralf

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A method for the determination of dissolved organic carbon in sea water by gas chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organic matter was carried out at elevated temperature and pressure after collection of a large number of samples. The resulting carbon dioxide was flushed through a gas chromatograph with helium as the carrier gas and the signal was recorded on a strip... chart recorder. Chromatographic analysis time was approximately eleven minutes per sample with a precision of + Q. 1 mg C/l. The organic carbon content of the sample was determined by measurement of the peak area using an appropriate carbon dioxide...

Fredericks, Alan D

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Quantitative Analysis of Ternary Vapor Mixtures Using a Microcantilever-Based Electronic Nose  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the identification and quantification of the components of a ternary vapor mixture using a microcantilever-based electronic nose. An artificial neural network was used for pattern recognition. Dimethyl methyl phosphonate vapor in ppb concentrations and water and ethanol vapors in ppm concentrations were quantitatively identified either individually or in binary and ternary mixtures at varying concentrations.

Pinnaduwage, Lal A [ORNL; Zhao, Weichang [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Temporal and angular analysis of nonlinear scattering in carbon-black suspensions in water and ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical origin of the nonlinear scattering of light induced by the focusing of intense laser pulses onto carbon-black suspensions (CBS’s) is discussed through the...

Durand, Olivier; Grolier-Mazza, Valérie; Frey, Robert

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Picosecond-resolution study of nonlinear scattering in carbon black suspensions in water and ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical origin of the nonlinear scattering of light induced by focusing of intense laser pulses onto carbon black suspensions (CBS’s) is discussed through the interpretation of...

Durand, O; Grolier-Mazza, V; Frey, R

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Variation and removal efficiency of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in an advanced water treatment system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the microorganism growth indicator and determines the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) content at the Cheng-Ching Lake Advanced ... (CCLAWTP) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Notably, AOC is associat...

Jie-Chung Lou; Bi-Hsiang Chen; Ting-Wei Chang…

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Oxygen Utilization and Organic Carbon Remineralization in the Upper Water Column of the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a part of the JGOFS synthesis and modeling project, researchers have been working to synthesize the WOCE/JGOFS/DOE/NOAA global CO2...survey data to better understand carbon cycling processes in the oceans. Wor...

Richard A. Feely; Christopher L. Sabine; Reiner Schlitzer…

323

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Waterflood and Enhanced Oil Recovery Studies using Saline Water and Dilute Surfactants in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to decrease the residual oil saturation. In calcareous rocks, water from various resources (deep formation, seawater, shallow beds, lakes and rivers) is generally injected in different oil fields. The ions interactions between water molecules, salts ions, oil...

Alotaibi, Mohammed

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Gasoline vapor recovery  

SciTech Connect

In a gasoline distribution network wherein gasoline is drawn from a gasoline storage tank and pumped into individual vehicles and wherein the gasoline storage tank is refilled periodically from a gasoline tanker truck, a method of recovering liquid gasoline from gasoline vapor that collects in the headspace of the gasoline storage tank as the liquid gasoline is drawn therefrom, said method comprising the steps of: (a) providing a source of inert gas; (b) introducing inert gas into the gasoline storage tank as liquid gasoline is drawn therefrom so that liquid gasoline drawn from the tank is displaced by inert gas and gasoline vapor mixes with the inert gas in the headspace of the tank; (c) collecting the inert gas/gasoline vapor mixture from the headspace of the gasoline storage tank as the tank is refilled from a gasoline tanker truck; (d) cooling the inert gas/gasoline vapor mixture to a temperature sufficient to condense the gasoline vapor in the mixture to liquid gasoline but not sufficient to liquify the inert gas in the mixture; (e) separating the condensed liquid gasoline from the inert gas; and delivering the condensed liquid gasoline to a remote location for subsequent use.

Lievens, G.; Tiberi, T.P.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

326

Economic and Technical Tradeoffs Between Open and Closed Cycle Vapor Compression Evaporators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solute. Evaporation tends to be a very energy intensive process. Approximately 1000 BTUs of energy are required to vaporize one pound of water. Many techniques have been developed to reuse energy Within an evaporation system so as to vaporize... Recompression A schematic of an open cycle vapor recompression evaporator is shown in Figure 2. This method uses the vapor in an open cycle for both heating and cooling. Rather than being condensed after the last effect, steam is compressed to a slightly...

Timm, M. L.

327

Chapter 11 - Nanofluidic Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Applications for Water Purification and Desalination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a brief overview of the basic physical processes that govern the structure and transport of water inside CNT pores, basic properties that make nanotube pore technologies attractive for water purification and desalination, the fabrication approaches for producing CNT membranes, and the experimental observations of water transport and ion exclusion properties in CNT membranes.

Olgica Bakajin; Aleksandr Noy; Francesco Fornasiero; Costas P. Grigoropoulos; Jason K. Holt; Jung Bin In; Sangil Kim; Hyung Gyu Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Potential of carbon nanotubes in water purification: an approach towards the development of an integrated membrane system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problems of water shortages and lack of access to safe drinking water have been and will continue to grow as major global problems. To alleviate these problems, water purification technologies are being updated. Recent years have witnessed impressive breakthroughs towards practical application of nanostructured materials such as Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) in the field of water purification owing to their unique thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. These nanoscale structures need to be arranged into well-defined configurations in order to build integrated systems with high efficiency (the nanotubes being reusable, whereas the traditional membranes foul easily and require frequent replacements), high flux (owing to the hydrophobic super smooth inner surface of nanotubes), and with improvements in chemical selectivity (through suitable chemical functionalisation of the CNTs), so that the idea of using CNTs in separation technology can be made realistic and the potential benefits of practical application of these unique materials can be exploited. This paper assesses the CNTs as an emerging technology in water purification system, particularly with respect to its potential for the removal of arsenic, fluoride, heavy metals and toxic organic components.

Soumitra Kar; R.C. Bindal; S. Prabhakar; P.K. Tewari; K. Dasgupta; D. Sathiyamoorthy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The effect of low concentrations of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in water on biological clogging of sand beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Infiltration of pretreated surface water with recharge wells is hampered by biological clogging processes in the aquifer. The influence of the concentration of easily assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in water on clogging was investigated in filter beds operated under well-defined laboratory conditions using acetate as a model substrate. Acetate concentrations in the water as low as 0.01 mg C/l promoted clogging with the main head loss, caused by bacterial growth, in the first centimeter of the sand bed. An empirical model was developed describing a linear relationship between the operation period to reach a certain increase in head loss (TPi) and the reciprocal value of the acetate concentration or acetate load [Lac g C/ (m2 · d)] at a constant filtration rate. The rate of clogging, designated as the microbiological clogging factor (Cr), is defined by the slope of the linear relationship between the square root of the increase of the head loss (P112) and the operation time. This linear relationship demonstrated that the increase in clogging rate was constant with time. Observations at several locations with experimental recharge wells revealed that the AOC concentration is an important parameter for the biological clogging potential of water. The AOC concentration of water used for infiltration in a recharge well should be less than 0.01 mg acetate-C equiv/l to prevent biological clogging for a period of more than a year.

W.A.M. Hijnen; D. Van der Koou

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

SciTech Connect

Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at three different seepage rates reveals that ebullition and bubble flow will be the dominant form of gas transport in surface water for all but the smallest seepage fluxes or shallowest water bodies. The solubility of the gas species in water plays a fundamental role in whether ebullition occurs. We used a solubility model to examine CO{sub 2} solubility in waters with varying salinity as a function of depth below a 200 m-deep surface water body. In this system, liquid CO{sub 2} is stable between the deep regions where supercritical CO{sub 2} is stable and the shallow regions where gaseous CO{sub 2} is stable. The transition from liquid to gaseous CO{sub 2} is associated with a large change in density, with corresponding large change in bubble buoyancy. The solubility of CO{sub 2} is lower in high-salinity waters such as might be encountered in the deep subsurface. Therefore, as CO{sub 2} migrates upward through the deep subsurface, it will likely encounter less saline water with increasing capacity to dissolve CO{sub 2} potentially preventing ebullition, depending on the CO{sub 2} leakage flux. However, as CO{sub 2} continues to move upward through shallower depths, CO{sub 2} solubility in water decreases strongly leading to greater likelihood of ebullition and bubble flow in surface water. In the case of deep density-stratified lakes in which ebullition is suppressed, enhanced mixing and man-made degassing schemes can alleviate the buildup of CO{sub 2} and related risk of dangerous rapid discharges. Future research efforts are needed to increase understanding of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage in surface water and saturated porous media. For example, we recommend experiments and field tests of CO{sub 2} migration in saturated systems to formulate bubble-driven water-displacement models and relative permeability functions that can be used in simulation models.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

Exchanges of Energy, Water and Carbon Dioxide Xuhui Lee (Yale University) and Edward Pa:on (NCAR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Influences of the Boundary Layer Flow on Vegeta8on-Air Influences of the Boundary Layer Flow on Vegeta8on-Air Exchanges of Energy, Water and Carbon Dioxide Xuhui Lee (Yale University) and Edward Pa:on (NCAR) * Summarize your projects and its scienFfic objecFves for the next 3-5 years The objecFve of this project is to establish a mechanisFc understanding of the interplay between flow heterogeneity in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), land surface heterogeneity, and vegetaFon-air exchange of energy, water and CO 2 . The project will invesFgate mechanisms by which mesoscale moFons in the ABL influence vegetaFon-air exchange. It will also quanFfy the influence of heterogeneity on predicFons by 1D column models used in regional and global scale climate models. It is hypothesized that two important ABL processes entrainment and flow

332

Structural annealing of carbon coated aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by chem- ical vapor infiltration (CVI) of carbon source gases into fiber preforms. While CVI of carbon fasteners [1]. While the above applications are currently filled by traditional carbon fiber C/ C compositesStructural annealing of carbon coated aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets Shaghayegh Faraji

Zhu, Yuntian T.

333

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b , Y.F. Zheng a , C.S. Lee a , N was used to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a hot-®lament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system in the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT)s. The CNTs synthesized from carbon monoxide validate

Zheng, Yufeng

334

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characteristics  of  power   plants  and  cooling  water  at CCS sites for power plant cooling. Presented at 10thused directly for power plant cooling without desalination (

Sathre, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Treatment of sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds in reed-bed mesocosms - Water, BOD, carbon and nutrient removal  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One method is dewatering and biodegradation of compounds in constructed wetlands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters after treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plants improve degradation and Phragmites australis is tolerant to xenobiotics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of sludge could be reduced by 50-70%. - Abstract: Since the mid-1970s, Sweden has been depositing 1 million ton d.w sludge/year, produced at waste water treatment plants. Due to recent legislation this practice is no longer a viable method of waste management. It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques and one promising alternative is the dewatering and treatment of sludge in constructed wetlands. The aim of this study was to follow reduction of organic carbon, BOD and nutrients in an industrial sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds passing through constructed small-scale wetlands, and to investigate any toxic effect such as growth inhibition of the common reed Phragmites australis. The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters in all the outgoing water samples, which shows that constructed wetlands are suitable for carbon and nutrient removal. The results also showed that P. australis is tolerant to xenobiotics and did not appear to be affected by the toxic compounds in the sludge. The sludge residual on the top of the beds contained low levels of organic carbon and is considered non-organic and could therefore be landfilled. Using this type of secondary treatment method, the amount of sludge could be reduced by 50-70%, mainly by dewatering and biodegradation of organic compounds.

Gustavsson, L., E-mail: Lillemor.Gustavsson@karlskogaenergi.se [Karlskoga Environment and Energy Company, Karlskoga (Sweden); Engwall, M. [Karlskoga Environment and Energy Company, Karlskoga (Sweden); School of Science and Technology, MTM - Man-Technology-Environment, Oerebro University, 701 82 Oerebro (Sweden)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Organic vapor jet printing system  

SciTech Connect

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

338

Production of elemental sulfur and ammonium thiosulfate by the oxidation of H2S containing water vapor and ammonia over V/Zr-PILC catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in the presence of water and ammonia was studied over V2O5 supported on Zr-pillared clay catalysts (V/Zr-PILCs). The synthesized catalysts were examined using a variety of characterization techniques. A catalytic performance study using V/Zr-PILC catalysts showed that H2S was successfully converted to elemental sulfur and ammonium thiosulfate (ATS) without considerable emission of sulfur dioxide. The H2S conversion over V/Zr-PILCs increased with increasing the content of vanadia up to 6 wt.%. This superior catalytic performance might be related to the uniform dispersion of vanadia species on the Zr-PILC support.

Kanattukara Vijayan Bineesh; Moon-il Kim; Goo-Hwa Lee; Manickam Selvaraj; Kyu Hyun; Dae-Won Park

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Influence of surface passivation and water content on mineral reactions in unsaturated porous media: Implications for brucite carbonation and CO2 sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The evolution of mineral reactive surface area is an important control on the progress of carbon mineralization reactions that sequester anthropogenic CO2. Dry conditions in unsaturated porous media and the passivation of reactive surface area by secondary phase precipitation complicate predictions of reactive surface during carbon mineralization reactions. Unsaturated brucite [Mg(OH)2] bearing column experiments were used to evaluate the effects of water saturation and hydrous Mg-carbonate precipitation on reaction of brucite with 10% CO2 gas streams at ambient conditions. We demonstrate that a lack of available water severely limits reaction progress largely due to the requirement of water as a reactant to form hydrated Mg-carbonates. The precipitation of a poorly crystalline carbonate phase in the early stages of the reaction does not significantly hinder brucite dissolution, as the carbonate coating remains sufficiently permeable. It is postulated that the conversion of this phase to substantially less porous, crystalline nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] results in passivation of the brucite surface. Although a mechanistic model describing the passivating effect of nesquehonite remains elusive, reactive transport modeling using MIN3P-DUSTY confirms that conventional geometric surface area update models do not adequately reproduce observed reaction progress during brucite carbonation, while an empirically based model accounting for surface passivation is able to capture the transient evolution of CO2 uptake. Both water limits and surface passivation effects may limit the efficiency of CO2 sequestration efforts that rely on the conversion of mafic and ultramafic rock to carbonate minerals.

Anna L. Harrison; Gregory M. Dipple; Ian M. Power; K. Ulrich Mayer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A review on solar thermal syngas production via redox pair-based water/carbon dioxide splitting thermochemical cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The high power density, ease of transportation and storage and many years of development of internal combustion engine technologies have put liquid hydrocarbon fuels at a privileged position in our energy mix. Therefore processes that use renewable energy sources to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels from H2O and CO2 are of crucial importance. Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) can be employed as the only energy source for the renewable production of hydrogen from water either indirectly, e.g. by supplying the electricity for electrolysis, or directly by supplying the necessary heat for thermochemically producing hydrogen. Among the various thermochemical cycles tested so far for CSP-driven hydrogen production via water splitting (WS), those based on redox-pair oxide systems, are directly adaptable to carbon dioxide splitting (CDS) and/or combined CO2/H2O splitting for the production of CO or syngas, respectively. The acknowledgement of this fact has recently revived the interest of the scientific community on such technologies. The current article presents the development, evolution and current status of CSP-aided syngas production via such redox-pair-based thermochemical cycles. At first the various redox oxide material compositions tested for water/carbon dioxide splitting are presented and their redox chemistries are discussed. Then the selection of suitable solar reactors is addressed in conjunction with the boundary conditions imposed by the redox systems as well as the heat demands, technical peculiarities and requirements of the cycle steps. The various solar reactor concepts proposed and employed for such reactions and their current status of development are presented. Finally, topics where further work is needed for commercialization of the technology are identified and discussed.

Christos Agrafiotis; Martin Roeb; Christian Sattler

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Brine for CCS. Presented at NETL CO 2 Storage and WaterLaboratory, Golden, CO. NETL (National Energy TechnologyLaboratory, Morgantown, WV. DOE/NETL Report 400/2008/1339.

Sathre, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Green chemistry : dense carbon dioxide and water as environmentally benign reaction media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) was investigated in scCO?, and the cycloaddition between cyclopentadiene and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) was studied in an scCO?/liquid water environment. Nitrogen chemistry, specifically the synthesis of nitrogen ...

Allen, Andrew J. (Andrew John), 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor Mercury Vapor Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Mercury Vapor Details Activities (23) Areas (23) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Anomalously high concentrations can indicate high permeability or conduit for fluid flow Hydrological: Field wide soil sampling can generate a geometrical approximation of fluid circulation Thermal: High concentration in soils can be indicative of active hydrothermal activity Dictionary.png Mercury Vapor: Mercury is discharged as a highly volatile vapor during hydrothermal

344

Stratified vapor generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Hassani, Vahab (Golden, CO)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

345

The role of hydrogen in methane formation from carbon and water over metal catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in air at 300 C for 2 h and at 400 C for 2 h. Calcination was followed by reduction under hydrogen at 300oC for 2 h, then at 425oC for 2 h. Before the catalyst was used, it was crushed using a mortar and pestle, and sieved to between 10 and 20 mesh... OR Figure 1. Diagram of On-line Gas Chromatograph 11 Rt the termination of an analysis, both hydrogen and carbon containing products of each reaction were compared to assure reproducibility. The detector unit for the on-line gas chromatograph...

Moore, Stanley Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

346

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Abstract: In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host...

347

Impact of the reaction conditions on the photocatalytic reduction of water on mesoporous polymeric carbon nitride under sunlight irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sacrificial hydrogen evolution was studied with sol–gel prepared carbon nitride photocatalysts loaded in-situ with platinum in a photocatalytic setup with defined geometry and a solar simulator as light source. Reaction conditions (e.g. photocatalyst concentration, triethanolamine concentration, amount of Pt precursor, water quality, etc.), and catalyst properties (e.g. BET surface area) were varied to optimize the catalysts for hydrogen evolution. We found that most of the parameters strongly influence the in-situ co-catalyst loading. The optimum platinum loading is between 0.03 and 0.09 wt%, which is less than 5% of the initial amount of platinum. A long term stability test was conducted showing a stable hydrogen evolution rate for more than 10 days indicating a stable catalyst under applied reaction conditions. We found that a change in the BET surface area affects the photocatalytic activity rather than the experimental conditions.

M. Schröder; K. Kailasam; S. Rudi; M. Richter; A. Thomas; R. Schomäcker; M. Schwarze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Limestone-Particle-Stabilized Macroemulsion of Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Water for Ocean Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In relation to ocean disposal of CO2 from power plants, a comprehensive plume model was developed to simulate the dynamic, near-field behavior of CO2 released in the water column as either a buoyant liq. ... from flue gases and injected into the oceans. ...

D. Golomb; E. Barry; D. Ryan; C. Lawton; P. Swett

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ignition and combustion drive by powerful laser radiation acting on a water surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ignition and combustion effects in water vapor generated...2-laser radiation on a water surface are investigated...

G. I. Kozlov; V. A. Kuznetsov

350

Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Air Sealing for New Home Construction Insulation Types of Insulation Insulation and Air Sealing Products and Services External Resources Find a Local AirVapor Barrier...

351

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of Alternate Water Gas Shift for Carbon Capture Final Final Report .doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Alternate Water Evaluation of Alternate Water Gas Shift Configurations for IGCC Systems August 5, 2009 DOE/NETL-401/080509 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

352

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.F. Keeling, S.C. Piper, A.F. Bollenbacher and J.S. Walker Carbon Dioxide Research Group Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California La Jolla, California 92093-0444, U.S.A. Period of Record 1958-2008 Methods Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5

353

Microemulsions of water in supercritical carbon dioxide : an in-situ NMR investigation of micelle formation and structure.  

SciTech Connect

High-pressure NMR spectroscopy was used for the first time to investigate microemulsions of water in supercritical carbon dioxide. The emulsions were formed using a family of anionic perfluoropolyether ammonium carboxylate surfactants. This system holds promise as a reaction medium for conducting homogeneous catalytic reactions within the aqueous micellular cores while, at the same time, exploiting the facile mass transfer properties of the supercritical fluid. Ammonium hexafluorophosphate was used as a water-soluble ionic guest to investigate micelle formation and structure. Under micelle-forming conditions, the PF{sub 6}{sup -} guest, surfactant, and water were uniformly dispersed throughout the CO{sub 2} phase, as demonstrated by in situ NMR imaging. In addition, the micelles were observed to form even in the absence of mechanical stirring. This spontaneous formation of micelles demonstrates that the NMR spectral properties were obtained under conditions that result in the production of thermodynamically stable microemulsions. The nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) was used to probe the micellular structure through dipole-dipole interactions between the PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion and the fluorinated backbone of the surfactant. A strong negative homonuclear NoE was observed between the PF{sub 6}{sup -} guest and the fluorine moiety that is located directly adjacent to the surfactant's carboxylate head group. This highly specific negative NOE indicates an ordered arrangement, where the PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion and carboxylate ion are located in close proximity to one another. This close association of two negatively charged ionic groups in an aqueous environment is unusual and suggests that the PF{sub 6}{sup -} guest is concentrated within the electric double layer that forms at the micellular interface.

Fremgen, D. E.; Smotkin, E. S.; Gerald, R. E.; Klingler, R. J.; Rathke, J. W.; Chemical Engineering; IIT

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the greenhouse effect? is the greenhouse effect? Greenhouse Effect Greenhouse Effect The greenhouse effect is used to describe the phenomenon whereby the Earth's atmosphere traps solar radiation, caused by the presence of gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and water vapor (H2O), in the atmosphere that allow incoming sunlight to pass through but absorb heat radiated back from the Earth's surface, resulting in higher temperatures. The greenhouse effect gets its name from what actually happens in a greenhouse. In a greenhouse, short wavelength visible sunlight shines through the glass panes and warms the air and the plants inside. The radiation emitted from the heated objects is of longer wavelength and is unable to pass through the glass barrier, maintaining a warm temperature

355

1.5 V battery driven reduced graphene oxide–silver nanostructure coated carbon foam (rGO–Ag–CF) for the purification of drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A porous carbon foam (CF) electrode modified with a reduced graphene oxide–Ag (rGO–Ag) nanocomposite has been fabricated to purify water. It can perform as an antibacterial device by killing pathogenic microbes with the aid of a 1.5 V battery, with very little power consumption. The device is recycled ten times with good performance for long term usage. It is shown that the device may be implemented as a fast water purifier to deactivate the pathogens in drinking water.

Surender Kumar; Somnath Ghosh; N Munichandraiah; H N Vasan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Gasification of Charcoal: Influence of Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct use of biomass as a fuel offers a limited field of applications. Conversion of biomass to gases and liquids is of great importance to make transport of energy cheaper, gases and liquids being more easil...

J. R. Richard; M. Cathonnet; J. P. Rouan

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Solid–Liquid–Vapor Equilibrium Models for Cryogenic Biogas Upgrading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In cryogenic upgrading processes involving dry ice formation, accurate predictions of solid–liquid, solid–vapor, and solid–liquid–vapor equilibria are fundamental for a correct design of the heat exchanger surface in order to achieve the desired biomethane purity. ... Moreover, the liquefied biogas production process, particularly interesting for cryogenic upgrading processes due to the low temperature of the obtained biomethane, requires an accurate knowledge of carbon dioxide solubility in liquid methane to avoid solid deposition. ... For some applications demanding a high energy content gas, namely vehicle fuels and injection in the natural gas grid, the biogas has to be upgraded into biomethane. ...

Mauro Riva; Marco Campestrini; Joseph Toubassy; Denis Clodic; Paolo Stringari

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fuel vapor control device  

SciTech Connect

A fuel vapor control device is described having a valve opening and closing a passage connecting a carburetor and a charcoal canister according to a predetermined temperature. A first coil spring formed by a ''shape memory effect'' alloy is provided to urge the valve to open the passage when the temperature is high. A second coil spring urges the valve to close the passage. A solenoid is provided to urge an armature against the valve to close the passage against the force of the first coil spring when the engine is running. The solenoid heats the first coil spring to generate a spring force therein when the engine is running. When the engine is turned off, the solenoid is deactivated, and the force of the first spring overcomes the force of the second spring to open the passage until such time as the temperature of the first spring drops below the predetermined temperature.

Ota, I.; Nishimura, Y.; Nishio, S.; Yogo, K.

1987-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture in the Presence of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture preservation of the IRMOF structure. Carbon dioxide capture from combustion sources such as flue gas in power this carbon capture challenge. The preferred method for measuring the efficiency of a given material

Yaghi, Omar M.

360

Category:Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Mercury Vapor page? For detailed information on Mercury Vapor as exploration techniques,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Water Ice, Silicate, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features in the Infrared Space Observatory Spectrum of the Carbon-Rich Planetary Nebula CPD -56 degree 8032  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined ISO SWS and LWS spectroscopy is presented of the late WC-type planetary nebula nucleus CPD-56 8032 and its carbon-rich nebula. The extremely broad coverage (2.4-197 microns) enables us to recognize the clear and simultaneous presence of emission features from both oxygen- and carbon- rich circumstellar materials. Removing a smooth continuum highlights bright emission bands characteristic of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (hereafter PAHs) in the 3-14 micron region, bands from crystalline silicates longwards of 18 microns, and the 43- and 62-micron bands of crystalline water ice. We discuss the probable evolutionary state and history of this unusual object in terms of (a) a recent transition from an O-rich to a C-rich outflow following a helium shell flash; or (b) a carbon-rich nebular outflow encountering an O-rich comet cloud.

Cohen, M; Sylvester, R J; Liu, X W; Cox, P; Lim, T; Schmitt, B; Speck, A K; Cohen, Martin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Water Ice, Silicate and PAH Emission Features in the ISO Spectrum of the Carbon-rich Planetary Nebula CPD-56 8032  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined ISO SWS and LWS spectroscopy is presented of the late WC-type planetary nebula nucleus CPD-56 8032 and its carbon-rich nebula. The extremely broad coverage (2.4-197 microns) enables us to recognize the clear and simultaneous presence of emission features from both oxygen- and carbon- rich circumstellar materials. Removing a smooth continuum highlights bright emission bands characteristic of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (hereafter PAHs) in the 3-14 micron region, bands from crystalline silicates longwards of 18 microns, and the 43- and 62-micron bands of crystalline water ice. We discuss the probable evolutionary state and history of this unusual object in terms of (a) a recent transition from an O-rich to a C-rich outflow following a helium shell flash; or (b) a carbon-rich nebular outflow encountering an O-rich comet cloud.

Martin Cohen; M. J. Barlow; R. J. Sylvester; X. -W. Liu; P. Cox; T. Lim; B. Schmitt; A. K. Speck

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fabrication and characterization of single carbon nanotube emitters as point electron sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a producing micron-size carbon fibers which contain single carbon nanotubes at their cores by a chemical vapor of the fractured carbon fiber, a multiwalled nanotube sticks out due to its different fracture toughness from the carbon fiber that is largely made of amorphous carbon. The pro- truded carbon nanotubes are usually 4

Qin, Lu-Chang

364

Investigation of Pool Spreading and Vaporization Behavior in Medium-Scale LNG Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A failure of a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker can occur due to collision or loading/unloading operation resulting in spillage of LNG on water. Upon release, a spreading liquid can form a pool with rapid vaporization leading to the formation of a flammable vapor cloud. Safety analysis for the protection of public and property involves the determination of consequences of such accidental releases. To address this complex pool spreading and vaporization phenomenon of LNG, an investigation is performed based on the experimental tests that were conducted by the Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center (MKOPSC) in 2007. The 2007 tests are a part of medium-scale experiments carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field (BFTF), College Station. The dataset represents a semi-continuous spill on water, where LNG is released on a confined area of water for a specified duration of time. The pool spreading and vaporization behavior are validated using empirical models, which involved determination of pool spreading parameters and vaporization rates with respect to time. Knowledge of the pool diameter, pool height and spreading rate are found to be important in calculating the vaporization rates of the liquid pool. The paper also presents a method to determine the vaporization mass flux of LNG using water temperature data that is recorded in the experiment. The vaporization rates are observed to be high initially and tend to decrease once the pool stopped spreading. The results of the analysis indicated that a vaporization mass flux that is varying with time is required for accurate determination of the vaporization rate. Based on the data analysis, sources of uncertainties in the experimental data were identified to arise from ice formation and vapor blocking.

Nirupama Gopalaswami; R. Mentzer; M. Sam Mannan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

Erbil, A.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Optimization of multi-pressure himidification-dehumidification desalination using thermal vapor compression and hybridization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humidification-dehumidification (HD or HDH) desalination, and specifically HD driven by a thermal vapor compressor (TVC), is a thermal desalination method that has the potential to produce potable water efficiently in order ...

Mistry, Karan Hemant

368

Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism of dense vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition method was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques.

Takashima, A.

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

369

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the build decision for carbon capture and sequestrationTenth Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration.be managed early on. Carbon capture technology is water-,

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Production of higher quality bio-oils by in-line esterification of pyrolysis vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure encompasses in-line reactive condensation processes via vapor phase esterification of bio-oil to decease reactive species concentration and water content in the oily phase of a two-phase oil, thereby increasing storage stability and heating value. Esterification of the bio-oil vapor occurs via the vapor phase contact and subsequent reaction of organic acids with ethanol during condensation results in the production of water and esters. The pyrolysis oil product can have an increased ester content and an increased stability when compared to a condensed pyrolysis oil product not treated with an atomized alcohol.

Hilten, Roger Norris; Das, Keshav; Kastner, James R; Bibens, Brian P

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Some Primary Amines of Pharmaceutical Importance by Correlation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Correlation Gas Chromatography Chase Gobble, Nigam Rath, and James Chickos* Department of Chemistry Information ABSTRACT: Vapor pressures, vaporization, and sublimation enthalpies of several pharmaceuticals and boiling temperatures when available. Sublimation enthalpies and vapor pressures are also evaluated for 1

Chickos, James S.

372

EPA releases list of potential endocrine disrupters | Consensus reached on prenatal exposures | Rewarding fertilizer pollution with crop subsidies | Order matters in pesticide exposures | News Briefs: Nano needs oversight ` Congress and carbon sequestration ` Low-cost greenhouse-gas controls ` Sowing carbon credits ` Cities for sustainability | Unleashing a dioxin legacy | Florida gators battle pesticides | Lead levels high in Canadian tap water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA releases list of potential endocrine disrupters | Consensus reached on prenatal exposures | Rewarding fertilizer pollution with crop subsidies | Order matters in pesticide exposures | News Briefs: Nano needs oversight ` Congress and carbon sequestration ` Low-cost greenhouse-gas controls ` Sowing carbon credits ` Cities for sustainability | Unleashing a dioxin legacy | Florida gators battle pesticides | Lead levels high in Canadian tap water ...

NAOMI LUBICK; ROBERT WEINHOLD; KRIS CHRISTEN; RHITU CHATTERJEE; REBECCA RENNER

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fostering a triple response mechanism to combat global climate change: Emission abatement, carbon capture and water improvement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Kyoto Protocol has established emission abatement and carbon sink increase to cope with climate change. However, in recent years, developed countries tend to focus more on the former. The simplifying of GH...

Ke Zhou; Xia Cao

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Evidence of old carbon in the deep water column of the Panama Basin from natural radiocarbon measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF OLD CARBON IN THE PANAMA BASIN to the average observedparticulate flux at the Panama Basin, Science, 218, 883-884,minus POC) between the Panama Basin Honjo, S. , D. Spencer,

Druffel, Ellen R. M; Griffin, Sheila; Honjo, Susumu; Manganini, Steven J

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Self-Assembled, Nanostructured Carbon for Energy Storage and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Self-Assembled, Nanostructured Carbon for Energy Storage and Water Treatment Self-Assembled, Nanostructured Carbon for Energy Storage and Water Treatment nanostructuredcarbon.pdf...

377

Three-Phase Vapor?Liquid?Liquid Equilibria for Methane + n-Octane + Monoethylene Glycol + Water at Pressures from (3.1 to 15.0) MPa and Temperatures from (281 to 363) K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are several commercial processes available for the dehydration of gas, such as the use of liquid or solid desiccants and expansion refrigeration. ... The gaseous part of the liquid samples, and the gas phase samples direct from the equilibrium cell, were expanded into a series of evacuated vessels of known volume from which the total amount of substance was determined from the perfect gas equation using the measured low-pressure PVT data. ... To predict the losses of MEG in processes for the dehydration of natural gas, the concentrations of MEG in the vapor phase are of interest to the gas industry. ...

Stanley J. Ashcroft; Gerd Brunner; Hansjörg Vollmer; Christopher W. Sweeney

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

378

VAPORIZATION THERMODYNAMICS OF KCl. COMBINING VAPOR PRESSURE AND GRAVIMETRIC DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.B. Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119899, Russia Bonnell D.W., Hastie J.W. National temperature chemistry situations, vapor pressures are typically less than 100 kPa. The molar volume is p = 101325 Pa). The subscript trs denotes that the changeisfor a transition, typically sublimation

Rudnyi, Evgenii B.

379

Vapor-side corrosion in thermal desalination plants  

SciTech Connect

This article reports the results of vapor-size corrosion monitoring studies carried out in multistage flash (MSF) desal unit No. 100 of Al-Khafji power and Desalination Plant in Saudi Arabia. Corrosion behavior of 70/30 Cu-Ni alloy, carbon steel (CS), and type 316L stainless steel (SS) was studied in vents and in the vapor size of distillers for 2,000, 4,000, and 9,000 h. Analyses of the experimental data indicated that in addition to O{sub 2}, S-containing compounds evolved during flashing of seawater reacted more with Cu-Ni alloy than with CS and type 316L SS. Explanations for comparatively higher corrosion of alloys exposed to the vapors of the first three (1 to 3) and middle (11 to 13) stages of the MSF plant are given with experimental results. Type 316L SS was found to be the alloy most resistant to vapor-side corrosion in all stages of distillers.

Asrar, N.; Malik, A.U.; Ahmed, S. [Saline Water Conversion Corp. (Saudi Arabia); Al-Khalidi, M.; Al-Moaili, K. [Al-Khafji Desalination Plant (Saudi Arabia)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material Degradation in Gas Diffusion on the water management of the PEMFC, namely the transport of product water (both liquid and vapor its water management performance and func- tion as indicators of the degradation of GDL material

Kandlikar, Satish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II: A hydrogen bonded water network switch is observed between pH 7.8 and 10.0.  

SciTech Connect

The neutron structure of wild type human carbonic anhydrase II at pH 7.8 has been determined to 2.0 resolution. Detailed analysis and comparison to the previous determined structure at pH 10.0 shows important differences in protonation of key catalytic residues in the active site as well as a rearrangement of the hydrogen bonded water network. For the first time, a completed hydrogen bonded network stretching from the Zn-bound solvent to the proton shuttling residue His64 has been directed observed.

Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Langan, Paul [ORNL; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN NATURAL AND CREATED WETLANDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Wetland ecosystems are significant carbon sinks. Their high productivity and presence of water gives them the ability to efficiently sequester carbon in the soil,… (more)

Bernal, Blanca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Crystallographic Snapshots of Cyanide- and Water-Bound C-Clusters from Bifunctional Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase/Acetyl-CoA Synthase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nickel-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs) reversibly catalyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and are of vital importance in the global carbon cycle. The unusual catalytic CODH C-cluster ...

Kung, Yan

384

Vacuum vapor deposition gun assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vapor deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, a hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

Zeren, Joseph D. (Boulder, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

LNG Vaporizer Utilizing Vacuum Steam Condensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report concerns the field test results of a new type of peak-shaving LNG vaporizer (VSV) whose heat source is ... heat of vacuum steam to vaporize and superheat LNG within heat transfer tubes. Prior to the.....

Y. Miyata; M. Hanamure; H. Kujirai; Y. Sato…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Running-Film Vaporizer for LNG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in welding technology and steel fabrication techniques have permitted the development of a new concept in cryogenic vaporizers—the running-film plate vaporizer. Although similar in heat transfer philosop...

H. H. West; G. L. Puckett

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Vapor Retarder Classification- Building America Top Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Building America Innovations profile describes research in vapor retarders. Since 2006 the IRC has permitted Class III vapor retarders like latex paint (see list above) in all climate zones under certain conditions thanks to research by Building America teams.

388

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Bioluminescence-Based Method for Measuring Assimilable Organic Carbon in Pretreatment Water for Reverse Osmosis Membrane Desalination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bioluminescence-based assimilable organic carbon (AOC) test was developed for determining the...luminescence and is nutritionally robust. AOC was measured in both a pilot plant and a...treatment. This article presents a marine AOC test for determining the biological growth...

Lauren A. Weinrich; Orren D. Schneider; Mark W. LeChevallier

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbon, Water and Energy over a Mixed Deciduous Forest in the Midwest  

SciTech Connect

During the project period we continued to conduct long-term (multi-year) measurements, analysis, and modeling of energy and mass exchange in and over a deciduous forest in the Midwestern United States, to enhance the understanding of soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange of carbon. At the time when this report was prepared, results from nine years of measurements (1998 - 2006) of above canopy CO2 and energy fluxes at the AmeriFlux site in the Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Indiana, USA (see Table 1), were available on the Fluxnet database, and the hourly CO2 fluxes for 2007 are presented here (see Figure 1). The annual sequestration of atmospheric carbon by the forest is determined to be between 240 and 420 g C m-2 a-1 for the first ten years. These estimates are based on eddy covariance measurements above the forest, with a gap-filling scheme based on soil temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Data gaps result from missing data or measurements that were rejected in qua)lity control (e.g., during calm nights). Complementary measurements of ecological variables (i.e. inventory method), provided an alternative method to quantify net carbon uptake by the forest, partition carbon allocation in each ecosystem components, and reduce uncertainty on annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Biometric datasets are available on the Fluxnext database since 1998 (with the exclusion of 2006). Analysis for year 2007 is under completion.

Danilo Dragoni; Hans Peter Schmid; C.S.B. Grimmond; J.C. Randolph; J.R. White

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Mechanistic and kinetic evaluation of organic disinfection by-product and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) formation during the ozonation of drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ozonation of drinking water results in the formation of low molecular weight (LMW) organic by-products. These compounds are easily utilisable by microorganisms and can result in biological instability of the water. In this study, we have combined a novel bioassay for assessment of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) with the detection of selected organic acids, aldehydes and ketones to study organic by-product formation during ozonation. We have investigated the kinetic evolution of LMW compounds as a function of ozone exposure. A substantial fraction of the organic compounds formed immediately upon exposure to ozone and organic acids comprised 60–80% of the newly formed AOC. Based on experiments performed with and without hydroxyl radical scavengers, we concluded that direct ozone reactions were mainly responsible for the formation of small organic compounds. It was also demonstrated that the laboratory-scale experiments are adequate models to describe the formation of LMW organic compounds during ozonation in full-scale treatment of surface water. Thus, the kinetic and mechanistic information gained during the laboratory-scale experiments can be utilised for upscaling to full-scale water treatment plants.

Frederik Hammes; Elisabeth Salhi; Oliver Köster; Hans-Peter Kaiser; Thomas Egli; Urs von Gunten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Investigation of water and CO2 (carbon dioxide) flooding using micro-CT (micro-computed tomography) images of Berea sandstone core using finite element simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study reports a numerical investigation of water and CO2 (carbon dioxide) flooding at the pore scale of a porous medium. We use high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images of Berea sandstone core to obtain the pore geometry. The numerical solution used for the simulation was carried out by a finite element based software package. Level Set method is used to determine the position of the interface between two immiscible fluids when oil is displaced by water and CO2, respectively. The present formulation is validated against single-phase flow through the porous structure. It is found that, fluid flow inside the pore space takes place through preferential inlet and outlet pores. For two-phase flow, it is observed that continuous displacement of oil occurs during water flooding but CO2 is able to displace oil at certain locations in the pores. Also, the separation of flow front is observed in the case of CO2 flooding. A quantitative comparison of the results obtained in two types of flooding simulations suggests that water displaces a higher volume of oil than CO2 in the time period for which the simulations are performed.

Akshay C. Gunde; Bijoyendra Bera; Sushanta K. Mitra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Vapor Pressures and Heats of Vaporization of Primary Coal Tars  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

/ PC92544-18 / PC92544-18 VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS FINAL REPORT Grant Dates: August, 1992 - November, 1996 Principal Authors: Eric M. Suuberg (PI) and Vahur Oja Report Submitted: April, 1997 Revised: July, 1997 Grant Number: DE-FG22-92PC92544 Report Submitted by: ERIC M. SUUBERG DIVISION OF ENGINEERING BROWN UNIVERSITY PROVIDENCE, RI 02912 TEL. (401) 863-1420 Prepared For: U. S. DEPT. OF ENERGY FEDERAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PA 15236 DR. KAMALENDU DAS, FETC, MORGANTOWN , WV TECHNICAL PROJECT OFFICER "US/DOE Patent Clearance is not required prior to the publication of this document" ii United States Government Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any

394

ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM DIFFERENT CARBON SOURCES USING ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED AND WETOXIDISED MANURE AS NUTRIENT AND WATER SUPPLY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasses, great interest has arisen in production of biofuels. The idea of combining biogas and bioethanol and water in industry is a rather expensive medium. The remaining liquid after the biogas process is waste to pollution of ground waters. Furthermore the biogas process does not kill all pathogens. Anaerobically

395

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers, a vapor-dominated hydrothermal system, is developed in host rock of the Franciscan Formation, which contains veins of quartz and calcite whose Δ18O values record the temperatures and isotopic compositions of fluids prevailing during at least two different episodes of rock-fluid interaction. The first episode took place at about 200°C, during which marine silica and carbonate apparently interacted with ocean

396

Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds  

SciTech Connect

Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition.

Trkula, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Means and method for vapor generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid--starting as "feedwater" heating where no vapors are present, progressing to "nucleate" heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with "film" heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10-30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Carbon, Land, and Water Footprint Accounts for the European Union: Consumption, Production, and Displacements through International Trade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

† Industrial Ecology Programme and Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway ... On the global level, the accounting for emissions embodied in trade increases the already high carbon footprints of Europe, Japan, South Korea, and the United States. ... On a global level, 72% of greenhouse gas emissions are related to household consumption, 10% to government consumption, and 18% to investments. ...

Kjartan Steen-Olsen; Jan Weinzettel; Gemma Cranston; A. Ertug Ercin; Edgar G. Hertwich

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Determination of an acceptable assimilable organic carbon (AOC) level for biological stability in water distribution systems with minimized chlorine residual  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in minimizing the chlorine residual in Japan because of increasing complaints about a chlorinous odor in drinking water. However, minimizing the chlorine residual causes the microbi...

Yumiko Ohkouchi; Bich Thuy Ly; Suguru Ishikawa…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Rapid analysis of cyanuric acid in swimming pool waters by high performance liquid chromatography using porous graphitic carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approach is presented for reducing analysis times of cyanuric acid in swimming pool waters by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC ... ) to fully resolve cyanuric acid from other pool interferences wit...

R. Cantú; O. Evans; M. L. Magnuson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Enhanced biodegradation of diesel fuel through the addition of particulate organic carbon and inorganic nutrients in coastal marine waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel fuel pollution in coastal waters, resulting from recreational ... operations, is common and can adversely affect marine biota. The purpose of this study was...Spartina alterniflora...), inorganic nutrients...

Michael F. Piehler; Hans W. Paerl

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Carbon Nanotube Growth Using Ni Catalyst in Different Layouts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes have been grown using Ni as catalyst by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (PECVD) in various pre-patterned substrates. Ni was thermally evaporated on silicon substrates ...

Nguyen, H. Q.

404

Porous media to separate gases liquid droplets and/or solid particles from gases or vapors and coalesce entrained droplets  

SciTech Connect

Gas-vapor treating and filter mats are described that are composed of glass fibers intermixed with micro-bits of any of an expanded thermoplastic styrene-polymer or expanded thermoplastic lower polyolefin or flexible foam polyurethane and a suitable organic bonding agent, which mat may contain any of fibers of a fiber-forming terephthalate polyester, activated carbon, and gas-vapor adsorbent crystalline zeolite molecular sieve particles.

Klein, M.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

405

Sustaining dry surfaces under water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

Paul R. Jones; Xiuqing Hao; Eduardo R. Cruz-Chu; Konrad Rykaczewski; Krishanu Nandy; Thomas M. Schutzius; Kripa K. Varanasi; Constantine M. Megaridis; Jens H. Walther; Petros Koumoutsakos; Horacio D. Espinosa; Neelesh A. Patankar

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect

Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Management Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Systems Models Publications Questions WECSsim Model The Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration Model (WECSsim): A Collaborative Systems Model The Water, Energy and...

408

Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect

Deposition conditions and film properties for a variety of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and silicon-carbon films produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are discussed. Deposition gases include monosilane, disilane, trisilane, and acetylene. Two types of optically wide band-gap p layers are obtained. One of these window p layers (without carbon) has been extensively tested in photovoltaic devices. Remarkably, this p layer can be deposited between about 200 to 300 /sup 0/C. A typical open circuit voltage in an all CVD p-i-n device is 0.70--0.72 V, and in a hybrid device where the i and n layers are deposited by glow discharge, 0.8--0.83 V.

Ellis F.B. Jr.; Delahoy, A.E.

1985-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium carbonate leaching Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all oxidizing agents Chlorates ammonium salts... compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... , calcium...

411

Non-Vapor Compression HVAC Technologies Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

While vapor-compression technologies have served heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) needs very effectively, and have been the dominant HVAC technology for close to 100 years, the conventional refrigerants used in vapor-compression equipment contribute to global climate change when released to the atmosphere. The Building Technologies Office is evaluating low-global warming potential (GWP) alternatives to vapor-compression technologies.

412

Synthesis of Co oxide doped carbon aerogel catalyst and catalytic performance in heterogeneous oxidation of phenol in water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co oxide doped carbon aerogel (Co/CA) was prepared, characterised by several techniques, and tested for heterogeneous oxidation of phenol in aqueous solution using oxone as an oxidant. For a comparison, homogeneous oxidation of phenol in Co2+/oxone was also investigated. It was found that homogeneous oxidation of phenol using Co2+/oxone was more effective than Co2+/H2O2 and homogeneous oxidation was faster than heterogeneous Co/CA–oxone. Heterogeneous oxidation of phenol in Co/CA–oxone system followed first order kinetics and the activation energy of the heterogeneous system was estimated to be 62.9 kJ/mol. Several factors influencing phenol degradation in the heterogeneous oxidation were studied. Co/CA loading played a more important role in phenol degradation than oxone concentration, and the presence of other organics in solution resulted in a lower phenol oxidation.

Yasnessya Hardjono; Hongqi Sun; Huyong Tian; C.E. Buckley; Shaobin Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Surface soil-mercury surveys are an inexpensive and useful exploration tool for geothermal resources. ---- Surface geochemical surveys for mercury were conducted in 16 areas in 1979-1981 by ARCO Oil and Gas Company as part of its geothermal evaluation program. Three techniques used together have proved satisfactory in evaluating surface mercury data. These are contouring, histograms and cumulative frequency plots of the data. Contouring geochemical data and constructing histograms are standard

414

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, B.K.

1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

A simple grand canonical approach to compute the vapor pressure of bulk and finite size systems  

SciTech Connect

In this article we introduce a simple grand canonical screening (GCS) approach to accurately compute vapor pressures from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. This procedure entails a screening of chemical potentials using a conventional grand canonical scheme, and therefore it is straightforward to implement for any kind of interface. The scheme is validated against data obtained from Gibbs ensemble simulations for water and argon. Then, it is applied to obtain the vapor pressure of the coarse-grained mW water model, and it is shown that the computed value is in excellent accord with the one formally deduced using statistical thermodynamics arguments. Finally, this methodology is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a water nanodroplet of 94 molecules. Interestingly, the result is in perfect agreement with the one predicted by the Kelvin equation for a homogeneous droplet of that size.

Factorovich, Matías H.; Scherlis, Damián A. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina)] [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina); Molinero, Valeria [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE Building America Case Study Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Existing homes with vapor open wall assemblies Type: Residential Climate Zones: All PERFORMANCE DATA Insulation Ratio The R-value ratio of exterior to interior insulation (e.g., R-15 exterior insulation on R-11 cavity insulation has a ratio of 0.58). This variable controls sheathing temperature. Vapor Permeable Insulation An insulation with vapor permeance greater than five U.S. perms (e.g., rigid mineral fiber insulations). This variable controls water vapor flow and sheathing temperatures. Water Resisting Barrier A membrane that resists liquid water transfer. Permeable WRBs allow water

419

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

SciTech Connect

A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Evaluation of autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizers associated with granular activated carbon used for drinking water purification by DNA-stable isotope probing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nitrification is an important biological function of granular activated carbon (GAC) used in advanced drinking water purification processes. Newly discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have challenged the traditional understanding of ammonia oxidation, which considered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) as the sole ammonia-oxidizers. Previous studies demonstrated the predominance of AOA on GAC, but the contributions of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation remain unclear. In the present study, DNA-stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to investigate the autotrophic growth of AOA and AOB associated with GAC at two different ammonium concentrations (0.14 mg N/L and 1.4 mg N/L). GAC samples collected from three full-scale drinking water purification plants in Tokyo, Japan, had different abundance of AOA and AOB. These samples were fed continuously with ammonium and 13C-bicarbonate for 14 days. The DNA-SIP analysis demonstrated that only AOA assimilated 13C-bicarbonate at low ammonium concentration, whereas AOA and AOB exhibited autotrophic growth at high ammonium concentration. This indicates that a lower ammonium concentration is preferable for AOA growth. Since AOA could not grow without ammonium, their autotrophic growth was coupled with ammonia oxidation. Overall, our results point towards an important role of AOA in nitrification in GAC filters treating low concentration of ammonium.

Jia Niu; Ikuro Kasuga; Futoshi Kurisu; Hiroaki Furumai; Takaaki Shigeeda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Gas chromatographic determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and smoked rice samples after solid-phase microextraction using multiwalled carbon nanotube loaded hollow fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded on hollow fiber membrane pores. Stainless steel wire was used as unbreakable support. The major advantages of the proposed fiber are its (a) high reproducibility due to the uniform structure of the hollow fiber membranes, (b) high extraction capacity related to the porous structure of the hollow fiber and outstanding adsorptive characteristics of MWCNTs. The proposed fiber was applied for the microextraction of five representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous media (river and hubble–bubble water) and smoked rice samples followed by gas chromatographic determination. Analytical merits of the method, including high correlation coefficients [(0.9963–0.9992) and (0.9982–0.9999)] and low detection limits [(9.0–13.0 ng L?1) and (40.0–150.0 ng kg?1)] for water and rice samples, respectively, made the proposed method suitable for the ultra-trace determination of PAHs.

Amir Abbas Matin; Pourya Biparva; Mohammad Gheshlaghi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

425

Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Bourcier, William L. (Livermore, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

Effect of paraffinic, naphthenic and aromatic distribution in the hydrocarbon mixture and water on the phase equilibria of carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon systems over the temperature range from 333 K to 366 K  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide flooding has been suggested as an efficient and effective means of achieving additional oil recoveries from depleted and/or water flooded reservoirs. The numerical simulation of a carbon dioxide flood requires a phase equilibria predictor that will provide the compositional distribution of the reservoir fluids as the displacement propagates through the reservoir. The objective of this work was to provide a phase equilibria predictor that utilizes the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state. A new PUT apparatus was constructed. This apparatus was used to measure the isothermal P-x data of the systems: CO/sub 2/-toluene, CO/sub 2/-ethylbenzene, CO/sub 2/-propylbenzene, CO/sub 2/-cyclopentane, CO/sub 2/-cyclohexane and CO/sub 2/-methylcyclohexane at 333.15 K, 349.82 K and 366.48 K. Interaction parameters were regressed from literature data for CO/sub 2/-paraffin systems and from the experimental data of this work for CO/sub 2/-aromatic and CO/sub 2/-naphthenic systems. Recommended interaction parameters for these systems are provided. Experimental results indicated that the dominant effect of water on CO/sub 2/-hydrocarbon systems was the solubilization of carbon dioxide by water into the aqueous phase. This concept was simulated with the SRK equation of state and a correlation of literature data on the solubility of carbon dioxide in water. The predicted results agreed well with the experimental results. The presence of dissolved salts in water mitigates the effect of water on CO/sub 2/-hydrocarbon systems. The presence on n-butylbenzene or n-butylcylcohexane in the heavy ends with n-decane improved the maximum miscibility composition of the system. Pressure has a substantial effect on maximum miscibility compositions.

Ezekwe, J.N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

BASIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH FOR D&D OF R REACTOR STORAGE POND SLUDGE: ELECTROKINETICS, CARBON DIOXIDE EXTRACTION, AND SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D&D operations at DOE sites across the country. Currently, the volume of these wastes is approximately 23,500 m3, and the majority of these wastes (i.e., almost 19,000 m3) consist of PCBs and PCB-contaminated materials. Further, additional PCB-contaminated waste will be generated during D&D operations in the future. The standard process for destruction of this waste is incineration, which generates secondary waste that must be disposed, and the TSCA incinerator at Oak Ridge has an uncertain future. Beyond incineration, no proposed process for the recovery and/or destruction of these persistent pollutants has emerged as the preferred choice for DOE cleanup. The main objective of the project was to investigate and develop a deeper understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic reactions involved in the extraction and destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from low-level mixed waste solid matrices in order to provide data that would permit the design of a combined-cycle extraction/destruction process. The specific research objectives were to investigate benign dense-fluid extraction with either carbon dioxide (USC) or hot water (CU), followed by destruction of the extracted PCBs via either electrochemical (USC) or hydrothermal (CU) oxidation. Two key advantages of the process are that it isolates and concentrates the PCBs from the solid matrices (thereby reducing waste volume greatly and removing the remaining low-level mixed waste from TSCA control), and little, if any, secondary solvent or solid wastes are generated. This project was a collaborative effort involving the University of South Carolina (USC), Clemson University (CU), and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) (including the Savannah River Technology Center, Facilities Decommissioning Division and Regulatory Compliance). T he project was directed and coordinated by the South Carolina Universities Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF), a consortium of the four public research universities in South Carolina. The original plan was to investigate two PCB extraction processes (supercritical carbon dioxide and hot, pressurized water) and two PCB destruction processes (electrochemical oxidation and hydrothermal oxidation). However, at approximately the mid-point of the three year project, it was decided to focus on the more promising extraction process (supercritical carbon dioxide) and the more promising destruction process (supercritical water oxidation). This decision was taken because the investigation of two processes simultaneously by each university was stretching resources too thin, and because the electrochemical oxidation process needed more concentrated research before it would be ready for application to PCB destruction. The solid matrix chosen for experimental work was Toxi-dry, a commonly used adsorbent made from plant material that is used in cleanup of spills and/or liquid solvents. The Toxi-dry was supplied by the research team member from the Facilities Decommissioning Division, WSRC. This adsorbent is a major component of job control waste.

Matthews, Michael A.; Bruce,David; Davis,Thomas; Thies, Mark; Weidner, John; White, Ralph

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Tribocharging phenomena in hard disk amorphous carbon coatings with and without perfluoropolyether lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Scanning polarization force microscopy was used to study changes in surface potential (tribocharging) caused by the contact between a tungsten carbide tip and the amorphous carbon coating of a hard disk, both when bare and when covered with Zdol-TX lubricant. The surface potential change produced by tip contact decays with time at a rate that is strongly dependent on lubricant coverage and on the presence of oxygen and water vapor in the environment. Two different charging mechanisms are proposed. One involves chemical modification of the surface by removal of oxygen bound to the surface. This gives rise to a potential change that decays with time. Another mechanism involves trapping of charge in states within the energy gap of the insulating carbon film. The potential change due to this trapped charge does not decay over periods much greater than 1 h.

van den Oetelaar, R. J. A.; Xu, L.; Ogletree, D. F.; Salmeron, M.; Tang, H.; Gui, J.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Tribocharging phenomena in hard disk amorphous carbon coatings with and without perfluoropolyether lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Scanning polarization force microscopy was used to study changes in surface potential (tribocharging) caused by the contact between a tungsten carbide tip and the amorphous carbon coating of a hard disk,both when bare and when covered with Zdol-TX lubricant. The surface potential change produced by tip contact decays with time at a rate that is strongly dependent on lubricant coverage, and on the presence of oxygen and water vapor in the environment. Two different charging mechanisms are proposed. One involves chemical modification of the surface by removal of oxygen bound to the surface. This gives rise to a potential change that decays with time. Another mechanism involves trapping of charge in states within the energy gap of the insulating carbon film. The potential change due to this trapped charge does not decay over periods much greater than 1 hour.

van den Oetelaar, Ronald J.A.; Xu, Lei; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Tang, Hung; Gui, Jing

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Global Carbon Cycle Radiative forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, solubility defined Effective partial pressure in surface water Gas exchange between air and water driven" of carbon Cooling of high latitude surface waters increases solubility of CO2 and saturation DIC Induces in deep ocean Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, etc. returned to inorganic form in the deep waters

Follows, Mick

434

Energy balance in laser-irradiated vaporizing droplets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interactions of vaporizing aerosols with a high energy laser beam are analyzed in the diffusive vaporization regime. This is the regime in which diffusive mass transport and...

Zardecki, Andrew; Armstrong, Robert L

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et...

436

Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. Abstract: A review with 171 references. Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers for...

437

Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment  

SciTech Connect

Variability in the magnitude and timing of precipitation is predicted to change under future climate scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to understand how variation in precipitation patterns consisting of soil moisture pulses mixed with intermittent dry down events influence ecosystem gas fluxes. We characterized the effects of precipitation amount and timing, N availability, and plant community composition on whole ecosystem and leaf gas exchange in a California annual grassland mesocosm study system that allowed precise control of soil moisture conditions. Ecosystem CO2 and fluxes increased significantly with greater precipitation and were positively correlated with soil moisture. A repeated 10 day dry down period following 11 days of variable precipitation inputs strongly depressed net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) across a range of season precipitation totals, and plant community types. Ecosystem respiration (Re), evapotranspiration (ET) and leaf level photosynthesis (Amax) showed greatest sensitivity to dry down periods in low precipitation plots. Nitrogen additions significantly increased NEE, Re and Amax, particularly as water availability was increased. These results demonstrate that N availability and intermittent periods of soil moisture deficit (across a wide range of cumulative season precipitation totals) strongly modulate ecosystem gas exchange.

St. Clair, S.B.; Sudderth, E.; Fischer, M.L.; Torn, M.S.; Stuart, S.; Salve, R.; Eggett, D.; Ackerly, D.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reaction of titanium polonides with carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

It has been ascertained that heating titanium and tantalum in carbon dioxide to temperatures of 500 or 800/sup 0/C alters the composition of the gas phase, causing the advent of carbon monoxide and lowering the oxygen content. Investigation of the thermal stability of titanium polonides in a carbon dioxide medium has shown that titanium mono- and hemipolonides are decomposed at temperatures below 350/sup 0/C. The temperature dependence of the vapor pressure of polonium produced in the decomposition of these polonides in a carbon dioxide medium have been determined by a radiotensimetric method. The enthalpy of the process, calculated from this relationship, is close to the enthalpy of vaporization of elementary polonium in vacuo.

Abakumov, A.S.; Malyshev, M.L.; Reznikova, N.F.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Basic Engineering Research for D&D of R. Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Collaborating researchers at the University of South Carolina (USC), Clemson University (CU), and the Savannah River Site (SRS) are investigating the fundamentals of a combined extraction and destruction process for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of PCB-contaminated materials as found at DOE sites. Currently, the volume of PCBs and PCB contaminated wastes at DOE sites nationwide is approximately 19,000 m3. While there are a number of existing and proposed processes for the recovery and/or destruction of these persistent 4 pollutants, none has emerged as the preferred choice. Therefore, this research focuses on combining novel processes to solve the problem. The research objectives are to investigate benign dense-fluid extraction with either carbon dioxide (USC) or hot water (CU), followed by destruction of the extracted PCBs via either electrochemical (USC) or hydrothermal (CU) oxidation. Based on the results of these investigations, a combined extraction and destruction process that incorporates the most successful elements of the various processes will be recommended for application to contaminated DOE sites.

Hamilton, Edward A.; Bruce, David A.; Oji, Lawrence; White, Ralph E.; Matthews, Michael A.; Thies, Mark C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hydrothermal combustion of biofuels in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) has long been recognized as a safe, clean and energy efficient method for destroying a wide range of organic materials and hazardous wastes. As SCWO systems operate at elevated pressure, all effluent streams are fully contained allowing efficient recovery of thermal energy using compact heat exchangers. Water vapor produced by the combustion efficiency, especially for fuels with increasing moisture content such as biomass. This paper compares the performance of a simple Rankine vapor power cycle which derives it`s heat input from (1) a hydrothermal combustion system, and (2) a conventionally-fired steam boiler. The study is based on a hypothetical cellulose-based organic fuel with a higher heating value of 7,000 BT/1bm (dry). For a constant organic feedrate of 100 tons/day (bone dry) mixed in 20:80 fuel/water ratio with water, the calculated net electric power output from the 31.93%. Whereas, for an organic feedrate of 100 tons/day (bone dry) with zero of 5,382 kW, at an overall thermal efficiency of 31.48%. The hydrothermal combustion power cycle is unaffected by free moisture in the fuel, and thereby uniquely well-suited for use in biomass power generation applications. The hydrothermal combustion process is exceptionally clean burning, and allows full control over carbon dioxide and SOx emissions. NOx levels are inherently ultra-low due to lower combustion temperatures. Hydrothermal combustion technology is ready for pilot-scale engineering development and demonstration.

McGuinness, T.G. [Summit Research Corporation, Sante Fe, NM (United States); Marentis, R. [Summit Research Corporation, Allentown, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing vapors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Values are recovered from a hydrocarbon-containing vapor by contacting the vapor with quench liquid consisting essentially of hydrocarbons to form a condensate and a vapor residue, the condensate and quench fluid forming a combined liquid stream. The combined liquid stream is mixed with a viscosity-lowering liquid to form a mixed liquid having a viscosity lower than the viscosity of the combined liquid stream to permit easy handling of the combined liquid stream. The quench liquid is a cooled portion of the mixed liquid. Viscosity-lowering liquid is separated from a portion of the mixed liquid and cycled to form additional mixed liquid.

Mirza, Zia I. (La Verne, CA); Knell, Everett W. (Los Alamitos, CA); Winter, Bruce L. (Danville, CA)

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes B. J. LeRoy,a) S. G-wall carbon nanotubes that are freely suspended over a trench. The nanotubes were grown by chemical vapor on the freestanding portions of the nanotubes. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on the suspended portion of both

Dekker, Cees

443

1993 NEC 1) (Single-Walled Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MWNT (Vapor-grown carbon fiber, VGCF)33) 10001300 34) SWNT CCVD Smalley 15) CO SWNT SWNT 1993 NEC 1) (Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, SWNTs) 1(a) 1nm µm µm SWNTs 2) (MWNTs) 1(c 29,30,35-41) SWNT , MgO Fe/Co, Ni/Co, Mo/Co nm SWNT VGCF Fe(CO)5 SWNT Ethanol tank Hot

Maruyama, Shigeo

444

VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

323 CHAPTER 17 VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX \\B E Van D for several novel and conventional heat pump systems for space conditioning and water heating. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar assisted heat pumps (SAHP) both parallel and series

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

445

Aerogel composites using chemical vapor infiltration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerogel composites using chemical vapor infiltration Aerogel composites using chemical vapor infiltration Title Aerogel composites using chemical vapor infiltration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1995 Authors Hunt, Arlon J., Michael R. Ayers, and Wanqing Cao Journal Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids Volume 185 Pagination 227-232 Abstract A new method to produce novel composite materials based on the use of aerogels as a starting material is described. Using chemical vapor infiltration, a variety of solid materials were thermally deposited into the open pore structure of aerogel. The resulting materials possess new and unusual properties including photoluminescence, magnetism and altered optical properties. An important characteristic of this preparation process is the very small size of the deposits that gives rise to new behaviors. Silicon deposits exhibit photoluminescence, indicating quantum confinement. Two or more phases may be deposited simultaneously and one or both chemically or thermally reacted to produce new structures.

446

Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

Olsson, Ylva Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b, , Ronald D Available online xxxx Keywords: Atmospheric pressure plasma Diamond-like carbon deposition DLC PECVD The atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) has been

Hicks, Robert F.

448

Self-assembly of carbon nanohelices: Characteristics and field electron emission properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-assembly of carbon nanohelices: Characteristics and field electron emission properties Guangyu. Their field-emission properties were investigated. Carbon nanohelices were fabricated using microwave- plasma of self-assembled carbon nanohelices on iron needles using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor

Zhang, Guangyu

449

Field Emission Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Variety of Emitter-Morphologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Field Emission Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Variety of Emitter@chemsys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Field emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which have been prepared through: single-walled carbon nanotube, field emission, alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition, ethanol

Maruyama, Shigeo

450

Water mist injection in oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Water mist is utilized to control the maximum temperature in an oil shale retort during processing. A mist of water droplets is generated and entrained in the combustion supporting gas flowing into the retort in order to distribute the liquid water droplets throughout the retort. The water droplets are vaporized in the retort in order to provide an efficient coolant for temperature control.

Galloway, T.R.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Viscosity of the Aqueous Liquid/Vapor Interfacial Region: 2D Electrochemical Measurements with a Piperidine Nitroxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Viscosity of the Aqueous Liquid/Vapor Interfacial Region: 2D Electrochemical Measurements, and that it is coupled to the interfacial water via hydrogen bonding with H2O. In view of this postulate, the viscosity into the dynamic characteristics of aqueous interfaces. Thus, parameters such as the viscosity of water

Majda, Marcin

452

Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RADIATIVE-TRANSFER DUE TO ATMOSPHERIC WATER-VAPOR - GLOBAL...giving rise to atmospheric mo-tions that...heat release by condensation as moist air...and because the atmospheric motions that...to thE1tfrof water in a leaky bucket...

J. Hansen; D. Johnson; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; P. Lee; D. Rind; G. Russell

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

453

Amorphous silicon-carbon alloys and amorphous carbon from direct methane and ethylene activation by ECR  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys are prepared using electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen is introduced into the source resonance cavity as an excitation gas. Silane is introduced in the main chamber in the vicinity of the plasma stream, whereas the carbon source gases, methane or ethylene, are introduced either with the silane or with the hydrogen as excitation gases. The effect of the type of carbon-source gas, excitation gas mixture and silane-to-carbon source gas flow ratio on the deposition rate, bandgap, subgap density of states, spin density and hydrogen evolution are studied.

Conde, J.P.; Chu, V.; Giorgis, F.; Pirri, C.F.; Arekat, S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Analysis and design of the internal mass transfer in oxygen-hydrogen fuel cell with a capillary membrane and with convective drainage of vaporous reaction products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism of mass transfer is analyzed by which water vapor drains convectively from an electrode-condenser system in a fuel cell with a capillary membrane. The problem of optimizing the mass-transfer para...

V. N. Serebryakov; M. V. Mel'nikov; V. S. Ovchinnikov…

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leaver and Howard Dalton Carbon sequestration Rattan Lal * * ( lal.1...and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric...and biomass burning. 3. Carbon sequestration Emission rates from fossil...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

“Carbon sequestration” refers to a portfolio of activities for ... capture, separation and storage or reuse of carbon or CO2. Carbon sequestration technologies encompass both the prevention of CO2 emissions into ...

Robert L. Kane MS; Daniel E. Klein MBA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes using scanning probe based nano-lithographic techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel process which does not require the traditional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) synthesis techniques and which works at temperatures lower than the conventional techniques was developed for synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNT). The substrates...

Gargate, Rohit Vasant

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Origami-inspired nanofabrication utilizing physical and magnetic properties of in situ grown carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in particular the vertically-aligned variety grown through a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)-based process, are highly versatile nanostructures that can be used in a variety of ...

In, Hyun Jin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Vapor Pressures and Vaporization, Sublimation, and Fusion Enthalpies of Some Fatty Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor Pressures and Vaporization, Sublimation, and Fusion Enthalpies of Some Fatty Acids Joe A. Wilson and James S. Chickos* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of MissouriSt. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63121, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Sublimation enthalpies

Chickos, James S.

460

Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of a Series of Dialkyl Phthalates by Correlation Gas Chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chromatography Chase Gobble and James Chickos* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis Missouri 63121, United States Sergey P. Verevkin Department of Physical Chemistry: Experimental vapor pressures, vaporization, fusion and sublimation enthalpies of a number of dialkyl

Chickos, James S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production and consumption throughout the...the sediment-water interface or...usually those that reduce sulfate or ferric iron—resulting...meters in the water column...of a separate pool of water (pore fluid or intracellular...authigenic carbonate make up 29 to 37...

Daniel P. Schrag; John. A. Higgins; Francis A. Macdonald; David T. Johnston

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

System and method for controlling hydrogen elimination during carbon nanotube synthesis from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for producing carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition includes a catalyst support having first and second surfaces. The catalyst support is capable of hydrogen transport from the first to the second surface. A catalyst is provided on the first surface of the catalyst support. The catalyst is selected to catalyze the chemical vapor deposition formation of carbon nanotubes. A fuel source is provided for supplying fuel to the catalyst.

Reilly, Peter T. A. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

463

EXAMINING THE SPECTROSCOPY OF WATER VAPOR IN THE ATMOSPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compare to relative humidity probe Describes VCSEL accuracy #12;FLOW DILUTION SYSTEM Critical Orifice

Petta, Jason

464

Adsorption Equilibrium and Kinetics of Water Vapor on Different Adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The zeolite sample presented the highest capacity at low relative pressures, while at pressures near saturation the higher amount adsorbed was obtained on the alumina sample. ... adsorption on nonporous and porous adsorbents, considering: (1) selection of equations relating in a general way the thermodynamic characteristics of a system taking into account the adsorbate-adsorbent and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions; (2) the use of these equations in deriving from the exptl. ...

Ana M. Ribeiro; Ticiane P. Sauer; Carlos A. Grande; Regina F. P. M. Moreira; José M. Loureiro; Alírio E. Rodrigues

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

465

Desalination of water by vapor transport through hydrophobic nanopores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although Reverse osmosis (RO) is the state-of-the-art desalination technology, it still suffers from persistent drawbacks including low permeate flux, low selectivity for non-ionic species, and lack of resistance to chlorine. ...

Lee, Jongho, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Moisture burst structure in satellite water vapor imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-season satellite data over the eastern Pacific Ocean, Schroeder (1983) found that about 78% of the local severe weather outbreaks over North America were related to the interaction of a moisture burst with an extratropical weather system. He hypothesized... that the severe weather outbreak was due to the broad zone of upper tropospheric divergence between the polar jet and STJ, and the large momentum t ansport by the STJ which altered the midlatitude circulation. 12 CHAPTER III DATA A. Satellite Imagery...

Ulsh, David Joel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

Balance of atmospheric water vapor over the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

082 130 I. ake Charles, Louisiana II, III 396 171 Burrwood, Louisiana 550 250 Merida, Mexico 640 305 Burrwood, Louisiana 320 177 17 f = 10. 2 qV n n' (20a) and f = 10. 2 qV t t (20b) The units are gm/sec-m-mb, and the constant value... expressions:1 n t. f = 10. 2 q V n n' (2la) and f =102qV (21b) As can be seen, these values were dep ndent upon the monthly-averaged specific humidi ty, q, and the monthly-averaged wind components, V n and V as determined previously. 1 ~11 t. ~d fl...

Hughes, Ralph Morgan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program has developed, in cooperation with Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory, the equipment and expertise to characterize gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. This capability has been demonstrated by the characterization of the tank 241-C-103 headspace. This tank headspace is the first, and for many reasons is expected to be the most problematic, that will be characterized (Osborne 1992). Results from the most recent and comprehensive sampling event, sample job 7B, are presented for the purpose of providing scientific bases for resolution of vapor issues associated with tank 241-C-103. This report is based on the work of Clauss et al. 1994, Jenkins et al. 1994, Ligotke et al. 1994, Mahon et al. 1994, and Rasmussen and Einfeld 1994. No attempt has been made in this report to evaluate the implications of the data presented, such as the potential impact of headspace gases and vapors to tank farm workers health. That and other issues will be addressed elsewhere. Key to the resolution of worker health issues is the quantitation of compounds of toxicological concern. The Toxicology Review Panel, a panel of Pacific Northwest Laboratory experts in various areas, of toxicology, has chosen 19 previously identified compounds as being of potential toxicological concern. During sample job 7B, the sampling and analytical methodology was validated for this preliminary list of compounds of toxicological concern. Validation was performed according to guidance provided by the Tank Vapor Conference Committee, a group of analytical chemists from academic institutions and national laboratories assembled and commissioned by the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program.

Huckaby, J.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Story, M.S. [Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc. Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

Alger, T.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Dawson, Jay W. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA)

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

471

Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Dawson, Jay W. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied by means of experimentally induced water-table fluctuations (Coaraze  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied. Keywords: Karst, hydrogeochemistry, fractured rocks, hydraulic properties, France insu-00376151,version1 high and low permeability regions are controlled by the hydraulic head gradient. Past studies have

Boyer, Edmond

473

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

474

Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

Norton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply � Approximately 49 inches

MacAdam, Keith

476

Journal of Electronic Materials, Vol. 19, No, 4, 1990 Carbon Tetrachloride Doped AIxGa_xAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Electronic Materials, Vol. 19, No, 4, 1990 Carbon Tetrachloride Doped AIx been shown to be a suitable carbon doping source for obtaining p-type GaAs grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with carbon acceptor concentrations in excess of 1 x 1019cm-3

Cunningham, Brian

477

Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

Atkinson, David

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

478

Program performs vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations  

SciTech Connect

A program designed for the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV or 41C calculators solves basic vapor-liquid equilibrium problems, including figuring the dewpoint, bubblepoint, and equilibrium flash. The algorithm uses W.C. Edmister's method for predicting ideal-solution K values.

Rice, V.L.

1982-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

479

Carbon Composite Bipolar Plate for PEM T. M. Besmann, J. J. Henry, J. W. Klett,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 19-22, 2003 #12;To develop a slurry-molded, carbon fiber material with a carbon chemical vapor-molded carbon fibers ­similar to paper or felt production ­fibers ~100 µm plus filler particles ­features-molded carbon fibers ­ net shape process/press-in features ­ process can be continuous (i.e., papermaking) ­ low

480

Synchroton X-Ray Studies of Liquid-Vapor Interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The variation of density across the liquid-vapor interface from essentially zero density far out in the vapor phase to a homogeneous density deep in the liquid phase can be determined by X-ray reflectivity mea...

J. Als-Nielsen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water vapor carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Vapor intrusion modeling : limitations, improvements, and value of information analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor intrusion is the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subsurface source into the indoor air of an overlying building. Vapor intrusion models, including the Johnson and Ettinger (J&E) model, can be ...

Friscia, Jessica M. (Jessica Marie)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

given by U.S. Department of Energy, Geothermal Division. #12;vii Table of Contents ABSTRACTOPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS CONSIDERING ADSORPTION governing the behavior of vapor- dominated geothermal reservoirs. These mechanisms affect both

Stanford University